File #921: "CAPNews-APR1974.pdf"

CAPNews-APR1974.pdf

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R e cruitin g/R et ention
Programs Get 'Booster'
MAXWELL AFB, Aia. -- Civil Air Patrol's cadet recruiting and retention programsgot a
"shot in the arm" during the March meeting of the National Executive Committee here.

WOW ! --Cadet Robert L. Hinman receives a "congratulations"
kiss from a fellow CAP member and friend, Gretchen
Hotmann, after he was presented the Gen. Carl A. Spaatz
Award during the annual Alabama Wing Ball. Cadet Hinman, a
member of the Maxwell AFB Cadet Squadron since 1969 has
earned his solo wings and travelled to England last year as part
of CAP's IACE program. Cadet WO Hotmann is a member of
Birmingham Composite Squadron 34. (Photo by MSgr. Russ
Brown.)

The NEC approved two
programs, one for cadet solo
scholarships and a cadet flight
orientation program. These
programs should add incentive
for all wings to emphasize their
cadet recruiting/retention efforts.
The scholarship program will
continue on the "one-third
basis" -- one-third from
National Headquarters and twothirds from regions, wing,
individual, outside contributors
or combinations thereof.
National will provide funds for
104 scholarships at $120 each
during fiscal year 1975 (July 74
to June 75).
They will be distributed based
upon a wing's cadet recruiting
performance. The 10 wings that
recruited the largest number of
members in 1973 will receive
three scholarships each. The 32
wings that fall in the mid-area of
the recruiting effort are to
receive two scholarships each,
while the 10 wings that recruited
the fewest cadets during 1973

4 Wings Record 10 Saves;_
Extend Save Efforts To 13

MAXWELL AFB, Ala. -- Four Civil Air Patrol Wings search and rescue (SAR) activities
boosted the number of lives saved thus far this year to 13.
Tennessee, Utah, New Mexico and Colorado received credit for 10 saves during February
and March.
In Tennessee. the life of one of search using over 17 hours of
enforcement personnel rescued
seven persons who had survived
flying time.
two young boys who had
survived a crash near Glenwood
a crash of a PA-32 aircraft in the
The 12th and 13th lives saved
Smokey Mountains was saved.
Springs, Colo.
came when members of the
Following the crash, the pilot
Colorado Wing and local law
(See Saves, Page2)
walked out of the rugged
mountains
to report the
accident.
A CAP search aircraft located
the crash Site only 14 minutes
after takeoff. National Park
Service personnel removed the
survivors from the crash.
An aircraft with four persons ! : . ! M A x F 2 L F A B ? L a r d A i r M p a l ~ r o e t N l t i ? n a l ~ B o a r d ! !
on board enroute from Aspen,
Meeting/Convention is less than six months away.
Colo., to Las Vegas, Nev., went
i. With this in mind, it is time you began making your plans to !ili
down in the southwest corner of ::::::i attend. This year the Hotel St. Francis in San Francisco will be the
Utah. The Utah Wing's CAP
:::' convention site." September 20 and 21 are the dates for the formal
aircraft flew three sorties during :i::i! business sessions with the 19th and 22rid designated as arrival and
the search for the missing craft
::::: departure dates.
!!ii
and received credit for the four
::::::i: With the energy crunch and austere budgeting being what they i:.::
lives saved.
even greater
In New Mexico. three persons :i:i are, airlift to the convention may presentthe shortage problems :i:ii~i
i!i! this year. There is no need to dwell on
of military
w e r e a b o a r d a n a i r c r a f t i~ii airlift -- most of you are well aware of it.
!iii
traveling from Mound Ridge,
ii! Region and wing commanders are urged to be thinking of :i:"
Kan.. to Santa Fe. N. M.. when it i:i: arranging either group affinity or charter flights for their i~!
went down. Wing pilots located
i!i~
the plane four miles northwest of i::i:: personnel,
iiii The Hotel St. Francis, located in Union Square, has reserved 600 i~
Gascon. N. M.
T h e c r a s h v i c t i m s w e r e i:i: rooms at special rates for CAP personnel. Tbey are $20 for single or i!~i
$30
recovered by the Army's 541st :i:i for a for double/twin. Tower accommodations are available at $25 i~ii
iiii
single or $35 for double/twin,
ii!i
Medical Detachment from Fort
~i[i Keep watching the Civil Air Patrol NEWS for additional i:i:
Carson. Colo. This unit shared i:i: information on this year's meeting. Let's make it the greatest CAP iii:
credit with CAP for saving the i[ii convention ever -- and, remember, begin your planning now!
:"..'i
three lives.
: : . ' : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~:i:
CAP flew 12 sorties on the

will be allocated one scholarship
each.
In the solo scholarship
program, prowsions are made
for a maximum of 15 hours, at
least two of which will be solo.
Payment of the solo scholarship
funding will be made to the wing
commander on a prepayment
basis.
These solo scholarships may
be applied to either powered or
glider training at the wing
commander's direction.
The flight orientation program
is based upon the Cadet Flight
Orientation Syllabus ~CAP Form
77) which became effective Jan.
1. 1974.
The program is designed to
assist the wing in recruiting and
retention by reimbursing it for
its performance in giving first

orientation flights to its cadets.
As with the solo scholarship
program, the basis of
reimbursement is a wing's cadet
recruiting effort in the
preceeding calendar year. The
1national total of new members in
the preceeding year will .be
divided into the number of
members recruited in an
individual wing to provide a
percentage factor which is
applied to a maximum number
of reimbursable orientation
flights. For a complete
breakdown on how to qualify .
your cadets for this program.
see Chapter 15 of CAP Manual 5016. dated Feb. 6, 1974.
In implementing the new
progi'am. National felt that it
would assist the wing by
(See Gets .'Booster' Page 2)

Cadet School
Dates Are Set
MAXWELL AFB, Ala. -- The
1974 Cadet Officer School will be
conducted here from June 21July 2.
The purpose of the school is to
assist and guide the individual
cadet in the techniques of
leadership. The goal of this
training is to educate the cadet
in the psychological theories of
~.:adership and their applications
as demonstrated. The cadet
should be equipped at the
completion of this high level
bourse to return to his home
wing and assist the wing staff to
establish similar courses within
the wing.

Cmdr's Guide
Is Available
MAXWELL AFB, Ala.
In
January 1974, a copy of CAPP 5t.
Squadron Commander's Guide.
was distributed to CAP
c o m m a n d e r s a t a l l
organizational levels.
Although designed primarily
as a ready reference source for
CAP squadron commanders, it
was the consensus of the
members of the National
Executive Committee (NEC)
that this pocket-size
"encyclopedia" of CAP would
prove to he invaluable to CAP
commanders at all levels and, in
fact. would prove to be most
useful to any CAP senior or
cadet.
The response to this pamphlet
has proven the prognosis of the
NEC to be sound. Individual and
unit orders from the CAP
Bookstore quickly necessitated
an additional reprint of this
document to meet the demand.
The contents of the Guide are
scheduled for annual revision
and reprint. The plastic covers
are of a semi-permanent nature
and allow for the insertion of the
reprinted contents for several
years.
A n y C A P s e n i o r m e m b e r.
cadet, or CAP unit may order
one or more copies of the Guide
from the CAP Bookstore. using
the standard order form.
The cost is $1.00 per copy,
which includes postage fees.

Such topics as communicative
skills, the learning process.
problem solving, group behavior
techniques, and cadet program
administration are part of the
school.
The Air University of the U.S.
Air Force assists in program
planning and provides portions
of the instruction for the cadets. "
This professional atmosphele
promotes the dignity and
behavior that examplifies our
cadet officer corps.
There is no age restriction for
cadets to apply for Cadet Officer
School: however, they must have
attained the Billy Mitchell
Award by Dec. 31. 1973 to be
eligible.
Quotas for the school have
been distributed to the wing
commanders. Selection boards
should select only those cadets
who are highly motivated and
who display the basic qualities
desired of future leaders in CAP.
This activity, without question.
will be one of the most
challenging and interesting in
our special activities program.
Applications for the activity
should be submitted in
accordance with the instructions
in the 1974 Special Activity
Brochure.

Female Uniform
Items Cortical
MAXWELL AFB, Ala. -The uniform for the 1974 cadet special activities has been
established as the summer
blue uniform, shade 1549/1550.
Due to the shortage of
WAF uniform items, the authority of CAP members to
purchase famale uniform
items in Air Force clothing
sales stores has been temporarily suspended.
This may require female
cadets to purchase the necessary items from commercial
sources. Check the March
Monthly Bulletin for a listing
of reputable firms which handle female military clothing
at reasonable prices.

PAGE TWO

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS ,

API~L ! 974

200 Attend Unit Open House
STAUNTON, Va. -- More than
200 guests recently attended a
open house held by the Augusta
Squadron and witnessed the unit
receive the Col. Allen C.
Perkinson Outstanding Squadron
Award.
CAP Col. Earl T. Van Stavern.
Middle East Region chief of staff
presented the award to CAP
C a p t . E . R a y P r o c t o r. c o m mander of the squadron.
In presenting the award for the
first time Colonel Van Stavern
~ommented that "The Augusta
Squadron is one of the most
active in the state and they have
a terrific cadet program."
Colonel Perkinson was
commander of the Virginia
PROUD MOMENT -- Edward L. Kimble shows his approval as
his son Chris receives the Gen. Carl A. Spaatz Award during the
annual-Alabama Wing Ball. Chris has been active in CAP since
1969 and is the first cadet of Alabama's Muscle Shoals
Composite Squadron to earn the award. Cadet Kimble, who
presently serves a vice-chairman of Alabama's Wing Cadet
Advisory Council, holds his solo wings and is a qualified radio
operator. He hopes to enter the Air Force Academy following
graduation from high school this year. (Photo by-MSgr. Russ
Brown.)

Saves
= ~-~Continued From Page 1)
A youngster witnessed the
accident while skiing and
reported it to his parents. CAP
was notified and, along with law
enforcement officials, directed a
civilian helicopter into the area.
The aircraft had impacted at a
high rate of speed and rolled
down a hill, making it almost
impossible to spot from the air
t
Once spotted by the copter
pilot, a ground team was sent to
the site'. The two boys were
taken by helicopter to the Aspen
Va l l e y H o s p i t a l . B o t h w e r e
suffering from fractures, frost
bite and one had internal
injuries.
The saves were credited to the
combined efforts of CAP, law
enforcement personnel and
civilian volunteers.
CAP flew more than 40 hours
during this search and rescue
operation.

Bristol County Composite
Squadron and Kent County
Composite
Squadron
participated in a joint effort to
recover a simulated crashed
plane and survivor.
After receiving coordinates
and the flight path of the
aircraft, the group ~ormed four
squads and searched for the
"downed" craft.
Cadet officers in charge of
each squad of cadets
systematically worked out a
search pattern, After three
hours of concentrated search in
thick underbrush and freezing
temperatures, the crash site was
located by one of the squads.
The survivor, who was
previously tagged with
simulated injuries, was given
proper medical aid until more
qualified help arrived.

Gets Booster

( Continued From Pa~e 1)
providing compensation for its
efforts in support of the cadet
program, and at the same time
help defray the expense of
operating corporate aircraft.
It is also felt that the program
will create a greater rapport
between cadet and senior
members.

They also viewed CAP rad~
equipment that was on dispta,
and CAP emergency servlce~
personnel explained search
procedures to them.
Special guest speaker at the
open house was CAP Col. Jon H.
Hill. Middle East Region
commander. He. spoke about
CAP's history and its current
purpose.

2 Complete Med Training
E L K I N S , W. Va . Tw o m e m b e r s o f t h e B u c h a n n o n C o m p o s i t e
Squadron (West Virginia Wing~ were recently certified as Emergency
Medical Technicians (EMTS) after completing a training course at
Davis and Elkins College here.
Lt. Dorothy Cowger and Cadet Basic Michael Cowger completed the
program which consisted of teaching techniques to instruct future
EMTS and how to safely remove patients from wrecked vehicles using
heavy duty equipment.
Lieutenant Cowger, the squadron information officer, also works
with Upshur County Emergency Medical Service as a qualified
ambulance driver, attendant and dispatcher.

