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2012 OHWG History - Vol. 1.pdf

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HISTORY OF
OHIO WING
Civil Air Patrol
Auxiliary of the United States Air Force

1 JANUARY 2012 – 31 DECEMBER 2012

VOLUME 1 - NARRATIVE
i

HISTORY
of

OHIO WING
Civil Air Patrol
Auxiliary of the United States Air Force
1 January 2012 – 31 December 2012

Prepared by
1st Lt Frank A. Blazich, Jr., CAP
Wing Historian
Reviewed By

Col. Gregory L. Mathews, CAP
Ohio Wing Commander

OHIO WING HEADQUARTERS
DEFENSE SUPPLY CENTER COLUMBUS
COLUMBUS, OHIO
ii

FRONTPIECE

Figure 1. Locations of Ohio Wing and Group headquarters.

iii

PREFACE
This history of the Ohio Wing of the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) covers the period of 1
January 2012 through 31 December 2012. Throughout CY2012, cadet and senior members
participated in events statewide and deployed in response to a major disaster on the east coast.
This report builds upon the OHWG CY2011 History. As wing historian, I have attempted to
share some of the activities of the membership and their myriad of experiences in and out of
Ohio.

Frank A. Blazich, Jr.
1st Lt
CAP
Ohio Wing Historian

iv

OHIO WING SQUADRONS – 2012
OH-001, Ohio Wing Headquarters, Columbus, OH
OH-000, Ohio Reserve Squadron
OH-999, Ohio Wing Legislative Squadron, Columbus, OH
OH-044, Headquarters, Group I, Blue Ash, OH
OH-032, Blue Ash Cadet Squadron, Cincinnati, OH
OH-078, Lunken Cadet Squadron, Cincinnati, OH
OH-156, Warren County Cadet Squadron, Lebanon, OH
OH-229, Harrison Composite Squadron, Harrison, OH
OH-244, Lt. Col. James R. Sanders Senior Squadron, Blue Ash, OH
OH-279, Clermont County Flight, Batavia, OH
OH-288, Pathfinder Cadet Squadron, Middletown, OH
OH-295, Robert E. Skoog Composite Squadron, Hillsboro, OH
OH-254, Headquarters, Group III, North Canton, OH
OH-051, Youngstown Air Reserve Squadron (ARS) Composite Squadron, Vienna, OH
OH-096, 96th Composite Squadron, Stow, OH
OH-177, Mansfield Flight, Mansfield, OH
OH-219, Medina County Skyhawks Composite Squadron, Wadsworth, OH
OH-275, Akron-Canton Senior Flying Squadron, Green, OH
OH-277, Tusco Composite Squadron, Dover, OH
OH-278, Akron-Canton Composite Squadron, North Canton, OH
OH-058, Headquarters, Group IV, Cleveland, OH
OH-003, Lorain County Composite Squadron, Elyria, OH
OH-004, Eagle Composite Squadron 410, Cleveland, OH
OH-131, Cuyahoga County Cadet Squadron, Brecksville, OH
OH-209, Firelands Composite Squadron, Norwalk, OH
OH-236, Lakefront Thunderbirds Composite Squadron, Cleveland, OH
OH-252, Frank H. Kettlewood Composite Squadron, Painesville, OH
OH-064, Headquarters, Group VI, Bowling Green, OH
OH-016, Toledo Air National Guard Base (ANGB) Composite Squadron, Swanton, OH
OH-185, Wauseon Flight, Wauseon, OH
OH-188, Findlay Composite Squadron, Findlay, OH
OH-213, Grand Lake Flight, Celina, OH
OH-261, Defiance Area Composite Squadron, Defiance, OH
OH-296, Van Wert Flight, Van Wert, OH

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OH-043, Headquarters, Group VII, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (AFB), OH
OH-037, Wright-Patterson Cadet Squadron, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH
OH-070, Ross P. Barrett Cadet Squadron 702, Springfield, OH
OH-114, Don Gentile Composite Squadron 709, Piqua, OH
OH-197, Dayton Aero Club Cadet Squadron 706, Troy, OH
OH-282, Wright Brothers Composite Squadron, Dayton, OH
OH-284, Miami Valley Composite Squadron, Miamisburg, OH
OH-285, Dayton Senior Squadron, Xenia, OH
OH-291, Headquarters, Group VIII, Columbus, OH
OH-085, Columbus Senior Squadron, Columbus, OH
OH-115, Captain Eddie Rickenbacker Composite Squadron, Whitehall, OH
OH-139, Columbus Composite Squadron, Worthington, OH
OH-157, Licking County Composite Squadron, Newark, OH
OH-210, Rickenbacker ANGB Squadron, Columbus, OH
OH-234, Union County Flight, Marysville, OH
OH-243, Ross County Senior Squadron, Chillicothe, OH

vi

TABLE OF CONTENTS
VOLUME I – NARRATIVE
Title Page ........................................................................................................................................ ii
Frontpiece ...................................................................................................................................... iii
Preface............................................................................................................................................ iv
Ohio Wing Squadrons – 2012 ..........................................................................................................v
Table of Contents .......................................................................................................................... vii
List of Illustrations ....................................................................................................................... viii
Chronology .................................................................................................................................. xiv
Executive Summary .................................................................................................................... xvii
CHAPTER I – INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................................1
CHAPTER II – AEROSPACE EDUCATION ............................................................................2
CHAPTER III – PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT .............................................................8
CHAPTER IV – CADET PROGRAMS ....................................................................................10
CHAPTER V – OPERATIONS..................................................................................................30
CHAPTER VI – HOMELAND SECURITY .............................................................................37
CHAPTER VII – TRANSPORTATION ...................................................................................38
CHAPTER VIII – GOVERNMENT RELATIONS .................................................................40
APPENDIX I – LINEAGE AND HONORS ..............................................................................43
APPENDIX II – 2012 AWARDS ................................................................................................44
APPENDIX III – OHIO WING COMMANDERS ...................................................................48
APPENDIX IV – BRIEF INTERVIEW WITH COLONEL MATHEWS .............................49
APPENDIX V – SQUADRON INSIGNIA ................................................................................53
APPENDIX VI – HISTORICAL NOTES .................................................................................74
GLOSSARY OF ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS ......................................................85
LIST OF SOURCE DOCUMENTS ...........................................................................................87

