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CAP Historical Monograph Number 1 1984.pdf

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Civil Air Patrol
Historical Monograph
NUMBER ONE

1984

DUCK CLUB

NATIONAL HISTORICAL COMMITTEE
Headquarters CAP

C I V I L A I R PAT R O L

i"*

i.

DUCK CLUB EMBLEM

DUCK CLUB

A N I N - D E P T H S T U D Y O F C I V I L A I R PAT R O L ' S
DUCK CLUB MEMBERSHIP

COLONEL LESTER E. HOPPER, CAP

CAP N AT I O N A L H I S TO R I C A L C O M M I T T E E M O N O G R A P H S E R I E S

NUMBER ONE

1984

PREFACE

Survival is one of man's strongest instincts. When the need for
survival is the direct result of individuals voluntarily exposing themselves to situations where survival is paramount we encounter uncommon valor. It is in this light that the author
~dertakes this means of paying special tribute to those who
vQlunteered to place their personal safety in jeopardy in order
to serve their country in time of its need.

Insofar as practical after forty years the compilation is complete. Any omissions are purely the result of the author's
limited ability to be complete. On some individuals selected
i~formation is not available. Therefore, apologies are in order
in the event that someone has been overlooked, or that some data
J s not included. The important thing is that over a hundred of
these, true patriots have been identified and several of their
~tories told in some detail.

L. E. Hopper
COL
CAP
National Historian
March 1984

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Primary credit for much of the unglamorous portion of this
work justifiably goes to fellow CAPer G. Jude Miller of
Lafayette, Louisiana. Miller's contribution has been in the
taki~%g of many lists of names, rank, serial numbers, bases
and the like and organizing in the manner presented so that
they are more useable. A product of the current technically
proficient generation he programmed his personal computer in
such a manner as to afford various analysis. Without his
help this work would not have been possible.

Special thanks are certainly due to fellow members of the Civil
Air Patrol's National Historical Committee, as well as those
individuals who have personally recounted their story to the
author.

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

Chapter
U n c o m m o n Va l o r
The Duck Club
Duck Club Membership List
Active Duty Base of Members
Home State of Members
Footnotes

1

CHAPTER 1

UNCOMMON VALOR

All who have flown single engine land based aircraft are well
acquainted with the phenomenon of a normally smooth running
exlgine appearing to begin running rough when flown over open
mater. Add to this the relative unreliability of aircraft
power plants of the late 1930's and early 1940's and throw in
maintenance under, many times, primative conditions by less than
fully trained civilian volunteers. Only now can some small
appreciation begin to develop as regards the thoughts that must
have been in mind of the aircrews who flew Civil Air Patrol's
Coastal Patrol Operations between March 5, 1942 and August 31,
1 9 4 3 . To fl y u n d e r t h e s e c o n d i t i o n s o n a n i n f r e q u e n t b a s i s
% , o u l d b e i n i t s e l f a n a c t o f h e r o i s m . To d o i t a l m o s t d a i l y f o r
17 months certainly constitutes uncommon valor on the part of
these civilian flyers who rushed to the aid of their country in
its time of great need.

The fact that they flew 86,6851 missions for a total of 244,6002
hours is well documented. In the course of this operation, 903
aircraft were lost resulting in 264 fatalities and 75 serious injuries were sustained. Of the 90 aircraft it is estimated that 746
were lost at sea involving 1497 aircrew men. These statistics reveal that 123 aircrew men survived the harrowing experience of a
forced landing at sea. Most all continued their flight activities

In at least the three8 cases of Lieutenants H. A. Coller, L. J.
DiCarlo and R. L. Wagstaff some survived a second time.

P~obably not the first of these survivors, but certainly numbered
~Long the earliest are9: First Lieutenants J. R. Schlager, C. L.
Savage and J. L. Fletcher. In the first week of June 1942 while
flying routine patrol from CAP Coastal Patrol Base Number 4 at
P ~ r k s l e y, Vi r g i n i a , P i l o t S c h l a g e r ' s p e r s o n a l l y o w n e d F a i r c h i l d
had an engine failure due to vapor lock and was ditched at sea.
After two hours of flight the aircraft's left tank was completely
d~y and the right tank refused to flow. Thus a hard earned lesson
was learned. In the future, pilots would be required to fly from
a l t e r n a t i n g t a n k s r a t h e r t h a n f r o m b o t h t a n k s s i m u l t a n e o u s l y.
Another lesson learned was one of minimizing exposure. Rules were
shortly issued prohibiting the inclusion of student observers such
as Lieutenant Fletcher as aircrew members on actual missions.
F o r t u n a t e l y, a l l t h r e e w e r e r e s c u e d w i t h i n a n h o u r a n d a h a l f .

"On July 21, 1942 at approximately 16:50 while on regular Patrol
Mission at position latitude 3806 - longitude 7455 in a Warner
Fairchild NC19144 with Lt. Charles Shelfus as observer we crashed
at sea. On regaining consciousness in the water I found the ship
had sunk and I could not find Lt. Shelfus".10 What is not told by
t h e w r i t e r , L i e u t e n a n t H e n r y T. C r o s s , i s t h a t h e h a d s u f f e r e d
several fractured vertebrae and that his rescue would in itself result in a heroic effort by others. Within 55 minutes Rehoboth,
Delaware Base 2's Sikorsky Amphibian arrived on the scene. Crewed
by Base Commander, Major Hugh R. Sharp, Jr. and Lieutenant Edmond

Edwards this venerable old aircraft encountered difficulty in
its landing in 8 to i0 foot swells. Due to a rough landing,
the Sikorsky's left pontoon was damaged and begin to fill with
water. What followed is best described by Major Sharp.

