File #319: "Cadet Summer Activities 1965.pdf"

Cadet Summer Activities 1965.pdf

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CADET
SUMMER
ACTIVITIES

This booklet has been prepared by National Headquarters, Civil Air Patrol, to provide CAP units with a
d o c u m e n t r e fl e c t i n g t h e w i d e - r a n g i n g o p p o r t u n i t y a ff o r d e d
each cadet through the Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program
to enrich their knowledge and grasp of the Aerospace Age.

Col Joe L. Mason, USAF
National Commander, Civil Air Patrol

Col Paul W. Turner, CAP
Chairman, National Board
Civil Air Patrol
(Now National Controller)

Col Lyle W. Castle, CAP
Vice-Chairman, National Board
Civil Air Patrol
(Now Nationa| Chah'man)

C i v i l A i r P a t r o l w a s c r e a t e d o n e w e e k b e f o r e P e a r l H a r b o r. A n E x e c u t i v e
Order on December It 1941, marked the beginning of a volunteer civilian organization
of pilots and aviation enthusiasts that has endured for nearly two and a half decades.
I n 1 9 3 9 , G i l l R o b b W i l s o n , n a t i o n a l l y e m i n e n t a v i a t i o n a u t h o r i t y, a p p r o a c h e d
Governor Charles Edison of New Jersey with a plan for Civil Air Defense Services.
The CADS of New Jersey became the model for Civil Air Patrol. Mr Wilson,
T h o m a s H . B e c k a n d G u y P. G a n n e t t a r e c r e d i t e d w i t h f o u n d i n g C A P.
Lt Gen Henry H. Arnold appointed a board consisting of Brig Gen George E.
S t r a t e m e y e r, c h a i r m a n , C o l H a r r y H . B l e e , M a j A . B . M c M u l l e n a n d L u c i u s P.
Ordway to study the proposal. The findings of the board were favorable and on
December I, 1941, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, Director of Civil Defense, signed the
o r d e r c r e a t i n g C A P a n d d e s i g n a t e d M a j G e n J o h n F. C u r r y a s C A P ~ s fi r s t N a t i o n a l
Commander.
Three coastal patrol bases were established on the Atlantic coast and equipped
with light planes donated by their owners. During these operations which ended on
A u g u s t 3 1 , 1 9 4 3 , C A P p i l o t s fl e w m o r e t h a n 2 4 , 0 0 0 , 0 0 0 m i l e s o v e r w a t e r. C A P i s
credited with sinking or damaging two enemy submarines. CAP aircraft flew nearly
87,000 missions, reported 91 vessels in distress, located 363 survivors of sea
d i s a s t e r s a n d d r o p p e d 8 2 b o m b s a g a i n s t e n e m y s h i p s . Tw e n t y - s i x C i v i l A i r P a t r o l
members lost their lives during coastal patrols, a total of 64 members gave their
l i v e s d u r i n g t h e w a r.
P u b l i c L a w 4 7 6 o f the 79th Congress incorporated Civil Air Patrol on July I,
1946 and in May 1948 the 80th Congress made CAP an official civilian auxiliary
of the U. S. Air Force.
The cadet program was initiated in 1942 and was a valuable source of aviation
c a d e t s f o r t h e A r m y A i r F o r c e . T h a t s a m e y e a r, t h e F C C a u t h o r i z e d a C A P c o m m u n i cations network which has since expanded into nearly 15,000 stations.
T h e C A P c a d e t p r o g r a m o ff e r s b o y s a n d g i r l s , a g e s 1 3 t h r o u g h 1 7 , a l i f e t h a t i s
exciting, rewarding and meaningful. It develops youth interest in aerospace and
aviation; it teaches the rudiments of flying through academic instruction in aerod y n a m i c s a n d o p e n s t h e d o o r t o s t u d e n t p i l o t s t a t u s . C i v i l A i r P a t r o l o ff e r s s c h o l a r ships in such areas as engineering, languages, airport management, physics,
aeronautics and aerospace medicine. Study grants are also available to youth not
planning to attend a 4-year college or university course. Every cadet is eligible to
complete for these honors.
Each cadet must attend an encampment before he or she can qualify for the
B i l l y M i t c h e l l Aw a r d w h i c h i n t u r n o p e n s t h e d o o r t o t h e m a n y h o n o r a c t i v i t i e s s u c h
as selection for one of those depicted in the following pages.

Cadet Summer Flying Encampment

Col Joe L. Mason, USAF, National Commander
signs contract for summer flying encampment.
Witnessed by Schweizer brothers.