vii

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure

Page

1. Locations of Ohio Wing and Group headquarters ..................................................................... iii
2. Ms. Daphne Horstmeier, Capt Victor Hammond, Capt Louis Adams, March ............................5
3. Capt Hammond teaches a student teaching the theory of flight at The Works Science Museum
in Newark, OH .................................................................................................................................5
4. OHWG recruiting and information booth during Family Day at the NMUSAF .........................6
5. OHWG seniors and cadets pose for a group photo at the NMUSAF ..........................................6
6. Capt Hammond quizzes OHWG cadets and senior members at the NMUSAF on aerospace
trivia .................................................................................................................................................7
7. A cadet reads the placard for a Sikorsky MH-53 Pave Low helicopter at the NMUSAF ...........7
8. Senior members partake in one of the many courses at the OHWG Spring PDO Weekend .......9
9. Akron-Canton Composite Squadron, OH-278 color guard, winners of the 2012 OHWG Cadet
Competition....................................................................................................................................12
10. Youngstown ARS Station Composite Squadron, OH-051, drill team, 2012 OHWG Cadet
Competition....................................................................................................................................12
11. Youngstown ARS Station Composite Squadron, OH-051, drill team after placing second
overall at the National CAP Cadet Competition ............................................................................13
12. Youngstown ARS Station Composite Squadron CyberPatriot team at the national finals in
Washington, D.C ............................................................................................................................14
13. Cadets Sean Beatty and Andrew Stoneburner engrossed in competition during the
CyberPatriot finals, 23 March ........................................................................................................14
14. 2012 OHWG Cadet Encampment Executive Staff with Major General Charles Carr ............17
15. 2012 Encampment Commander Maj David Jennison welcomes and briefs the cadets ...........17
16 and 17. Cadets arrive and begin training ..................................................................................18
18. Map reading and orientation exercise during encampment .....................................................18
19. NCOLA field training exercise ................................................................................................19

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20. Classroom instruction at NCOLA ............................................................................................19
21. Commandant of Cadets Capt James Goodman chats with cadets ...........................................20
22. OHWG encampment parade color guard .................................................................................20
23. OHWG encampment graduation pass and review ...................................................................21
24. Presenting arms, 2012 OHWG encampment graduation parade .............................................21
25. OHWG color guard at the opening air show parade ................................................................23
26. Cadets guarding one of the wing’s Cessna 182s while resting in the aircraft’s shadow .........23
27. Cadets guarding an F/A-18 Super Hornet ................................................................................24
28. Another hot day, but another successful Dayton Air Show for OHWG cadets .......................24
29. Demonstrating procedures for pulling over and approaching a vehicle ..................................25
30. Cadets receiving a briefing about the Columbus Police Mounted Unit...................................26
31. Cadets with one of the Ohio State Highway Patrol Cessnas ...................................................26
32. IACE cadets spell out “OHIO” ............................................................................................... 28
33. Cadet DuKwant Kang sits in the cockpit of a Boeing 737 at Net Jets while Capt Nathaniel
Spehr and C/Maj Tanner Barnes look on .......................................................................................28
34. Enjoying a day at Hocking Hills ..............................................................................................29
35. Cadet Julie Koichu takes to the skies with the OHWG during her orientation flight ..............29
36. Cadets of OH-051 enjoyed glider orientation flights and learn characteristics of flight, 6
October ...........................................................................................................................................31
37. One of the two OHWG Cessna 182s deployed to New Hampshire, seen here in one of the NH
Army National Guard hangers .......................................................................................................35
38. 2d Lt Jeffrey Marshall, mission scanner/aerial photographer, is seen here photographing
damages caused by Hurricane Sandy.............................................................................................36
39. Maj Jerry Pearsall, Capt Curt Rowe, and 2d Lt Jerry Marshall at the mission base................36
40. OHWG delegation at the steps of the Capitol Building ...........................................................41

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41. OHWG delegation in the halls of Congress .............................................................................41
42. Col Mathews and MG Carr speaking with a member of Senator Portman’s staff ..................42
43. C/Capt Jared Mohler addressing a question from Senator Portman’s staff .............................42
44. Ohio Wing patch ......................................................................................................................54
45. Ohio Wing Headquarters patch ................................................................................................54
46. OH-999 patch ...........................................................................................................................54
47. OH-032 patch ...........................................................................................................................55
48. OH-044 patch ...........................................................................................................................55
49. OH-078 patch ...........................................................................................................................55
50. OH-244 patch ...........................................................................................................................55
51. OH-288 patch ...........................................................................................................................56
52. OH-051 patch ...........................................................................................................................57
53. OH-096 patch ...........................................................................................................................57
54. OH-219 patch ...........................................................................................................................57
55. OH-277 patch ...........................................................................................................................57
56. OH-003 patch ...........................................................................................................................58
57. OH-004 patch ...........................................................................................................................58
58. OH-058 patch ...........................................................................................................................58
59. OH-131 patch ...........................................................................................................................58
60. OH-236 patch ...........................................................................................................................59
61. OH-064 patch ...........................................................................................................................60
62. OH-188 patch ...........................................................................................................................60
63. OH-037 patch ...........................................................................................................................61