Dairy Boosts CAP
WARWICK, R. I. ~ Rhode Island's Wing Commander/CAP Col.
Edgar Bailey recently presented Michael DeCiantis Sr., of DeCianti s
Brothers Dairy a CAP Certificate Of Appreciation for their support of
Civil Air Patrol in West Warwick, R. I.
The dairy had a picture of a CAP aircraft printed on their milk
cartons for three weeks.
A slogan "Get High The Safe Way" appeared with the photo.

Units Conduct Exercise
N E W P O R T, R . I .
Tw e n t y one cadets and seniors from two
Rhode Island squadrons recently
held a one-day search and rescue
exercise at Brenton Point State
Park.
Members of the Newport-

Flying Corps of the Virginia
Protective Force in 1941 prior to
the formation of CAP in the
state.
He was later commissioned a
Major in CAP and named
V i r g i n i a W i n g C o m m a n d e r. a
position he held until 1968.
A photo display of recent
missions attracted much
attention from the guests.

Hernandez Heads
Wg. Cadet Council
BRONX, N.Y. -- Cadet Lt.
Col. Reinaldo Hernandez has
been elected chairman of the
N e w Yo r k W i n g ' s C a d e t
Advisory Council.
Heraandez is cadet
commander of the Bronx
Cadet Squadron 1 and is
presently a cadet member of
the 525th AFROTC
Detachment at Fordham
University, Bronx, N.Y.
He has also earned his solo
wings through CAP's solo
scholarship program.

WAF Aid Virginia Unit
HAMPTON, Va. -- Three WAF from Langley AFB's Honor Guard
recently visited the Peninsula Composite Squadron to address them on
wearing of the uniform, drill and the Air Force Honor Guard program.
The WAF were Sgt. Jill Pitt, non-commissioned officer-in-charge of
the Honor Guard and A1C Cheryl Kingman and Amn. Frances Cox.
The airmen work in the Langley AFB Hospital Pharmac~-"
ing to the honor guard is volunteer duty for them.
They invited the cadets to observe the Honor Guard practice, and
will return to help with parade flag procedures:

Cadet Beck Completes
Home Study Course
MONROE, La. Cadet James
B. Beck of the Monroe
Composite Squadron recently
completed the HS-3 Radiological
Monitoring home study course.
The course is offered by Civil
Defense and is now open to Civil
Air Patrol cadets.
He has also completed the
Civil Defense home study course
and the medical self-belp course.

ADDRESS CHANGE?
LARGE COLLECTION -- Cadets Linda Berry and Richard
Va n P a t t e n p r e s e n t s A l v i n E . S c h e i n e r m a n , p u b l i c i t y
chairman for Schenectady, New York's Musculer Dystrophy
drive a check for more than $700. The money was collected
by members of the Schenectady Composite Squadron during
the town's annual fund raising drive. In the past two years,
the unit has collected nearly $3,000 during the Muscular
Dystrophy Campaign. (Photo courtesy The Schenectady
Gazette)

M A I L T H I S F O R M T O : H Q C A P - U S A F / D P Y D M A X W E L L A F B , A L A . 3 6 11 2
NAME
STREET
CITY
S TAT E
CAPSN
CHARTER NO.

ZIP
(CIRCLE ONE) SENIOR/CADET

~AP ITEMS & USAF FLIGHT CLOTHIN

E F F E C T I V E D AT E .

We suggest you use any extra copies in promoting~advertising Civil Air Patrol by leaving
the CAP NEWS where non-members will get an opportunity to read it: (Public Libraries,
doctors offices, etc.)

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APRIL 1974

PAGE THREE

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

CAP-SA Officials
Hold Joint Meeting
WESTMINISTER. Md. Personnel from Civil Air Patrol's Carroll
Composite Squadron and the Salvation-Army's Baltimore Divisional
Headquarters recently held a j oint meeting to discuss the utilization of
forces during natural disaster situations.
CAP's emergency services programs and the number of corporate
aircraft and surface vehicles available for transportation assistance
were among the topics discussed.
The Salvation Army officials are very much intersted in the wing's
communications capability both in the number of stations available
and in the flexibility of their operation
CAP Maj. Kenneth H. White. Maryland Wing chief of staff, termed
the meeting "'a complete success."

Columbia Unit Is ~Best'
COLUMBIA, S. C. -- The Richlands County Cadet Squadron of
Columbia has been recognized by the South Carolina Wing as the top
unit in the state for 1973.
Capt. Ted Lybrand, squadron commander, received the trophy from
Col. E. Lee Morgan, wing commander. Colonel Morgan cited the unit
for an "outstanding job during 1973 in cadet recruiting, retention and
fulfillment of cadet achievement contracts.
The unit will receive use of the wing's Cessna 154) aircraft during
July for cadet orientation rides and student instruction. The aircraft is
loaned to the top unit in the wing each year. Last year's winner was
the Anderson Composite Squadron.
The Aiken Composite Squadron has placed second in the competition
the last two years.

Police Orient Carolinian~
RECEIVES CHARTER--South Dakota's Huron Composite Squadron Commander, CAP
Maj. Frank She!ton (right), accepts the unit's official charter from CAP Col. Eugene Pluth,
wing commander, during a recent squadron meeting. The unit was organized in mid-1973
and they presently have 14 cadet and seven Senior members. Sgt. John Wider (center), is
the unit's cadet commander. (Plainsman Photo)

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. -- Members of the Winston-Salem
Composite Squadron were guests of the Winston-Salem police
department recently for-a familiarization program about police
facilities, equipment and methodology.
Six seniors and 17 cadets participated in the orientation program
which included a tour of the facilities of the Forsyth County Jail and
the police department. The cadets received a ride in a police van. The
seniors were assigned to patrol cars.
Police Capt. Frank Wilson and Police Lt. Steve Monk conducted the
tour.

18.Tour Navy Destroyer ,
R A D I O O P E R AT O R - Cadet Gregory V. Bowman
(seated), holds his
recently earned Civil Air
Patrol Radio Operator
Certificate of Proficiency.
Bowman, a member of the
Winston-Salem Composite
Squadron (North CaroLina
Wing), is the first member
of his unit to earn the
certificate. Looking on is
CAP Lt. Col. James H.
Cheek, advisor to the CAP
National Communications
Committee.

CLAYMONT, Del.--Eighteen cadets and seniors from the Wilmington (Delaware) Cadet Squadron were recently given a tour of theUSS
Rich, a U. S. Navy Destroyer.
The tour, conducted by EQsign J. M. Hayes,USN, gave the CAp
group insight into the life aboard the destroyer. They were briefed on
the communications, firepower and general duties of a destroyer.
The excursion was arranged by CAP 2d Lt. Alan Solomon,
Wilmington Squadron Military Education Officer and a member of the
U. S. Naval Reserve.

BOX SCORE
Seniors
Cadets

34,3 54
24,876

GAM

518

Total

59,748
(As of Feb. 28, 197~4)
(926 decrease since Jan. 1, 1974)

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Courtesy of Zack Mosley .And Chicago Tribune -- N.Y. News Syndicated.

APRIL 1974

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

PAGE FOUR

From The Commander

Use Airlift Resources Wisely
by Brig. Gen. Leslie J. Westberg, USAF
National Commander
With summer just around the
corner, many of you are making longrange plans to participate in various
CAP.summer activities. Each year
the CAP-USAF staff, selected CAP
members, and USAF Reservists
jointly plan and program these
activities. I am pleased to report that
this year's schedule is once again a
very good one. The majority of the
hurdles have been cleared. The single
remaining obstacle is transportation,
or more specifically-military airlift.
The reduction in
the number of flying hours allocated to Air Force
units is the primary limiting factor. As an example, the flying
time allocation for
our_USAF-CAP reion-assigned T-29s has been cut
nearly in half. This also reduces
airlift capability by a similar amount.
Other Air Force units that previously
provided airlift support to CAP have
undergone similar reductions and
have informed our LOs that such
support will be extremely limited in
the future. There appears to be no

real relief in sight for the immediate
future.
The dilemma created by this flying
time reduction can be traced to
several factors. The most current is
the energy crisis. Aviation fuel is
distilled from the same crude oil
supplies as your automotive fuel and
most of you need not be reminded of
the automobile gas shortage. When
the fuel supply was reduced, our
flying time also had to be reduced.
Furthermore, the Air Force has been
deeply involved in a fund,saving
austerity program. This resulted in a
substantial reduction in active duty
aircraft and aircrew manning.
Since there are less aircraft and
airerews, fewer flying hours were
allocated to maintain pilot
proficiency. So there in a nutshell lies
our problem. It is real, it exists now,
and shows no signs of getting better.
We will have to live with it.
How? This is probably the most
perplexing question we face today.
First of all, I want to assure you that
each of our liaison officers are
. e x p e n d i n g t h e m a x i m u m e ff o r t
possible to obtain required airlift
support. You can contribute directly
to this effort by making maximum
utilization of all airlift. When air-

lift is available, use it. Do not
request airlift support unless you
absolutely need it and can fill the
available seating space in the
aircraft. Make definite travel plans
and adhere to them. No-shows for
scheduled airlift are embarrassing,
prevent others from using the airlift,
and make it difficult to obtain airlift
from the same unit another time.
I will emphasize one more point.
All CAP members traveling on
military aircraft must be on official
CAP business. Simply being a CAP
member does not authorize you to
ride in military aircraft. You must
meet the provisions of CAPR 76-1.
The decrease in airlift has made the
remaining support missions highly
visible and definitely open for
criticism. Anytime you are
questioned regarding your airlift
e l i g i b i l i t y, b e s u r e y o u c a n f u l i y
justify the fact that you are
Conducting official CAP business. We
must not abuse our remaining airlift
resources.
As you can see from the preceding
comments there is a distinct
possibility that airlift will not be
available to support all summer
a c t i v i t i e s . M y s t a ff i s c u r r e n t l y
formulating a plan to best utilize our

available resources. As a guideline
for the airlift plan, liaison officers
have been instructed to use the
following listing to determine airlift
priorities:
I. National Board Meeting
NEC Quarterly Meetings
National Staff College
Cadet Officer School
2 . National Congress on Aerospace
Education
3. Region Conferences
4. Summer Activities
5. Other CAP Support
Please keep these thoughts in mind
when you plan your summer
schedule. You may be faced with the
decision to provide your own
transportation to and from the
activity sites. Also, very little backup airlifL may be available in case
scheduled airlift does not
materialize. Be fully prepared
financially to defray any unforeseen
transportation expenses. They may
create a hardship for some personnel,
but no suitable alternative exists.
Bear in mind that we are doing
everything within our power to
alleviate this problem. But until the
present situation is resolved, let's all
buckle down and try to make the best
of our available airlift resources.

Chairman's Comments

The Lively Commander ...................
iv

by Brig. Gen. William M. Patterson, CAP
National Board Chairman
ANYONE

WHO LOVES WORK
CAN HA VE
A H E C K U VA T I M E A R O U N D
HERE.
I'm sure most of you are familiar
with this sign. It's been around a long
time but it was not until one night last
Summer that l saw the message and
the meaning clearly demonstrated. It
happened while making an
unannounced visit to one of our
squadrons on meeting night. The sign
was the first thing I noticed on the
commander's desk. I made a mental
note to suggest something perhaps
more inspirational.
Four hours later-over a final cup of
coffee--I was con'vineed that the
sign was not only
proper and fitting
...but also right on
target. From eight
'tiI midnight I marveled at the
patience, stamina and knowledge of
this dedicated guy. He'd been on his
feet since dawn and still insisted on
driving me to my hotel. This was TLC
personified..The Lively Commander.
We've always known that the
squadron commander is the key
element in our personnel structure.
Similarly, we have long accepted the
fact that the success--or failure -- of
Civil Air Patrol is directly
proportionate to the performance ot
the more than 1600 squadrons which
they command.
Not at National!
Not a Region!
Not at Wing!