First flight in sailplane.

The summer of 1965 marked the beginning of a new era for Civil Air Patrol
c a d e t s . A c a d e t fl y i n g e n c a m p m e n t w a s i n a u g u r a t e d a t E l m i r a , N e w Yo r k . T h r e e
courses, powered flight, glider pilot and soaring orientation, comprised the new
program. The Schweizer Corporation and the Harris Hill facilities were hosts for
the glider phase while the Elmira Aeronautical Corporation at Chemung County Airport
provided powered flight training. A total of 92 cadets attended the three courses.

Ground school is part of it.

A bird poised for flight.
4

Cadet Summer Flying Encampment

Hooking up for aero tow.

Expert instruction is a must.

Most cadets who successfully completed the Private Glider Pilot course were
awarded a private glider pilot license. In many instances the cadet was qualified
f o r t h e i n t e r n a t i o n a l l y r e c o g n i z e d F e d e r a t i o n A e r o n a u t i q u e I n t e r n a t i o n a l e ( FA I )
The FAI is represented in the United States by the Soaring Society
"C" award.
o f A m e r i c a . The soaring course consisted of a minimum of nine hours flying time
a n d a t l e a s t 3 5 fl i g h t s b y a e r o t o w. T h e c o u r s e l a s t e d t w o w e e k s . A t o t a l o f 1 6
cadets participated in this course.

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C I V I L A I R PAT R O L
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Typical cadet billets.

Harris Hill flight line.

Cadet Summer Flying Encampment

Start of aero tow.

Ready for solo attempt.

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Almost airborne.

Airborne.

OK for release.

Free as a bird!

Cadet Summer Flying Encampment

Col Mason discusses powered flight.

Boning up on navigation.

The powered flight course, conducted at Chemung County Airport under the
direction of the Elmira AeronautiCal Corporation, prepared the participating cadets
for private pilot licenses in accordance with the requirements set forth by the
F e d e r a l A v i a t i o n A g e n c y ( FA A ) . E a c h s t u d e n t r e c e i v e d a t o t a l o f 4 0 h o u r s fl y i n g
time--25 hours dual and 15 hours solo. Before receiving his license each student
m a d e a n a d d i t i o n a l 1 - 1 / 2 h o u r fl i g h t c h e c k w i t h a n FA A e x a m i n e r. I n a d d i t i o n
to the flying training, all students received approximately 10 hours ground school
training.

First instruction flight.

First time in the left seat.

Cadet Summer Flying Encampment

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Col Paul W. Turner, CAP, congratulates cadet
on receiving solo wings.

(Right) Oscar Bakke, NE Region Director,
FA A , a w a r d s s o l o w i n g s t o c a d e t . C o l S . H .

du Pont, CAP Encampment Commander, looks
on.

(Below) FAA inspector is briefed prior to
check-flight take-off.

A skull session.

International Air Cadet Exchange

In 1947 the Air Cadet League of Canada proposed the International Air Cadet
Exchange. The purpose, then as now, was to foster international understanding, good
will and fellowship among the youth of the free world. In the beginning the Exchange
w a s l i m i t e d t o a t o u r o f t h e U . S . a n d C a n a d a . To u r p e r s o n n e l c o n s i s t e d o f t w o U S
escorts and 24 cadets to Canada and a similar number of Canadians to the US--a total
of 52 participants. In 1965 a total of 349 cadets and escorts participated in the
program. During the past 18 years a total of 2,043 CAP cadets and 552 CAP and
USAF escort officers have taken part in the IACE. Visiting cadetshave
numbered 2,022 with 523 escorts. The grand total for the 18 years is 5,140 participants. Every state in the Union, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, have
hosted visiting cadets at least once. Thirty-one foreign countries have taken part
i n t h e I A C E , t h o u g h 2 2 w a s t h e l a r g e s t n u m b e r p a r t i c i p a t i n g i n a n y o n e y e a r. A c t i v e
participants have been: Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Costa
R i c a , C u b a , D e n m a r k , E c u a d o r, E l S a l v a d o r, F r a n c e , G e r m a n y, G r e a t B r i t a i n ,
G r e e c e , G u a t e m a l a , I s r a e l , I t a l y, J a m a i c a , L u x e m b u r g , M e x i c o , N e t h e r l a n d s , N o r w a y,
P e r u , P o r t u g a l , S p a i n , S w e d e n , S w i t z e r l a n d , T u r k e y, U r a g u a y a n d Ve n e z u e l a .