"After landing was unable to locate survivor for several minutes
on account of rough sea. Finally sighted Pilot Cross at several
hundred yards distance while he and Amphibian were on crests of
wa~es. Encountered some difficulty in making the downwind turns
tc reach the victim, but this was finally accomplished, and a first
attempt was made to taxi the ship up to victim. On this first
attempt, however, we misjudged the strength of the wind and were
blown away from the victim before we were able to grasp him. On
s e c o n d t r y, h o w e v e r, w e w e r e s u c c e s s f u l i n g r a b b i n g a h o l d o f t h e
victim who was unable to hold on to the rope which was thrown to
h i m b e c a u s e o f h i s i n j u r y. T h e o b s e r v e r, L t . E d w a r d s , h o w e v e r,
lifted Pilot Cross from the water and helped him into the ship,
which was no easy task because of the rough water and the violent
pitching of the Amphibian".II

~'Remained in water at location searching for Observer Shelfus until 18:20. There being no signs of Shelfus and with Cross in
serious condition, it was deemed wise to get to shore as soon as
possible. As the sea was too rough for takeoff, we started taxiing on westerly course at 18:20. At approximately 18:25 port wing
float sank. Observer Edwards went out to starboard bomb rack for
balance, where he stayed uncomplainingly until the ship was beached
at Chincoteague at about 01:30 the following morning. This was no

easy task for Observer Edwards for he had stripped off almost all
of his clothing in order to give them to Pilot Cross. At intervals
all during the night, he was completely immersed in the sea during
which waves flowed over the starboard wing float to which the bomb
rack was attached, and to say the least, he was far from comfortable
from cold after the sun went down".12

"Laid course for coastal buoy No. 3 planning to tie up to it for
the night, not having sufficient gas to taxi to Chincoteague, the
n e a r e s t h a r b o r. B y t i e i n g t o t h e b u o y, o u r p o s i t i o n c o u l d b e r e ported by radio so that fast Coast Guard boat could rush Cross to
shore for medical aid".13

" O n a p p r o a c h i n g N o . 3 b u o y, w e w e r e m e t b y C o a s t G u a r d p i c k e t b o a t " . 1 4

"Condition of sea made transfer of Cross unwise" 15

"Seaplane was taken in tow by picket boat at 19:50 and towed to
Ch[ncoteague, arriving about 23:45".16

Uncommon valor? Certainly on the part of Lieutenant Cross for exposing himself, but even more so for Major Sharp and Lieutenant
Edwards for their heroic rescue. Sharp and Edwards were later
awarded CAP's Blue Merit Emblem and the Air Medal from the hands
of President Roosevelt at a White House ceremony in February of
1943. Roosevelt's comments to Sharp that this was the first time
that he had awarded this medal is fitting tribute in itself.17
Certainly it was the first such award to civilians for service

with the armed forces. These two were not the last in that an
additional 824 Air Medals18 were awarded to other Coastal Patrolmen by a grateful country in mid 1948. At this time Sharp and
E4wards were awarded the First Oak-Leaf Cluster19 for their previously awarded Medal. As a postscript, although unable to fly
d~e to his injuries, Lieutenant Cross later transferred to Civil
A i r P a t r o l ' s C o a s t a l P a t r o l B a s e N u m b e r 1 4 a t P a n a m a C i t y, F l o r i d a
as its operation officer.

The fact that many other survivors of forced landings at sea
continued to expose themselves to further risk is well supported
bI the two crashes involving Lieutenant Louis J. DiCarlo stationed
at Base 9 on Grand Isle, Louisiana. On September 17, 194220
L£eutenant DiCarlo suffered the first of his two hazardous crashes.
Flying the dusk patrol on that date Pilot DiCarlo and Observed Frank
Serwich detected oil coming from the firewall of their Rearwin
Cloudster. Again, lets turn to a contemporary account of the
i n c i d e n t s o t h a t w e m a y b e t t e r u n d e r s t a n d t h e h a p p e n i n g s o f t h e d a y.

"Several minutes after DiCarlo had been separated from Sutton, he
m)ticed oil coming through the firewall. He immediately headed
the ship toward the nearest point on land, while Serwich grabbed the
m i k e , y e l l e d " M AY D AY " s e v e r a l t i m e s , a n d g a v e t h e i r a p p r o x i m a t e
position. The oil pressure started to sink slowly as DiCarlo tried
to climb the ship. He reached 1000 feet when the pressure dropped
to zero. Serwich continued to try to reach the base, but never got
a "ROGER" on his report. A few seconds later parts started to fly
from under the cowling and then the engine flew to pieces. DiCarlo

glxded down toward the water, levelled off, then brought the nose
up and made a tail first landing on the waves. They struck with
a terrific impact and the glass jug which held the silver marker
slick fluid broke at once, splattering the pilot and observer with
bright silver paint. At the same time the antenna wire whipped
around the front of the ship, and caught around DiCarlo's neck,
momentarily strangling him. Serwich quickly pulled out his hunting knife and severed the wire. In the 35 seconds between the
time that the ship hit the water and the time that it sunk beneath
the waves, both men fought their way out of the ship and inflated
their Mae Wests, dragging along the canvas motor hood which had
been laying in the back of the plane. They each clenched opposite
ends of this canvas between their teeth, which kept them from being
separated as they swam clear of the wreckage. DiCarlo guided the
pair on the outside of the muddy Mississippi water, because he knew
the current would carry them out to sea. Through the dark, swelling
waters the two men swam, tying their Mae Wests together so as not to
become separated".21

"Eack at the base, Joe sat thinking of the two men that he was now
certain were down somewhere in the Gulf; Louis DiCarlo, 38 years
eld, a thin, almost sickly looking man; Frank Serwich, 37 years old,
a 6 footer who weighed only 150 ibs. Pretty slim chance that these
two could last a night in the water or make their way to land; Joe
felt an overpowering urge to do something, but there was nothing at
ail that he could do".22

"DiCarlo and Serwich were in the water two hours now, still moving

tcward land and steering clear of the Mississippi current. Both
men were weakening, but continued to lie on their Mae Wests and
paddle with their hands toward shore in the complete darkness. As
time wore on Serwich, the weaker of the two, became nearly exhausted, and DiCarlo had to pull and shove him along to keep him
fnom giving up right there. Just about when DiCarlo was ready to
gave up, they sighted the seawall and with what was more guts than
strength they hoisted themselves onto land and lay there exhausted.
They had been swimming for four and one-half hours. As they lay
on the seawall, several small boats passed, not hearing their shouts.
Finally they were able to attract the attention of a small Coast
Guard boat, which flashed its searchlights up and down the seawall.
As the searchlight swung up and down, it suddenly hit two bright
silver objects that shone like Greek gods in the black night. The
two men were still covered by the marker fluid, which they can
thank for saving them from cold and exposure on the seawall".23