It is in our grass root Squadron that
the job gets done; the mission
fulfilled; and the future of our
organization determined. This is
where theory, plans and hopes are
solidified by hard work into deeds,
facts and progress. The rest of us -from theWings and Regions all the
way to the Pentagon have just one
overriding objective: Help the
squadron commander and his people
get the job done.
NEW TOOLS
That's why we updated,
consolidated and refined CAPP 50,
Squadron Commander's Handbook.
This extensive publication encompasses all that a squadron commander
needs to keep his unit rolling. Sure
i t ' s b u l k y. I t h a s t o b e . . . c o n t a i u s
everything but the aspirin for his

.

Realizing that our squadron
commanders should be -- must be -highly mobile and can't carry the
manual with them, we developed the
pocket Squadron Commander's
Guide, CAPP 51. This handy, ready
reference compresses his day-to-day
data into a personalized, wallet-sized
secretary.
We ' r e p r e t t y h a p p y w i t h t h e s e
functional aids and I am certainly
grateful -for the many
thanks/compliments received from
field commanders. But that hot night
last summer in an old, fan-cooled
(?!!) World War II building
convinced me that something is still

NEWS

PAT R O L
Cr Cr ~ * USAF AUXILIARY * 1 ¢t ¢t ,

Netteml Cemmemk.
Hetml ~ Chewme~
Directm ef Inflwmatien
Chie~ o4 Internal h~metmn

April 1974

headaches. Fiscal, legal, safety,
S A R , C D , p e r s o n n e l , s u p p l y,
communications or you name it.

I~1. Gen Unite J W~tlmqg. USAf
Ilq, Gen. WlSlem m. I~t~te~m, CAP
LI CIA. Win. Coquets Ifl. USAF
Capt. J. 14. I~tINn, Uf~F

Asslston! Edltc.
TScJt. Don Thweatt. U~kF
The Civil Air PmtveJ News ~t an offlcial publkat~m cdF Civil Air I~trel, a ~rivate
bemvcAent ~ and ouxiUclry d ,ho Unirnd htet Ai¢ k@, published
monthly at H~ctrters CAP-USAF (OIL Buildi~l 714. Maxwell Air Ferce Bate,
Alebem 36112
a
Opinlcms t~ heeein do net ne~ fe~resent these ~ the Ak r-e~m
eny d its depmtments. Edttee~d cepy sh~ld be mtdmumd to tdltw. CAt' News.
Natlenol Heedquarm~ (OfL Mozwedl AffiJ, fktabama 36112.
Questions about advertising rates i~ the Civil Ak Patrol News
should be directed to Leavell, Wise, Kimbrough & Tkheli Advertising, P.O. Box 267, Montgomery, Alabama 36101. Phone
(205) 265-8747.
The appearance of advertising in the p~blicotion with the
exception of the CAP Education Materials Center {Bookstore)
and the CAP Supply Depot does not constitute an e~lorsement by the Civil Air Patrol Corporatio~ 6f the products or*
sef vices advertised.
Pu~ by mwl subscription (Civil ~ ~ m~wl~hlp ~/et inclvde tubsc, it~tien}. $2.00 Im~ yea*.
~ la~ imstage l~id at/~, Ale. 36104.
Pe,~maste~ Iqeam send f4m~s 3579 10 Ns~l~,~m,'t. CAP (~'YO). Ma~weg
kFS, Akt. 36112.

missing. We've got to do more in
telling everyone -- in and out of Civil
Air Patrol -- about these hundreds of
men and women who have the
toughest job of all.
d ZIPPY PRODUCTION
- What I'd like to do is produce a
full-length motion picture depicting
the life of a CAP Squadron
Commander. Since we can't send a
million bucks and Hollywood won't,
we're producing our own slide
feature. This will be the last prong in
our senior training program.
It will show a typical day in the life
of a typical commander -- in and out
of his uniform. There will be about 45
slides -- but the entire thing zips past
in about 15 minutes. In fact, most of
the action is clicked off so swiftly that
the stills seems to be moving. There's
absolutely nothing static or slow
motioned about this presentation. It
tells the story of a lively commander
in a lively manner.
This training kit is on the books
now. With final script approval and a
shooting schedule established, we
should be in production by Summer.
We ' r e s h o o t i n g f o r a n e a r l y F a l l
distribution of slides and narration to
the field.
This is another first for Civil Air
Patrol. This project -- although
technically a training kit for
recruiting and orienting new
squadron commanders -- does much
m or e.
--It tells all of those who are now in
the hot seat that we know how tough
their job is.
...And how very grateful we are to
each of them.

luadro n
Hears About Drugs

"

WLNSTON-SALEM, N. C.
Members of the WinstonSalem Composite Squadron
were recently given a
detailed briefing on drug
abuse. The briefing was part
of a first aid and personal
safety course conducted at
the Forsyth Chapter of the
American Red Cross.
The training included a
film entitled Drug Decision
and a drug discussion
conducted by a narcotics
officer from the WinstonSalem police department.
The effects of drugs was
discussed with CAP
members by a registered
pharmacist.
The first aid training is
offered to senior and cadet
members of the squadron in
preparation for emergency
services and disaster relief
activities. It is also part of
the unit's personal safety
programs.
Participation in the Red
Cross's new standard first
aid and personal safety
course includes 16 hours of
training and practice.

ELT Found In 3 Minutes
HANDS TELL IT ALL -- A narcotics officer from the
Winston-Salem Police Department shows Cadets Frank
Gregory lIl (left) and Bob Youngquist what marijuana looks
like after it is burned. The demonstration was recently
conducted as part of a program on drugs during the
squadron's first aid course. (Photo by CAP Lt. Col. H.
Nelson)
.

.

I~VERETT. Wash. -- On two
recent occasions, a 14-year-old
Civil Air Patrol Cadet from the
Paine Field Composite Squadron
demonstrated his ability to perform in emergency situations.
For the benefit of all
members of Civil Air
Patrol, the latest statistics
of search and rescue
activities throughout the
organization am shown
below.
These am unofficial
figures compiled by
Directorate of Opcmttions
at CAP National
Hendquartem.
(As of Mar. 17, 1974)
Number of Missions
Number of Aircrafts
977
Number of Sorties
1,710
Flying Hours
2,884
Personnel
4,826
Mobile Radios
873
Fixed RadiOs
861
Saves
13
SAR Objectives located 28

Pilot Neglect Causes
Costly Air Search
ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- An Emergency Locator Transmitter
(ELT) that was inadvertently dropped from an aircraft on Mr.
Susitna was responsible for a costly search recently conducted by
Civil Air Patrol and the Army National Guard.
When the ELT signal was reported, CAP sent their aircraft,
along with a National Guard helicopter, to the site 80 miles west of
Anchorage.
Due to turbulent winds and driving snow, they were unable to
land or search in the immediate vicinity of the beacon signal.
When a passing aircraft spotted a light in the vicinity of the
search, it was decided to send out an aircraft to drop flares.
After several flares were dropped, the searchers determined that
the light did not come from the pin-pointed location of the signal
and decided to continue the search at dawn.
The following morning a pilot heard of the search on radio. He
notified the agencies that he had dropped an ELT in the search
area. Turbulence over Mr. Susitna had blown out the window of his
plane to which his ELT was attached.
He thought that the ELT had been destroyed by the fall.
However, it landed in the soft snow and began to transmit an
emergency signal.
Had the pilot reported the loss upon landing, more than $4,000 in
materials could have been saved. This figure does not include the
risk of life and limb during the search due to adverse weather
conditions.
This episode should be a lesson for all pilots to mount their ELT's
on the interior of the aircraft where they will not fall off in flight.

Teenager Demonstrates
His Life Saving Ability

Matthew Selland was
present when a house was on
fi r e i n h i s c o m m u n i t y. H i s

Gp 16 Cites
3 For Service
YPSILASITI, Mich. -- Three

members ,from the Detroit
Metropolitan Group 16
(Michigan Wing) have been
awarded the Meritorious Service
Award for outstanding
contributions to Civil Air Patrol.
Recieving the award were Lt.
Col. Alan R. Crieghton,
commander of Group 16;
Chaplain (Capt.) Harry Goodall,
Group 16 chaplain: and 1st Lt.
Lillian Cantrell. Group Communications, lnformationL Finance and Testing officer.
Col. Edward L. Palka,
Michigan Wing commander,
presented the awards.

815 N. 60th Avenue * Hollywood, Florida 33021

IF

PAGE FIVE

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

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assistance was requested by a
fireman who recognized him as a
CAP member. A fireman had
been overcome by smoke in the
house and Mattassisted in
removing him from danger.
A few days later, he was on-thescene at an automobile accident
where a lady was trapped inside
the car. He was asked to help a
policeman get to the injured

ORLANDO, Fla. -- Try and top this one. Four members of the
Howard Showalter Senior Squadron (Florida Wing) set a new record
for locating a signalling emergency locator transmitter (ELT,.
WO Harry Lipscomb. 2d Lt. Richard White and Senior Members
Nail Handley and Dennis White turned on their receivers to 121.5
during a preflight of their aircraft and picked up the signal.
They physically moved the aircraft around to locate the source of
the signal and found it coming from a nearby hangar.
They went to the hangar and informed the owners of the ELT that it
was broadcasting. Total time from discovery of the signal to its
location and shut off was three minutes.

'Quick Thinker' Gets Water
MEMPHIS, Tenn. -- When the water main burst at the Manry
County Hospital recently, CAP Maj. Irvin Howell, commander of the
Maury County Squadron, had a quick solution.
He arranged to have a tanker filled with 5,700 gallons of water
hooked up to the water supply. The hospital was then able to keep their
boilers in operation and maintain heat throughout the hospital. The
tanker belonged to the Dairy Transport Company.
Major Howell received a letter of appreciation for his efforts from
Jon C. Trezona, acting director of Hospital Administration.

won'lan.

Matt entered the auto through
a window and administered first
aid to the victim who had a large
cut on her forehead.
Selland has been in CAP for
one year. He received a letter
,of appreciation from the firedepartment for his actions.

Nelson Is New
F~% ~mlselor
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.CAP Lt. Col. Holli Nelson of the
Winston-Salem Composite
Squadron was recently appointed
an Accident Prevention Counselor by the Federal Aviation
Administration.
Acounselor is the FAA's local
agent for the accident
prevention program.
His duties will include
correction of the unsafe flying
practices he observes, plus
giving courtesy check flights to
pilots desiring them. He also
recommends training to correct
any unsafe habits.
Lt. Colonel Nelson is a [light
instructor active in the WinstonSalem Squadron cadet flight
training program.
He also serves as the Director
of the North Carolina Wing's
senior program and is a Wing
check pilot.

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PAGE SIX

APRIL 1974

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

Cadets Honored
For Saving Others
ANAHEIM, Calif. Two Simi Valley Civil Air Patrol cadets were
recognized here recently for saving the lives of others one for
saving the life of his own father.
Larry Condon and Todd Bradish were presented American Red
Cross life saving awards. Cadet Condon was also given the CAP
Bronze Medal of Valor. Both young men are members of the Simi
Valley Cadet Squadron 59.
Both the CAP and the Red Cross recognition for Condon came as the
result of an incident on Feb. 14, 1973. According to the citation, the
young man "distinguished himself by conspicious heroic action by
risking his own life to save others."
Traveling along the San Diego Freeway with his mother in the car,
Condon saw a vehicle ahead plunge over the embankment and turn
turtle. The youth immediately pulled off the shoulder, told his mother
to go to a call box and notify the California Highway Patrol while he
went to the aid of the stricken vehicle.
"Neither of them," the citation continued. "could turn the ignition
off or unfasten their seatbelts and the odor of leaking gas was beginning to permeate the car. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, he reached into the car and shut off the headlights and ignition. He then managed to unfasten the seat belts and assist the two women out of their car and up the embankment awav from the dangerous
and potentlallv explosive situation.
According to Dr. Bonaventure F. Eng of Granada Hills Community
Hospital, George Bradish, father of young Todd, is alive today due to
the quick thinking and effective action of his son.
"On August 19, 1973," Doctor Eng said in recommending the cadet
for the Red Cross award, "Mister Bradish was working in the attic of
his house. He accidentally handled a worn electric power line. Besides
sustaining severe burns tohis hands and chest at the point of contact
with the power line, Mister Bradish apparently had a cardiac arrest.
He fell and appeared to be in an unconscious state.
"Luckily for Mister Bradish, his fourteen-year-01d son Todd was
near by. As soon as Todd found his father unconscious and without
pulse, he realized that his heart had stopped beating. Young Todd
immediately started mouth-to-mouth breathing and external cardiac
massage. These emergency steps initiated by young Todd undoubtedly
saved his father's life."
"In cardiac arrest," Doctor Eng added, "the first few minutes are
critical. Young Todd Bradish had received first aid training in the Red
Cross/Civil Air Patrol cadet's program. The proper first aid steps
taken by Todd at the critical moment proved to be life saving."

