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2012 OHWG History - Vol. 2.pdf

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HISTORY OF
OHIO WING
Civil Air Patrol
Auxiliary of the United States Air Force

1 JANUARY 2012 – 31 DECEMBER 2012

VOLUME 2 - SOURCE DOCUMENTS

LIST OF SOURCE DOCUMENTS
SD01

2013 Legislative Day OHWG Annual Statement

SD02

Wing Calendar for 2013

SD03

OHWG Encampment Cadet Staff Organizational Chart

SD04

OHWG Encampment Newsletters

SD05

OHWG Spring 2012 Aerospace Education Newsletter

SD06

OH-051 press release on 2012 CyberPatriot National Finals Competition

SD07

OHWG IACE 2012 Report

SD08

OHWG Encampment Cadet Staff Training Newsletters

SD09

OH-004 Newsletter, February 2012

SD10

OH-070 Newsletter, January 2012

SD11

OH-282 Newsletter, February 2012

SD12

OH-282 Newsletter, March 2012

Ohio Wing Report
International Air Cadet Exchange 2012
Table of Contents
Pre-Planning................................................................................................................................................ 36
Activities ..................................................................................................................................................... 37
Overall ........................................................................................................ Error! Bookmark not defined.
Items in Process for OHWG Continuity ..................................................................................................... 52

Pre-Planning
1. The IACE Program took an immense amount of pre-planning and communication.
2. Special thanks are given to the Barnes Family for making a wonderful home for our
IACE cadets. Capt Tanda Lainhart for assistance with transportation. Lt Col Steve Jones
for advice from a former IACE participant.
3. The staff for the project comprised of Ohio Wing Project Officer: Nathaniel Spehr, Capt,
CAP and Cadet Project Officer C/Maj Tanner Barnes, CAP.
a. Pre-planning took months to line up host families, figure out transportation, line
up tours, arrange an O-Flight, and organize a ten day fun event.
4. Our international guests consisted of Or Zabludowski and Julie Koichu from Israel, and
DuKwant Kang and Sohyoun Park from South Korea. Each was an outstanding
representative of their country. Our bond that developed over those days embodies the
strength of diplomacy. I still miss them and cherish the time we all had together and the
outstanding memories we created to last a lifetime.

Activities
Friday
After touring Washington D.C. with National CAP the cadets arrived in Ohio for an
unforgettable ten days. Friday when the cadets first arrived everyone was nervous. Were the
plans made going to be good enough? What haven’t I accounted for? When the International
Cadets arrived we had a welcoming committee of cadets and seniors to meet them at the airport.
We helped get their luggage and took them to the host families to get acquainted. Having the
cadets spend time that evening getting to know who they were going to spend a lot of time with
was productive and allowed questions to be asked. After dinner they heard about the tractor pull
at the county fair that evening, they were interested in going, so we hopped in the CAP van and
went to see the tractor pull at the county fair. They asked many questions about the origination of
the event. We also went into one of the animal buildings and one of the cadets made a comment
about one of the rabbits being fat but cute. Which lead to he needed to find a stuffed bunny to
give to his girlfriend back home that lasted the whole week.

Saturday
We went to a local military museum. I had my doubts about taking them there as it was
originally a backup. Yet when the SAREX was cancelled we had extra time. The cadets enjoyed
the Motts Military Museum. They they met with an older gentleman who unofficially trained
commandos who went on the Entebbe Raid. Also one of the Korean items in the museum was
upside down and the escort brought it to me. The project officer took it to the museum and they
corrected it. The cadets also met the museum director himself. After, we went to the Ohio
Historical Society who was having a Civil War Reenactment. The international cadets saw the
civil war band and people dress and act as if they were in the 1860’s. Next, we went to the Jazz
and Rib fest. The cadets enjoyed the ribs and cool jazz. After went home and relaxed for a few
minutes. Then we went to the Crew (soccer game). The cadets had a good time and we got to see
the only goal of the game and winning point (downside-traffic after the game was bad).

Sunday

We went to the Hocking Hills of Ohio! I was thinking we were going to spend a few hours at the
hills; however, we ended up spending most of the day. We spent time exploring Old Man’s Cave
then took the trail over to the Ash cave area. We had a picnic lunch in the park. The cadets liked
the walk on the trail as they got to see a lot of nature. (There was no cell reception down there).
We were going to also go kayaking/canoeing; however, command debated it was a high
adventure activity. In the end we didn’t go kayaking/canoeing. Yet, we still made it fun! The
cadets were tired so we went home that evening and had dinner there. What started out as
playing air hockey in the basement quickly turned into ping pong then a full blown Nerf War
with splitting up Korea and Israel and US on one team and the other members on the other. To
Israel vs. Korea and sudden death duels, it really made the evening for them. One of the most
memorable events for them was not a tour, who they met, but the fun they had.

Monday
We toured Net Jets a worldwide executive jet aviation business. They did give the cadets a
briefing of all types of different aircraft they had. The cadets got to see the newest aircraft they
had in their fleet (which was going to be unveiled the next day) and the CEO of NetJets. We
went over to flight safety. The cadets got to be in a pilot training simulator and they also got to
do the flight attendant training simulator. After that we went to lunch and then went to Airport
Maintenance. Pete Bricker gave an outstanding tour to the cadets. I was at first hesitant on taking
the cadets because I was not sure it was going to be interesting enough. Yet, there were Boeing
737’s that the cadets got to walk in and around while they were being worked on. While Mr.
Bricker explained and answered many of their questions about the aircraft and their parts. Then
we went to the Franklin Park Conservatory. After that we went to Easton Town Center mall to do
some shopping. We had dinner at Max and Erma’s and had a great time joking around. That
evening we also watched Back to the Future as well as the Ohio Wing Encampment 2012 video.

Tuesday
We traveled out to the Armstrong Air and Space Museum through some strong thunderstorms.
We then went to Bob Evans (a restaurant started in Ohio) and had a good lunch. From there we
went to the Air Force Museum. After, we went to Huffman Prairie and overlook of WPAFB.
Then we went to America’s largest comic book store. As we had gotten to know them and their
interests we added and subtracted things from the schedule. The cadets liked it and purchased a
few comic books. That evening we visited the Wright Patterson Cadet Squadron. The cadets
thoroughly enjoyed the visit and even did questions and answers with the CAP cadets. The
cadets also received squadron t-shirts from the Wright Patterson Cadet Squadron. Also, they
gave the cadets a huge bag of candy which we called the decision bag the rest of the week.
Before a decision was made everyone had to have a piece of candy.
Wednesday

The cadets were tired from the day before so we decided to do a late start day and also give them
any extra time if needed. We then went to the Chiller and did mid-day ice skating. The cadets
really enjoyed the activity. Then we went to tour the state house, the cadets were interested in the
building and the process of government at the state level. Then we went to the Santa Maria a
replica of the ship, and landmark in Columbus. After, we went to the Spaghetti Warehouse and
had a great dinner with the cadets. (In the future it may be better to do this at lunch since it would
be a little cheaper). Then, we went to the clippers baseball game, the cadets enjoyed the game
and we got their names to be displayed on the scoreboard. They really liked that personal touch
and that we went above and beyond for them.

Thursday
We took a trip up to Cleveland, Ohio and had cadets meet us up there. We went to a park on the
lake for an overlook of the lighthouse. Then we went to the USS Cod (an old World War Two
submarine) the cadets enjoyed it. Then we went over and got a quick guided tour of the
Women’s Air and Space Museum right next door to the Cod. Then we went out to lunch in the
historic tower of Cleveland- sadly we were unable to get to the top floor to do the overlook. Then
we took the cadets over to the Rock and Roll hall of fame. The last project officer’s AAR stated
not to take the cadets to the Rock and Roll hall of fame. This year I almost considered not taking
them to the hall of fame. Yet, through spending time with the cadets on the car rides they liked

rock music. So I took them up to the hall of fame and we were there until it closed. We only got
through a few floors in 3 hours. We also took the cadets around the Cleveland browns stadium
(and told them how bad the team was) and also the Cleveland Indians. Initially we could have
stopped at the Pro-Football hall of fame as well since they stay open late; however, the cadets

wanted to go home.

Friday
We took a tour of the Ohio State University. We also got into the stadium and took pictures of
the field. Then we went to the Park of Roses. From there we went to the Columbus Zoo and got
through many of the exhibits and got ice cream too, including Buckeye (chocolate and peanut
butter in the ice cream). Afterwards we headed over to the water park for some heat relief. We
went back home and watched the opening ceremonies of the Olympics after a great dinner.

Saturday
We were able to arrange CAP O-flights, which was very hard to get scheduled. The cadets loved
flying! Then we were going to go to the Lancaster festival; however, the cadets did not want to
go so, we went to magic mountain fun center and did putt putt golf, go karts, and the batting
cages.

Sunday
We spent the day at the Ohio State Fair where we explored many different exhibits and vendors.
Sunday evening we presented the cadets with symbolic challenge coins, buckeyes, and pins.

Monday
We sadly had to say our goodbyes. After sorting out an issue with airport security the cadets
were on their way back to Washington D.C. Yet, they had many memorable experiences in Ohio.
Afterwards

When the cadets went back to Washington D.C. they had to make a video of their host state. This
was a fun video.
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151168458539670&set=vb.545684669&type=2&the
ater
Afterwards, we have maintained contact over facebook and have even made a few international
phone calls.