~The two men were picked up by the Coast Guard and taken to Burwood,
where because they had lost all identification, they were placed
under technical arrest. A telephone call to the base soon verified
who they were, and that same phone call was received amidst great
jubilation by the members of the base".24

~hus goes the story of DiCarlo's first "dunking". Although not
quite as dramatic, DiCarlo's actions during his second one certainly demonstrates that he had all of the ingredients of a true
hero. Early on December 18, 194225 after experiencing radio trouble
9n Fairchild NC29013 Pilot DiCarlo accompanied by Observed Michael

L. Heim found it necessary to return to Grand Isle for repairs.
Subsequent to the necessary repairs to their radio DiCarlo and
Heim encountered a rough engine while attempting to take off.
They returned to the hangar where the engine was found to be safe
for flight. So for the third time on that fateful day DiCarlo
taxied for departure. This time he made it, but not for long.
At about 200 feet, already over the Gulf, the Fairchild's engine
S t o p p e d c o m p l e t e l y. U n a b l e t o m a k e i t b a c k t o l a n d , D i C a r l o
skillfully effected another water ditching. Upon impact the aircraft flipped over trapping both he and Heim. Freeing himself
from his seat belt he noticed that Helm was having difficulty releasing his seat belt. Only after assisting Heim in the removal
of his seat belt did DiCarlo leave the aircraft and swim to the
s u r f a c e a n d s a f e t y.

Cool thinking has long been accepted among pilots as the difference
between survival and death at the time of impending disaster. Cool
action on the part of Wiley R. Reynolds certainly was evident on
J u l y 11 , 1 9 4 3 2 6 O n t h a t d a t e a t a b o u t t w o i n t h e a f t e r n o o n P i l o t
Reynolds and his observer, Lieutenant R. J. Cohn, were on routine
patrol from Base 3 in Stinson NC39496. Reynolds' first person
description of the disaster is as follows:

"Zngine started missing and losing power at about 1500 ft. Dropped
a couple of smoke flares to get wind direction. Saw small craft below and circled near. Occupants of craft signaled us to drop our
i00 lb. demolition bomb safe. As I got close to the water I

pulled on full flaps, shut off ignition and hauled back on controls. Ocean was calm. Plane nosed over, then settled back to
float about 8 minutes before sinking in 150 ft. of water. Landing craft picked us up in about 5 minutes. My observer, who did
not know how to swim, kept cool, inflated his one man raft and
held on to plane wing and raft. I opened door on left side and
swam around to my observer. All this time my cousin, Harry Bassett
and Alex Thomson was circling in a companion plane calling base but
could not be heard at Lantana due to local thunderstorms. We
arrived in Fort Pierce about an hour later".

27

Worthy of note is the last crash at sea of a Civil Air Patrol Aircraft engaged in Coastal Patrol operations. Just thirty days short
of the termination of coastal patrol operations on August 31, 1943
an aircrew took a dunking. Late in the afternoon of July 31, 194328
with Lieutenant W. L. Grief, Jr. as pilot and Flight Officer W. A.
Fullerton, Jr. as observer the last of CAP's 74 crashes at sea
o c c u r r e d . F o r t u n a t e l y, G r i e r a n d F u l l e r t o n w e r e r e s c u e d b y a s m a l l
navy craft within an hour and a half. Both were returned unhurt to
C a p e M a y.

CHAPTER 2

THE DUCK CLUB

Long a tradition in European armies the recognition of individuals for special acts had its beginning in the United States
Military with The Badge for Military Merit.1 .Orders creating
the Badge for Military Merit were issued by the Continental
Army on August 7, 1782. A simple heart shaped piece of cloth,
i t w a s a w a r d e d t o a l l r a n k s i n v o l v e d i n a c t s o f u n u s u a l g a l l a n t r y.
George Washington wrote when he established this first award,
"The road to glory in a patriot army and free country is open to
a11". Certainly, it is then fitting that the form taken some 160
years later to recognize Civil Air Patrol's patriots would be a
simple cloth device.

Some form of recognition was badly needed to help the sagging
morale of the civilian airmen so valiantly fighting the Axis
S u b m a r i n e fl e e t i n o u r C o a s t a l Wa t e r s . A l r e a d y, b y M a r c h o f
1943, some 512 aircraft had been lost at sea resulting in 163
fatalities and 874 aircrew men surviving the harrowing experience of a crash on water. It was at that time that Lieutenant
Colonel L. A. (Jack) Vilas conceived the award to be presented to
all who survived. Designated the "Duck Club" the idea paralleled
the Army Air Corps famed Caterpillar Club. The name of the actual
d e s i g n e r o f t h e a w a r d h a s b e e n l o s t i n t h e p a g e s o f h i s t o r y, b u t
~t has been commonly thought that Colonel Vilas was the designer.

Utilizing the prevailing Blue Civil Air Patrol Disc as a background, the emblem portrays a red duck sitting on the water which
is represented by a series of blue wavy lines. Civil Air Patrol
Bulletin, Volume II, Number 15 of April 9, 1943 specifies that it
is to be worn below the flap of the left pocket of the shirt or
b l o u s e . S u b s e q u e n t l y, C A P R u l e s 5 s p e c i fi e d b o t h t h e 2 % i n c h
diameter cloth badge and a 1 inch metallic version. The metallic
version was produced in blue and red enamel over sterling silver
b y B a s t i a n B r o t h e r s o f R o c h e s t e r, N e w Yo r k .

Indications are that the distribution of the award was carefully
controlled by Headquarters Civil Air Patrol using a handwritten
and typed listing.6 They were generally forwarded to individuals
in care of their respective Base Commanders. In some cases, they
were transmitted direct to individuals who were no longer on
a c t i v e d u t y. Q u o t e d b e l o w i s t h e c o n t e n t o f t h e t y p i c a l m i l i t a r y
style letter which transmitted the emblem.