F a c t s t o P a s t e i n Yo u r H a t
The Senate Appropriations Committee has
summarized some truths about defense spending
and its relation to other government costs. Main
points are:
= In Fiscal 1964, defense absorbed 42.8 percent of federal outlays. The figure for Fiscal 1974
is 29.4 percent.
Over the past decade, government costs have
gone up 127 percent. Defense costs have gone
up fifty-seven percent. As a percentage of total
outlays, they have gone down thirteen percent.
= If we separate the costs of defense from the
costs of the rest of government, the fifty-seven
percent increase in defense compares with a 176
percent increase in costs for all other activity.
= Tw e n t y y e a r s a g o , d e f e n s e s p e n d i n g w a s
double that of all other federal agencies. Today,
the other agencies spend more than twice what
the Pentagon spends.
= Tw e n t y y e a r s a g o , d e f e n s e s l ~ e n d i n g w a s
double that of all state and local governments
combined. Today, the situation is reversed.
= Twenty years ago, about forty-nine cents out
of every tax dollar federal, state, and local-w e n t f o r d e f e n s e . To d a y, t h e fi g u r e i s n i n e t e e n
cents.
= Tw e n t y y e a r s a g o , t o t a l d e f e n s e m a n p o w e r
was nearly equal to all other public employm e n t - - f e d e r a l , s t a t e , a n d l o c a l - - - c o m b i n e d . To clay, such other public employment exceeds defense manpower by nearly four to one.
= Defense spending, for the first time in American history, is today below prewar levels in terms
o f w h a t t h e d o l l a r w i l l b u y. T h a t i s t r u e e i t h e r
after or during a war.
= The committee conclusion:
1. The defense budget does not dominate public spending.
2. The defense budget is not the primary cause
of the high cost of government.
3. The defense budget has not deprived human
resources programs of needed funds.
Reprinted with permission of Air Force Magazine, published by the Air Force Association, 1750 Pennsylvania
Ave., NW, Washington, D.C.20006.
II

W I N N E R S A L L - - M a j . G e e . E v e l l e J . Yo u n g e r, U S A F R ( s e c o n d f r o m r i g h t ) , w h o i n
civilian life is attorney general of California, is joined by others who received awards at the
California Wing Conferenee recently. From left to right are Cadet Maj. Winoaa Jones of
Squadron 63 -- outstanding cadet of the year; Lt. Pat Smith, commander of Squadron 63 -outstanding cadet unit of the year; General Younger -- California Wing's "Distinguished
Citizen for 1973"; and Maj. Barbara Ferguson -- outstanding senior member of the year.

AFA Forms Unique Unit
MONUMENT, Colo. -- A new and unique cadet
squadron was recently chartered at the Air Force
Academy to provide aerospace activities for youth
in the northern portion of the Pikes Peak region.
Commander of the new unit -- Falcon Cadet
Squadron -- is Maj. Leo Kimminau, USAF
Retired. He is assisted by Capt. Robert Barnes,
USAFR, Lt. Ron DeCurtins, USAF. and Academy
Cadet Robert Hickcox..
Major Kimminau was the USAF-CAP If~iison officer for the Nebraska. Wing prior to his
retirement last year. Captain Barnes is a former

CAP cadet from the California Wing and has
nearly 2,000 hours as a Air Force instructor pilot.
Lieutenant DeCurtins is an instructor pilot in the
Academy cadet T-41 flying program while Cadet
Hiekeox is cadet-in-charge of the CAP club
composed of former CAP cadets who are now
enrolled at the Academy.
These four men form the nucleus of an
organization that has already attracted several
additional active, reserve and retired military
personnel with extensive flying experience.

FORM AFA UNIT -- Key figures in the organization of a Civil Air Patrol unit for seniors
a n d c a d e t s a t t h e U . S . A i r F o r c e A c a d e m y, C o l o . , a r e f r o m l e f t , L e o K i m m i n a u o f
Monument; AFA Cadet Robert Hickeox; Ron De Curtins of the Academy staff; and Bob
Barnes of Monument.

APRIL 1974

PAGE SEVEN

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

Minnesota Unit Holds AnnualFishing Derby
BEMIDJI, Minn.Several hundred anglers
recently took to the ice
for some fishing when
the Bemidji Composite
Squadron held their 7th
annual
Ice Fishing
Derby.
The CAP members cut
some 700 holes in the
ice. All the contestants
who took part in the fun
and fishing had a chance
to win over $1,500 in
prizes.
The prizes included a
snowmobile, a tent, a
TV, an outboard motor,
a bicycle and a sled.
The donations taken at
the derby will be used
for the maintenance and
upkeep of the squadron's
aircraft.

EVEN THE YOUNGSTERS TRIED THEIR HAND
D U R I N G T H E C A P F I S H I N G D E R B Y.

T H I S O N E P O U N D T H R E E O U N C E C AT C H N E T T E D
C L A R K VA N A S S E A B I C Y C L E . H E T O O K F I R S T P L A C E
IN HIS DIVISION.

i~!~:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:~;.:i:.:.:.:i:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:i:!:.!~i
i~i:: Photos by Jerry Dogget, /ii
i!il Bemidji Pioneer Press iili
i~ii Photographer.

iiii
~ ii~

R A N D Y K L A S E N P R O U D LY D I S P L AY S T H E F O U R
POUND EELPOUT HE CAUGHT TO WIN A NEW
OUTBOARD MOTOR.

T H I S C A N I N E A N G L E R TA K E S A ' C O O L D R I N K ' F R O M
A FISHING HOLE.

P A G E

~

~ A I R PAT I I O L 1 4 I L L S

APML 1974

EQUIPMENT CHECK-Cadet MSgt. Freddie Anderson, Col. J. A. Vozzo and Cadet
MSgt, Brian Schmidt

DRESS RIGHT DRESS
Mississippi Cadets Prepare For Inspect-

+~ ~ _ lrammgrias ttumrurpose !

' K N O T ' T H A T W A Y- Army ROTE Cadet Sgt. Eddy
Whir, Cadets Peter Vozzo, Bill
Christian and Darrell McAIlister

!

q
N

M
C O M M U N C AT I O N S T R A I N I N G - C a d e t M i c h a e l R u s s e l l , M a j . J a m e s T. + P r i c e , U . S . A r m y '
and Cadet Willie Andersoe

UP A TREE :

weal
Cadet Michael Russell, Maj. James I

ark ldl~ PATIIGL 14~1~

APllUL 1974

PAGE NINE

O B S TA C L E C O U R S E - Cadet Michael Russell, Col.
J.A. Vozzo and Cadet MSgt.
Freddie Anderson
f

!ii!i!ilJiiflJJ!iiiiiiii!

AT ROPE'S END-Cadet MSgt. Freddie Anderson.

i WAY N O W ? ?
Price, U. S. Army, and Cadet Turner Luttrell

A LONG HAUL-Army ROTC Cadet Maj. Wells
and Cadet MSgt. Freddie Anderson

COFFEE BREAK-Cadet Sgt. Bill Christian

::

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Photos by MSgt.
Russ Brown

ii!i

i ~ : i ~ ~ . ~ : ~ i!i

APRIL 1974

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

PAGE TEN

Medication And Flying
by Lt. Col. Sidney W. Raymond, CAP
Medical Officer
Illinois Wing
After many years of examining applicants
for Airman Certificates, I find the most
common reason for being unable to issue
them is the use of medication. Often the
"over the counter" purchase, when used by
the flyer, can be a real hazard in the air.
Almost all medication used on prescription
is contra-indicated; it may not be the
medication itself but the condition for which
it is prescribed.
The victim of the common cold is better off
not to fly, if the symptoms are pronounced.
The use of remedies which contain an
antihistamine can cause drowsiness and
blurring of vision.
Simple inhalors may contain drugs which
raise the blood pressure or cause over
stimulation.
Cough medicines may contain a derivative
ON TV -- CAP Col. Frank L. Swaim, commander of the
of opium, an antihistamine, or both and are
Rocky Mountain Region, discusses Civil Air Patrol with
apt to produce drowsiness. These effects are
Miss Rosemary (Barney) Barnweil on her TV show "Area
increased by the reduction of oxygen at
4" in Denver, Colo. During the recent program, Colonel
altitude.
Swaim explained CAP's cadet and aerospace education
They can add as much as 5,000 feet over the
programs and spoke on flight safety in the Rocky Mountain
airplane's altitude to your body's
Region. He also displayed an electronic locator transmitter physiological requirements. They may cause
(ELT) and related its importance to general aviation.
dizziness, blurting of vision, or headache. The
airman may not recognize-the onset of
drowsiness.
Antimotion sickness pills are frequently
used by persons planning air trips as
BETHESDA, MD. -- The Betbesda-Chevy Chase Cadet Squadron
passengers. These must never be used by an
(Maryland Wing) recently held a recruiting drive at the Cabin John airman. They usually contain antihistamines
Junior High School in Potomac, Md.
and may produce a sound slumber.
Cadets 2d Lt. Gary Seale, Sgt. Margaret Ross, 2d Lt. Max Wepasnick
Needless to say, sleeping pills are not to be
and MSgt. Danny Hall participated in the drive. They talked with
many students on the CAP Cadet program and what it has to offer.
taken.
The students were also invited to attend the next squadron meeting.
Allergy, hayfever, and asthma remedies in
general fall into the soporifics or sleep

Cadets Recruit At School "

Pa. Unit Starts School
YORK, Pa. -- The York Composite Squadron 301 recently started an
aerial navigation school for cadets and seniors.
The school, conducted by CAP Lt. William Thompson, deals with
map reading and aerial navigation. The students also prepare flight
plans and request weather reports and other vital information for their
flight as part of the classroom work.

Cadet Halcin In Contest Finals
MINNETONKA, Minn. -- Cadet Cynthia Halcin of the Viking
Squadron was recently selected as one of the 35 national finalists in the
Miss Teenage America Contest.

CAP Honors Va. Trooper
STAUNTON, Va. -- Trooper
George Calo of the Virginia State
Police was recently presented a
Civil Air Patrol Certificate of
Appreciation by CAP Col. Earl
T. Van Stavern, Middle East
Region chief of staff.
Galo was presented the
certificate for his efforts in
helping CAP locate a crash site
in western Augusta County.
He flew his helicopter in
adverse weather conditions to
the scene when heavy fog
hampered CAP aircraft.

CAP Maj. Keith Burnett of the
Augusta Squadron flew on the
mission as a observer and he was
awarded a "find" ribbon.
The presentations were made
during open house activities held
at the squadron.