Visiting Cadets in New York

PATROL
EXCHANGE

C a d e t s f r o m C e n t r a l a n d S o u t h A m e r i c a n c o u n t r i e s a r r i v e d i n N e w Yo r k a
w e e k e a r l y i n ~ 6 5 a n d w e r e h o s t e d b y N e w Yo r k W i n g u n t i l r e a d y t o d e p a r t f o r
host wings... American cadets were processed for overseas in Washington,
DC . . . flown to Rhein/Main AB, Frankfurt, Germany o . . met European cadets
. . . a l l w e r e h o s t e d a t d i n n e r b y b a s e c o m m a n d e r. . . M AT S j e t s fl e w v i s i t o r s t o N e w Yo r k . . . s p a r k l i n g r o u n d o f e n t e r t a i n m e n t b y N Y W i n g , C A P, t h e n
off to host wings. American cadets meanwhile were hosted by 16 European and
Near East nations and 5 Central and South American countries. During continental tour American cadets visited many areas where history was born, were
treated to sailplane flights, greeted by heads of state and welcomed into the homes
of many world famous leaders and statesmen.

The Les Crane TV show in New York.

Peps i?

Visiting Cadets in New York

Col R. R. Johnston, USAF, NER LO, and Col
Jess Strauss, CAP, Commander of the New York
Wing.

Bishop Joseph Flannery, Administrator of St.
Patricks Cathedral, greets Costa Rican cadet.
National Chaplain Hickey in center.

The 175 visitors, cadets and escorts, were billeted at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel
w h i l e i n N Y. T h e y h e l p e d c h a n g e t h e n a m e o f T i m e s S q u a r e t o F o r e i g n E x c h a n g e S q .
They were guests of Pepsi Cola Internationalfor a boat ride around Manhattan. They
v i s i t e d t h e U n i t e d N a t i o n s b u i l d i n g s a n d w e r e g u e s t s o f L t C o l G e n e L e o n e , C A P, f o r
a n e x c i t i n g d a y a t t h e N e w Yo r k W o r l d ' s F a i r .

An important part of any visit.

A CAP interpreter described the sights of
Manhattan.

Reception and Ball for Visiting Cadets in New York

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Ready for the ball at the Waldorf-Astoria.

Cols Lyons, Johnston, and Strauss form receiving line.

At the ball.

Visiting Cadets at World's Fair-New York

New York World's Fair.

Visit to FAA and Mercedes-Benz for Escorts

In Washington the visiting cadets were
g u e s t s o f t h e FA A a n d t o u r e d t h o s e
facilities.
Mercedes-Benz of North America,
Inc. hosted escort officers at a reception
where they had the opportunity to meet
many important figures in the US government. The cadets, meanwhile, were on
sightseeing tours of Washington, attending theaters or shopping for souvenirs
and mementos of their visit to the
National Capitol.

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Pan-American Reception and Dinner in Washington, D.C.

Pan American World Airways is a perennial host to the visiting cadets. This
year Pan Am invited their young guests to dinner at the famous Statler Hilton Hotel
in Washington. Among the many notables attending the function were: Vice- President
H° H. Humphrey and his military attache, Col Don Peffel, USAF; John A. Lang,
A d m i n i s t r a t i v e A s s i s t a n t t o t h e S e c r e t a r y o f t h e A i r F o r c e ; G e n L . S . K u t e r, U S A F
Ret.; Vice- President of Pan Am; Sen D. K. Inouye, (D-Hawaii) ; Rep L. L. Wolff (D-NY) ;
M a j G e n C . P. L o w, U S A F, a s s t c h i e f o f s t a f f f o r r e s e r v e f o r c e s ; a n d m a n y o t h e r s .

Senator Daniel K. Inouye (D.Hawaii) was principle speaker.

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Trude Feldman, White House correspondent,
interviews Israeli cadets.

A welcome to the Pan-Am dinner by Gen I.. S.
Kuter, USAF, Ret.

Military Ball at Boiling AFB, Washington, D. C.

Present and past National Commanders of CAP:
Brig Gen Stephen D. McEIroy, Col Joe L. Mason,
a n d C o l P a u l C . A s h w o r t h , U S A F, R e t .
Guys and gals.

The military ball at the Bolling AFB Officers Club is one of the highlights of
the annual exchange. Two elements of the Air Force Band, the Strolling Strings and
the Airmen of Note, provided the entertainment.

The romance of the Strolling Strings.

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. . and then we went into a steep turn . . .'~

Close of Festivities in Washington, D. C..