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64. OH-043 patch ...........................................................................................................................61
65. OH-070 patch ...........................................................................................................................61
66. OH-197 patch ...........................................................................................................................61
67. OH-282 patch ...........................................................................................................................62
68. OH-284 patch ...........................................................................................................................62
69. OH-285 patch ...........................................................................................................................62
70. OH-085 patch ...........................................................................................................................63
71. OH-115 patch ...........................................................................................................................63
72. OH-139 patch ...........................................................................................................................63
73. OH-157 patch ...........................................................................................................................63
74. OH-210 patch ...........................................................................................................................64
75. Civilian Air Reserve wings ......................................................................................................65
76. Civilian Air Reserve patch .......................................................................................................65
77. Group 1 patch, World War II ...................................................................................................66
78. Group 4 patch, World War II ...................................................................................................66
79. Coastal Patrol Base No. 14 patch .............................................................................................66
80. Cleveland Courier Service patch .............................................................................................66
81. Group 1 patch ...........................................................................................................................67
82. Group 2 patch ...........................................................................................................................67
83. Group 4 (?) patch .....................................................................................................................67
84. Group 7 patch ...........................................................................................................................67
85. Akron-Canton Composite Squadron 2003 ...............................................................................68
86. Chillicothe Cadet Squadron 1403 ............................................................................................68

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87. Cleveland Squadron 405 ..........................................................................................................68
88. Cleveland Senior Emergency Service Squadron 406 ..............................................................68
89. Columbus Cadet Squadron 806 ...............................................................................................69
90. Cushite Cadet Squadron 407 ....................................................................................................69
91. Dover Bay Cadet Squadron 1107 ............................................................................................69
92. Eagle Squadron 410 .................................................................................................................69
93. Lunken Composite Squdron 103 .............................................................................................70
94. Black River Senior Squadron 405............................................................................................70
95. North Canton Composite Squadron 278 ..................................................................................70
96. Peregrine Cadet Squadron 402.................................................................................................70
97. Fairborn Composite Squadron 703 ..........................................................................................71
98. Ohio Wing Staff (rocker) .........................................................................................................71
99. Findlay Composite Squadron 188 ............................................................................................71
100. Mohican Composite Squadron 501 ........................................................................................71
101. Western Hills/Cincinnati Squadron 104 ................................................................................72
102. Wright-Patterson Composite Squadron 104 ..........................................................................72
103. Columbus Senior Squadron 801 ............................................................................................72
104 and 105. Ground Search and Rescue School ..........................................................................73
106. Advanced Ground Team Training .........................................................................................73
107. Cols Carl E, Jividen, Robert E. Arn, and Gregory Mathews, OHWG/CC ............................74
108. Col Earle L. Johnson, circa 1945 ...........................................................................................77
109. The 1916 Ohio State football team. Johnson is fourth from the right on the back row .........78
110. Johnson as director, Ohio Bureau of Aeronautics, circa 1940-41 .........................................79

xii

111. Johnson in Washington as Executive Officer of the CAP, January – March 1942 ...............84
112. Johnson’s military decorations as they would appear posthumously ....................................84

xiii

CHRONOLOGY – 2012
January
7-8
14
February
2

3-5
18
19

Training Leaders of Cadets Course, Wright-Patterson AFB
OHWG Staff Meeting, DSCC, Columbus, OH
Members of OHWG participated with members of the Indiana Wing as
part of the Continental U.S. North American Aerospace Defense
Command Region – 1st Air Force exercise to protect airspace around
Super Bowl, Indianapolis, IN
Wing SAREX/TREX, Clever Field, New Philadelphia, OH
Wing Field Trip to National Museum of the USAF, WPAFB, OH
C/A1C Christmas Mary Rowlands, Youngstown ARS Composite
Squadron awarded CAP Bronze Medal of Valor for protecting her brothers
from a pit bull dog attack

March
1
10
10
11-16
22-24
24

Members of OHWG traveled to Washington, D.C. for National Legislative
Day
OHWG Staff Meeting, DSCC, Columbus, OH
Ohio Wing Cadet Competition, Columbus Police Academy, Columbus,
OH
Col Gregory Mathews attended 2012 Wing Commanders Course at CAP
National Headquarters, Maxwell AFB, Montgomery, AL
National High School CyberPatriot Competition Finals, Washington, D.C.
GTE Tabletop Exercise, Columbus, OH

Info on

April
14
17
19
24
26-29
27-29

OHWG Staff Meeting, DSCC, Columbus, OH
U.S. Military Academies Seminar, OSU, Columbus, OH
DDR Visit to Ross P. Barrett Cadet Squadron, OH
DDR Visit to Pathfinder Cadet Squadron, OH
Guided Training Exercise (GTE) with IN and KY Wings at Columbus, IN
OHWG teams accomplished all their objectives
GLR Cadet Competition, Camp Lincoln, Springfield, IL

May
5-6
19
26

Spring PDO Weekend, DSCC, Columbus, OH
OHWG Staff Meeting, DSCC, Columbus, OH
Maj James Caines assumed duty as OHWG Vice Commander (Support)
replacing Maj Clyde Bowman

9
16-23

OHWG Staff Meeting, DSCC, Columbus, OH
OHWG Encampment, WPAFB, OH

June

xiv

June
16-17
20- 24
24

Scanner/Observer Training Class, Dayton-Wright Brothers Airport,
Dayton, OH
National Cadet Competition, Wright Staff University, Dayton, OH
OHWG CDEX