Texas Unit Aids
B-36 Restoration
B E D F O R D , Te x . - - T h e
Museum of Aviation Group
located at the Ft. Worth-Dallas
Airport has acquired the loan of
a B-36J Peacemaker Bomber
from the Air Force Museum.
Members of the Mid-Cities
Composite Squadron will help
them restore it.
Plans by the group now include
disassembling the old bomber
and transferring it to the new
museum site.
The plane will be restored to
allow present and future
generations to see this giant
bomber that never fired a shot or
dropped a bomb in anger.

producing drugs, usually the antihistamines.
In these, the action is much stronger and
longer lasting.
S o . f a r, w e h a v e c o n s i d e r e d o n l y t h e
commonly used medications apt to produce
sleep, drowsiness and irritability. Another
group to be avoided are the weight control
and appetite destroying medications which
may be used by the overweight. These fall
into two groups.
Group one are those designed to reduce or
inhibit the appetite. These are usually based
on Amphetamine, also known as Benzedrine
or "Bennies." These, in addition to habituation, cause wakefulness, nervousness and
impaired judgement.
The second group is based on speeding up.
metabolism, that is the rate of burning up
food by the body. Thyroid extract is the best
known representative of this group. While it is
not contraindicated in under-active thyroid
glands, its use otherwise is taboo; it also
causes nervousness, sleeplessness and
weakness.
How long after use of these various drugs
should an airman remain grounded? Usually
24 hours is sufficient but after the thyroid
medications, a period of 48 hours should
elapse.
What should an airman do to find out about
the medication being used? A call to any FAA
d e s i g n a t e d Av i a t i o n M e d i c a l E x a m i n e r
( A M E ) o r t h e G e n e r a l Av i a t i o n D i s t r i c t
Office (GADO) Will usually get a prompt
answer.
Unfortunately, physicians who are not
intimately connected with flying are not
always able to give an authoritative answer.
When in doubt, do not exercise the
privileges of your Airman Certificate. you
may lose your license or your life.

Whistling In The Dark
by Chaplain (Maj.) Kenneth W. Henschel, USAF
Christians for many centuries have met each
other on Easter morning with the antiphonal
greeting: "He is risen! He is risen indeed!" This
may sound like whistling in the dark, but it is a
reminder that the Lord Jesus is alive. He lives,
with grace to sustain in time of need.
Yet we wonder if it is really true this story
about the resurrection of Jesus. We would like to
believe that it really happened the way the GosDels
record the event, and still there is whistling in the
dm'k recesses of our minds. Those doubts come, do
they not? The Easter good news of the empty tomb
is heard again, but those whistles are also heard. Is
it myth? Was it hallucination? Or is it bona fide
history?
The Lord Jesus died. Nothing is more real or
human than that. He died without bitterness or
recrimination. His men were always impressed by
the way He died, as a sheep led to the slaughter,
not opening His mouth. Nothing is more divine
than that.
He died, not for Himself, but for us! That;s what
He said He would do, and He did! There is nothing
good about us, but still He died for us. He, too,
whistled in the dark at times, wondering if He
could do all that. He asked the Father if that bitter
cup of the cross could be removed from His

distined lot.
When we whistle in the dark about the future,
when we are plagued by cynicism and despire,
when we wonder if there is any light in this dark
and troubled world, then let this fact come home to
you: He died for us, He did! He did so willingly,
because He loved us and still loves us.
And ~for all of that, God raised Him from the
dead. Can't you see those women on that Sunday
morning, whistling in the dark? How those
disciples hoped against hope that those stories
about grave clothes and the stone were really true!
Well, their whistling stopped a few hours later
when they saw Him. They became convinced that
this Jesus was the Son of God with power. They
said to their world: "Jesus is Lord! He is risen! He
is risen indeed!" They told others to trust Him,
even with their little daily lives.
Trust Him, my friend. Don't ever forget Him,
because He has not forgotten you. He is Lord, and
His lordly power watches over you. The witness of
those first eyewitnesses is a sure record. The
history of the Christian Church is a firm testimony
to His resurrection. His own Spirit at work in your
heart is the ultimate testimony that He lives.
And if He lives, then you, too, shall live -eternally, which ought to stop all that whistling in
the dark.

B-36 PEACEMAKE

PAGE ELEVEN

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

APRIL 1974

Warning!

Watch Out For 'Gas'

R E S E R V E PA R K I N G - - C a d e t s M i k e P e t e r s ( l e f t ) a n d B o b
Scoggin work on their squadron's new "high and dry"
parking space for the unit's T-41 aircraft. Cadets and senior
members of the Winston Salem Squadron (North Carolina
Wing), recently undertook this project which will connect
directly with the ramp area and providea solid walk way
from their headquarters to the aircraft. (Photo by CAP Lt.
Col. H. Nelson)

60 Attend Daylong Seminar
GRAND PRAIRIE, Tex.--Texas Wing's Crusader Composite Squadron recently hosted a one day communications seminar with 60
cadets attending.
The seminar was conducted in two sessions. One a classroom period
and the other an on-the-air radio net session.
The classroom portion was orientated toward teaching the radio
operators how to perform their job more effeciently through proper
message make-up and speedy and accurate delivery.
Information covered in the classroom was graphically reinforced
through the on-the-air radio net where messages were both originated
and passed.
According to CAP Capt, Ron Blackwell, coordinator for the course,
"once these cadets teach this material to the operators in their home
squadrons, Texas communications should show a real improvement."

4 Receive Honors At Banquet.
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- Four members of the Daytona Beach
Composite Squadron (Florida Wing) were honored recently during a
unit awards banquet.
Maj. MerriLL Powell was presented a special plaque for his services~
to the squadron. He had served as squadron commander for seven
years prior to resigning last year.
Cadet Sgt. Cathy McCiancy was honored as the squadron's Cadet of
the Year while Cadets Sgt. Bob McGovern and Chuck Vola were each
presented with a trophy as most dependable cadets of the year.
j

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Choose Number of Unit~ Desired
Benefits
1 Unit 2 Units 3 Units 4 Units 5 Units
Accidental Death $5,000 $10,000 $15,000 $20,000 $25,000
Dismemberment
5,000
10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000
Medical Expense.
500
1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500
Annual Cost
Non-Pilot
Pilot

$10.00
20.00

$20.00 $30.00 $40.00 $50.00
40.00 60.00 80.00 10000

I I~reby Make Application For Civil Air Patrol Senior Member
Accident Insurance Under Hartford Accident & Indemnity Co.
Master Policy On File At National Headquarters Civil Air
Patrol.
Name ............................................
Date of Birth .....................
Address ...., .......................... i ......................................................
CAP Ser. No ........................Pilot ............. Non-Pilot ................
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Relation ....................
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I Certify I Am A Member Of The ..........................

Wing, CAP

question.
MAXWELL AFB, Ala. -- With
a. If the recommended fuel is
c. If higher than recommended
the ongoing fuel shortage and a
not available and the aircraft
fuel is used for a long period of
movement by some oil
must be operated, the next
time, more frequent inspection
companies to discontinue
higher grade should be used.
Under no circumstances should
of the combustfon chamber
production of 80/87 octane
you use a lower grade fuel. A
components is required.
aviation fuel, there is the
lower octane fuel than
possibility of the proper grade of
d. When operating with higher
fuel not being available at some
recommended c a n c a u s e
octane fuels, keep fuel flow on
preignition, and in turn, loss of
airports. Therefore, we are
the rich side of normal lean at
power and, eventually, engine
confronted with two potential
cruise power. This will
- failure.
problems -- the temptation to
counteract the effects of
b. Some manufacturers permit
use automotive fuel and the
increased combustion chamber
proper use of alternate aviation
the unrestricted use of the next
deposits.
higher grade of fuel in engines
fuel.
approved for 80/87 octane. Other
The difference in the
For further information, read
properties and chemical
manufacturers restrict its use to
DOT/FAA Advisory Circular 91composition of automotive
25% of the operating time. Lead
33, "Use of Alternate Grades of
gasoline and aviation gasoline
deposits will form when using
Aviation Gasoline for Grade
higher octane fuel. In the older
80/87," and Advisory Circular 20make automotive fuels unsafe
for use in aircraft engines The
vintage engines, built with solid
K,
"Danger:
Automotive
stem exhaust valves and bronze
main differences between
Gasoline at Work." These
valve guides, these deposits can
automotive and aircraft fuels
publications are free and
are:
cause valve erosion and
available from:
accelerated valve wear. Check
a. Automotive fuels have a
Department of Transportation,
wider distillation range than
the manufacturer's service
Distribution Unit, TAD 484.3,
representative if you have a
aircraft fuel and promote poor
Washington, D.C., 20590.
distribution of the high antiknock components of the fuel.
(Octane rating is one measure of
a fuel's anti-knock qualities.)
Also, the octane rating of
In the February issue of the Civil Air Patrol NEWS, we reviewed automotive and aircraft fuels
aviation weather forecasts and advisors that are available to the pilot.
are not comparable due to the
Thanks to Ist It. Ted Lungwitz of the Thunderbird Senior Squadron
different methods used to rate
(Colorado Wing), the following changes to the issue and valid times of
the two fuels. This results in an
forecasts were brought to our attention.
appreciable difference in actual
"Aviation Area Forecasts (FA)...These FA's are now prepared
anti-knock ratings for the two
every 12 hours and are valid for 18 hours. Also, at the current time,
types of fuel, even though they
Airmets and Sigmets are issued as needed for icing, turbulence, etc.
may have the same octane
"Aviation Terminal Forecasts (FT)are issued every 12 hours and
n u m b e r. S u c h d i f f e r e n c e s c a n
are valid for 24 hours. Note that these selected FT's are now all 24
lead to destructive preignition
hoers forecasts; where previously some were 12 hour terminals and
and/or uncontrollable detonation
some were 24 hour terminals. Previously, these FT's gave forecasted
in the cylinders.
ceilings, visibilities,~-tc., fro" the complete period. Since the change
b. Automative fuels are more
last year, these FT's new give forecasted data for the first 12 hours volatile and tend to erupt into
and the last 12 hours contain only the notation: VFR, MVFR and IFR,
violent action such as
to indicate visual flight rules, marginal visual flight rules or
uncontrollable detonation. Also,
instrument flight rules. These three notations agree with the standard
the greater volatility increases
rules."
fire hazards. The higher vapor
Lieutenant Lengwitz also pointed out that it will aid the weather
pressures of auto fuel can lead to
briefer if you include your aircraft call sign or numbers in your revapor lock.
quest for weather information.
c . Te t r a e t h y l l e a d i n
In checking these forecasts out, We found that many people
automotive fuels contains an
were not aware of these changes in preparation and valid times.
excess of chlorine and bromine.
It pays to know how current the information is that you are using.
Aviation fuels contain onlv
The weathermen do their best to provide an accurate picture of
chemically corrected amounts of
climatic :conditions, but the decision to go is yours, based on your
bromine. Chlorine is very
judgement.
corrosive and could lead to
SIR, glE'YE R P#OBtgffl-j1 RHH, NO i CRPTRIN, SOISE OF I/T'S OK R$
exhaust valve failure if used in
T H E U N I T F I N R N ~ P R O B l e m - THESE CRPF ~.g': ILON6 R$ IRO:T
aircraft engines.
YOU PREPRRtO lOT THEIR RRE
BOOKS DON'T ~ RS LONG RS
d. Automotive fuels have
EXRCTLY #RLRNC£..) UJE'RE WITHIN RREN~T CORREfE.. ~RLL RIGHT,
solvent characteristics not
f-~-~R FEKI CENTS
suitable for aircraft engines.
~D
,This can cause deterioration of
gaskets, seals, and fuel lines.
e. Automotive fuels can form
gum deposits in aircraft engines.
Automobile engines have built-in
tolerances to accommodate this.
Aircraft engines do not.
ALTERNATE AVGAS
SiR, OUR/NSPtcr/oN REp.p~) LET ]I'm SORRY R$OUT)THRT'$ O&
If you must ~se alternative
THE HRIRCUT,$1R, Z ~ KID, YOU £RN*T
~UST MRVEN'T HRD~ FOLIOiU RLL
AVGAS, follow the engine manuLTHE TIME... f'-"~THE RULES RLL
facturer's recommendations at
~ £ N y , s s r t t , ) ~
all times. In general, the following should he considered when
using an alternate fuel:

Are You Weatherwise?

H.Q.

FOR UNIFORMS
IN STOCK
1549 TROPICALS
1550
HALF SLEEVE SHIRTS
LOWEST PRICES
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frllllD THE

~T'J 0~, SIR-~FT~R~ [mosr oF rov~) /you Cl;N'T ¢OZtOWi
STORF FOR RLL, YOU WERE LUITHItilJ LRNOIN&S ~ |hit THE gULFS r~
R ,4UI411.£ I'm T#KING ~ ~ ~R ?EIU FElT OF TNEjF--~_ I~IGHT.~
DIE z-q UP.