Col Mason discusses the lACE.

A visit to the White House was part of the trip.

The ball marked the close of the 18th International Air Cadet Exchange. The
visiting cadets boarded jet aircraft for the return to Rhein/Main Air Base where
they again met the Civil Air Patrol cadets who were on their way back to the States.
International youth had once more proven the value of learning first-hand the way of
life of the people of many lands.

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CAP's leaders chat with Mr. John Lang of the
office of the Secretary of the Air Force.

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Many countries were represented.

Vice President Humphrey Visits Cadets

A special citation.

Greeting cadets.

Vice President Hubert H.
Autographing.
H u m p h r y, a n o l d f r i e n d o f C i v i l
Air Patrol, was generous with
his time in visiting with the foreign cadets. He greeted
t h e m o n t h e s t e p s o f t h e C a p i t o l , s i g n e d a u t o g r a p h s a n d S p e a k e r.
talked with many on an individual basis. The Vice-President
w a s a l s o p r e s e n t a t t h e P a n A m e r i c a n W o r l d A i r w a y s r e c e p t i o n a n d d i n n e r. O n
this occasion he addressed the group by reading a message from President Johnson
and added, "... this brief sharing in the family life of your hosts has been a
mutually rewarding experience.~ As a gesture of remembrance he gave souvenir
pens to all the visiting cadets.

Visiting Cadets in Host CAP Wings

After a gala round of entertainment
and sightseeing, the visiting cadets
boarded aircraft which took them to their
h o s t s t a t e s . Tw e n t y - o n e w i n g s p a r t i c i pated in the 1965 program with cadets
spending nearly two weeks with the
families of CAP members in the following
states.
Norwegians welcomed to Oregon.

Turkish cadets guests of Connecticut.

A u s t r i a . . . . Virginia
B e l g i u m . . . . Arkansas
C a n a d a . . . . Georgia
C h i l e . . . . Wyoming
Costa Rica . o . Utah
D e n m a r k . . . . Indiana
E c u a d o r . . . . Nebraska
El Salvador . . . Wisconsin
F r a n c e . . . . Kansas
G e r m a n y . . . . Montana
Great Britain ° . Florida
I s r a e l . . . . Illinois
J a m a i c a . . . . California
Netherlands... Delaware
l ~ o r w a y . . . . Oregon
P e r u
. . . .
Maryland
P o r t u g a l . . . . Washington
S p a i n . . . .
Michigan
S w e d e n . . . . Ohio
Switzerland... Pennsylvania
Turkey .... Connecticut

Meanwhile Civil Air Patrol cadets
were visiting in the 21 participating
countries.

El Dorado, Arkansas, hosts the Belgians.

Visiting Cadets in United States

Costa Ricans in American Fork, Utah.

Wisconsin entertains El Salvadorans.

French cadets visit the Lear plant in Kansas.

Visiting Cadets in United States

In their visit to the various states,
cadets live and experience a typical
American family life routine. They tour
the shrines and civic, business and
industrial interest points, but their
schedule also affords them time for a
sampling of "home" life as American
youth live it in their family circle.

Peruvian delegation in Maryland.

T~en dances and weiner roasts,
picnics and hayrides, rodeos, county
fairs and church youth socials are events
always programmed to afford the International visitors a representative crosssection of American living.

German cadets visit Helena, Montana.

Netherlanders in Delaware.

Visiting Cadets in United States

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Israelis in Illinois.

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A visit to the low countries.

Dalles City, Oregon, Mayor welcomes
Norwegians.

Visiting Cadets in United States

United Kingdom cadets in Florida.

The Swiss are greeted by Pennsylvanians.

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El Salvador cadets enjoyed their visit to
Wisconsin.

Visiting Cadets in United States

The Kansas Wing hosted the French.

Jamaican cadets were guests of the
California Wing.

Visiting Cadets in United States

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The Belgians visited the World's Fair.

While the visitors from Sweden toured Ohio.

And the Chilean cadets went to Wyoming.

Visiting Cadets in United States

/ /
Ecuador cadets visit SAC Headquarters, Heb.

A Connecticut yacht club hosts Turkish
visitors.

El Salvador cadets present certificate of
Danish cadets in Indiana.

appreciation during visit to Wisconsin.

Visiting Cadets in United States

Swedish visitors inspect model of aircraft
carrier in Ohio.

Israelis visit radar control in Illinois.

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Michigan welcomes Spaniards.