July
30 Jun-3 Jul
3
6-8
7- 8
10
14
15-20
18
17-30
20-30

Scanner/Observer Training, Ohio State University Airport, Columbus,
OH
OHWG announcement of refurbished Cessna 172 joining fleet
Cadet Programs, Dayton Air Show, WPAFB, OH
OHWG CDEX
OHWG issued new Cessna 182T for OHWG fleet; delivered to
Rickenbacker Airport, Columbus, OH 4 August
OHWG Staff Meeting and all Commanders Call, DSCC, Columbus, OH
OHWG Cadet Programs Law Enforcement Program, Columbus, OH
CAP-USAF Logistics audit rated OHWG “excellent”
Five OHWG cadets participate in the National Blue Beret
Encampment
IACE, OHWG Hosting

August
31 Jul-9 Aug OHWG has five cadets participate in Cadet Officer School at Maxwell
AFB, AL
10-12
OHWG cadets place second at GLR “King of the Rock” competition,
Rock Cut State Park, IL
11
OHWG Staff Meeting, DSCC, Columbus, OH
17-19
Disaster Relief Exercise (DREX) held at Mansfield Lahm Airport,
Mansfield, OH
21- 25
OHWG contingent attend Summer National Boards, Baltimore, MD
September
8
8-15
14-16
October
13
13
19-20
20-21
26-28

OHWG Awards Ceremony; OHWG Staff Meeting, DSCC, Columbus,
OH. CP-14 member Carl Jividen promoted to CAP Colonel and presented
with Distinguished Service Medal
Fall SAREX
WACO Fly-In, Troy, OH
Cadet Programs, National Character Day, Columbus Police Academy,
Columbus, OH
OHWG Staff Meeting, DSCC, Columbus, OH
Table Top ES exercise, Mansfield AFRB, Mansfield, OH
Fall PDO Weekend, Mansfield Lahm AFRB, Mansfield, OH
OHWG SAREX/EVAL

xv

November
4-14
10
December
8
9
15
15
24

Six members of OHWG deployed to New Hampshire in response to
Hurricane Sandy
OHWG Staff Meeting, DSCC, Columbus, OH
OHWG Staff Meeting, DSCC, Columbus, OH
C/Lt Col Bonnie C. Wilshire of Harrison Composite Squadron announced
as Gen. Carl A. Spaatz Award recipient
OHWG Communications Meeting
Members of OHWG participated in Wreaths Across America, including
decorating graves of OHWG members KIA in World War II
Youngstown ARS Composite Squadron announced as semifinalist for
CyberPatriot competition

xvi

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The Ohio Wing in 2012 made considerable progress in cadet programs and operations.
Over the course of the year the squadrons in the state were active in their local communities and
the leadership of the wing increased its visibility and operations. The wing’s cadets achieved
great success, with one earning the prestigious General Carl A. Spaatz Award, and an OHWG
team making the finals of the national CyberPatriot competition. In recognition of the success of
the OHWG cadet programs, the CAP NHQ awarded the wing with a national mission award in
August.
From January to June, the wing took part in several training exercises for operations and
emergency services. Table top exercises prepared the wing for graded SAREXs and other
training exercises. The wing met all staffing requirements for any Department of Homeland
Security (DHS) or United States Air Force (USAF) missions without delay.
Throughout the summer and early fall, the wing and squadrons hosted several public
events. OHWG personnel hosted the National CAP Cadet Competition at Wright State
University in Dayton, assisted with the annual Dayton Air Show, hosted four cadets from Israel
and South Korea as part of the International Air Cadet Exchange (IACE), and welcomed cadets
from other wings to the 2012 OHWG Cadet Encampment, NCO Leadership Academy, and Law
Enforcement Program.
As 2012 came to a close, the wing honored the past and present. In September, it
recognized two members for fifty years of loyal service and decorated a surviving member of
Coastal Patrol Base No. 14. In November, six members deployed to New Hampshire in response
to Hurricane Sandy, another example of OHWG personnel volunteering on behalf of their nation.

xvii

CHAPTER I – INTRODUCTION
OHIO WING ORIGINS
The Ohio Wing completed its 71st year of service to the people of the State of Ohio and
to the United States of America. On 19 September 1942, Earle L. Johnson, Director of the Ohio
Bureau of Aeronautics publicly announced that on 22 September 1941 the Ohio Wing of the
Civil Air Defense Service of the United States would commence recruiting pilots, aircraft
mechanics, and aviation radio operators. With the establishment of the Civil Air Patrol under the
Office of Civilian Defense on 1 December 1941, Johnson became the first commander of the
Ohio Wing of the Civil Air Patrol, headquartered in the Wyandotte Building, Columbus, OH.

WING ORGANIZATION AND STATUS
The Ohio Wing is presently headquartered in Building 306 on the Defense Supply Center
in Columbus, OH. Descending from Wing Headquarters, there are 6 subordinate groups and 43
squadrons and flights. Total membership includes 739 senior members and 711 cadets. There are
eight single-engine CAP aircraft, one glider, and 17 CAP vehicles assigned to the wing. The
wing maintains 14 VHF/FM repeaters, 176 VHF/FM stations, and 18 HF stations.
For CY2012, the wing operated under the command of Colonel Gregory L. Mathews who
sought to maintain complete staffing and operations of all wing directorates. Increases in wing
operations and cadet program activities are a testament to the volunteer hours of the wing, group,
and squadron staffers state-wide. Federal budget issues imposed concerns and occasional
headaches on wing planning, but in way no way did budgetary issues impact the ability of
OHWG personnel to respond to any and every staffing request from state and federal agencies.