~.,,, ~~.l~ ~

Signed .... ........................................... . ............. Date ...................
Make Check Payable To Turner-Weaver-Wilson
P.O. Box- 6010, Nashville, Tennessee 37212
Contributed by Lt. Col. A. R. Creighton, CAP, Michigan Wing

=

PAGE TWELVE

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

APRIL 1974

They Benefit All
What would you do with $3.000,000,000? To phrase the question
another way. what couldn't you do with this amount? That is what is
being spent this fiscal year ~ending June 30, 1974) on research and
development for the U.S. Air Force.
The number one mission of the Air Force. is to preserve the
peace and security of the United States. The Air Force Systems
Command iAFSCI is the agency responsible for advancing the
aerospace technology needed to support the Air Force mission.
What they do with these billions is of vital interest to all
Americans, especially taxpayers.
Even though this figure represents only six or seven percent of the
total budget for the Department of Defense for FY '74, it is a heck of a
l o t o f m o n e y. C i v i l A i r P a t r o l m e m b e r s , a s w e l l a s A i r F o r c e
personnel, should do their best to assure that the American public
knows what its money buys. Even more, that the public knows about
the additional dividends it gets for this money.
The "dividends" of Air Force Research and Development (R&D)
are called "spinoffs." A "spinoff" is a by-product of aerospace
technology that can have a direct impact on the civilian economy.
More simply stated, "spinoffs" can mean jobs, higher standards of
living, and better health and safety benefits for all Americans.
Some R&D spinoffs have become so much a part of our daily routine
that you probably don't recognize them as such. Yet, they make your
family's and your neighbor's lives more than livable.
LIKE WHA T?
Like food, for example. Have you ever eaten a meal that was
prepared all or in part with frozen meat or vegetables? The original
TV-Dinner was developed during World War II to feed B-29 bomber
crew members. The frozen food industry has grown some since then.
You may have shaved that handsome face this morning with a razor
blade that has a "special cutting edge". Your close shave, and any
resulting nicks, are the result of a thin film sputtering technique
developed as a metal processing refinement by the Air Force.
Oh, did your wife cook your dinner last night using ceramic
cookware that doesn't burn, change color or crack under temperature
changes? The cookware your wife can't do without was originally an

342 passengers, flying at 575 mph, expect quality flights on
the Boeing 747 'Jumbo Jet.' An Air Force spinoff helps meet
those expectations. A descendent of a sophisticated Air
Force inertial guidance system provides the 747 greater
flight accuracy at high operational altitudes and speeds.
crews can now patch faulty surfaces and have them open for traffic in
less than an hour. The Air Force wasn't looking for a faster method to
speed the movement of people and things in the United States; it just

intercontinental ballistic mis-- spunoff that way.
sile nose cone, The odds are your
A VIA TION ADVANCES
neighbor's wife also has a nose
cone in her kitchen and doesn't
As mentioned, Spinoffs originate from research initiated for one
even know it.
major purpose advancing aerospace technology for the U.S. Air
Force. Some developments have had a very pronounced spinoff impact
The nickel-cadmium battery
on civilian aviation. Consider the C-47 Skytrain. the Air Force's
your brother uses to power his
venerable "Gooney-Bird." The commercial version of this aircraft,
electric wristwatch was first
the DC-3. was a direct spin-off of military R&D.
developed for the Air Force.
It is no surprise that you may notice a striking similarity between
Your aunt's hearing aid and your
the Boeing 707 commercial, jetli'ner and the Air Force's KC-135
camera may also depend on the / Stratotanker. Commercial jet airliners became a reality based on the
same type of battery.
development and production of the KC-135 and the B-47 and B-52
strategic bombers. Also. jet airliners became economical and
Do you smoke a pipe? There
practical only after the development of Air Force jet engines, jet
are pipes on the market now that
fuels, and lubricants which increase engine life.
smoke cooler and last longer
A descendant of one of the Air Force's most sophisticated aircraft
than natural briar pipes. They
inertial guidance systems is now being used on the Boeing 747 'Jumbo
are made from the highly heat
Jet.' The device provides greater flight accuracy at the high altitudes
resistant, compressed carbon
and speeds at which the world's largest jet airliners operate.
Additionally, the 'Jumbos' would require longer landing distances if it
lining developed from rocket
were not for the turbine engine thrust reverser and beryllium brake
propulsion fuel cases. That may
This may be a more substantial meal than the original "TV
not impress most smokers. They
linings they use. Both were originally developed for the Air Force.
Dinner" developed by Air Force R & D for B-29 crew
Commercial aircraft builders are making increased use of titanium,
are just glad to have a pipe that
members.
one of the strongest lightweight materials available for aircraft
smokes cooler and draws easier.
construction. The materials and manufacturing techniques of working
with titanium were first developed for the Air Force.
If you drive a 1972 or newer automobile, you may be overlooking an
The Air Force technology that aided in the rescue of downed pilots in
idea that was developed and implemented by the Air Force. Radio Southeast Asia may already be impacting on CAP's SAR activities.
antennas implanted in the windshield glass was originally a technique
{See Spinoffs, Page 13)
used in cockpit canopies.
A vacation isn't a vacation without luggage. Air Force laboratories
developed the silicone-impregnated plastics used to make the new,
indestructible, suitcases and clothing bags. The researchers were
looking for a material that was light in weight and strong as steel.
They found it and it had a commercial application.
One of the most visually impressive developments from Air Force
research is the Rigid Geodesic Radome. Originally designed to shelter
expensive and delicate radar equipment from the elements, this type
of construction proved to have great strength and permanence. The
most notable commercial use of this technique is the Astrodome in
Houston.

Air Force Research and
Development was the
moving force behind the
production of nickle
cadmium batteries such as
t h i s o n e . To d a y, ' n i c k l e cad' batteries provide
power for cameras,
hearing aids and electric
wrist watches.

A vast area of communications, third generation computors,
compact TVs and hearing aids owe their existence to another Air
Force development the integrated circuit. These electronic devices
can do the work of 70 former components. The possibilities are
endless.
Your next CAP air or ground search for a lost hunter or pilot may be
made easier by another Air Force spinoff. Long lasting emergency
flares based on Air Force developed technology may make your
search shorter and successful.
A mortar-pocked runway in Southeast Asia is far removed from the
street in front of your home. However, the need to quickly repair
enemy damaged runways led the Air Force to the development of 'fast
fix' cement. Civilian airport operators and highway construction

ELTs (emergency locator transmitters) are impacting on
CAP's search and rescue (SAR) activities. The circuitry in
some of the civil aviation ELTs was originally developed by
Air Force R & D for iocator beacons used in Soatbeast Asia.

APRIL 1974

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

gaseous impurities. Initial tests indicate that the pollution detector
may play an important role in man's efforts to understand and control
pollutants better.
Clean air, water and land are good for everyone. The Air Force is
utilizing current and developing resources to keep a good thing going.

SPINOFFS

I Continued From Page 12)
The URT-33 locator beacon was used in SEA to guide rescuers to the
pilots. Circuitry based on the URT- 33 is being used in some
emergency locator transmitters C ELTs) for civil aviation.
Another spinoff of Air Force, and U.S. Army, R&D may extend the
transmitting life of ELTs. Lithium anode batteries were developed for
military liferaft strobe lights, and survival radios and beacons.
Batteries similar to these are being used to power ELTs. The civilian
manufacturers claim that the batteries give longer, more dependable,
service and increased performance at low, subzero, temperatures.
This is an important element in successful SAR activities.
Thousands of aircraft parts and special components, from "O" rings
to sodium cooled valves to de-icing fluids for fuels, have been developed by Air Force programs. They are now standard items for commercial aircraft and even automobile manufacturers.
MEDICAL MARVELS
Unlike military equipment R&D programs which may have only a
partial "spinoff" potential, new medical techniques and tools are
immediately adaptable to civilian use. For example, Air Force
aeromedical research centers developed electron beam microprobe
analysis. This process is now being used for advanced biological tissue
examination and diagnosis.
Sensor devices used to monitor pilot heartbeat, respiration, and
other bodily functions were developed by the Air Force for the X-l, X2, and X-15 flight programs and the early space environment
experiments. These biosensors allow doctors and nurses in hospitals to
monitor several patients at one time from a central location. The
medical personnel thus have a constant observation and warning
system.
An advanced version of this technique allows a doctor to work in his
office and still maintain a check on a patient in his home. A special
sensor is connected to the patient's telephone circuit. This spinoff may
someday make medical care as easy as an area cede.
Artificial heart and kidney machines have eased the suffering of
many Americans. Several of the electrical and mechanical
components in these machines were made possible by Air Force
development projects. From these projects came the part
miniaturization necessary to reduce the machines to a practical, more
usable, size.

PAGE THIRTEEN

The extended solar cell
panels are the main power
source for this
communications satellite
An Air Force R & D
spinoff, solar cells are
today being looked at as
one answer to the energy
crisis.

ENERGY
No one topic of conversation or thought has gripped American
consciousness as dramatically as has the energy crisis. Because of the
complex needs of the aerospace environment, Air Force Research and
Development has been working with energy problems for several
years.
Use of the sun's energy is a prospect that has flamed the
imaginations of many people. Solar cells that turn sunlight into
electrical energy were developed by the Air Force to provide power
for communications systems. This process is currently being used on
the Los Angeles Freeway to power the emergency telephone system.
Nuclear energy has been called the fuel of the future. Experiments
conducted at the Air Force's nuclear power plant in Sundance, Wyo.,
have made commercial development practical. In researching the
peaceful applications for nuclear energy, Air Force engineers
established many records for endurance and minimum nuclear fuel
requirements.
.Producing energy more efficiently is another part of the answer to
the energy crisis riddle. Recently, a lightweight, superconducting
magnet, twice the strength of conventional iron-core magnets, was
deveroped in a joint R&D effort by the Air Force and the Defense
Research Board of Canada. The magnet will be part of a new
Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Generator under development by
Systems Command. MI-ID commercial power systems will have the
capability to increase power output by 50 percent, reduce pollution 50
percent and increase plant efficiency by 20 percent while only using
the same amount of fuel as a conventional generator.
More and better energy from Air Force R&D spinoffs is of
increasing importance -- for today and tomorrow.

A COMMENT
Every spinoff you have just read about was a by-product of
someone's idea on how better to deter war and preserve peace, or how
to wage a successful conflict should deterence fail. Allowing every
American to live his life in fullest freedom was objective number one.
Improving the standard of life was actually incidental.
You can hear some individuals complain about the non-existence of
a "peace dividend" resulting from American disengagement in
Vietnam. These spinoffs, and hundreds of others just like them, have
always been "peace" dividends.
Through Air Force Research and Development technology, the
American people are investing in peace and freedom. I urge you to
.,~Tre-e'e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-o-e-e-e-~- this report with a fellow stockholder.
share

ECOLOGY
The Air Force was concerned about the environment long before it
.
a
became fashionable. In 1965, the Bureau of Sports Fisheries and
Wildlife of the Interior Department and the Air Force agreed to
°
o
develop Air Force land intelligently. This program now embraces
.
* P hotoSb y t h e
.
o
more than 6.5 million acres. An additional 600,000 acres have been
*
Office of
*
incorporated into an effective .forest management program.
.
o
Environmental pollution has been attacked on a broad front by the
**
Information q
*
*
Air Force. Since the mid-60s, the Air Force has spent more than $60
°
million for new and improved treatment facilities for industrial and *
Headquarters q *
.
sanitary wastes.
: Air Force Systems :
Has it helped? Every effort helps. Recently, the U.S. Air Force
Academy at Colorado Springs became the first military installation to
Command and *
win an Environmental Protection Agency award for meritorious
achievement. The academy was cited for its waste water treatment
o MSgt Russ Brown *
*
and water recycling programs.
Air Force R&D projects are also impacting in this area, especially
~QgOQIOQQOgQOQQQO09~
air pollution. Technological advancements have made it possible to
modify the jet engines on the C-5 and essentially eliminate smoke
omissions. The beneficial implications for civilian jet aircraft are
clear.
A spinoff of rocket propulsion technology may one day be used
to eliminate solid air pollutants from industrial smoke stacks. The
system is called the Charge-Droplet Scrubber.
Positively charged water droplets are injected into a smoke stack
through a series of small tubes. As pollutants, such as ashes, are blown
upward in the stack, they collide with the droplets which are mo~ing
downward toward the negatively charged walls of the stack. The
droplets entrap the particles and wash them down the side of the stack
into a drain. The residue can then be intelligently disposed of.
Another recent R&D development is a portable pollution detector.
This device enables technicians to identify the measure both solid and

The KC-135 Stratotanker
(left) was developed and
produced so the Air Force
could better preserve the
peace and security of the
United States. Any spinoff
similiarity between it and
the Boeing 707 at the right
is not coincidental.
Commercial aviation has
depended heavily upon Air
Force bomber and tanker
R & D programs.