" i. It is recorded at National Headquarters that in the service
of the Civil Air Patrol you were in an airplane which had a forced
7
landing on water while on an active duty mission".

" 2. Just as everyone who has ever bailed out of an airplane is
one of the fellowship of the Caterpillar Club, it is our thought
that every member who shares your experience shall be a member
of the Duck Club".

8

" 3 . I n t o k e n o f y o u r m e m b e r s h i p i n t h i s s e l e c t f r a t e r n i t y, I

inclose herewith an emblem which you are entitled to wear on
the left pocket of your uniform, half an inch below the flap.
With it goes my congratulations that you are still with us to
talk about it and the hope that you will wear it to show that
the Patrol is proud of you".

9

Because of cost considerations and the wartime scarcity of
silver, members surviving more than one crash received only
one award.

" i. The records at National Headquarters now indicate that
while on active duty mission for Civil Air Patrol - Coastal
Patrol, you were forced down at sea and this has made you a
two-time member of theDuck Club. We can't send you another
emblem, but we can and do send our greetings on becoming a
select member of this fraternity".10

" 2. This time, we are twice as glad that you are with us to
swap another Patrol yarn".

11

In both cases, the letter was signed by Civil Air Patrol's
National Commander, Lieutenant Colonel Earle L. Johnson.

CHAPTER 3

DUCK CLUB MEMBERSHIP LIST

The following pages contain a computer generated alphabetical
listing of all known Duck Club Members.

..... MAI~CH 1984

DUCK CLUB STODY
C . A . P. H I S T O R I C A L C O M M I T T E E
COL. L. E. HOPPER

" ' PA G E

1
i

NAME

RANK

SERIAL
NUMBER

BASE
NUMBER

A C K L E Yv H . B .
A L L E N 1 E . T.
ANDERSON, D. R.
AT L A S S , J . N .
BAGON, J. E.
BANER, C. A.
BENDER, L. D.
BILLET! A. B.
BINDER, R.
BOZARTH, E. H.
BRYSON, J. E.
B U S H , J . W.
C A N N O N 1 H . P.
C A R T E R 1 H . T.
C A R T I E R , R . W.
CHALOWI R.
C H E W, J . W. I J R .
CLARK, C. S.
C L AY 1 A . G .
COHEN1 B. R.
COHN, R. J.
COLLER, H. A.
C O N N E R , T. V. , J R .
COOPER, R. E.
CRABTREE! A. H.
C R O S S , H . T.
CUSHMANt H. B.
DAMMEYER, J. E.
DICARLO, L. J .
DICKSON, G. E.
D I M I T R Y, E . A .
D U B O S E , T. J .
E A S T H A N t T. C .
EGBERT1 E. H.
E G G E N W E I L E R , F. E .
E VA N S , S . C .
FA R R , W. G .
FA U L K N E R I R . A .
FLETCHER, J. L.
F L I N T, W . F.
F U L L E T O N , W. A . I J R .
GARVIN, H. H.
GASTON, H. E.
B R I E R , W. L . , J R .
( ~ R O T H , W. H .
G R O V E , G . W.
GRUBBI J. R.IJR.
HARRIS, H. R.
H E A L E Y, J . J .
HEIM, M. L.
JENKINS, E, J.
J E N K I N S 1 W. K .

1 / LT
F/O
CAPT
1 / LT
F/O
CAPT

5-3-48
2-1-106
6-3-47
4-1-722
2-1-209
4-1-776

13
17
11
07
01
07
01
11
01
07
21
11
02
02
21
01
02
14
05
14
03
07
10
04
05
02
07
11
09
06
09
08
01
06
01
10
01
21
04
06
02
09
06
02
07
21
17
06
16
09
06
09

SORTED BY NAME

6-3-1432

l I LT
l I LT
l I LT
l I LT
l I LT
l I LT
l I LT
l I LT
l I LT
CAPT
l I LT
l I LT
CAPT
HAJ
2 / LT
1 / LT
CAPT
F/O

4-1-432
4-4-752
4-5-47
2-1-155
2-3-95
4-4-169
2-2-1017
3-1-192'5'
5-1-1755
4-1-246
5-1-1755
4-1-34
4-1-1339
8-1-3278
7-5-416
4-1-245
5-1-1443
4-1-420
6-3-59
4 - 8 - 11
3-1-1816
4-8-94
4-3-692
2-1-427
4-2-885
3-1-222
8-1-26
2-1-45
4-4-469
3-2-465
3-1-149
2-3-79

I / LT
I / LT
I / LT
I / LT
F/O
I / LT
F/O
I / LT
l I LT

4-2-818
2-3-177
4-1-515
4-4-72
3-1-1239
4-2-551
4 -4-770
7-4-201
4-2-613
4-6-1084

CAPT
I / LT
I / LT
l I LT
I / LT
I / LT
CAPT
I / LT
l I LT
I / LT
2 1 LT
l I LT
2 1 LT

MARCH 1984
C . A . P.

DUCK CLUB STUDY
H I S TO R I C A L C O M M I T T E E
COL. L. E. HOPPER

SORTED BY NAME
NAME
JOHNSON, C. E.
K E H O E , C . F. , I I .
K E Y S , T. F.
KIN8, D. L.
K N O T T , J . P.
K N O X , J . P.
L A N C A S T E R , R . T.
LEAS, D. S.,JR.
H A N N I N G , T. C .
HARVEL, C. L.
M A S H B U R N v H . F.
HCCAULEYt A. 3.
HCCLAINI R. B.
H C L A U G H L I N t F. C .
MILLER, R. H.
MOSKOWITZI S.
MYERSI A. R.
N E E L , R . F.
P A L M E R , T.
PEARSON, C. M.
PENN, E. E.
PERMENTER, 3. B.
P I L G R I N , S . W. , J R .
P O L E Y, C .
P R O K O P O V I T S t T. R .
R E Y N O L D S , W. R . , J R .
RHODES, J. L.
RICKSEN, R. E.
R I D G L E Y, H . E .
ROYCE, R. G.
RUBIN, H.
S A LT E R , W. H .
S A N D E R S , W. H .
S A N S C H A G R I N , T. J .
S AVA G E , C . L .
SCHLAGER, 3. R.
SCHOLZE, R. E.
S C H U C H T E R , J . R . W.
S C O T T, W . A .
S E R W I C H , F. J .
SHIELDS, G. H.
S M I T H , W. O .
S P E L L E R B E R G I J . P.
STEPHENSON, R. E.
STORY1 R. L.
S T O W E , S . P. I J R .
STUBBINSI K . F .
S WA I H , C . S.
U I L A S , W. A.
WAGSTAFF, R . L .
WA L L A C E ~ H . ( W E S L E Y C ? )
WEAKLAND, 3. R.,JR.