Items in Process for OHWG Continuity
International Air Cadet Exchange DEADLINES!
1. An arrival and departure airport is due by 1 Feb
2. Confirmed electronic programs are due to NHQ by 31 March
3. Within 30 days an After Action Report is due to NHQ
Suggested Timeline
1. Pre-Planning panel convenes to decide to host or not, review Standard Operating
Procedure (October)
2. Send scouting email to wing about project officer and host families for IACE cadets
(October)
3. Pick Project Officer (November)
4. Review host family houses/option with visiting homes (December)
a. Select 2 primary homes per area and select backups
5. Comprise a project team (December)
a. Hold first planning meeting with topics about the schedule and a packing list
6. Comprise a draft schedule (January) with backups as well as:
a. Budget
b. ORM
7. Create a packing list (January)
8. Call and tentatively schedule with politicians and tours (January)
a. Reconfirm in March, May, and early July, and two days before arrival.
9. Ask for extra funding if needed (February)
10. Line up transportation (March)
11. Invite Cadets to events (May)
a. Deadline to register June 30th (for group rates)

IACE Host Family Questionnaire
Name:
Grade:
CAPID#:
1. Have you hosted foreign cadets before? Is so from where?
2. Where in the state are you located?
3. How many rooms do you have available for them to use?
a. How many regular beds do you have available?
b. How many bathrooms do you have available?
c. How many showers do you have available?
4. How many cadets are you willing to host?
5. Are you willing to cook and do laundry for the cadets?
6. How many members in your immediate family are CAP members?
a. What are their ages?
7. How many days are you willing to host the cadets?
8. Are you able to take off work?
9. Are you able to transport the cadets?
10. What events are around your area to keep cadets entertained?
11. What skills do you have to make our guests feel comfortable while here?
12. How often do you watch or read the news?

1.
2.
3.
4.

Project Officer Questionnaire
How much time do you have to devote to IACE planning?
Have you assisted in hosting or hosted foreign exchange cadets before?
Are you able to take time off work and transport cadets?
Have you managed any CAP or other special projects before?

A scenario based interview should be conducted, sample questions follow.
1. If a cadet does not enjoy one of the events, while the others are enjoying it, what do you
do?
2. Two cadets talk in their own language in front of everyone; however, you can read their
body language. They are upset and frustrated with each other. How do you handle
resolving the situation?
3. As you are with the cadets touring them around, a civilian makes a racist comment about
the group. How do you handle this situation?
4. You can tell one of the host families is overwhelmed after day 2 of 5 they said they
would host. How do you aid the family in feeling better?
5. Due to unexpected expense by higher gas prices and cadets eating more food than
planned, you are running low on money. You still have two days left with the cadets. If
you do everything you want to do you know you will be over budget. What decision do
you make?

Collage of Ohio IACE

Encampment Staff Training
March 17, 2012

Encampment Training; Day Two

91 Days until Encampment!!

Todays Overview
Quotables:
“You are the staff; you
are held to a higher
standard and waiting
until the last minute to
reply to an e-mail will
not cut it.”
-Lt Goodman

“Does anyone else’s
chair rock back and
forth? It’s pretty comfy”
-C/1st Lt Burris

“There’s no one taking
pictures!”
-C/Capt McQuaid

“Can I be Yoda?!”
-C/1st Lt O’Grady

”That diaphragm thing
is a hoax”
-ANONYMOUS

Dedicated Committed.
Determined. These are the
words that begin to describe
this year’s Encampment
Staff. As day two of the STW
began to unfold, new faces of
the staff were introduced.
Squadron Two Commander
C/Lt Col Sierria Larson from
North Carolina, and Public
Affairs OIC C/2nd Lt Ashleigh
Keister from Kentucky were
some of the new cadets in
attendance for today’s training. These cadets show that
no matter how far away you
live, if you have a job to carry
out, you will do anything and
everything to get it done.
The day began out with an
Inspection and then segued
into Drill and Ceremonies.
This covered everything from
the basics to complex marching movements. The staff
grasped the teaching concept
fairly well, giving way to an
ensured easy teaching meth-

-C/SSgt Sacket

A much needed break for lunch
allowed the staff time to bond
even further with one another
over tasty burritos from
Chipotle, burgers from McDonalds, and subs from Jimmy
Johns. Jokes were cracked and
stories were told of where they
came from and how they got to
where they are today in CAP
and life in general.



Be animated
NO MONTONE



Know what you’re going to
talk about



Confidence and competence



Eye contact



Engaging your audience

“It’s that ‘AHA’ moment in
the middle of the week
that the one struggling
flight finally gets it and
everything is just phenomenal. That is the
most rewarding part of
being on staff.”
-C/Maj Neuville

Flight Staff continued their
bonding and training as they
repeatedly practiced Pass and
Review, as well as guidon drill.
PT

Proper Class Teaching Pointers with C/1st Lt O’Grady


“Is there a nap time in
the schedule?”

od for the basics at Encampment. Squadron time consisted of coming up with flight
names and jodies, along with
some bonding time with the
staff.

Smiling + Executive Staff =
HAPPY ENCAMPEMNT STAFF

Page 2

Encampment Staff

Classes of Encampment

Activities



Blanks—YAY



Rock wall? Rappelling Tower

Cadet Programs



Fire Department

NCSA



Honor Guard

Drill & Ceremonies



Air Force Museum



Obstacle Course?



Military Air Craft



Combat Controller,
PJ



AF Colonels



Midnight Run!!!



Real Morning PT
Drill



Air Force Fundamentals

Working Dogs





Mail Call

Shelters

Model Rocketry

Search Techniques

Tour of Tower

BCUT

O-Flight
Ground
Air Craft Recognition
Air Craft Maneuvers
Flight Line Maneuvers



Emergency Services



Higher Education
C&C
Scholarships

Land Navigation

Honor Guard

Survival

Color Guard

Direction Finding

Character Development

24 Hour pack

Boot Class

Experiences in Field

Hair (females)

Areas to Improve
No more boring
Senior Member
Classes!! Look at

“Communication outside of the
STWs needs to be improved,”
says C/Capt Mohler.

your staff; THESE
ARE THE
INSTRUCTORS OF

The communication during the

STWs is beyond what is expected. However, communica- 
tion outside of the STWs is lagging much of what our Executive staff is asking of us.

Honor Flight
Think of Classes!!

Everyone has room
for improvement.
Communications,
however, is the one
that needs the most.

ENCAMPMEMNT

Drill and Ceremonies
The cadet staff gathered
around C/Capt. McQuaid as he
covered the basics of drill and
ceremonies that should be
covered during this encampment. These commands included Counter March, Column
of Files, Column of Twos, Column of Fours, and basic facing
movements. As the staff
watched these movements and
made corrections together, the
cadets began to get a better

understanding of what they
were really going to face at the
2012 encampment. Although
the drill came naturally to the
staff, teaching the basics will
be quite a challenge if the concept is not grasped correctly at
the training. Questions were
asked by the numbers and
many commands and executions were double checked
during the teaching process
ensuring that every staff mem-

ber got all of the correct information to pass on to the basics.

Encampment Training; Day Two

Page 3

Command Voice
The Executive Staff stressed to
the Flight Staff that your command voice is KEY. “We are not
the Army,” C/Lt Col Larson
mentioned. “Yes, you have to
annunciate your commands,
but do not slur your words together.”

C/Maj Neuville made a clear
statement that was sure to
alleviate pressure from the
Flight Sergeants. “Flight Commanders, even though your
Flight Sergeants will be in
charge of the cadets
98.999999 percent of the time,
it is okay for you to march your
flights from point A to point B.
You don’t want to abuse your
Flight Sergeants’ voices because trust me, it will not end
well for them.”

Larson comes from an JROTC
unit in North Carolina and has
a vast history of drill and ceremonies, so she brings much to
the table for this encampment.
The expectations are high for
Squadron Two as she stresses
the importance of command
voice, and with that comes
command presence.

Motivation
It’s not always
What is an Encampment without a motivated staff member?
Encampment is a time for
learning, but remember, Encampment should be fun as
well. These cadets are not in
the actual military, so you can’t
expect them to take your yelling
and criticism very much. Keep
in mind, when you were a basic,
you wanted to be motivated to
get through the week, right?

Motivating your cadets to push
beyond what they think they
can do really shows that they
have leaders that genuinely
care about them and their success. It’s okay t o be friendly
and goofy with the cadets. Just
be sure that it is the correct
time and place for your silly
motivation strategies.

Establishing Flight Names and Jodies
The squadron staff worked
together to come up with the
names and jodies for their
flights. They wanted to come up
with unique names that had
never been heard before that
would properly display the
flight’s individuality. This was a
comical process that kept everyone on their feet and was also
very important in the team
building process.

As for the jodies, Star Wars and
Rocking Chairs were a few mentionable themes that would
definitely appease the basics.
In Ohio, jodies are the foundation of just about everything.
They reflect upon a flight’s confidence and team-work as they
continue to make fun of and
call out other flights.

about how
hard a cadet is
to motivate;
it’s about how
much of an
effort you put
into it!

Encampment Staff Training 3 Overview
56 days until encampment!
A cold drizzle
and a soft pitter
patter of rain
drops surrounded the staff
members in the
Beightler Armory on April 21

Brought to you by your PA team
during the third
official STW.
However, the
puddles of water
did not stand in
the way of the
vigorous work of
our staff.

Activities
C/Capt. Barnes lead the flight Can you guess these shapes?
staff in an activity that encouraged them to expand their
communication skills beyond
words alone. The staff had to
create shapes and symbols
that were recognizable to the
senior members and PAO
Team using chairs as their only
medium.
Down time is crucial when it comes to bonding with
your fellow staff members. So what better way to
bond than to play ninja?! The staff “oohed” and
“aahed” as people were chopped out of the game.
Even C/Maj. Nueville took part in this exciting game!
Staff was also introduced to a new game called “tiger
tails” and it was a hit with everyone!

The mops and
buckets were
broken out in a
rush to clean
up and catch
the mess of
the dripping
ceilings.

DRILL, DRILL, DRILL!
Today at the third encampment staff training, over an hour was
spent on drill alone! Everyone is giving 110% to better the quality
of drill that attending cadets will be taught. Even though it was
raining, and quite cold, the staff members decided to go outside
anyway. Squadron 2 drilling in front of the American and Ohio
State flags.

