File #1269: "CAPP 25 - Morse Code - June 1961.pdf"

CAPP 25 - Morse Code - June 1961.pdf

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CAPP 25
C I V I L A I R PAT R O L PA M P H L E T

JUNE 1961

LEARNING THE

INTERNATIONAL

MORSE CODE

L E A R N I N G T H E I N T E R N AT I O N A L M O R S E C O D E

Learning the International Morse Code can be a lot of fun, and it's really easy if
you approach it properly - that is, to think of it entirely in terms of sound. If you
think of "dots and dashes," you're in for trouble~ So go about it this way: When
you see a ‘”-“ in the chart on the next page, call it a "dit" - say it to yourself and
make it sharply and staccato. When you see a “—,” call it a "dahh" - accent it
slightly and draw it out a bit, as "daahhh." So the letter "A" would be pronounced
"dit-dahh" - or, to make it sound more like the actual code letter when you hear it
on the air, "didaahh." It should have the same accent and swing as "today,"
making the "to" very short and accenting ,'day." When speaking other letters,
remember to keep the "dit" short, the ",dahh" longer and accented.
Yes, we said speaking - every time you see the code equivalent for a letter say it
to yourself, and don't try to memorize a picture of it as printed.
Practice saying strings of dits - dididididididi . . . etc.; it should sound like a blast
from a machine gun. Then practice saying strings of dahhs they should be long
and smooth, with as short a space between them as your tongue can make.

The alphabet, numerals and punctuation marks are shown in this chart.
Learn the letters in some random order such as E, T, A, R, I, S,N, M, G, H, D, L,
U, V, B, C' F, and then on to the remainder. By such a system you will soon be
able to make up short words and even sentences out of the early letters, such as
tare, start, rate, snore, etc.; practice saying these to yourself in didah language.
As you progress, concentrate on the "harder" letters like Q, Z, J, etc., and then
practice with the numerals and punctuation marks~ Do not use the code chart for
long study; pick out a few letters and learn them, and then lay this booklet away
while you practice saying the sounds to yourself. Or, hand the book to a friend so
he or she can name some of the letters and check on your answers.
When you are ready, go back to the chart to learn a couple more letters; again,
lay the booklet away while you practice saying the new ones, mixing in plenty of
the already-learned characters so you won't forget them.
Don't hurry to read all the letters too soon. What you are doing is learning a type
of mental coordination; and practice with only 8 or 10 letters is just as good from
that standpoint as practice with all 26.
A very good way to develop code ability is for two people to learn the
c o d e t o g e t h e r. S p e a k l e t t e r s t o e a c h o t h e r, o r s i m u l a t e c o d e b y w h i s t l i n g
or hissing through your teeth. Send single words as soon as you know
enough letters, while the other fellow writes down your "message."

Code practice equipment may be built locally or purchased from~a radio parts
distributor. Additional helps on studying code are contained in '"Learning the
Radiotelegraph Code," which you may obtain by sending 50 cents to the American
Radio Relay League, West Hartford, Connecticut.

INTERNATIONAL MORSE CODE

PRACTICE DEVICES
A c i r c u i t f o r a b u z z e r c o d e p r a c t i c e s e t i s s h o w n b e l o w. T h e
size of the condenser determines the strength of the signal in
the headphones. Should the .001 microfarad unit shown give
too loud a signal, it may be reduced to 500 or even 250 micromicrofarads.

To

Phones

Two Dry Cells in
series connected

here

Buzzer

The above technique requires someone to send well-formed
characters. A better solution for receive-only:learning would
be to obtain phonograph records for beginners in code. These,
too, may be purchased from radio equipment and parts companies.