PAGE

RANK

SERIAL
NUHBER

BASE
NUMBER

CAPT
CAPT
2 / LT
1 / LT

4-2-738
8-2-1732
4-1-100
4 -3-481
4-2-18

2 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT

3 - 1 - 2 7 11
3 - 1 - 2 7 11
4-1-43

1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
2 / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT

4-4-488
8-1-2834
5-2-464
4-1-645
4-3-732
6-3-232
3-1-968
8-1-1251

2 / LT
1 / LT
F/O
1 / LT
1 / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
CAPT
1 / LT

4-1-812
8-1-718
4-4-822
4-3-33
2-1-142
3-1-2057
4-1-89
4-1-365
2-1-750
4-1-356
4-1-540

F/O
F/O
1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
2 / LT
CAPT
1 / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT

4 - 2 - 111 7
4-1-1375
3-1-397
3-2-708
3-1-805
4-1-1053
4-1-567
3-3-181
4-8-272
4-4-439
1-4-1213
5-1-2763
5-3-237
4-4-429
4-4-335
4-4-433
4-4-12
4-1-300
4-4-847
4-1-1751
2-1-1701

06
10
07
08
06
01
17
17
07
07
21
10
09
05
08
11
04
10
17
07
07
21
08
01
17
03
05
17
07
O7
06
06
O7
01
04
04
07
07
01
09
16
01
14
01
16
21
16
21
07
02
05
06

CAPT
2 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT

MARCH 1984

DUCK CLUB STUDY
C . A . P. H I S T O R I C A L C O M M I T T E E
COL. L. E. HOPPER

SORTED BY NAME

PAGE

NAME

L

L
L
L

RANK

SERIAL
NUMBER

BASE
NUMBER

W E S T, J . K .
WETZELI B. B.
WILLIAMS, B. L.
W I M P, R . E .
WINFIELDt 3. H. tOR.
W O O D ! F. R .
WOODHAUS, E, J.
ZIMMERMAN: C, B,

I I LT
I I LT
l I LT
2 1 LT
FIO
I / LT

8-1-686
5-1-933
4-4-236
4-5-869
7-4-349
6-3-961

2 1 LT

4-2-44

10
14
21
05
10
11
13
06

LRECORDS S E L E C T E D

L
L
L~

L

;

11 2

CHAPTER 4

ACTIVE DUTY BASE OF MEMBERS

The following pages are a computer generated listing of all
known Duck Club Members arranged by their Civil Air Patrol
B a s e N u m b e r.

A total by Base Number is shown below:

BASE

L

L

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
i0
11
12
13
14

15
16
17

18
19
20
21

L O C AT I O N

NO. OF MmmERS

A t l a n t i c C i t y, N e w J e r s e y
Rehoboth, Delaware
Lantana, Florida
P a r k s l e y, Vi r g i n i a
Flagler Beach, Florida
St. Simons Island, Georgia
Miami, Florida
James Island, Charleston, South Carolina
Grand Isle, Louisiana
B e a u m o n t , Te x a s
Pascagoula, Mississippi
B r o w n s v i l l e , Te x a s
Sarasota, Florida
P a n a m a C i t y, F l o r i d a
C o r p u s C h r i s t i , Te x a s
Monteo, North Carolina
S u f f o l k , R i v e r h e a d , L o n g I s l a n d , N e w Yo r k
Falmouth, Massachusetts
Portland, Maine
Bar Harbor, Maine
Beaufort, North Carolina

13
7
2
5
6
12
17
4
7
7
6
0
2
4
0
4
7
0
0
0
9

..... H'ARCH-1984

NAME

"
'
DUCK CLUB STUDY
C , A . P. H I S T O R I C A L C O M M I T T E E
COL. L. E. HOPPER

SORTED BY BASE NO,
RANK

BENDER~ L. D.
K N O X t J . P.
E G G E N W E I L E R ! F. E .
CHALOWI R.
S A N S C H A G R I N I T. J .
S H I T H I W. O .
STEPHENSONI R. E.
BAGONI J, E.
S C O T T, W . A .
P O L E Y, C °
BINDERw R.
E A B T M A N I T. C .
FA R R , W, G ,
C R O S S , H . T.
C H E W 1 J . W. I J R .
C A R T E R t H . T.
C A N N O N I H . P.
W A G S T A F F, R . L .
G R I E R , W. L . I J R .
F U L L E T O N I W. A . ~ J R .
R E Y N O L D S 1 W. R . , J R .
COHN, R. J.
S AVA G E 1 C . L .
BCHLAGER, J. R.
FLETCHERt J. L.
HYERSI A. R.
COOPER, R. E.
CRABTREE, A. H.
H C L A U G H L I N , F. C .
RHODES1 J. L,
C L A Y, A . G .
WIHP! R. E.
WA L L A C E ~ H . ( W E S L E Y C ? )
JOHNSON1 C. E.
EGBERT1 E. H.
ZIHMERHAN, C. B.
K N O T T , J . P.
F L I N T 1 W . F.
GASTON, H. E.
JENKINS~ E.J.
WEAKLANDI J. R. IJR.
HARRIS1 H. R.
RUBINt H°
DICKSONI G. E.
S A LT E R 1 W. H .
CUSHHAN~ H.B.
K E Y S 1 T. F.
M A N N I N G t T. C .
PEARSON1 C. H.
BOZARTHI E. M.
ROYCE1 R, G,
MARVEL1 C. L.