Say hello to your Logistics and
Communication team!
These staff members are vital to keeping encampment flowing well. They have already
made an efficient cadet check in system,
along with some long lists containing the material items that staff need.
Thank the Medic!
Only two injuries happened today, but luckily medic C/Capt Raduenz was there to help.
He was somewhat pleased that he “finally
had something to do!” and that nothing was
serious.
Trumpet Time!
1st Lt Thomas demonstrates his
trumpet skills!
PT!
Staff has a great time doing PT and fun games! Everyone is giving their
best in PT in order to set good examples for
encampment cadets. PT doesn't have to be
all exercise; who says you can’t have a good
time?!

STW on the War Training Zone @ WPAFB
Ohio Wing Encampment 2012

5/25-5/27

Final STW

Preparing for Encampment: The Home Stretch
As the cadet staff
began arriving from Michigan, Kentucky, Indiana, and
all over Ohio, the final STW
gave way to final ideas and
bonding. C/LtCol Neuville
hand-picked a staff of 41
cadets to help her serve at
Encampment this year and
she couldn’t be any happier
with the turn out. All of the
staff members have bonded
and formed relationships
that will make working at
Encampment much more
enjoyable.

Inside this issue:
Nom Nom Nom

2

NCOS

2

Team Sport

3

Midnight PT

3

PT

5

Drill

5

provide the best possible
experience for both cadets
and staff members. Finally,
our TACs: without them,
none of this would have
happened. Dare we say
more?

The Public Affairs
team was one step ahead of
the rest of staff in order to
get the perfect shot for the
best memories. Logistics
was right there with the PA
team as they provided gallon after gallon of water to
the thirsty staff. Executive
staff members continued to
work in the final touches to
the Encampment in order to

2

What Squadron
Commanders are
Expecting

The pressure of
Encampment began to fall
upon the staff, but preparation for the cadets has yet
to slow. Every member that
participated in the STW was
moving the entire time and
rarely had time to sit down

and rest. From the flight
staff to the support staff,
everyone was moving.
Flight Sergeants and commanders met and developed plans to effectively
teach cadets. Squadron
Commanders mentored the
fight staff in order to better
their plans, as well as coming up with plans for their
squadrons as a whole. T

17 Days Until Encampment 2012

Page 2

STW on the War Training Zone @ WPAFB

Nom Nom Nom
“My mail box is hungry!”
“Mail Call” is something that
C/LtCol Neuville is bringing
to Ohio from Michigan. This
concept is an opportunity for
the staff members to write
letters to one another
throughout the week and
just be silly teenagers.
C/LtCol Neuville wants to
make sure that her staff
stays sane during the week,
so mail call (as well as her
many other tactics) will do
the job in keeping the walking-dead alive.

Of course, the LtCol herself
will need some help in remaining in her silly state of
mind, so these activities will
not only benefit the flight
staff, but her, too.

So let’s take “mail call” with
an open mind because we
all know that our commander only wants the very best
for us!

NCOLA
Sometimes
you just need
time to goof
around and
break away
from
Encampment.

Along with basic cadet training at encampment, NCOLA (Non-Commissioned Officer Leadership Academy) will also be hard at work. The purpose of NCOS is to train NCOs to be better leaders and to prepare them to become officers. So far, 15 cadets have signed up,
however they are hoping to reach 17 .Maj. Schoettelkotte is the cadet commander and
has many great things in store for the week . Each day, the flight will be lead by one of the
NCO’s that applied for the school in order to further their leadership skills. Throughout the
week, the NCOS will be listening to multiple guest speakers, doing leadership projects, and
going on special trips. All of these will reflect on the primary goal of the school, which is
creating better leaders. The special guests that they will be listening to have had great
leadership experience and will be sharing all their tips and stories to the NCOs. The training that the applicants will be
going through at NCOS will
further benefit them both in
and outside of CAP.
Team

C/Maj. Schoettelkotte

Team sports were the time
that the staff could unwind,
let loose, and have fun with
one another. Team sports
were also the time where
the squadrons could bond,
work on communication
skills, and build an ever
firmer relationship with one
another.

Sports

Soccer
Ninja
Ultimate Hackie Sack
Extreme Hide and Seek

These are the times that we
will remember because this
is where we all found ourselves and our friends.
OHWG Encampment 2012
will be something that we
will cherish forever.

Page 3

Final STW

Game Pictures

C/1st Lt Kirby
Squadron 1

What Squadron Commanders are Expecting
Squadron One: 1st Lt. Kirby

Squadron Two: Capt. Barnes

Lt. Kirby is looking forward
to seeing the upcoming generation of cadets at this
years encampment. He and
his squadron staff have
come up with goals that they
will strive to achieve
throughout the week. Two of
their biggest goals are receiving top scores at encampment and giving cadets
a good impression of CAP.
The staff have been training
hard in order to achieve these goals and are looking
forward to encampment.

Capt. Barnes has high hopes
for his squadron. He is really
hoping to see that how his
staff prepared is really benefiting the cadets. One key
thing they are working on is
motivation for the cadets to
want to stay at encampment
the whole week. This is important to their squadron
goal of achieving 100% graduation, which is harder than
it sounds. Capt. Barnes is very
happy with how the staff is
doing.

Squadron Three: 1st Lt.
O’Grady
“Servant Leaders”, Confident
but Competent”. These are
just a few of the goals that
are being stressed by Squadron three commander Lt.
O’Grady. Squadron three has
made great progress and are
constantly motivating each
other in preparation for encampment. Lt. O’Grady is
looking forward to the arrival
of the cadets and seeing her
staff in action.

C/Capt Barnes
Squadron 2

Midnight PT!
Cadet staff must be ready for everything! If cadets want to go home, the staff needs to
strive to convince the cadet that Basic Encampment is beneficial to their CAP career if they
choose to go to various encampments or become an officer.
How will the cadets be prepared to face Encampment if the staff isn’t?

C/1st Lt O’Grady
Squadron 3

Page 4

STW on the War

PT
Physical Training!
Gets the staff prepared for the cadets, as well as
builds confidence in themselves and their staff.
Because everyone has different backgrounds from
their squadrons, pt practice is essential in order to
put them in uniform styles of training.
As the squadrons push their way toward Encampment, motivation is key in order to keep them focused on the prize: Honor Flight. Honor Flight is
an achievement that everyone is striving for and will do anything to get there. However, the
achievement is not reachable if the staff themselves aren’t ready to motivate and push their cadets. During the final STW, staff members became closer than ever as they discovered the deeper meanings of teamwork and motivation. What exactly did they find in those two words? Ask
them yourselves because you may be surprised to hear what they discovered.

Inspection
The final STW inspections ensured that flight staff and support
staff alike were prepared to present themselves to the cadets.
Lead by Example!

Lead
By
Example

C/LtCol Neuville could not stress enough that the cadets will
follow whatever example we set for the cadets to follow. If
staff uniforms are slacking, then so will the cadets’ uniforms
because they will think that it is acceptable.
The inspections were lead by Squadron Commanders in order
to observe and review their staff’s progress, as well as seeing
what areas need improvement before placing themselves in
front of the cadets. How will your uniforms look at Encampment?

Pass in Review
“Column of flights, right flight, column right, march”
This command is the called by each squadron commander right at the start of the pass in review portion of the graduation ceremony. The pass in review
is a time where both cadets and staff get to shine.
They get to show off how much they have grown
during the encampment week to wing and region
staff, their proud parents, and friends. The purpose
of a ceremony like this is to display proficiency and
the state of training of the cadets at the encampment, promote teamwork and pride in the Civil Air
Patrol organization, and accord distinctive honors
to distinguished individuals and our national symbols such as the United States Flag .

Page 5

Final STW

Required Staff Training (RST)
In order for us to stay with
CAP during Encampment, all
of staff—including Seniors—
had to take part in a 75 minute class covering everything not to do as a member
on staff.
The goal [of leadership] is to
get your followers to take
direction from you not because you enforce the rules
or because you have power
over them, but because they
feel inclined to do so.

One of the slides in the
presentation consisted a
quote along theses lines and
truly touched all of the leaders in the room because it
spoke to us and said “yes,
show them who is in charge,
but gain their trust and respect so that they want to
carry out their tasks.

Planning for Cadets
C/LtCol Neuville made clear to the staff that while at chow, if the cadets are
silent, we are silent.
“We aren’t here to socialize or gossip.”
Although talking amongst each other about the “lazy” or “progressing” cadets
is very tempting at chow, professionalism is key. In order for the cadets to
understand that we truly mean business, we must look the part. Every guideline in the BCTM (Basic Cadet Training Manual) that the cadets are expected
to follow, the staff must parallel these standards. This includes drill, sleeping
arrangements, and talking privileges.
REMEMBER: LEAD BY EXAMPLE

Squadron Pictures

Squadron 1—The Thinkers

Squadron 2—The Avengers

Squadron 3—The Jedi

Wise Words from C/Chief Michael Miller
I look forward to working with all of you at Encampment and I know it will go well. Remember, we
must strive to be our absolute best!
“The truth of the matter is that you always know the
right thing to do. The hard part is doing it.”
-Gen Herbert Norman Schwarzkopf, U.S. Army
Ret.

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& check out the PT
video

Random Picture Goodness

Eagle Squadron News
DECEMBER 2011

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 1

Cadet 2Lt. Gregory Jenkins Receives Billy Mitchell
Second Lieutenant Gregory
Jenkins received the General
Billy Mitchell Award during a
promotion ceremony on November 7, 2011. He is a senior at
West Geauga High School. Cadet 2Lt Jenkins was promoted
by Bruce Johnstone, Maj. USAF
and Theodore L. Shaffer, Lt.
Col, CAP and John Porter, Lt.
Col, CAP.