1

CHAPTER II – AEROSPACE EDUCATION
WING STAFF
Director of Aerospace Education
Deputy Director
Assistant Director (External)
Assistant Director (Internal)
Assistant Director (Internal)
Editor of Buckeye Airspace

Capt Victor Hammond
Capt Louis Adams
Capt Joseph Mosher
1st Lt Suman Agarwal
Capt Donald Thomas
Capt Donald Thomas

NARRATIVE
Capt Victor Hammond and his staff made notable strides in aerospace education (AE) in
2012. In the area of training, 41 senior members earned the Brigadier General Charles E
“Chuck” Yeager Aerospace Education Achievement Award, raising the OHWG’s overall total to
408 recipients. By 31 December 2012, 13 members of the wing achieved the master rating in the
AE specialty track; 15 senior ratings; 45 technician ratings; and 40 senior members were enrolled
working towards the technician rating. The OHWG had 26 aerospace education members
(AEM), all teachers using CAP aerospace materials in their classrooms. Wing-wide, squadrons
and groups reported 69 active aerospace education officers, and five squadrons are enrolled in
the Aerospace Excellence (AEX) Program using the same curriculum materials as the AEMs.
AE outreach became a personal focus for Hammond. Almost every squadron in the wing
received a personal visit at some point during the year. He conducted a space camp presentation
to Ms. Daphne Horstmeier’s students at Covedale Elementary School, Cincinnati, OH in March,
and a course on the theory of flight at The Works Science Museum, Newark, Ohio in April to K
– 8th grade homeschoolers. For the latter presentation, students had the opportunity to
experience hands-on the forces of lift, drag, and inertia. Many questions were asked and students
eagerly volunteered as the instructor not only discussed the principles of flight but actively
demonstrated how aircraft are designed to fly. Hammond further showed how students can

2

explore flight as aeronautical engineers do on a daily basis with common materials such as paper
airplanes, balsa models, and blow driers.
Under the careful eye of Capt Donald Thomas, the OHWG AE program published a
second volume of the Buckeye Airspace newsletter. A richly illustrated professional document,
the Spring/Summer issue included articles about aerospace science, history, trivia, and public
events in the wing. As an off-shoot of the newsletter, the OHWG established a Literary Award in
October to recognize excellent in writing and creativity for the best essay, narrative, or piece of
creative writing submitted by an OHWG cadet. Administered by the AE wing staff, Cadets
Shane L. Warren and Drew Mosley from Blue Ash Squadron, OH-032, received the first awards,
consisting of a plaque and $100 cash prize provided by an anonymous donor. The cadets
received the honors for their work on a series of articles appearing in the Buckeye Airspace in the
fall of 2011 and spring of 2012 titled “Spin-offs from the STS Program.”
Another new AE activity introduced in 2012 was the first annual OHWG field trip to the
National Museum of the United States Air Force (NMUSAF) on 18 February. The weekend
coincided with training for the 2012 Ohio Wing Encampment Staff and resulted in a large
turnout of 106 seniors and cadets. Prizes were awarded in the following categories; Scavenger
Hunt, won by OH-003; oldest senior member in attendance, won by OH-003, age listed as 68;
the furthest unit traveled, OH-278; and the youngest cadet in attendance, tied four ways by OH003, 234, 37, and 32. The Lorain County Composite Squadron OH-003 received additional
recognition for having the most members in attendance. Units in attendance were OH-003, OH004, OH-032, OH-037, OH-070, OH-078, OH-096, OH-139, OH-234, OH-278, OH-282, OH284, OH-296, and OH-001. Maj Jerry Pearsall represented the wing commander, Col Greg L.
Matthews, due to a last minute emergency.

3

AE instituted several OHWG awards to give membership more recognition, modeled on
the regional and national awards. For 2012, Capt Donald Thomas of OH-219 received the
Aerospace Education Officer of the Year award for the Ohio Wing. Ms. Daphne Horstmeier of
Covedale Elementary School, Cincinnati, OH was named the OHWG AEM Teacher of the Year.
1st Lt Brian Stoneburner of OH-051 received the first OHWG senior Brewer Award for 2012,
and C/2d Lt Emily E. Conroy, also of OH-051, received the first OHWG cadet Brewer Award
for 2012.

4

Figure 2. L to R: Ms. Daphne Horstmeier, Capt Victor Hammond, Capt Louis Adams, March.

Figure 3. Capt Hammond teaches a student teaching the theory of flight at The Works Science
Museum in Newark, OH in April.

5

Figure 4. OHWG recruiting and information booth during Family Day at the NMUSAF, 18
February.

Figure 5. OHWG seniors and cadets pose for a group photo at the NMUSAF.

6

Figure 6. Capt Hammond quizzes OHWG cadets and senior members at the NMUSAF on
aerospace trivia.

Figure 7. A cadet reads the placard for a Sikorsky MH-53 Pave Low helicopter at the NMUSAF.

7

CHAPTER III – PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
WING STAFF
Director of Professional Development
Special Projects Officer

Lt Col Paul Connor
Lt Col Bruce Tresz

NARRATIVE
The wing held two PDO weekends in CY2012. The first, 5 – 6 May, took place at DSCC
and the Ohio Wing Headquarters in Columbus, OH. Over 165 cadets and senior members
attended and participated in 11 different courses. Classes included Squadron Leadership School,
Corporate Learning Course, Unit Commanders Course, Training Leaders of Cadets, Basic Cadet
Officers, NCO, and Airmans courses, Scanner/Observer Course, ICS 400/Radiological
Monitoring Course, Basic First Aid and CPR Course, Senior Rating IG Course, and a
communications course. These CAP members represented five different CAP regions and nine
wings from as far away as Florida.
A second PDO weekend took place at the Mansfield Lahm Air National Guard Base in
Mansfield, OH. Approximately 137 cadets and senior members attended, representing four wings
in the GLR. Eleven courses, including ICS 300, were taught during the weekend in addition to an
ES tabletop exercise, with the GLR director of emergency services in attendance and
participating.
Wing members furthered their professional development by achieving several CAP
milestones. For the first time since 2008, the OHWG had a cadet earn the General Carl A. Spaatz
Award. C/Lt Col Bonnie Wilshire of the Harrison Composite Squadron, GLR-OH-229, achieved
this prestigious level of development in the cadet program on 8 December. In addition, OHWG
cadets earned one General Ira C. Eaker Award, 18 Amelia Earhart Awards, 29 Billy Mitchell
Awards, and 71 Wright Brothers Awards. For senior members, 70 earned the Membership
Award, 36 the Benjamin O. Davis, Jr. Award, eleven the Grover Loening Aerospace Award, six

8

the Paul E. Garber Award, and two, Majors Paul E. Bronsdon and David N.C. Stone, the Gill
Robb Wilson Award.