PAGE

SERIAL
NUMBER

1 / LT
CAPT
1 / LT
2 / LT
2 / LT
F/O
1 / LT
1 / LT

3-1 -222
2-2-1017
3-1 -397
1-4-1213
5-3-237
2-1 -209
3-3-181
2-1-142

CAPT
MAJ
1 / LT
1 / LT
I / LT
I / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT
F/O
1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
] / LT
I / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT

I / LT
1 / LT
F/O

2-1 -427
2-1 -45
5-1-1443
3-1 -1925
2-3-95
2-1 -155
4-4-847
2-3-177
2-3-79
4-1 -89
4-1 -34
3-2-708
3-1 -805
3-2-465
3-1 -968
7-5-416
4-1 -245
4-1 -645
4-1 -365
4-1 -246
4-5-869
4-1-1751
4-2-738
4-2-885
4-2-44
4-2-18
3-1-149
4-2-818
4-2-61 3
2-1-1701
4-2-551

1 / LT
F/O
I / LT
CAPT
1 / LT
2 / LT
CAPT
1 / LT

3-1-1816
4 - 2 - 111 7
4-1 -420
4-1-100
4-1 -43
4-1-812
4-1 -432
4-1 -540

I / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT
CAPT

1

.

.

.

BASE
NUHBER
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
03
03
04
04
04
04
04
05
05
05
05
05
05
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
06
07
07
07
07
07
07
07

.

MARCH 1984
C . A . P.

NAHE

DUCK CLUB STUDY
H I S TO R I C A L C O M M I T T E E
COL. L. E. HOPPER

S O RT E D B Y B A S E N O .
RANK

U I L A S , W. A .
BANER, C. A.
COLLER, H. A.
PENN, E. E.
AT L A S S , J . N .
S C H U C H T E R , J . R . W.
R I D G L E Y, H . E .
S A N D E R S , W. H .
G R O T H , W. H .
SCHOLZE, R. E.
HILLER, R. H.
P I L G R I N , S . W. , J R .
D U B O S E , T. J .
KING, D. L.
DICARLO, L. J.
S E R W I C H , F. J .
MCCLAIN, R. B.
GARVIN, M. M.
J E N K I N S , W. K .
D I H I T R Y, E . A .
HEIM, M. L.
N E E L , R . F.
W E S T, J . K .
C O N N E R , T. V . , J R .
K E H O E , C . F. , I I .
E VA N S , S . C .
WINFIELD, J. H.,JR.
M C C A U L E Y, A . J .
OAMMEYER, J. E.
B I L L E T, A . B .
ANDERSON, D. R.
W O O D , F. R .
B U S H , J . W.
MOSKOWITZ, S.
WOODHAUS, E. J.
ACKLEYt H. B.
S P E L L E R B E R G , J . P.
COHEN, B. R.
CLARK, C. S.
WETZEL, B. B.
S T O R Y, R . L .
S T U B B I N S , K . F.
SHIELDS, G. H.
H E A L E Y, J . J .
RICKSEN, R. E.
L A N C A S T E R , R . T.
A L L E N , E . T.
GRUBS, J. R.,JR.
LEAS, D. S.,JR.
P R O K O P O V I T S , T. R .
P A L M E R , T.
H A S H B U R N , H . F.

PAGE

SERIAL
NUMBER

CAPT
CAPT
2 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
CAPT
CAPT
F/O
1 / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
I / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT

4-1-300
4-1-776
4-1-1339
8-1-718
4-1-722
4-1-567
4-1-356
4-1-1375
4-1-515
4-1-1053
4-3-732
4-3-33
4-3-692
4-3-481
4 - 8 - 11
4-8-272
5-2-464

1 / LT
1 / LT
F/O
1 / LT
1 / LT
CAPT
CAPT
F/O
1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
CAPT
1 / LT
1 / LT
2 / LT

4-8-1084
4-8-94
7-4-201
8-1-1251
8-1-686
8-1-3278
8-2-1732
8-1-26
7-4-349
8-1-2834
6-3-59
6-3-1432
6-3-47
6-3-961
4-5-47
6-3-232

1 / LT
1 / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT
I / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
2 / LT
F/O
1 / LT
1 / LT
2 / LT

5-3-48
5-1-2763
5-1-1755
5-1-1755
5-1-933
4-4-429
4-4-433
4-4-439
4-4-770
2-1-750
3 - 1 - 2 7 11
2-1-106
3-1-1239
3 - 1 - 2 7 11
3-1-2057
4-4-488

2

BASE
NUHBER
07
07
0707
07
07
07
07
07
07
O8
O8
08
08
O9
08
O9
09
O9
08
09
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
11
11
11
11
11
11
13
13
14
14
14
14
16
16
16
16
17
17
17
17
17
17
17
21

MARCH 1984
C . A . P.

NAME

DUCK CLUB STUDY
H I S TO R I C A L C O M M I T T E E
COL. L. E. HOPPER

S O RT E D B Y B A S E N O .
RANK

SWAIM, C. S.
G R O V E , G . W.
BRYSON, O. E.
FA U L K N E R , R . A .
S T O W E , S . P. , J R .
PERMENTERI J. B.
WILLIAMS, B. L.
C A RT I E R I R . W.

t.

JRECORDS S E L E C T E D 1 1 2

PAGE

SERIAL
NUMBER

BASE
NUMBER

4-4-12
4-4-72
4-4-752
4-4-469
4-4-335
4-4-822
4-4-236
4-4-169

21
21
21
"21
21
21
21
21

CHAPTER 5

HOME STATE OF MEMBERS

The following pages are a computer generated listing of all
known Duck Club Members arranged by home state. It is based
on the individual's serial number which was assigned sequentially by the Wing (state} where the member first joined
Civil Air Patrol. For the purposes of this:study it is
assumed that members joined CAP in their home state and
therefore, the serial number prefix number is used as a means
of identifying home states. Those members whose serial number
could not be located are tabulated as unknown.