Cadet Jenkins presented with the Billy
Mitchel Plaque by
Bruce Johnstone,
Maj. USAF

Eagle Composite
Squadron is pleased to
announce that Cadet
Member, Cadet

The General Billy Mitchell
Award is earned by Civil Air Patrol cadets who have successfully completed the second
phase of the cadet program. It
marks the end of the enlisted
phase of the cadet program;
cadets are promoted to Cadet
Second Lieutenants upon receipt and, by extension, Cadet
Officers. The award is given in
honor of Maj Gen William "Billy"

S
Mitchell, former Deputy Chief of the
Army Air Service and military aviation p
visionary.
e

In order to earn this award, cadets
must pass a series of leadership,
aerospace and physical fitness tests
and attend character development
training for each achievement from
Cadet Airman Basic through Cadet
Chief Master Sergeant. Cadets must
pass a comprehensive exam covering aerospace topics and leadership
theory. In additional, they must complete staff duty reports, mentor other
cadets in aerospace training, pass a
physical fitness exam, and lead moral leadership discussions. In addition,
cadets must attend a military-style
encampment before this award is
made, and have maintained active
membership in the Civil Air Patrol for
at least 18 months since joining. 15%
of Civil Air Patrol cadets achieve the
Mitchell Award.

Squadron Honored to Present Colors at Hockey Game
Our Squadron was invited to and presented the
colors during the national anthem at the Lake
Erie Monsters Hockey
game on Saturday November 19th. 47 Cadets
family and friends attended and over 10,000
were in attendance at
the Quicken Loans Arena which made it an
excellent opportunity for
exposure for our squadron and CAP in general.
Thanks to all for their
participation.

c
i
a
l
p
o
i
n
t
s
o
f
i
n
t
e
r
e
s
t
:

Inside this
issue:

New Cadet Profile
Cadet Volunteer

2

A Look Back

2

And a Look Forward

3

Cadet Profile

3

Commanders Corner
Left to right C/SSgt Queisser, C/SMSgt
Best, C/Amn Jenkins, C/SrA Gulden

2

3

Summer Encampment

4

EAGLE SQUADRON NEWS

Page 2

Welcome New Cadets to our Team
On behalf of 004 Eagle Composite squadron we would like to
welcome the following
Cadets:
Reginald D Clark
Luke A. DiPidova
William C Hammond
Emily M Jenkins
Ashley N Jenkins
Daniel Kiec
Paul W Turnage
Geoffrey Battenfield

Your membership
in CAP will
allow us to
fully execute
our missions of
emergency
services, cadet
programs and
aerospace
Education

Kristen M Urasek
As a CAP member, you are
part of a long, proud history
of selfless service. I hope
you know how much we
value the donation of your
most valuable asset – your
personal time. We can’t
thank you enough for your
dedication to our organization.
Please spread the word to
your friends and classmates on the great things
CAP is doing. Why not invite them to a meeting?

Continuing the Mission of Volunteerism
In the spirit of the Civil Air
Patrol, Cadets and Senior
Members from 004 volunteered our services to help
those less fortunate. Our
Members assisted in packing and distributing food as
part of the Mayor’s Holiday
Basket Give-Away Program. After the program
ended the squadron was
able to spend a few

minutes with volunteers
from many different organizations discussing
the important missions of
Civil Air Patrol as well as
taking a few group photographs. This is an excellent annual volunteer opportunity for our squadron
to participate in.

C/Amn Kristen Urasek

A Look Back at 2011


 Airport Marker & Flight
Chart Course

 Color Guard– Fairport
Harbor Parade, Lyndhurst Home Days Parade and Lake Erie
Monsters Hockey
Game

Invaluable Moral Leadership briefings conducted by Lt. Sadler as
well as informative
Safety Briefings conducted by Col Bream.

 Model Aircraft Build

 ELT Mission Practice



 Aerospace Academic
Challenge competition

 SAREX Mission

Many thanks go out to
C/SSgt Cassandra Espenschied for providing
her leadership as Cadet Commander.

We had a fantastic educational and fun year:
 Lost Nation Air Show

 Solon Gun Club

 Certified Radio Operator Course

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 1

Page 3

….And A look Forward to 2012
2012 will be a year for 004
Eagle Composite Squadron to soar. We are planning aggressive cadet recruitment, community outreach and fund raising activities to ensure that we
are the premier CAP
squadron in NE Ohio.
We are planning another
very exciting year consisting of the “usual” events as
well as some new adventures.
We will be visiting the National Museum of he U.S.

Air Force April 17-20 as the
Doolittle Tokyo Raiders fly
in for there 70th anniversary reunion. This aviation
event will be the largest
gathering of 25 B-25’s
since WWII. The reunion
will include autograph sessions, memorial services at
the museum as well as a
public lunch and banquet.
Congratulations to Cadet
2Lt. Gregory Jenkins for
being selected as current
Cadet Commander as well
as Capt. Dennis Silvia being selected as Squadron

Commander.
Thanks go to outgoing
Squadron Commander
Maj. Jody Slingluff for the
leadership you provided in
2011.
Tell us what events you
would like to do in 2012.
Cadet input is invaluable
and welcome. Please
reach out to 1 Lt. Prhne
Squadron Scheduling Officer. Have a wonderful
2012.

Cadet Profile—C/AB Chase Hammond
This episode we feature
the newest member to our
squadron C/AB Chase
Hammond, Chase is a 17
year old Sophomore attending University School.
Chase, his parents and
sister Hayley moved to
Chagrin Falls 2 years ago

from Charlotte, NC.
Most of Chase’s free time
is occupied by currently
building a home made fully
functional hovercraft, cant
wait to take a ride in that
machine.
Chase joined CAP to learn
to become a leader which

should benefit him greatly
since his next goal is to
attend the US Air Force
Academy and study Aeronautical Engineering.
Fun fact about Chase is
that he was born in Sydney
Australia and has lived in
Bangkok Thailand as well

as Hong Kong.
On behalf of 004 Eagle
Composite Squadron,
Welcome to the Team
and continued success
in achieving your goals.

Commanders Corner - Jody Slingluff, Maj., CAP
As your commander for
over the past two years I
wanted to thank my senior
staff, for all their support,
dedication and hard work.
As volunteers, they all
have busy lives and work
schedules but always find
the time to make our
squadron run smoothly.
I want to also acknowledge
our cadets. I am very proud
of this group of young men

and women. They are all
hard working dedicated
individuals, who are busy
with school, sports and
other activities, but find the
extra time to participate in
CAP. Anytime our squadron has had an outside
function with the public, I
have had nothing but outstanding reports on their
performance, respect and
professionalism.

I want to also thank the
parents, who without their
support we could not have
these cadets participating
in the CAP program. It
takes their dedication to
show interest in their children’s activities, motivate
and to simply get them to
our weekly meetings and
outside activities.
We look forward to an exciting, busy 2012 year for

our squadron.
There are many activities
and outside events planned
for next year.
Let’s make 2012 another
successful and fun year for
the squadron.

004 Eagle Composite Squadron
Woods King Green Road Armory
4303 Green Rd
Highland Hills, Ohio 44128

Meeting Monday’s 7p-9p
Contact Squadron Commander
Jody Slingluff , Maj., CAP

Civil Air Patrol, the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a nonprofit organization with
more than 60,000 members nationwide. CAP, in its Air Force auxiliary role, performs 90
percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air
Force Rescue Coordination Center. Its volunteers also perform homeland security, disaster relief and counterdrug missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies.
The members play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to over
25,000 young people currently participating in CAP cadet programs. CAP has been performing missions for America for more than 68 years. For more information on CAP, visit
www.gocivilairpatrol.com.

Were On the Web
gocivilairpatrol.
com
oh004.ohwg.cap.
gov
Facebook: Civil
Air Patrol-GLR004

Summer Encampment 2012 Details (Cadets & Staff)
Civil Air
Patrol
encampments are
a truly
unique
opportunity for
young
adults
between the ages of 12-21
to expand their leadership
skills and gain an early
understanding of the military lifestyle. Over the
course of a week, new cadets are introduced to a
variety of mental and physical challenges designed to
build and enforce the Civil
Air Patrol Core Values:
Integrity, Volunteer Service,

Excellence, and Respect.
Successful completion of
an encampment is required
for the Billy Mitchell Award
and opens up many new
and exciting opportunities
for CAP cadets, including
numerous college and flight
scholarships, National Cadet Special Activities, and
the ability to return to encampment as cadet staff.
The 2012 Ohio Wing Encampment will be held 1624 June 2012 at WrightPatterson Air Force Base in
Dayton, Ohio.
For more information regarding encampment, you
may e-mail us at encampment@ohwg.cap.gov.

CIVIL AIR PATROL (CAP)
United States Air Force (USAF) Auxiliary
Ross P. Barrett Cadet Squadron 702 (GLR-OH-070)
th

269 Communications Combat Squadron, Bldg 109
Springfield ANG Base
706 Regula Avenue; Springfield OH 45502
CAP Squadron
Meetings:
Every Thursday,
1800 - 2000
(Arrive by 1745)

www.gocivilairpatrol.com
Members Directory:
www.capmembers/com
ESERVICES
Log in with CAP ID

Squadron Commander:
1st Lt Wendell D. Meade
wendell.meade@ohwg.cap.gov

SQUADRON 702 NEWSLETTER
INSIDE THIS EDITION
Page
COMMANDER’S CORNER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
EAKER CADET VISITS SQUADRON . . . . . . . .
1
CADET ACHIEVEMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
WHAT’S BEEN GOING ON? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
CADET SPOTLIGHT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
MEET THE STAFF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4
CAP SQUADRON 702 NAMESAKE . . . . . . . . . .
4
WHAT’S COMING UP? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
CAP CALENDAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5
For questions or comments, or to provide input, contact
2d Lt Marsha Loges, marsha.loges@ohwg.cap.gov .