This ceramic cookware won't crack, chip, peel or be adversely effected by extreme changes in temperature. It is
probably constructed of a material originally developed for
Air Force Intercontinental Ballistic Missile nose cones.

t

APRIL 1974

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

PAGE FOURTEEN,

IDEA MART

MER Confers Via Air
by Ist Lt. H.K. Chafin, CAP
South Carolina Wing

MAXWELL AFB, Ala. The Middle East
Region Communications Conference was held
on the air this year instead of having
participants come in to a central location.
According to Maj. Leon Nell, MER
DCS/Communications, the conference would
have normally been held in Richmond, Va..
with participants driving several hundred
miles and an average attendance of about 35
communicators from the seven wings in
the MER.
This year, due to the fuel shortage and
CAP's determination to conserve the nation's
energy, a decision was made to conduct the
Communications Conference on radio. The
MER frequency of 4585.0 MHz was used for
the three-plus hours of conference. The MER
had a total of 124 participants check in.
Figuring a total savings of approximately
42.000 miles of driving, 2,760 gallons of fuel at
a cost of $1,480.00 and out-of-pocket expenses
for hotels and meals of $9,950.00, a total of
approximately $11,400.00 and countless hours
of time involved in driving were saved.
Further. it was figured that sitting at home in
an easy chair was a lot safer than being out on
the road driving, unless of course your chair
broke. The above figures indicate that the
conference by radio was entirely successful
from a conservation standpoint.
Major Neil, known to MER as KIL-769,
conducted the conference in normal net

procedure starting with the roll call of wing
and region personnel. Check-in and
participation by National Headquarters AZ64. and by the MERLO office (2VHP) and by
one station in the Northeast Region brought
the total roll call to 124. Several wings within
the region gathered communicators in a
central place within the state to take part in
the conference.
Items on the agenda included the purpose of
the "'On the Air Conference." net procedure
to be followed, proper use of pro-words.
teletype (RETT), VHF-FM equipment
including repeaters, communications
reporting system, violations and how to avoid
them, dissemination of traffic to all levels of
CAP, and the use of the 4583.5 emergency
frequency.
In conducting the conference, all wing
directors of communications were given the
opportunity to make comments and to gather
comments from other members within his
wing.
The entire conference was taped in several
locations and made available to
communicators within each wing and was
also covered by an appointed Information
Officer. Comments at the close of the net
were very much in favor of holding more
conferences of this type, not forgetting that
an occasional face-to-face meeting would still
be necessgry.

CAP Gp. Visits D.C. Area
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. -- A
first hand experience in
aerospace and national heritage
education was shared recently
by CAP members representing
all eight squadrons of the
Westcbester Group, New York
Wing.
Ten senior members and 35
cadets under the command of
CAP Maj. Michael J. Gallo paid
"a three day visit to the
Washington, D.C. area.
.The trip began with an
extensive tour of the Goddard
Space Flight Center in
Greenbelt, Md.
Lectures and movies
highlighted the tour as well as

the historical aspects of the
Center's contributions to
America's space program.
The following day they toured
the White House. the Capitol,
Washington Monument and the
National Air and Space Museum
of the Smithsonian Institution.
According to Major Gallo, the
group was especially
enthusiastic about their visit to
the National Air and Space
Museum where they viewed the
Wright Brother's airplane and
some of the original equipment
used in the Gemini and Apollo
missions.
The group was housed at
Andrews AFB during their visit

SPACE MISSION ROUTES -- Cadet Antonio Mendes
(center), points out a route used by an Apollo space craft to
Cadets Len Lesnefsky (left), and James Smith during their
recent visit to the Goddard Space Flight Center.

which climaxed with a farewell
party held in the base service
club.

Squadron Gets
s5,000 Girl
EAGLE RIVER. Wise. The
Vilas County Squadron
IWisconsin Wing), received a
$5,000 check from a memorial
foundation recently.
A note accompanying the
check stated simply: "We hope
these funds can be used in the
purchase of equipment that will
better equip your group to do it's
job of saving lives, perhaps by
equipping your Beaver aircraft
for instrument flight conditions.
In view of the federal law
requiring all aircraft to be
equipped with locator beacons.
we would also hope an electronic
direction finder could be
purchased for the aircraft. This

HIGHEST CADET AWARD -- Colorado Governor John
Vanderhoof presents Cadet Col. Allen E. Gray the Gen. Carl
A. Spaatz Award. The prestigious Spaatz Award culminates
many hours of extensive study in a series of courses in
aviation and aerospace science-related subjects. Cadet Gray
has been active in CAP for the past five years as a member
of the Walter M. Schirra Squadron.

"
Senlors Get CD's Number

ANNVILLE. Pa. -- Members of the Annville Senior Squadron 306
recently received a briefing on Civil Defense from Walter Francis.
Lebanon County (Pa.) Civil Defense director.
Mr. Francis spoke on the emergency telephone number that is being
encouraged for use nationwide {number 911 i. This number would be
easier to remember than the current seven digit number being used.
Francis explained.
He said that the operator who receives the call at the local Civil
Defense control center would then call the appropriate facility for the
help needed.

First Aid Training Pays Off
FREDERICK, Va. -- Civil Air Patrol training came into play near
here recently when CAP Lt. Chris Miller, returning from a
communications seminar, happened upon a vehicle accident involving
eight persons.
The lieutenant was the first person on the scene. He contacted Lt.
John McKinney, Frederick Composite Squadron commander, on his
mobile radio unit and informed him of the accident and of the need for
help.
Lieutenant McKinney alerted the Washington County State Police
station and they dispatched police and an ambulance to the scene.
While they (police and ambulance) were on the way, Lieutenant Miller
administered to the needs of the victims.
The lieutenant commented, "my first aid training gained through
Civil Air Patrol proved to be very valuable."

Unit Receives U.S. Flag
HERNDON. Va. Through the efforts of U.S. Senator William L
Scott (Rep.) the Herndon Composite Squadron was recently presented
a U.S. flag.
The flag was flown over the Capitol Building in honor of Civil Air
Patrol's 32rid anniversary.
Mrs. Del Heiney, secretary to the senator, presented the flag during
a recent awards ceremony held by the squadron.

Four h eads are
b
e

Use car pools

APRIL 1974

PAGE FIFTEEN

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

Cadet Directorate Answers Questions

N AV Y C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S - - U . S . N a v y C a p t . A n d y
Serrell presents Cadet MSgt. Kathy Elder her earned
achievement during a recent Spokane Composite Squadron
f o r m a l c e r e m o n y. C a p t a i n S e r r e l l a l s o a d m i n i s t e r e d t h e
cadet oath and formally embarked two new young members
on their way in the CAP program. The Navy captain is team
leader of a group of Industrial College of the Armed Forces
Instructors that are currently presenting National Security
Seminars at selected locations in the U. S.

Cadets Meet, Hear POW
PHOENIX. Ariz.
The
Arizona Wing Cadet Advisory
Council recently sponsored a

HEADQUARTERS
FOR C.A.P.
YEAR ROUND REGULATION
AIR FORCE UNIFORMS

Blouse&* .......
Excellent condition
C6mplete with CAP Buttons
Shade 1084

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Same uniform as s19
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95

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$5.95

all sizes to 42
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all si ..... 3 2 . . . . . . . . . .
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CAP CUTOUTS-pr.
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Sr. or Cadet ........ea
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Complete with CAP buttons.

WAF UNIFORMS
Dacron/Cotton Cord

,a,,orin.washable Sizes
,, .... ~ual,t,~ 95
"'easv care"
6 thru 20: S,R L [ncludin~
CAP buttons. "

"

Wing Cadet Conference at Luke
AFB, Ariz.
More than 100 cadets
participated in the week-end
activities, which included tours
of the 26th Region North
American Air Defense
headquarters, learning centers
and simulators of the 58th
Tactical Training Squadron and
problem solving seminars.
Col. Gobal James, USAF, a
former POW, was the featured
speaker for the banquet which
concluded the conference.
Another highlight of the event
was the announcement that the
Cadet Advisory Council
chairman and vice-chairman, 1st
Lt. Don Soloman and Capt.
Stuart Maxon respectively, had
received nominations to the Air
Force Academy.
Also in attendance was the
Arizona Wing commander. CAP
Col. Eugene Issak.

QUESTION: I recently had a
contract returned because of an
incorrect signature. Our
squadron commander has been
here for several months, so why
was the contract unaccepted?
ANSWER: No matter how many
times we try to exlilain this
situation, it continues to be one
of our biggest problem areas. [f
a new unit commander or testing
officer is appointed, his name
and signature must, repeat,
must be submitted to National
Headquarters/EDAE on a CAP
Form 53. It may be sent
s e p a r a t e l y, w i t h a c o m p l e t e d
contract
or
other
correspondence, but it must be
sent. If the new Form 53 is not in
file, any contracts (or
examination requests or
examinations) signed by the new
appointee will be returned to the
unit. Appointment to the position
is not, by itself, enough; the
Form 53 must also be signed and
forwarded.

Florida Cadets
Hold Bivouac
TA L L A H A S S E E . F l a . - C a d e t s f r o m t h e Ta l l a h a s s e e
Composite Squadron under the
supervision of senior members
recently held a weekend bivouac
in the Marianna Caverns State
Park at Marianna. Fla.
Their activities included
search and rescue training, a
compass mission and cave
exploration.
After reveille and breakfast on
the second day, the cadets were
also taken on aft exploratory
hike.

G R A N D P R A I R I E , Te x .
Cadet Lt. Col Eddy Billman of
the Crusader Composite
Squadron has been designated a
primary nominee for the Air
Force Academy.
Cadet Billman has been with
the Crusader unit for five years
and is presently serving as their
cadet commander.
Commenting on his association
with CAP, Billman said. "I had
no plans for the future when I
joined CAP, or any real interests
or ambitions. CAP developed the
leadership potential and selfreliance that enabled me to go
into other areas."

WEISS & MAHONEY, Inc. J
i

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

~IN NEW YORK
ITOUCHDOWN

//

I
I

IAIRPORT A~p~m= ~ ~d ~,v*.
FAA Certificated A41vlnced FIGgkt Scheel
I A M I T Y V I I . L I E , k . I . . N . Y.

QUESTION: Our unit would like
to obtain a Cadet Progress Chart
to help us keep track of our
cadets. What is the correct
procedure?
ANSWER: Complete CAP Form
8, indicating Cadet Progress
Chart, and forward to National
Headquarters/DAPED.
Suggestions for posting the chart

HAPPY OCCASION -Cadet Col. Edward K.
Stanwoed recently became
the third Hawaii Wing
Cadet to earn the Gun.
Carl A. Spaatz award. He
is a member of the Kalawai Cadet Squadron and
been active in CAP for
over six years. Stauwood
became a senior member
early this year and is
presently a senior
management major at the
Rensselaer Polytechnic
I n s t i t u t e i n Tr o y. N . Y. '

are found in CAPM 50-16, Feb. 6,
1974, Ch.apter 9.
QUESTION: Last month I joined
C A P, a n d I h a v e a l r e a d y
received my first orientation
flight. On the CAP Form 77 there
is a place for my CAP serial
number. I have not yet received
a s e r i a l n u m b e r, s o s h o u l d I
enter "pending" in that space as
with contract number one?
ANSWER: No. Our suggestion is
that you hold the card until you
r e c e i v e y o u r s e r i a l n u m b e r.
Without a serial number the
information cannot be entered
on your data processing record,
and you and your squadron and
wing would lose credit for your
flight if you sent the card now.
QUESTION: I recently applied
for a CAP scholarship for next
year. On the application I listed
the college to which I had
applied at the time. Since then I
have applied to two other
universities. If I am selected to
receive the scholarship and do
not attend the school listed on
my application form. must I
forfeit the scholarship?
ANSWER: No. Upon notification
of selection for receipt of a CAP
scholarship you should send
confirmation of the name and
address of the accredited college
or university to which the
scholarship funds should be
forwarded.