Ta b l e d b e l o w a r e t h e W i n g P r e fi x N u m b e r s u s e d t o d e t e r m i n e
the state of initial CAP membership and the number of Duck Club
Members identified:

S TAT E

PREFIX

NO. OF MEMBERS

Unknown

None

8

Alabama

4-6

0

Arizona

8-5

0

Arkansas

7-4

2

California

9-1

0

Colorado

8-3

0

Connecticut

1-5

0

Delaware

2-3

3

STATE

PREFIX

NO. OF MEMBERS

Florida

4-1

22

Georgia

4-2

8

Idaho

9-4

0

Illinois

6-1

0

Indiana

5-2

1

Iowa

7-2

0

Kansas

7-5

1

Kentucky

5-3

2

Louisiana

4-8

4

Maine

1-1

0

Maryland

3-3

1

Massachusetts

1-4

1

Michigan

6-3

5

Minnesota

7-1

0

Mississippi

4-7

0

Missouri

7-3

0

Montana

9-5

0

Nebraska

7-6

0

Nevada

9-6

0

New Hampshire

1-2

0

New Jersey

2-2

1

New Mexico

8-4

0

N e w Yo r k

2-1

8

North Carolina

4-4

14

North Dakota

7-8

0

Ohio

5-1

5

S TAT E

PREFIX

NO. OF MEMBERS

Oklahoma

8-2

1

Oregon

9-2

0

Pennsylvania

3-1

11

Rhode Island

1-6

0

South Carolina

4-3

4

South Dakota

7-7

0

Te n n e s s e e

4-5

2

Te x a s

8-1

6

Utah

9-7

0

Ve r m o n t

1-3

0

Virginia

3-2

2

Washington

9-3

0

West Virginia

5-4

0

Wisconsin

6-2

0

Wyoming

7-9

0

TOTAL

MARCH 1984
C . A . P.

NAME

DUCK CLUB STUDY
H I S TO R I C A L C O M M I T T E E
COL. L. E. HOPPER

SORTED BY CAP SERIAL NO.
RANK

BENDERm L. D.
K N O X , J . P.
MARVEL, C. L.
RUBIN, H.
6ARVIN, M. M.
WOODHAUS, E. J.
P A L H E R , T.
BINDER, R.
S H I T H , W. O .
A L L E N , E . T.
P O L E Y, C .
C A N N O N , H . P.
WEAKLAND, J. R.IJR.
BAGON, J. E.
E A S T M A N , T. C .
FA R R , W. G .
RICKSEN, R. E.
C H A L O W, R .
G R I E R , W. L . , J R .
F U L L E TO N I W. A . , J R .
C A R T E R ~ H . T.
GRUBB, J. R.,JR.
F L I N T 1 W . F.
DICKSON, G. E.
C H E W, J . W. I J R .
P R O K O P O V I T S , T. R .
E G G E N W E I L E R , F. E .
L A N C A S T E R , R . T.
LEAS,' D. S.,JR.
S A N S C H A G R I N , T. J .
SCHLAGER, J. R.
MYERS, A. R.
FLETCHER, J. L.
S AVA G E ! C . L .
S C O T T, W . A .
K E Y S , T. F.
SCHOLZE, R. E.
COLLERI H. A.
S A N D E R S , W. H .
WA L L A C E 1 H . ( W E S L E Y C ? )
CRABTREEt A. H.
C L AY 1 A . G .
U I L A S I W. A .
COHNI R. O.
R I D G L E Y, H . E .
RHODES, J. L.
CUSHHANI H. B.
M A N N I N G , T. C .
BOZARTHt E. M.
G R O T H , W. H .
ROYCE, R. G.
S C H U C H T E R , J . R . W.

2 / LT
F/O
1 / LT
1 / LT
I / LT
F/O
CAPT
HAJ
1 / LT
CAPT
1 / LT
F/O
1 / LT
1 / LT
CAPT
1 / LT
1 / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT
I / LT
1 / LT
2 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
CAPT
2 / LT
2 / LT
F/O
1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
CAPT
1 / LT
CAPT
I / LT
I / LT
I / LT
CAPT
I / LT
I / LT
CAPT

PAGE

SERIAL
NUMBER

1-4-1213
2-1-106
2-1-142
2-1-155
2-1-1701
2-1-209
2-1-427
2-1-45
2-1-750
2-2-1017
2-3-177
2-3-79
2-3-95
3-1-1239
3-1-149
3-1-1816
3-1-1925
3-1-2057
3-1-222
3 - 1 - 2 7 11
3 - 1 - 2 7 11
3-1 -397
3-1-805
3-1-968
3-2-465
3-2-708
3-3-181
4-1-100
4-1-1053
4-1 -1339
4-1-1375
4-1-1751
4-1-245
4-1-246
4-1-300
4-1-34
4-1-356
4-1-365
4-1-420
4-1-43
4-1-432
4-1-515
4-1-540
4-1-567

BASE
NUMBE'R
01
01
07
06
09
13
17
01
01
17
01
02
O6
01
01
01
17
01
02
02
02
17
06
06
'02
17
01
17
17
01
04
04
04
04
01
07
07
07
O.7
05
05
05
07
03
07
05
07
07
07
07
07
07

MARCH 1984

NAME

DUCK CLUB STUDY
C . A . P. H I S T O R I C A L C O M M I T T E E
COL. L. E. HOPPER

SORTED BY CAP SERIAL NO.
RANK

M C L A U G H L I N ~ F. C .
AT L A S S I J . N .
BANERI C. A.
PEARSONm C. M.
R E Y N O L D S , W. R . , J R .
S A LT E R , W. H .
K N O T T , J . P.
ZIHHERMANI C. B.
HARRIS, H, R.
JENKINS, E. J.
JOHNSON, C. E.
GABTONI H. E.
EGBERT! E. H.
P I L G R I N t S . W. t J R .
KING! D. L.
D U B O S E I T. J .
HILLERv R. H.
S WA I M I C . S .
C A RT I E R , R . W.
WILLIAMS, B. L.
S T O W E t S . P. I J R .
S T O R Yo R . L .
S T U B B I N S ~ K . F.
SHIELDS, G. H.
FA U L K N E R t R . A .
H A S H B U R N , M . F.
G R O V E , G . W.
BRYSONt J. E.
H E A L E Y, J . J .
PERMENTERI J. B.
W A G S T A F F, R . L .
B U S H , J . W.
"IMP1 R. E.
J E N K I N S v W. K .
DZCARLOt L. J.
S E R W l C H , F. J .
D I M I T R Y, E . A .
C R O S S , H . T.
COHEN, B. R.
CLARK, C. S.
S P E L L E R B E R G , J . P.
WETZEL, B. B.
HCCLAIN, R. B.
STEPHENSON, R. E.
A C K L E Y, H . B .
BILLETI A. B.
MOSKOWITZ, S.
ANDERSON, D. R.
DAMMEYERI J. E.
W O O D , F. R .
HEIH, M. L.
WINFIELD, J. H. IJR.