EAKER CADET VISITS SQUADRON
For the past several weeks, Squadron 702 has had the
pleasure of the company of a former active Squadron
member, CAP Eaker Cadet,
C/Lt Col Alan R. Ehrle. C/Lt
Col Ehrle is among the top 2%
of all CAP Cadets, having
attained the rank of Cadet
Lieutenant Colonel and earned
the prestigious General Ira C.
Eaker Award.
C/Lt Col Ehrle has participated
with CAP Squadron 702 for six
years. He was promoted to his
current rank in December, 2009, and he is currently a
member of Squadron 001 in Salina, KS. He joined CAP
because of an interest in becoming a fighter pilot; he saw
CAP as a good way to learn about the military, without
making any formal commitment.
While Ehrle’s long-term goals are still evolving, he is now
very interested in veterinary medicine, and he hopes to
open a Veterinary clinic, or work for the San Diego zoo,
or travel world-wide as a Veterinarian. He also has an
interest in helping with advancements in regenerative
medicine.
C/Lt Col Ehrle is a graduate of Northwestern High School
in Springfield, OH. The 20 year old college student is
pursuing studies at Allen County Community College in
Iola, KS, where he is a sophomore. In May he will have
completed all requirements for an Associate Degree and
he plans to transfer to San Diego State University, where
he will pursue a Bachelor’s Degree in Biology and
Zoology.
(Continued on Page 3)

JAN - MAR 2012 EDITION
COMMANDER’S CORNER
Squadron Commander,
1st Lt Wendell D. Meade

Welcome to the New Year –
2012 – a year in which we
expect to see continued
growth and improvement
throughout CAP Cadet Squadron 702. Our CAP Cadets
have experienced remarkable achievements over the
past year, successfully completing training and posting
several promotions and we are now positioned - both as
individuals and as a Team - to undertake new
challenges and to progress even further through the
phases of the CAP Cadet Program.
Teamwork, Training, Recruitment, and Retention, are
the watchwords for our renewed efforts as we advance
with CAP Program activities, focusing on developing
practical and leadership skills, self-discipline, and selfesteem in Cadets, while building on CAP Core Values.
We hope to strengthen the bond among all our CAP
members through our Wingman Program, wherein our
more advanced Cadets serve as mentors to our younger
Cadets. This not only reinforces leadership abilities, but it
also accelerates learning by providing guidance and
support in each of the elements of the CAP Program Leadership, Aerospace Education, Physical Fitness,
Character Development, and Activities. The improved
Teamwork serves to unite all members, driving them to
work harder, together, to achieve their common goals.
This increase in the active leadership roles of our Cadets
also results in improved self-confidence, commitment,
and personal responsibility.
Another important target outcome of all our Squadron
undertakings is Fun. Through a mix of study, discussion,
interaction, and hands-on activities, we create an
environment where the CAP Program and its associated
challenges are exciting and enjoyable, as well as
educational. Whether we’re focusing on military history,
emergency services, citizenship, or any other subject, if
CAP is a pleasant experience, our Cadets are likely to
recruit other interested candidates to join our ranks.
I encourage Parents to visit our Squadron Meetings this
year, and to become involved with us in the pursuit of
sustained excellence and achievement in all our Cadets,
as they grow into Future Aerospace Leaders.

CAP CORE VALUES: « INTEGRITY « EXCELLENCE « RESPECT « VOLUNTEER SERVICE
Page 1 of 6

CADET ACHIEVEMENTS

In a 27 October 2011 formal Civil Air Patrol (CAP)
promotion ceremony, a CAP Cadet from Ross P. Barrett
Cadet Squadron 702/070 was recognized for his
achievements.
Cadet Senior Airman Joseph I.
Batchelor was promoted to the rank of Cadet Staff
Sergeant. Cadet Batchelor, who lives in Springfield, OH
and is home-schooled through Dayton Christian Home
School, had been a member of the CAP Cadet Program
for 14 months at the time of promotion.

In a 15 December 2011 formal Civil Air Patrol (CAP)
promotion ceremony, a CAP Cadet from Ross P. Barrett
Cadet Squadron 702/070 was recognized for her
achievements. Cadet Senior Airman Alexandra K.
Shishoff was promoted to the rank of Cadet Staff
Sergeant. Cadet Shishoff, who lives in Beavercreek, OH
and attends Beavercreek High School, had been a
member of the CAP Cadet Program for 21 months at the
time of promotion.

Pictured above (l to r) are CAP Squadron 702/070 Deputy
Commander for Cadets 2d Lt Heather Fox, visiting
C/Lt Col Alan Ehrle, and C/SSgt Alexandra K. Shishoff.
Pictured above (l to r) CAP Squadron 702/070 Squadron
Commander 2d Lt Wendell Meade “pins on” the promotion rank
insignia for CAP C/SSgt Joseph Batchelor.

In a 01 December 2011 formal Civil Air Patrol (CAP)
promotion ceremony, a CAP Cadet from Ross P. Barrett
Cadet Squadron 702/070 was recognized for his
achievements. Cadet Airman Grant W. Kramer was
promoted to the rank of Cadet Airman First Class.
Cadet Kramer, who lives in Springfield, OH and attends
Kenton Ridge High School, had been a member of the
CAP Cadet Program for 5 months at the time of
promotion.

In a 15 December 2011 formal CAP Squadron 702
ceremony, Cadet Staff Sergeant Joseph Batchelor
received the Wright Brothers Award and Ribbon. This
milestone award marks the successful completion of
Phase I of the Cadet Program and promotion to the rank
of Cadet Staff Sergeant.
It requires specific
achievements in the areas of leadership, physical fitness,
drill and ceremonies, and character.

Pictured above (l to r) CAP Squadron 702/070 Deputy Squadron
Commander for Cadets 2d Lt Heather Fox and visiting
C/Lt Col Alan Ehrle congratulate C/SSgt Joseph Batchelor.
Cadet Sqdn Cmdr, C/2d Lt Joshua Cluney stands at attention.
Pictured above (l to r) CAP Squadron 702/070 Squadron
Commander 1st Lt Wendell Meade “pins on” the promotion rank
insignia for CAP C/A1C Grant W. Kramer.

CAP CORE VALUES: « INTEGRITY « EXCELLENCE « RESPECT « VOLUNTEER SERVICE
Page 2 of 6

WHAT’S BEEN GOING ON?

Christmas Party
On 15 Dec 2011 CAP Cadets enjoyed a Christmas
Party, and were treated to surprise gifts.

Wreaths Across America
In a 10 December 2011 ceremony at the Dayton Veterans
Administration Center Cemetery, CAP Cadets representing
several Squadrons in Southwest Ohio joined CAP members
from across the nation in a formal wreath laying ceremony.
The event was sponsored by Wreaths Across America, an
organization whose mission is to Remember, Honor, and
Teach the legacy of unbounded patriotism of military
veterans who have given their lives for their country. During
the ceremony, Cadet Senior Airman Alexandra K.
Shishoff, of CAP Cadet Squadron 702/070, played Taps,
paying homage to all fallen military.

Pictured above, accompanied by an honorary flag bearer, CAP
Squadron 702/070 C/SRA Alexandra Shishoff plays Taps.

Aerospace Education Presentations
CAP Cadets enjoyed a trip to the National Museum of the
United States Air Force, on 26 Nov 2011. An assignment
for that visit was for each Cadet to prepare a report on a
selected aircraft. Those reports were presented on 15 Dec
st
2011, and awards were given for the best works. 1 place
nd
went to C/SSGT Joe Batchelor, 2 place to Cadet Isaiah
rd
Kramer, and 3 place to C/2d Lt Joshua Cluney.

Pictured above, the CAP Squadron 702/070 Cadets
pose for a group photo during their Christmas Party.

Pictured above, the CAP Squadron 702/070 Cadets
open their surprise gifts during their Christmas Party.

EAKER CADET

(Continued from Page 1)

Speaking of the value he has gained from his CAP
experience, C/Lt Col Ehrle said, “CAP has helped me
become a positive influence on the world… by teaching
me about followership, leadership, communication
skills, respect, honor, and integrity”. He praised his
years in CAP, saying, “It has created an environment
where a person can learn from his mistakes and
continue to grow as he progresses through the
program”. He cited numerous benefits he has received
from CAP, “…so many opportunities, from getting to
see places that civilians don't get to see, getting to
take Orientation flights, helping out with air shows,
learning leadership skills through encampments and
squadron activities, and even helping me to achieve
scholarships”.
Asked what words of advice he has for other CAP
Cadets, C/Lt Col Ehrle said, “There are times when
CAP gets tough but as long as you have teamwork,
motivation, and enthusiasm and you are willing to work
hard, you can achieve anything in the Cadet Program”.

Pictured above (l to r), are the CAP Squadron 702/070
AE Presentation award winners, Cadet Isaiah Kramer,
C/2d Lt Joshua Cluney, and C/SSgt Joseph Batchelor,

Considering his high level of accomplishments in CAP,
C/Lt Col Ehrle serves as an inspirational role model for
all of our young Squadron 702 Cadets.

CAP CORE VALUES: « INTEGRITY « EXCELLENCE « RESPECT « VOLUNTEER SERVICE
Page 3 of 6

CADET SPOTLIGHT

MEET THE STAFF

Each edition features a brief personal bio of a CAP Cadet,
highlighting that Cadet’s CAP activities, goals, and special interests.

Each edition features a brief personal bio of a Senior Member
(SM), highlighting that SM’s CAP background and experience.

Today’s spotlight is on C/SSgt Joseph Batchelor, who,
since becoming a member of the CAP Cadet Program about
1½ years ago, has risen to the CAP NCO rank and has
earned the Wright Brothers Award,. He is 13 years old, is in
the seventh grade, and is home-schooled through the
Dayton Christian Home School.

Today’s focus is on Senior Member Paul R. Isaacs,
Squadron Deputy Commander, who has been
associated with CAP for one year.
He also is
Aerospace Education Officer for the Squadron.

C/SSgt Batchelor’s favorite CAP activities are the bivouacs,
and he especially enjoyed the experience with other CAP
Squadron Cadets during the
weekend D-Day re-enactment.
C/SSgt Batchelor says his favorite
subject is History, and his
personal hero is President Ronald
Reagan. He states with pride that
he is a “Reagan Conservative”,
and that even though he wasn’t
alive during Reagan’s presidency,
what he most admires about
President Reagan is his courage.
C/SSgt Batchelor lives in Springfield with his parents and
his six brothers and sisters. He has a number of family
responsibilities, including yard work and mowing, and he
already is learning how to cook. He likes music and plays
the trumpet, and he especially enjoys spending time with his
dog, Sophie, a black Labrador Retriever.
Kudos to C/SSgt Batchelor for his dedication and hard work
as he continues to advance in the CAP program!