Figure 8. Senior members partake in one of the many courses at the OHWG Spring PDO
Weekend, 5 – 6 May.

9

CHAPTER IV – CADET PROGRAMS
WING STAFF
Director of Cadet Programs
Deputy Director
Deputy Director
Activities Development Officer
Asst Activities Development Officer
Activities Officer (North)
Activities Officer (Central)
Activities Officer (South)
Drug Demand Reduction Admin
Asst DDR Admin

Capt James Goodman
Capt Nathaniel Spehr
Capt Ross Fairbairn
Maj Thomas Rehman
Capt Cynthia Duckworth
Maj Michael Sidman
1st Lt Bradley Thomas
1st Lt Robert Schmidt
Capt Jeffrey King
1st Lt Mark Holtzclaw

NARRATIVE
Competitions
Cadet programs expanded their work of 2011 with a successful year of activities and
accomplishments in 2012. In coordination with the Columbus Police Academy who graciously
loaned the use of their facilities, the OHWG hosted the Annual Cadet Competition on 10 March.
The Akron-Canton Composite Squadron, OH-278, won the color guard competition, and the
Youngstown ARS Composite Squadron, OH-051, took home the first place award as the top drill
team in Ohio. Both teams advanced to the GLR Cadet Competition at Camp Lincoln,
Springfield, IL, held from 27 – 29 April. The Youngstown ARS Composite Squadron drill team
won the regional title and advanced to the National CAP Cadet Competition.
At Wright State University in Dayton, OH from 20 – 23 June, the OHWG hosted the
competition and welcomed cadets and senior members from across the country. A total of 138
cadets from all eight regions competed in the overall drill and color guard competitions,
demonstrating their skills in drill, aerospace knowledge, written exams, panel quizzes, and
physical fitness challenges including volleyball and a mile run. Once more, the Youngstown
ARS Composite Squadron performed exceptionally well, placing second overall in the nation.
Furthermore, they brought home first place in the volleyball competition with an undefeated

10

record, second place in the mile run, and second place in the written competition. Coached by
Maj William Hrinko and 1st Lt Patricia Hrinko, the team consisted of team commander Mercer
Martin, deputy commander Nathanial Forrider, and members Vanessa Betz, Megan Beatty, Ryan
Cain, Daniel Clegg, Emily Conroy, Caleb Durfee, Brian Haight, Lauren Holt, Daniel Kennedy,
Aubry Lindauer, Austen Peters, and Trenton Wyant.
The Youngstown ARS Composite Squadron cadets also proved their mettle in the
National High School Cyber Defense Competition, CyberPatriot. “Team Hercules” from OH-051
advanced to the national championship round of the competition on 22 – 24 March in
Washington, D.C. The competition, designed to give hands on exposure to the foundations of
cyber security, provided the team one to three virtual machines each containing several
vulnerabilities. The student teams had to clean the image of them in a set amount of time, with
the teams exposing the most vulnerabilities advancing. “Team Hercules,” coached by Capt Paul
Creed III, consisted of cadets Jacci Acierno, Sean Beatty, Austen Peters, and team captain
Andrew Stoneburner. Although the team did not place in the final three, as one of the nation’s
twelve finalists (out of 600 registered teams) in the All Service Division, they proudly
represented Ohio and the GLR. As an addendum, at the start of 2013, this same team advanced
again to the national championship round for the 2013 CyberPatriot competition, as one of three
CAP teams.

11

Figure 9. Akron-Canton Composite Squadron, OH-278 color guard, winners of the 2012 OHWG
Cadet Competition.

Figure 10. Youngstown ARS Station Composite Squadron, OH-051, drill team, 2012 OHWG
Cadet Competition.

12

Figure 11. Youngstown ARS Station Composite Squadron, OH-051, drill team after placing
second overall at the National CAP Cadet Competition. In addition to the cadets, L to R: GLR
Vice Commander for Operations Col Donald Haffner, Capt Paul Creed III, OH-051 squadron
commander, OHWG Commander Col Gregory Mathews, and GLR Vice Commander for
Support Col Fred Rosenberg.

13

Figure 12. Youngstown ARS Station Composite Squadron CyberPatriot team at the national
finals in Washington, D.C. L to R: Major General Charles Carr, Cadets Jacci Acierno, Austen
Peters, Sean Beatty, Andrew Stoneburner, and Capt Paul Creed III.

Figure 13. Cadets Sean Beatty and Andrew Stoneburner engrossed in competition during the
CyberPatriot finals, 23 March.