Ecuadorans pose in front of missile at SAC
Headquarters in Omaha, Nebraska.

American Cadets Abroad

American cadets tour Brussells, Belgium.

Canada hosted fifteen CAP cadets.

On a lake shore in Israel.

American Cadets Abroad

At the Inonu Gliding Camp in Turkey.

The Spitzberg Gliding School in Austria.

CAP cadets welcomed to Peru with a reception in the home of Col and Mrs James Harris, USAF.

Ecuador also was host to the CAP Visitors.

Jet Orientation Course, Perrin AFB, Texas

The flight line training normally
includes three flights in a jet trainer
for a total of about five hours flying
time. Adverse weather and other factors
may cause a reduction in the number
of flights or time flown. Each flight
is preceded by a briefing and followed
by a critique, each about one hour in
duration. Cadets spend an hour in the
synthetic trainer reviewing the principles
of instrument flying and radio/telephone
procedures.
A ride in a TF-102 is the award given the
outstanding cadet. Pilot is the USAF project
o f fi c e r, C a p t J . G . M e r r y, U S A F.

The Jet Orientation Course is an
annual one-week program for outstanding
male cadets. It is planned and conducted
by the 4780th Air Defense Wing, Air
D e f e n s e C o m m a n d , P e r r i n A F B , Te x a s .
The purpose of the course is to provide
orientation in the basic elements of jet
aviation and to stimulate interest in
the USAF as a career.
The course was developed specifically
for CAP cadets and consists of some
16 hours of academic instruction and
approximately 18 hours training on the
flight line. Both phases are taught by
full-time USAF instructors from the
host base training group. The academic
phase includes study of the various
major components of the jet trainer being
used by the host base in its training
of USAF air crew members, engineering
peculiar to it, its emergency egress
s y s t e m s , w e a t h e r, fl i g h t i n s t r u m e n t s ,
navigation aids and instrument approaches, flight planning, air doctrine, flying
safety, physiological training and a briefing on the USAF Academy and the College
Air Force Officer training program.

A "ride" in the altitude chamber°

Vertigo check in the spinning chair.

Jet Orientation Course

Pre-flight check.

AF Father and CAP son.
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last minute briefing.

Para-sail demonstration.

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C A P s t a f f e r s w i t h U S A F p r o j e c t o f fi c e r.

Outstanding cadet on Dorothy Cox Show.

Jet Orientation Course

Bar-B-Q at base recreation area~

Academics.

The Jet Orientation Course was first conducted
a t Ty n d a l l A F B , F l o r i d a , i n 1 9 5 5 w i t h a c l a s s o f
16 cadets. In 1956 it was expanded to its present
size of one cadet from each wing (52) and moved
t o P e r r i n A F B , Te x a s , w h e r e i t h a s b e e n h e l d e v e r y
year since.

High point of the course.

Cockpit inspection.

Aerospace Age Orientation Course, Maxwell AFB, Alabama

The AAOC is an annual one-week program for outstanding female cadets and
i s t h e o n l y n a t i o n a l o r i e n t a t i o n c o u r s e f o r w h i c h f e m a l e c a d e t s m a y q u a l i f y. I t
i s p l a n n e d a n d c o n d u c t e d b y t h e A i r U n i v e r s i t y, U S A F, M a x w e l l A F B , A l a b a m a ,
a n d i s s u p e r v i s e d b y WA F p e r s o n n e l . W h i l e a t t e n d i n g t h e c o u r s e , t h e c a d e t s
m e t G o v e r n o r Wa l l a c e ( a b o v e ) m e t w i t h a n A l l i e d O f fi c e r s P a n e l ( b e l o w l e f t ) ,
and enjoyed the friendly atmosphere of a hot dog party (below right). The primary purpose of the course is to provide information on career opportunities
f o r w o m e n i n t h e U S A F a n d i n a v i a t i o n a n d t o d e v e l o p k n o w l e d g e o f t h e U S A F.

Aerospace Age Orientation Course

Discussing the '65 program.

In Air University's Hall of Fame.

The AAOC content varies some depending on the availability of equipment,
facilities, etc., but generally briefings consist of: Women in the Air Force, the
M a j o r A i r C o m m a n d s , N u c l e a r We a p o n s e ff e c t s a n d t h e U S S p a c e P r o g r a m . Vi s i t s
are made to the Medical Service School at Gunter AFB and other points of interest
in the Montgomery area. Certificates of Completion are awarded by the Air University
at the end of the course.

Inspecting a moulage after a crash
demonstration.

ZZZzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

Space Age Orientation Course, Chanute AFB, Illinois

The Space Age Orientation Course is
also a one-week course for male cadets.
It is conducted under the supervision of
t h e C h a n u t e Te c h n i c a l Tr a i n i n g C e n t e r,
Chanute AFB, Illinois. It is designed to
further the aerospace education of the
cadets and to motivate them toward
careers in aerospace and allied sciences.
This course, developed specifically
for Civil Air Patrol cadets by the Air
Training Command, consists of 40 hours
of briefings, tours and training films
presented by USAF personnel from the
Tr a i n i n g C e n t e r.

At a Minuteman control panel.

While the course may vary from year
t o y e a r, t y p i c a l s u b j e c t s i n c l u d e m i s s i l e
familiarization, Air Force designators,
purpose and uses of missile systems,
missile propellent safety and cryogenic
production, nonballistic weapon systems,
ballistic weapon s y s t e m s, propellent
t r a n s f e r s y s t e m s , Ve r n i e r e n g i n e fi r i n g ,
an introduction to space, a space systems
orientation and future concepts of aerospace doctrine.
At the conclusion of the course a
graduation ceremony is held during which
the cadets are awarded Certificates of
Completion by the Air Training
Command.

Inspecting the Minuteman.

Missile transfer site.

Federal Aviation Agency Cadet Orientation Program
T h e FA A C O P i s p l a n n e d a n d c o n d u c t e d b y t h e FA A A c a d e m y a t W i l l R o g e r s
F i e l d , O k l a h o m a C i t y, O k l a h o m a , a n d l a s t s f o r o n e w e e k . T h e p u r p o s e o f t h e
program is to acquaint the cadets with the history and organization of F A A
and to develop an understanding of the functions and responsibilities of its var i o u s u n i t s . I t a l s o p r o v i d e s i n f o r m a t i o n o n c a r e e r o p p o r t u n i t i e s i n FA A . T h e
program consists of briefings, demonstrations and tours that are conducted by
e a c h o f t h e t h r e e t r a i n i n g d i v i s i o n s o f t h e A c a d e m y. B r i e fi n g s a r e p r e s e n t e d
c o n c e r n i n g e n r o u t e a n d t e r m i n a l t r a f fi c c o n t r o l , FA A r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s i n t h e a r e a
of engineering and manufacturing, responsibilities of aircraft maintenance ins p e c t o r s a n d t h e FA A i n s p e c t o r s j o b i n a i r c a r r i e r a n d g e n e r a l a i r c r a f t o p e r a t i o n s .
D e m o n s t r a t i o n s a r e g i v e n i n t h e u s e o f A D I S , I L S , TA C A N a n d r a d a r e q u i p ment.
Visits are made to the Flight Service Station. Cadets also view F A A
training films. Program was inaugurated in 1961 at request of National Headquarters.

Radar Central.

Traffic Control Training laboratory°

The synthetic trainer scope.

Certificates of Completion.

Summer Encampments

Model Encampment Cadet.

The purpose of the summer encampments for cadets is to provide them with an
opportunity to gain a working knowledge of the operation of an Air Force base and
to live in an atmosphere associated with military life by making available to them
quarters, food service, medical and recreational facilities normally provided Air
Force personnel. The encampments also demonstrate the common relationship
between vocational training as taught and practiced in the Air Force and those trades
peculiar to the aviation industry in civilian life.

Summer Encampments

New Jersey staff at Dover AFB, Delaware.

Ready for departure for Malmstrom AFB,
Montana, from Mountain Home, Idaho.

In 1965, 51 CAP wings attended 42 encampments at 33 Air Force bases. 6,571
cadets, supervised by 798 seniors attended encampments in 1965.

'

Inspection of Wyoming.Colorado Wings at
lowry AFB, Colorado.

~11

u

i

The Tennessee Wing went to Sewart AFB, Tenn.

Summer Encampments

Personal equipment section during the NY
wing encampment at Griffiss AFB, NY.

Uniform check of a Florida cadet at the
Tyndall AFB encampment.

S i n c e 1 9 5 4 , 9 2 , 4 11 C i v i l A i r P a t r o l c a d e t s h a v e a t t e n d e d e n c a m p m e n t s g e n e r a l l y
under the auspices of Air Force bases. In addition to the regular encampments,
inter-regional exchanges between girl cadets have been a regular activity for the
past several years.

m

The Minnesota Wing checks in at Scott AFB,
Illinois.

Morning report at Scott AFB, III.

Summer Encampments