CAP SQUADRON 702 NAMESAKE
Written by CAP C/A1C Grant W. Kramer

Just who was Ross Paige
Barrett? Ross P. Barrett was
born in Cambridge, Ohio on May
25, 1922, which was an
immensely turbulent time for
African-Americans wanting an
improved style of life. During his
high school career, Barrett was
an upright and moral studentathlete who excelled and stood
above all others in his class. In
particular, one of his favorite
classes was industrial arts, which includes many things
such as woodworking and machine repair.
Barrett graduated with a scholarship to attend courses and
participate in football at Wilberforce University in 1940.
While he was enrolled there, he was in the Army ROTC that
was installed at Wilberforce. The Japanese attack on Pearl
Harbor, which brought America into World War II, disrupted
Barrett’s typical college life. In 1943, the cadet corps was
mobilized and Barrett was shipped off to fight in the
European theater of the Second World War. He fought with
the 371st Regiment of 24th Infantry Division against Fascist
Italian forces and he won many medals, including the Purple
Heart, Bronze Star Medal and Mediterranean Theater of

SM Isaacs served in the
United States Air Force
(USAF) from 1966 to
1997 where his career
specialty
area
was
Aircraft Maintenance and
Logistics. He served in
the Philippines, VietNam,
Panama, Oman, and
Saudi Arabia. He was promoted to the rank of Colonel
in 1994 and retired from military service in 1997. SM
Isaacs resides in Centerville, Ohio, and is employed as
a USAF Foreign Military Sales Consultant, for
Dynamics Research Corporation.
Speaking of his commitment to CAP service, SM
Isaacs said, “My military experiences developed in me
a personal sense of responsibility and commitment to
others and to our country. Not a lot of our youth
nowadays have the opportunity of military experience
so where will they develop that sense of responsibility
and commitment? Few of our schools, homes and
other institutions provide that training. However, I do
see it taking place in the service auxiliaries like CAP. It
is enjoyable to see the change that takes place in our
young people as they get more and more involved in
CAP, developing into responsible young adults."
A heartfelt CAP Salute goes to SM Isaacs for his
many years of esteemed service to our country, and
his continued contributions to the CAP Cadet Program!

(Continued from previous column)

Operations Ribbons with two battle participation stars.
In addition to all of these amazing achievements for
combat, Barrett also managed to complete Army
Officer Training. After WW II, he decided to endure
combat again during the Korean War, serving with the
th
th
24 regiment of the 25 Infantry Division. Even after
military life, Barrett continued to achieve in many
different aspects of his life.
After Barrett left the military, Barrett decided to
complete his studies and he earned a master’s degree
from Kent State University. During his career he
became an instructor of Industrial Arts, and the first
black principal of South High School in Springfield, OH.
After he retired from both of those positions, he still did
volunteer work and he gave back to his community in
many ways. He was also an Ohio Civil Air Patrol
(CAP) pilot who died while working for CAP.
In conclusion, Ross Paige Barrett was, indeed, a highly
honorable and righteous American; someone after
whom we are proud to name our CAP Squadron.

(Continued in next column)

CAP CORE VALUES: « INTEGRITY « EXCELLENCE « RESPECT « VOLUNTEER SERVICE
Page 4 of 6

WHAT’S COMING UP?
January

CAP CALENDAR

February

Special Events:
See Squadron OIC for additional details.

March

April

Squadron 702 meets every Thursday, 1800 - 2000
(arrive by 1745), at Springfield ANG Base, Bldg. 109,
unless indicated otherwise.

Sqdn
Meeting

Refer to the latest OPLANS/OPORDs
for the most current information.
Uniform of the
Planned Activities
Day (UOD)

JAN
05 Jan

BDUs

Drill
Squadron Discussion

12 Jan

BDUs

Leadership
Great Start
Parents’ Night

19 Jan

PT Gear

Safety
Testing
Character Development
PT

Ohio Wing Field Trip
Sat, 18 Feb, 1000-1600
National Museum of the USAF
st
Sqdn OIC: 1 Lt Meade
UOD: Dress Blues
see OH WG web site Calendar for more info

26 Jan

BDUs

Aerospace Education
Parents’ Night

FEB
02 Feb

BDUs

Leadership

Ohio Wing Cadet Competition (Color Guard, Drill Team)
Sat, 10 Mar, 0700-1700
Columbus Police Academy, Columbus
Sqdn OIC: 2d Lt Fox
UOD: see OH WG web site info

09 Feb

BDUs

Aerospace Education

16 Feb

PT Gear

Safety
Testing
Character Development
PT

23 Feb

BDUs

Communications
Team Building
Parents’ Night

MAR
01 Mar

BDUs

Leadership

08 Mar

BDUs

Aerospace Education

15 Mar

PT Gear

Testing
Character Development
PT

22 Mar

BDUs

Safety
Professional Development
Parents’ Night

29 Mar

Civilian Attire

Squadron Facility Clean-up

CAP Training Leaders of Cadets (TLC)
Sat, Sun; 07-08 Jan
Wright-Patterson AFB, Building 206
st
Sqdn OIC: 1 Lt Meade
UOD: see OH WG web site TLC email info
CPR/First Aid Joint Training
Sat, 14 Jan
Squadron 706, Troy WACO Historical Field
Sqdn OIC: 2d Lt Fox
UOD: BDUs
Model Rocketry
Sat, 21 Jan, 1000-1600
2d Lt Fox Residence, Xenia
Sqdn OIC: 2d Lt Fox
UOD: Civilian Attire

Bivouac
Fri, Sat, Sun, 23-25 Mar
Warfighter Camp, WPAFB
Sqdn OIC: 2d Lt Fox
UOD: see OH WG web site Calendar
CAP Professional Development Opportunity (PDO)
Sat, Sun; 05-06 May
Defense Supply Center, Columbus (DSCC)
Sqdn OIC: 2d Lt Fox
UOD: see OH WG PDO web site info

GET WELL SOON!
Special thoughts, prayers, and get-well wishes go to
CAP Squadron 702/070 Deputy Commander for Cadets,
2d Lt Heather M. Fox, who is ill and may undergo
surgery. Best wishes for a speedy recovery!

CAP CORE VALUES: « INTEGRITY « EXCELLENCE « RESPECT « VOLUNTEER SERVICE
Page 5 of 6

Civil Air Patrol (CAP), the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a nonprofit organization with more than
60,000 members nationwide. CAP, in its Air Force auxiliary role, performs 90 percent of continental U.S.
inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) and has
been credited by the AFRCC with saving more than 100 lives this fiscal year. Its volunteers also perform
homeland security, disaster relief and counterdrug missions at the request of federal, state and local
agencies. The members play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to over 25,000
young people currently participating in CAP cadet programs. CAP has been performing missions for
America for more than 68 years. For more information on CAP, visit www.gocivilairpatrol.com or
www.capvolunteernow.com.

SEMPER VIGILANS
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CIVIL AIR PATROL (CAP)
United States Air Force (USAF) Auxiliary
Ross P. Barrett Cadet Squadron 702 (GLR-OH-070)
th
269 Communications Combat Squadron, Bldg 109
Springfield ANG Base
706 Regula Avenue
Springfield OH 45502

CAP CORE VALUES: « INTEGRITY « EXCELLENCE « RESPECT « VOLUNTEER SERVICE
Page 6 of 6

Volume 1, Issue 1
February 2012

Introducing “FLIGHT LINES”
The Mighty 282’s Official Newsletter

FLIGHT LINES

WRIGHT BROS. 282ND COMPOSITE SQUADRON, CAP

It has been sometime since
we have published our last
newsletter, and we have
begun the process again!

promotions and awards and
lots more about what is
happening and what we will be
doing!

Flight Lines will become
the Official Newsletter of
the Wright Bros. 282nd
Composite Squadron and
will be published on a
monthly basis. This
publication will be
emailed out monthly and
extra copies made
available at squadron
meetings.
This newsletter will
contain information about
our squadron activities,
upcoming events, bivouacs,
dates to remember,

things happening in the
squadron. Please submit all
articles or ideas to 1st Lt Chris
Dix by email at
chris.dix@squadron282.com.
I would also appreciate
any feedback, good or bad,
on this newsletter and what
you like and don't like
about it. This is YOUR
Newsletter and I would
like it to be useful and
informative to all members
of the Squadron.

The Mighty 282 and “future” 284 at a 2010 Bivouac

I will look to each of you to
help with articles and news
worthy information about

This months addition is
just a sample of how the
newsletter will be set up,
however, if there is
anything that you see and
don’t like, or don't see and

Our Squadron Patch
The history of squadron
patches goes way back to
WWI. A young American
ambulance driver in France
was exposed, for the first time,
to a new form of art adorning
the cowls of trucks and the
sides of airplanes. This art
form later became known as
"nose art". This ambulance









driver was quick to realize the
morale boosting effects of this
art form among the troops, and
it was an experience he kept in
the back of his mind after he
returned to the United States in
1918. Who was this
Ambulance driver? His name
was Walt Disney and he was
first contracted by the US Navy

Promotions & Awards

to create a mascot for a new ship.
From there, all the armed forces
wanted these “cartoons” and the
Squadron patch was born.
Can you tell me what our patch
symbolizes? The first 2 cadets to
email me the correct answers will
receive a free, brand new,
Squadron Cap! Send your email
to chris.dix@squadron282.com

SM K. Bowling to 2nd Lt

February Events & Activities:

2nd Lt L. Fecher to 1st Lt

 Feb 4 & 5 OH SAREX

1st Lt C. Dix, 1st Lt T. Koeller, 1st Lt A. Sturgill
awarded the Benjamin O Davis Award for Level II

 Feb 14 Valentines Day

C/1st Lt D. Raduenz to Cadet Commander
C/CMSgt B. Fecher to Cadet North Flight
Commander
C/TSgt C. Hookassian to NCO in charge of South
Flight
1st Lt C. Dix Senior Rating Cadet Programs

 Feb 18 & 19 OH SAREX Rain date
 February Activity TBA

The Mighty 282’s Commanders Corner
Greetings members of the Mighty 282!
I can’t express how proud and humble I am
to have been selected to serve as
commander of one of the most respected
squadrons in Ohio Wing.
In my short time with the squadron, I have
found that our senior members are
motivated, enthusiastic, and willing to do
what is needed to accomplish the missions
of Civil Air Patrol. We have a young and
eager cadet corps and I look forward to
working with them to help them advance in
the cadet program. There is nothing I enjoy
more than promoting and presenting
ribbons to cadets.
As you know, there has been a lot of
tension, drama, and friction within our
organization the past few months. We

cannot let this drive the squadron
apart. If we do, this squadron will
collapse and I know you certainly don’t
want to see that happen. So, I’m asking
all of you to put your differences, hard
feelings, and misgivings aside and
perform your duties to ensure our
squadron…YOUR squadron…is strong.
I will be presenting our annual awards, as
well as other awards and promotions on
either 7 or 8 February. I am trying to
secure the VFW hall for the 7th so that
our wing commander, Col Mathews, can
attend and present some of our awards. I
hope you can be there.