14

Encampment and NCO Leadership Academy
Continuing a tradition dating back decades, the 2012 OHWG Basic Encampment took
place at Wright-Patterson AFB and Wright State University in Dayton, OH from 16 – 23 June. A
total of 145 cadets and 27 senior members collectively made the encampment a complete
success. Under the command of Maj David Jennison and C/Lt Col Michelle Neuville, 84 Basic
Cadets graduated from the encampment on 23 June. Basic Cadets were educated in customs and
courtesies, aerospace education, drill, character development and more. Meanwhile, cadet
staffers were improving their leadership skills by training and mentoring junior cadets. The
encampment events included orientation flights, DDR projects, aerospace education projects,
emergency services training, K-9 demonstrations, honor guard demonstrations, and National
Museum of the U.S. Air Force and Air Force Institute of Technology tours, among other
activities. “Cadet activities should be led by cadets for cadets. It is the job of the senior members
to provide the opportunity for cadets to lead cadets. Giving cadets the opportunities they need to
improve their leadership skills is where it’s at, and encampment is just one of those venues they
can use to advance their education and training,” reported Capt James Goodman, Commandant
of Cadets and OHWG Director of Cadet Programs.
Special individual awards presented to cadets included:
Most Improved Cadet: C/SSgt Shawn Bailey
Encampment Honor Cadet: C/SSgt Julia Lowe
Encampment Honor NCO: C/TSgt Evan Schulz
Encampment Honor Officer: C/2nd Lt Matthew Nedolast
Encampment Honor Senior Officer: C/Capt Riley O'Grady
The Honor Squadron for Encampment went to Squadron Two, led by:
C/Capt Tanner Barnes, Squadron Commander
C/Capt Jacob Lowe, Executive Officer
C/CMSgt John Howard, First Sergeant
The Honor Flight for encampment went to the Delta Flight, led by:
C/1st Lt Andrew Campbell, Flight Commander
C/SMSgt Benjamin Kindel, Flight Sergeant

15

Honor Flight Cadets for the week went to:
Alpha Flight: C/SrA Roger Buerkle
Bravo Flight: C/SSgt Julia Lowe
Charlie Flight: C/SrA Sarah Stark
Delta Flight: C/SrA Brandon Flowers
Echo Flight: C/A1C Brenton Pears
Foxtrot Flight: C/A1C Dane Johnson
Golf Flight: C/Amn Bryce Beckner
Hotel Flight: C/TSgt Raul Takeute
India Flight: C/Amn Brock Pears
During the encampment, the OHWG held its first Non-Commissioned Officer (NCO)
Leadership Academy (NCOLA). The academy was open for all cadets from the grade of C/SrA
to C/CMSgt who attended a previous encampment, and sought to develop the skills of young
CAP leaders. As a week-long course, the academy was dedicated strictly to developing Cadet
NCOs in the encampment environment. Eleven NCO's participated in the Academy, led by
senior commander 1st Lt John Jackson and cadet commander C/Lt Col Joshua Schoettelkotte.
Throughout the day, each NCO had a chance to show and develop his or her leadership skills.
Some of the positions they held were Flight Sergeant, Safety NCO, Academic NCO, and
Standardization NCO. There were multiple other opportunities for the students to learn
leadership skills in less formal positions during the day.
Special individual awards given at the graduation ceremony for the participants included:
NCO Spirit Award: C/TSgt Luke Knollinger
Most Improved Award: C/MSgt Drew Bogle
Top Writer Award: C/CMSgt Maria Consbruck
Top Speaker Award: C/TSgt Joseph Haluska
Top Performer: C/CMSgt Maria Consbruck
In the course of the week, Major General Charles Carr, CAP National Commander, Great Lakes
Region Commander Col Robert Karton, and OHWG Commander Col Greg Matthews visited
with cadets and observed the training.

16

Figure 14. 2012 OHWG Cadet Encampment Executive Staff with Major General Charles Carr. L
to R: Jared Mohler, Michelle Neuville, MG Carr, Ian W. McQuaid, and Michael Miller, 23 June.

Figure 15. 2012 Encampment Commander Maj David Jennison welcomes and briefs the cadets.

17

Figures 16 and 17. Cadets arrive and begin a week of fun and training.

Figure 18. Map reading and orientation exercise during encampment.

18

Figure 19. NCOLA field training exercise.

Figure 20. Classroom instruction at NCOLA.

19

Figure 21. Commandant of Cadets Capt James Goodman chats with cadets.

Figure 22. 2012 OHWG encampment parade color guard.

20

Figure 23. 2012 OHWG encampment graduation pass and review.

Figure 24. Presenting arms, 2012 OHWG encampment graduation parade.

21

Dayton Air Show
From 6 – 8 July, members of the OHWG assisted at the annual Dayton Air Show held at
the James M. Cox International Airport. Approximately 71 cadets and 31 senior members, under
the command of Capt James Goodman and cadet commander C/Lt Col Sara Fishbein,
volunteered their time to support the activities of the 88th Operational Support Squadron from
Wright-Patterson AFB. During the three days of the air show, the wing provided a qualified
ground team ready to respond to any USAF request. The Wright-Patterson Cadet Squadron, OH037, and Ross P. Barrett Cadet Squadron 702, OH-070, with nine flights of cadets helped with a
variety of tasks while providing cadets leadership opportunities. Most important of all, despite a
heat index of 120° F, there were no medical or safety issues reported.
Honor awards were presented to the following members for their outstanding service at
the 2012 Dayton Air Show:
Alpha Flight: C/2d Lt Scott Mayer
Bravo Flight: C/SrA Dane Johnson
Charlie Flight: C/Amn Alex Miller
Delta Flight: C/MSgt Drew Bogle
Echo Flight: C/Amn Tyler Hirsch
Foxtrot Flight: C/TSgt Joseph Batchelor
Golf Flight: C/Kramer
Hotel Flight: C/TSgt Cipriano Apolinario
India Flight: C/SrA Bryce Beckner
Flight Sergeant: C/MSgt Arden Sacket
Flight Commander: C/2d Lt Nathaniel Turner
TAC: 1st Lt Edward Cox

22

Figure 25. OHWG color guard at the opening air show parade.