Menders Assist
Airport Opening
N O R F O L K . Va .
Cadets
from the Norfolk Composite
Squadron recently assisted
officials during grand opening
ceremonies for the expanded
Norfolk Regional Airport.
They worked with the security
forces and handed out souvenirs
to those in attendance.
In addition, the cadets
performed safety functions
which included assisting
handicapped visitors.

Bitlman Is Academy Nominee
EARnART AWARDS
tFelKgary)

Cadet Biliman

WAF BERET

42 RFTH AVE. NEWYORK, N.Y.10011]

ANSWER: A cadet is required to
wear the uniform to meetings
and other official CAP functions.
The blazer combination is
encouraged for wear at CAP
social functions in lieu of the
service uniform.

QUESTION: What is the status
of the new cadet officer hat
device?
ANSWER: The device has been
reviewed and sent to the
manufacturer for production.
Delivery is expected at any
time, and when it occurs the
Bookstore catalogue number and
price will be announced in the
CAP News -- hopefully next
month.

S
;lu~.

$10.951
WRITE FOR
I
FREE 1974 CATALOG
I

QUESTION: Is a cadet required
to wear the CAP uniform, or can
he wear the blazer combination
instead?

Educational package of MOON MAPS, Facts & Figures Includes official looking certificate of ownership of a 360
acre lot of the MOON. Actual close-up map locates your
lot on the moon landscape. Each lot is numbered and your
name will be registered with your lot number. $5 value Only $2.98 while supply lasts.

LUNAR SERVICES CORPORATION
6000 Stevenson Ave. Suite 301-B
Alexandria, Virginia 22304

Sherrie L. Soustek
Robert M. Adkins
Carol A. Carroll
Clint C. Smith
Steven M. Lindemann
Kevin D, Barrett
James B. Philpitt
John P. Frontera Jr
Harry L. Greenwav Jr
Ralph C. Clark
Lonnie D. Adkins
David W. Holbronk
Cheryl D. Barnes
Ann J. Thielking
Ronald A. Wegner
Martin L. DefinhauEh
Michael S. Cowan
David M. Sladeh
Gall M. Lofdahl
Katherine E. Edge
Dianne R Mt~re
James M. Boniello
Mark A. Haddad
Dour A Dalev
Jim M. Murr~
Bruce J. Develbiss
Robert G. Bennett
Rhett A. Risher
Andres S. Gonzalez. Jr
Greg G Clasen
Kenneth M. Rhodes
Daniel A. Scharf
Merrill R. Damme
Vincent Krasinskl

01041
02036
03072
04091
05015
06022
08120
08159
08159
08425
10073
11172
12079
12175
13002
18072
18075
21017
21044
22048
28037
31228
34016
34038
34070
34197
36019
30064
42187
42195
46018
48013
51005
52068

MITCHELL AWARDS
( Febrnar y t
Michael K. Rt~teman
Chuck E. Stevenson
Charles R. Melton
Marlin J. Tars
Gregory J. Hunto~n
D P. I'insonneault
Robert D. Ruffin
Wayne M. Behrons
Stephen A. Ragnccl

01013
01016
01034
01041
02045
02064
03042
04016
04138

Gavle L. Lvman
James H. McKinnev. Jr
Jay T. Tourtel
Steve E. Tvsen
Mmhael F. Landrv
Michael J. C, arian
Gregory H Raines
Alvin R. Williams
James W. Rvan
Kevin P. Hochstedler
Scott E. Freeman
Thomas G. Shedd
Joan M. Pattlson
Daniel H. Wi[liford
Gregory W. Fowler
John D BIoemer
Thor A. Chrmtenscn
Michael R. Schraitz
J Rmhard Wood
William M. Black. IV
James F. Holdener
Raymond G. Tiedeman
Carl D. Jaeger
Michael D. Loehle
Jerrv J. Blanchard
Priscilla J. Cowan
James J. Holmes
F.J. McConnelL Jr.
Lawrence M, Stanley
Susan D. H. Wootton
Arthur G. Levesque
Chervt A. Boren
Timothy A. Price
Lee C. Harris
Michael E. Wells
Jon G. Brimacomb
Paul W. Peeples. Jr
Nils L. Hovik
William G. Bowden
Wdliam E. Quarles
Daniel A Hoeflv
Antwone M. Hunt
Peter D. Hanlon
Mark J. Broderick
Edward R Petruska
Victoria Maximciuc
Jack J. Forvsinsk;
Arthur Silverman
Sleven R. Sconfienza
Loretta M. Scarinzl

05015
Norman L. Dmgmore
05051
Randall J. Williams
05070
Sandy S. Stroud. Jr.
05099
Brian S. Shepherd
06014
Richard L. Mook
06027
Paul P. Stoikov
06054
Mark A Prudhne
07006
Michael P. Yonkers
07012
Michael W. Henslev
07016
Russell B. Brown
08133
Steven I. Waldman
08160
Ralph C. Jones
08169
John K, Weaver
09052
Richard B. Wilhemlv
09065
Glenn R Knehel
0f~66
Erik B. Jensen
Joseph R. Frankovich
10073
11011
Melanie A. Barthle
11036
Margaret S. Donlev
11172 " Lvnette R. Callahan
Kevin E. Greer
11196
11269
Dennis L. Castillo
12036 Allen R Bailey
Frank 3. Nigro
15046
16067
Michael K. Baxter
Mark S. Hathaway
16075
18003 W.T. Stephens. Jr.
18003 Dennis M. Bareer
18044 James A. Hollis
19043 Stephen D. Repp
19054 Charles R. Kopiasz
20145 Emmette T. Honiivo
20190 Lionel Q.L. Mew
20235 Raul Laracuente
20238 Dalv C. Delvalle
21034 Victor A. Nazario
22057 Wilfredo Cotes
23088 Angel F. Ve~a
24031 ' Carlos Torres
25017 Johnny Asencio
25033 John Montalvo
25033 Wanda Ramos
29086 Ramon M. Fiores
31044 Efrain lrizarrv
31044 Edna 1. Jusino
31111
Miriam Vazquez
31116
Luis Ores
31131
Aria A. Avala
31167
lvette Velez
31189
LUZ D. Ortiz

32048
32081
32111
34051
34051
34131
34131
34131
35074
36042
37040
37049
37060
37082
37089
37102
39065
40050
40050
411050
41036
42178
42187
46003
460e8
47078
48055
48112
49008
45018
5f028
51020
51030
52087
52087
52087
52087
52087
52087
$2087
52087
52087
52087
52087
52087
52087
52087
52087
52087
52087

APRIL 1974

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS
,,,

PAGE SIXTEEN

NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS
C I V I L

A I R
P A T R O L
-- USAF AUXILIARY-Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama 36112

@

AN OPEN LETTER TO ALL CIVIL AIR PATROL SENIOR MEMBERS
As a senior member of Civil ~ir Patrol you are encouraged to become a member
of the Air Force Association. Since its inception in 1946, the Air Force
Association has provided extremely valuable service in effectively advancing
the cause of aerospace power for national security The U. S. Air Force has
long recognized the values and benefits of the AFA and supports it enthusia s t i c a l l y.
C i v i l A i r P a t r o l h a s b e n e fi t e d f r o m A FA s u p p o r t o n s e v e r a l f r o n t s . E a c h y e a r,
at the National Board Meetina, the AFA honors the outstandinq cadet of the
y e a r. T h i s i s a t r i b u t e i n r e c o g n i t i o n o f t h e o u t s t a n d i n n w o r k w e d o w i t h
young people. Last September the AFA nassed General Resolution No. 22 which
places the AFA on record as a supporter of the CAP supply bill currently in
Congress. The 280 Air Force Association local chapters are encouraged to
provide assistance and even sponsorship to CAP units in their area. Ruch an
active, positive stance by the AFA deserves the SUOoort of as many senior
members as possible.
You can benefit directly from this membership. If you are now serving, or have
s e r v e d i n t h e U . S . m i l i t a r y, y o u r y e a r l y d u e s o f $ 1 0 . h O e n t i t l e y o u t o r e c e i v e
the AIR FORCE MAGAZINE, a monthly publication desiqned to increase nublic awareness, knowledge and understandino of the vital issues that are affectina the
United States and the Air Force. This excentional magazine is, in itself,
worth the $10.00 membershin. In addition, you can apply for insurance coverage
i n t h r e e ( 3 ) a r e a s : g r o u p l i f e , a c c i d e n t a n d h o s p i t a l i n d e m n i t y. E a c h n f
these programs will save you money.
I f y o u h a v e n o t s e r v e d i r t h e U . S . m i l i t a r y y o u m a y s t i l l j o i n A FA a s a P a t r o n
Member. You will still receive the AIR FORCE ~!AGAZINE to keep you up to the
minute on all important aerospace activities in the world, but, because of
federal income tax regulations, you cannot particinate in the insurance programs.
Becoming a member of the ~ir Force Association gives each of us an opportunity
to further support Civil Air Patrol through an orqanization ~.,hich is also dedicated to the advancement of aerospace nower and education for the benefit of
our country and mankind.
The membership anplication ~orm is nrovided below ~or vour)~nience.
/

Prigadier ~eneral, CAP
Chairman, National [~oard

National Comman~

l?60PenneylvonlaAvenue, N.W.

APPLICATION FOR AFA MEMBERSHIP

Wm~ngton. D.O. 20OO8
I wish to become a member of the Air Force Association and support its objective of adequate aerospace power for
national security and world peace. I certify that I am a U.$. citizen eligible for membership under one of the approved
membership categories Indicated below. Fu~tber, 1 understand that the annual membership fee of $10 Includes an annual
eubecrlptlon ($g) to AIR FORCE Magazine.

D k:tbel).ty

IZI ~D~

[] IkmMmlx.' CI llmumllmlw

[] I Msh to Im afillld~ Mlh Um
[] I vdsh ~ be a mmnber ~ br8~

FOR COMPLETION BY NON ACTIVE DUTY MEMBERS
I

NOTE: An application which does not indicate a category of membership eligibility must be processed as a request to become an AFA Paitnm

CATEGORIES OF
*
MEMBERSHIP ELIGIBILITY
(Check One)
L.J Kr~e[l~O"
LJ Air force
[] Other
[] Non-Retired but Previous Active or
Reserve Duty
D War Time (see note)
[] Peace T,me
[] Reserve Components
of the Armed Forces
[] Sl~m& Mdm or wklo~ of

BUSINESS
(Check One)
[] USAF Civilian

[] Aircraft Pilot

FI Arnold Air Society Alumnus
[] FAA , , . , r ~ . t
~ n.
t . J
v u ~ ,
w . . . , % ~
. /. - . ~. l . . . . .
[] P~esslmmI {[~. lawyer, etc.)
[

]

I

OTHER SPECIAL INTERESTS
(Chec All r opn Boxes)
k App ate

~

~

[] Ne~ Media
[] Aerospace IndmtTy
m Other Business or Industry
~ nm,r
-....

.

-

-

D

-

NOTE: War .tim|_peri~$, g
as .m Ry ..e ]u
eftS~u.s;..c,,,, ,r,
gmlllm ~fl
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(vm t} ..............
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(ww !~. ..........
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(Kerea)
6/27/60 te 7/311.

I

(Vietnuel)5/64 to presant

* in me even you . . no~ elq~mle m r AFA membershi- in one
. . . . . are . . . . . . .
.
v .
of the itemized membership catel~ries, we invite you t~ m~ome
an AFA Patron and ~cebe a subscription to .AIR F~ Ma~zMe.
The Paben ~de is $10 ~r one year, $24 for one ]men.
-

.

|

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