-mail is the best way to contact me at
mike.hood@squadron282.com or by my
Wing email at the following address—
michael.hood@ohwg.cap.gov.
Due to my work schedule, trying to reach
me via telephone/cell phone is a “hit-ormiss” proposition.
That’s all for this month.
Semper Vigilans!
MICHAEL K. HOOD, Lt Col, CAP
Commander

I’m still getting around to meeting all of
you. I have an open door policy, so feel
free to contact me. Sending a squadron e

Cadet Spotlight— C/SrA Marissa Matassa
Marissa Matassa is a C/SrA in the Mighty
282 and has been a member since March
2011. She is in 7th grade at Ankeney
Middle School. Her favorite subjects are
band and English. In band she plays
percussion. She hopes to become a
drummer for the Beavercreek High
School Marching Band. She loves going
to the football games with all her friends
and sometimes the band actually plays
better than the football team.
Something you may not know about
Marissa is that in 3rd & 4th grade she
played football for Eager Beaver
Football. Her favorite part of playing

football was that she got to tackle
people. Oh – and she really loved
conditioning! No – Really! She also
played soccer and was in Cheerleading in
5th & 6th

favorites.

grades. Another sport that Marissa
enjoys is dance – street & hip hop are her

When Marissa grows up Marissa plans to
join the Air Force and then to become a

Marissa also has two pets. A dog named
Sasha and a cat named Toots (named
after Tootsie Rolls – you don’t want to
know why.) Sasha was rescued from the
Humane Society and is a Retriever/
Greyhound mix. She – the dog – LOVES
to play ball and go on hikes and swim at
the Narrows with Marissa. Toots is just
your average annoying cat. Marissa likes
to carry Toots around the house on her
shoulder – as if she were a monkey.

Did You Know, Civil Air Patrol:


Has the largest fleet of singleengine, piston aircraft in the
world.



Has a fleet of 1,000 emergency
services vehicles maintained for
training and mission support.



Page 2

Conducts 95% of all inland
search and rescue in the United
States, as tasked by the Air Force
Reserve Coordination Center.



Performs aerial reconnaissance for
homeland security.



Members in the 1940’s were known as
the “Sub-Chasers.”



Provides about 10% of each year’s
new classes entering military service
academies.



Provides college scholarships in
several disciplines.

FLIGHT

L I N ES

The Mighty 282!

Parents Committee
The Mighty 282 needs parents!
We would like to see the parents of our
cadets become more involved in the
squadron in a support role.
We are in need of parents who will be
willing to assist in squadron activities, be
chaperones, assist in meetings, provide
snacks and other functions. This would
be considered a “Sponsor Member” and
will not require you to attend meetings
VOLUME 1, ISSUE 1

each week or be in the “Full Member
Program” but on a as needed bases only.
This would require maybe 1 meeting a
month, or less depending on how many
we have involved.
If you are willing, or want more
information on how you can help, contact
1st Lt Chris Dix at
chris.dix@squadron282.com or call 937985-2820.

The success of our
Squadron lies not only
with the members of the
Squadron, but with the
Parents who assist and
serve the Squadron when
in need!
Page 3

WITH OVER FIFTY MEMBERS DEDICATED TO PERFORMING CIVIL AIR
PATROL'S IMPORTANT "MISSIONS FOR AMERICA", THE WRIGHT
BROTHERS 282nd AERO COMPOSITE SQUADRON INVITES YOU TO
EXPLORE WHAT CIVIL AIR PATROL HAS TO OFFER!
WRIGHT BROS. 282ND COMPOSITE
SQUADRON, CAP

Squadron 282 meets twice a week at
the following locations:
Tuesday Evenings
7:00pm to 9:15pm
Olivet Church
14135 Little Richmond Road
New Lebanon, Ohio 45345
Or
Wednesday Evenings
7:00pm to 9:15pm
Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #3438
5441 Marina Drive
West Carrollton, Ohio 45449
For More Information or Membership
Information Contact:
1st Lt Chris Dix
Phone: 937-985-2820
www.squadron282.com
E-mail: chris.dix@squadron282.com

The Mighty 282!

The Civil Air Patrol (CAP) is the civilian auxiliary of the United States Air Force. We
are a volunteer, non-profit organization made up of aviation-minded adult and youth
cadet members committed to serving the nation and our communities.
As an official auxiliary of the Air Force, CAP has three principal missions Emergency
Services, Cadet Programs and Aerospace Education.
Civil Air Patrol was organized December 1, 1941, as part of the U.S. Office of
Civilian Defense. During World War II, its members provided orientation flights to
thousands of prospective aviation cadets and recruits. Members also flew more than
24 million miles on coastal patrol operations, searching for German U-boats off the
coasts of the United States. Civil Air Patrol coastal patrol pilots summoned help for
91 ships in distress and 363 survivors of submarine attacks. Patrol crews spotted 173
enemy submarines, dropped bombs or depth charges on 57 of them and received
credit for sinking or seriously damaging at least two. Others were destroyed by planes
and ships summoned by Civil Air Patrol pilots.
Civil Air Patrol crews flew many other wartime missions, including a courier service
for airlift of personnel and light cargo; target towing and tracking flights for training
anti-aircraft gunners; powerline and pipeline surveillance; forest fire patrol; and
patrol along the southern U.S. border. Sixty-four members died while performing
operations in support of the armed forces in the early years of the Civil Air Patrol.
The organization became a permanent peacetime institution on July 1, 1946. On that
date, President Harry S. Truman signed Public Law 476 of the 79th Congress,
incorporating Civil Air Patrol in its present form.
Civil Air Patrol became a permanent civilian auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force in May
1948 with the enactment of Public Law 557 of the 80th Congress.

More Squadron Info
We Do Speaking Events!
Do you have an organization, club or ministry you
are involved in that brings in
speakers?
If so, we can provide a member to
speak at your meeting as a guest to
give your members more
information on Civil Air Patrol,
our history, membership, what we
are doing, and how to get
involved!

For more information, please contact our
Public Affairs Officer
1st Lt Chris Dix at 937-985-2820
or

Squadron Classifieds
Do you have CAP items that you are no longer in need of
that you want to sell or donate to a fellow member?
Are you in need of any CAP related items such as:
 Uniforms / ribbons or devices
 Emergency Service Equipment
 Radios
 Aircrew items
 Backpacks or other Gear
 Tents, Sleeping bags

If you do, then post your ad here! Forward your
information to 1st Lt Chris Dix and he will post
in our next edition!

Volume 1, Issue 2
March 2012

It has been several years since
the 282 has had a Color
Guard available for events
and competitions. However,
under the diligence and hard
work of Maj Spurling and
Capt Mitchell, our Color
Guard is back again!

FLIGHT LINES

WRIGHT BROTHERS 282ND AERO COMPOSITE SQUADRON

The Mighty 282 off to
Color Guard Competition!
banners have been used by
many armies in battle. They
served several purposes: to
identify units, for signaling and
to be a common point of
reference for the movements of
the soldiers in the unit,
enabling them to keep

Cadets Austin Koeller,
David Mead, Marissa
Matassa and Ethan Pitzer,
have been working hard to
bring back this important
part of our Squadron. The
amount of time they have
put in is tremendous giving
up evenings and Saturdays
to practice from dusk till
dawn.

formation.
The flag was also a symbol of
the unit. The loss of a unit's
flag was not only shameful,
but losing this central point of
reference could make the unit
break up. To protect the flag, a
detachment of soldiers was
assigned to guard it.
The first competition for
these cadets will be
March 10th, but due to
limited space, Capt
Mitchell tells us
spectators are not
permitted.
We wish the Mighty 282
Color Guard Good Luck
and God Speed in this
event!

Since early history, flags and

Why are we called the
“Mighty 282”
Lt Dix first coined the term the
“Mighty 282” when he did the
One Call Now meeting
announcements a couple years
ago.
The Merriam Webster
dictionary defines “Mighty” as
“possessing might, powerful
accomplished or characterized

by might, great or imposing in
size or extent, extraordinary.”
Our Squadron has always been
on the forefront in our Group
and Wing in many areas. We
have become to be known as
the “go to” Squadron when
something needs to be done.
Whether it be in search &

Promotions & Awards








C/1st Lt Raduenz Cadet Officer of the Year
C/SrA Marissa Matassa Cadet of the Year
1st Lt T. Koeller Sr. Member of the Year

rescue, training or organization,
Squadron 282 is always on top.
We are a MIGHTY FORCE!
Therefore, take pride in the
heritage you now posses, show
your “Mightiness” in all you do.
Make your squadron and
yourself proud of all we
accomplish together!

Events & Activities
 March 10th—Ohio Wing Color Guard
Competition.

Capt Hicks Commanders Commendation Award

 March 23-25—Multi Unit Group Bivouac.

C/SrA Marissa Matassa Air Force Association
Award
Certificates of Appreciation to Lt Col Mitchell as
well as to Olivet Church and VFW Post 3438 to
allow us the use of their facilities for which we
could not do without their help.