I / LT
I / LT
CAPT
2 / LT
l I LT
FIO
I / LT
2 1 LT
FIO
I / LT

l I LT
l I LT
2 1 LT
l I LT
I I LT
1 I LT
1 ILT
1 ILT
I / LT
I I LT
l I LT
2 1 LT
l I LT
I / LT
l I LT
FIO
2 1 LT
I I LT
2 1 LT
l I LT
l I LT
2 1 LT
l I LT
l I LT
2 1 LT
l I LT
1 / LT
l I LT
l I LT
2 / LT
l I LT
l I LT
2 / LT
CAPT
1 / LT
l I LT
F/O
F/O

PAGE

SERIAL
NUMBER

BASE
NUMBER

4-1-645
4-1-722
4-1-776
4-1-812
4-1-89
4 - 2 - 111 7
4-2-18
4-2-44
4-2-551
4-2-613
4-2-738
4-2-818
4-2-885
4-3-33
4-3-481
4-3-692
4-3-732
4-4-12
4-4-169
4-4-236
4-4-335
4-4-429
4-4-433
4-4-439
4-4-469
4-4-488
4-4-72
4-4-752
4-4-770
4-4-822
4-4-847
4-5-47
4-5-869
4-8-1084
4 - 8 - 11
4-8-272
4-8-94
5-1-1443
5-1-1755
5-1-1755
5-1-2763
5-1-933
5-2-464
5-3-237
5-3-48
6-3-1432
6-3-232
6-3-47
6-3-59
6-3-961
7-4-201
7-4-349

05
07
07
07
03
06
06
06'
06
06
06
06
06
08
08
08
08
21

2~

21
21
16
16
16
21
21
21
21
16
21
02
11
05
09
09
09
09
02
14
14
14
14
09
01
13
11
11
11
11
11
09
10

MARCH 1984
C . A . P.

NAME

SORTED BY CAP SERIAL NO.
RANK

COOPERI R. E.
N E E L ! R . F.
E VA N S t S . C .
HCCAULEYI A. J.
C O N N E R I T. V. , J R .
~/ESTI J. K.
PENNI E. E.
K E H O E ! C . F. t I I .

==RECORDS SELECTED

DUCK CLUB STUDY
H I S TO R I C A L C O M M I T T E E
COL. L. E. HOPPER

11 2

1 / LT
1 / LT
CAPT
1 / LT
1 / LT
1 / LT
CAPT

PAGE

SERIAL
NUMBER

BASE
NUMBER

7-5-416
8-1-1 251
8-1-26
8-1-2834
8-1-3278
8-1-686
8-1-71 8
8-2-1 732

04
10
10
10
10
10
07
10

FOOTNOTES

CHAPTER 1
1

Civil Air Patrol Operations Report, National
Headquarters, Civil Air Patrol, dated 3
September 1943

ibid

ibid

ibid

ibid

Based on statistical analysis of CAP Operations
Reports, Accident Reports and related data in
the CAP National Archives

ibid

ibid

Contemporary History of CAP Coastal Patrol
N u m b e r 4 b y M a j o r I . W. B u r n h a m I I , C A P

L e t t e r f r o m L t . H e n r y T. C r o s s t o M a j o r E a r l e

FOOTNOTES (CONT'D)

CHAPTER 1 (CONT'D}
Johnson dated October i0, 1942 recommending
Major Hugh R. Sharp, Jr. and Lt. Edmond
Edwards for citation for bravery

Statement dated July 21, 1942 by Major Hugh
R. Sharp, Jr. relating to incident, Paragraph
5

ibid, Paragraph 6

ibid, Paragraph 7

ibid, Paragraph 8

ibid, Paragraph 9

ibid, Paragraph i0

Oral History Interview of Colonel Hugh R. Sharp,
Jr. conducted in Wilmington, Delaware on October
17, 1983

Civil Air Patrol National Historical Committee
Monograph Series, Number 2, "Air Medal Roll"

FOOTNOTES (CONT ' D}

CHAPTER 1 (CONT'D)
19

Paragraph 3, General Order Number 12, Department of the Air Force, 14 April 1948

"Joe -- Sub Hunter" a contemporary History of
Base 9 by Stuart M. Speiser

ibid, Page 14, Paragraph 3

ibid, Page 15, Paragraph 1

ibid, Page 15, Paragraph 2

ibid, Page 15, Paragraph 3

Civil Air Patrol Accident Board report Number
6, dated May 22, 1943

1 9 8 3 p e r s o n a l c o r r e s p o n d e n c e w i t h M r. W i l e y R .
Reynolds of Palm Beach, Florida

ibid

Operations Report 7/31/43 of 25th Antisubmarine
Wing USAAF

FOOTNOTES (CONT 'D)

CHAPTER 2
1

Kerrigan, Evans E, American War Medals and
D e c o r a t i o n s , T h e V i k i n g P r e s s , N e w Yo r k 1 9 6 4

Analysis of Civil Air Patrol Operations Reports on Coastal Patrol Activities

ibid

ibid

CAP Rules, 62 Insignia, Paragraph 7 dated 28
October 1943

List of Duck Club Members contained in CAP
National Archives

Letter, Headquarters Civil Air Patrol, 22
October 1943

ibid

ibid

Draft of letter to Duck Club Members contained
in CAP National Archives

FOOTNOTES (CONT ' D)

CHAPTER 2 (CONT'D}
11

ibid