 March 31—Stebbins High School AFJROTC
volunteer activity.

The Mighty 282’s Commanders Corner
Members of the Mighty 282: Spring is
fast approaching and a time when we’ll
want to spend more time outdoors! Now
is the time we should start thinking about
squadron activities we all can get involved
in (both north and south flights).
With that in mind, I’m soliciting input
from all of you for suggestions on what
types of activities we should do. One
thing I want to put together is an open
house for the squadron that would include
both flights.
We’re our own best advertisers and we
have a great product. We just need to get
the word out about the great things we do.

up with ideas for an open house and
other activities.
A meeting was held in February to
discuss the results of the reunification
survey and a proposed reorganization of
the squadron. Nothing has been decided
yet, but a decision will be coming from
me soon, so be ready to press on once the
decision is made.
Let’s continue to work together and
make our squadron strong and
successful!
Lt Col Mike K. Hood, CAP
Commander

So, let’s put our heads together and come

Show your Pride—CAP T-Shirt School Days & Recruiting Drive!
We are in the process of planning our
next “Open House” for both flights and
we need your help!

know of all the things we are doing and
what Civil Air Patrol is all about
Lt Dix is preparing business cards for each
of you to hand out. It will have contact
information and a place to put your name.
When you find someone who is interested,
give them a card and write your name on it.
Each cadet who gets 2 new members to sign
up will receive a recruiting ribbon to wear
on their uniform. Sorry Senior Officers,
you need to get 7 new members to get a
ribbon!

We will have a separate Open House at
each flight, most likely in April, to get
new Senior and Cadet members to join.
We like to see our squadron grow so that
we can accomplish more and allow our
cadets to take on added responsibilities.
Do you know of anyone who may be
interested? How do you spread the
word? Well how about wearing your
black squadron t-shirts to school on
meeting days? When you are asked what
it is you are wearing, tell them. Let them

So show your 282 pride and wear those
shirts!

Did You Know, Civil Air Patrol




July 1, 1946, President Harry S.
Truman signed Public Law 476
of the 79th Congress,
established CAP as a federally
chartered benevolent civilian
corporation.
May 26, 1948, 80th Congress
passed Public Law 557. This
made Civil Air Patrol an
Auxiliary of the United States
Air Force.

Page 2



There are over 61,441 members and
1,700 units nation wide.



There are Eight Regions: Northeast,
Middle East, Great Lakes, Southeast,
North Central, Southwest, Rocky
Mountain, and Pacific. (Special Overseas Cadet Squadrons)



There are a total of 52 wings in Civil
Air Patrol, that is including all 50 states,
Puerto Rico, and District of Columbia.

F L I G HT

LINES

Civil Air Patrol—The Coastal Patrol
Originally, the Coastal Patrol was to be unarmed and strictly reconnaissance. The air crews of
the patrol aircraft were to keep in touch with their bases and notify the Army Air Forces and
Navy in the area when a U-boat was sighted, and to remain in the area until relieved. This
policy was reviewed, however, when the Civil Air Patrol encountered a turkey shoot
opportunity. In May 1942, a CAP crew consisting of pilot Thomas Manning and observer
Marshall "Doc" Rinker were flying a coastal patrol mission off Cape Canaveral when they
spotted a German U-boat. The U-boat crew also spotted the aircraft, but not knowing that it
was unarmed, attempted to flee. The U-boat became stuck on a sandbar, and consequently
became an easy target.
Rinker and Manning radioed to mission base the opportunity and circled the U-boat for more
than half an hour. Unfortunately, by the time that Army Air Force bombers came to destroy
the U-boat, the vessel had dislodged itself and had escaped to deep waters. As a result of this
incident, CAP aircraft were authorized to be fitted with bombs and depth charges. Some of
CAP's larger aircraft had the capability of carrying a single 300-pound (140 kg) depth charge,
however, most light aircraft could only carry a 100-pound (50 kg) bomb. In some cases, the
bomb's flight fins had to be partially removed so they would be able to fit underneath the wing of a light aircraft.
One squadron's insignia of the time was a cartoon drawing of a small plane sweating and straining to carry a large bomb. This insignia
became popular throughout CAP.
The CAP’s first kill was claimed by one of the larger aircraft. The Grumman G-44 Widgeon, armed with two depth charges and
crewed by Captain Johnny Haggins and Major Wynant Farr, was scrambled when another CAP patrol radioed that they had
encountered an enemy submarine but were returning to base due to low fuel. After scanning the area, Farr spotted the U-boat cruising
beneath the surface of the waves. Unable to accurately determine the depth of the
vessel, Haggins and Ferr radioed the situation back to base and followed the enemy in
hopes that it would rise to periscope depth. For three hours, the crew shadowed the
submarine. Just as Haggins was about to return to base, the U-boat rose to periscope
depth, and Haggins swung the aircraft around, aligned with the submarine and dove to
100 feet (30 m). Farr released one of the two depth charges, blowing the submarine's
front out of the water. As it left an oil slick, Farr made and second pass and released the
other charge. Debris appeared on the ocean's surface, confirming the U-boat's demise
and the Civil Air Patrol's first kill.
The sinking was perhaps the crowning achievement for CAP's Coastal Patrol, which
continued to operate for about 18 months (from 5 March 1942 to 31 August 1943)
before being officially retired. During this time, the Coastal Patrol reported 173 U-boats
and attacked 57 of them with 83 ordnance pieces, resulting in two confirmed kills.
Overall, the Coastal Patrol flew 86,865 missions, logging over 244,600 hours. Coastal Patrol aircraft reported 91 ships in distress and
played a key role in rescuing 363 survivors of U-boat attacks. 17 floating mines were reported and 5,684 convoy missions were flown
for the Navy.

Parents Committee
The Mighty 282 needs parents!
We would like to see the parents of our
cadets become more involved in the
squadron in a support role.
We are in need of parents who will be
willing to assist in squadron activities, be
chaperones, assist in meetings, provide
snacks and other functions. This would
be considered a “Sponsor Member” and
will not require you to attend meetings
VOLUME 1, ISSUE 2

each week or be in the “Full Member
Program” but on a as needed bases only.
This would require maybe 1 meeting a
month, or less depending on how many
we have involved.
If you are willing, or want more information on how you can help, contact 1st Lt
Chris Dix at chris.dix@squadron282.com
or call 937-985-2820.
Thanks for helping!

The success of our
Squadron lies not only
with the members of the
Squadron, but with the
Parents who assist and
serve the Squadron when
in need!
Page 3

WITH OVER FIFTY MEMBERS DEDICATED TO PERFORMING CIVIL AIR
PATROL'S IMPORTANT "MISSIONS FOR AMERICA", THE WRIGHT
BROTHERS 282nd AERO COMPOSITE SQUADRON INVITES YOU TO
EXPLORE WHAT CIVIL AIR PATROL HAS TO OFFER!
W R I G HT B R O T H ER S 2 8 2 N D A E R O
C O M P O S I T E S Q U A DR O N

Squadron 282 meets twice a week at
the following locations:
Tuesday Evenings
7:00pm to 9:15pm
Olivet Church
14135 Little Richmond Road
New Lebanon, Ohio 45345
Or
Wednesday Evenings
7:00pm to 9:15pm
Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #3438
5441 Marina Drive
West Carrollton, Ohio 45449
For More Information or Membership
Information Contact:
1st Lt Chris Dix
Phone: 937-985-2820
www.squadron282.com
E-mail: george.dix@ohwg.cap.gov

The Mighty 282!

The Civil Air Patrol (CAP) is the civilian auxiliary of the United States Air Force. We
are a volunteer, non-profit organization made up of aviation-minded adult and youth
cadet members committed to serving the nation and our communities.
As an official auxiliary of the Air Force, CAP has three principal missions Emergency
Services, Cadet Programs and Aerospace Education.
Civil Air Patrol was organized December 1, 1941, as part of the U.S. Office of
Civilian Defense. During World War II, its members provided orientation flights to
thousands of prospective aviation cadets and recruits. Members also flew more than
24 million miles on coastal patrol operations, searching for German U-boats off the
coasts of the United States. Civil Air Patrol coastal patrol pilots summoned help for
91 ships in distress and 363 survivors of submarine attacks. Patrol crews spotted 173
enemy submarines, dropped bombs or depth charges on 57 of them and received
credit for sinking or seriously damaging at least two. Others were destroyed by planes
and ships summoned by Civil Air Patrol pilots.
Civil Air Patrol crews flew many other wartime missions, including a courier service
for airlift of personnel and light cargo; target towing and tracking flights for training
anti-aircraft gunners; powerline and pipeline surveillance; forest fire patrol; and
patrol along the southern U.S. border. Sixty-four members died while performing
operations in support of the armed forces in the early years of the Civil Air Patrol.
The organization became a permanent peacetime institution on July 1, 1946. On that
date, President Harry S. Truman signed Public Law 476 of the 79th Congress,
incorporating Civil Air Patrol in its present form.
Civil Air Patrol became a permanent civilian auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force in May
1948 with the enactment of Public Law 557 of the 80th Congress.

More Squadron Info
Squadron Classifieds

We Do Speaking Events!
Do you have an organization, club or ministry you
are involved in that brings in speakers?
If so, we can provide a member to speak at your
meeting as a guest to give your members more
information on Civil Air Patrol, our history,
membership, what we are doing, and how to get
involved!
For more information, please
contact our
Public Affairs Officer
1st Lt Chris Dix at
937-985-2820
or
george.dix@ohwg.cap.gov

Attention Parents, Volunteers and others. We are in great
need of the following items for our cadets:






BDU Boots
Dress Shoes for Blues
Dress uniforms to include, shirts, belts, pants caps
Dress Blues Jackets
Dress Blues raincoats, (trench coats)

Please check your local Goodwill and other stores as well as
any donations your can get for military instillations. Your
donations are appreciated and can be a tax deduction for you.
Used items do need to be in very good condition and all
items need to meet CAP specifications.