Figure 26. Cadets guarding one of the wing’s Cessna 182s while effectively utilizing the
aircraft’s shadow on an otherwise scorching day.

23

Figure 27. Cadets guarding an F/A-18 Super Hornet.

Figure 28. Another hot day, but another successful Dayton Air Show for OHWG cadets.

24

Law Enforcement Program
An exciting new cadet opportunity took place from 15 – 20 July at the Ohio State
Highway Patrol Academy. The OHWG, in a joint partnership with the Ohio State Highway
Patrol and Columbus Division of Police, initiated the OHWG Law Enforcement Program to
provide cadets with a familiarization of law enforcement careers at the federal, state, and local
levels. Under the coordination of Capt Walter L. Distelzweig, retired Chief of the Columbus
Division of Police, cadets interacted with personnel from the FBI, Secret Service, U.S.
Marshalls, military security forces, and state and local law enforcement offices. In addition to
tours of the State Highway Patrol and Columbus Police aviation units, cadets witnessed
demonstrations of mounted police units, SWAT, K-9 units, and the usage of firearms. The
program proved a resounding success for all the cadets and senior members involved, and
solidified a working relationship between the OHWG and the state law enforcement community.

Figure 29. Demonstrating procedures for pulling over and approaching a vehicle.

25

Figure 30. Cadets receiving a briefing about the Columbus Police Mounted Unit.

Figure 31. Cadets with one of the Ohio State Highway Patrol Cessnas.

26

International Air Cadet Exchange Program
From 20 July to 4 August, the OHWG hosted four cadets from the International Air
Exchange Program (IACE). Under project officer Capt Nathaniel Spehr and cadet project officer
C/Maj Tanner Barnes, Ohio welcomed Cadets Or Zabludowski and Julie Koichu from Israel, and
Cadets DuKwant Kang and Sohyoun Park from South Korea. During their visit in Columbus, the
IACE cadets visited the Motts Military Museum in Grove City, attended a Columbus Crew
soccer match and Columbus Clippers baseball game, visited Hocking Hills State Park for a day
of exploring caves and hiking, and toured the Net Jets aviation facilities at the Port Columbus
International Airport. While in Dayton, they enjoyed a visit to Huffman Prairie, the National
Museum of the United States Air Force, and a visit with members of the Wright-Patterson Cadet
Squadron, OH-037. Next on the tour of Ohio, the cadets traveled to Cleveland to see the World
War II submarine USS Cod, the Women’s Air and Space Museum, and capped off the day with a
visit to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Returning to Columbus, the foreign visitors enjoyed a
day of the Ohio State Fair and each received an orientation flight before returning to
Washington, D.C. In the words of Capt Spehr, “our bond that developed over those days
embodies the strength of diplomacy. I still miss them and cherish the time we all had together
and the outstanding memories we created to last a lifetime.”

27

Figure 32. IACE cadets spell out “OHIO.” L to R: Sohyoun Park, Or Zabludowski, Julie Koichu,
and DuKwant Kang.

Figure 33. DuKwant Kang sits in the cockpit of a Boeing 737 at Net Jets while Capt Nathaniel
Spehr and C/Maj Tanner Barnes look on.

28

Figure 34. Enjoying a day at Hocking Hills. L to R: Or Zabludowski, Sohyoun Park, Julie
Koichu, Nathaniel Spehr, DuKwant Kang, and Tanner Barnes.

Figure 35. Cadet Julie Koichu takes to the skies with the OHWG during her orientation flight.

29

CHAPTER V – OPERATIONS
WING STAFF
Director of Operations
Standardization-Evaluation
Asst Stan/Eval North
Asst Stan/Eval South
Aircraft Maintenance Officer
Asst Wing Maintenance Officers
Counter Drug Officer
Glider Operations
Orientation Flight Officer
Asst Orientation Flight Officer

Lt Col Marc Pagan
Lt Col Walter Murphy
Maj John Marinaro
Capt Allan Koglmeier
Lt Col James H. Moore
Lt Col Raymond Francis and Capt Patrick Kelly
Lt Col Michael Ullman
Maj Milton Moos
Capt Joseph Mosher
Capt John Keating

NARRATIVE
For CY2012, the OHWG expanded its fleet of aircraft and improved its operational
capabilities. After months of engine work on one of the wing’s Cessna 182 aircraft, by May the
wing had all seven aircraft and its lone glider operational for the first time in over a year. On 24
June, CAP NHQ requested the wing to retire one of its two Cessna 172s, later sold by the NHQ.
To replace this aircraft, NHQ provided the wing a refurbished Cessna 172, delivered in January
2013. The NHQ issued the OHWG an eighth aircraft, a brand new Cessna 182T, in June and it
arrived in Columbus direct from the factory in August. After outfitting for operations and
accumulating engine break-in hours, this aircraft became fully operational in November. Of the
six airframes active throughout the year, half received upgrades to their GPS units.
With all airframes in service, the OHWG accrued considerable flying hours in operations
and for cadet orientation rides. For FY2012, the wing flew 1,583.3 hours. In CY2012, OHWG
pilots flew 414.9 hours of cadet orientation rides; during the annual wing encampment, 11 pilots
flew approximately 80 cadets in orientation rides totaling nearly 80 hours. The wing loaned two
aircraft to NESA for two weeks, with 53.8 hours of flight hours logged between airframes. For
the wing deployment in response to Hurricane Sandy, the two Cessna 182s flown on FEMA
photo reconnaissance missions logged 82.9 hours of flight time.

30

Figure 36. Cadets of OH-051 enjoyed glider orientation flights and learn characteristics of flight,
6 October.

31

Wing Deployment in Response to Hurricane Sandy, 4 – 14 November
Hurricane Sandy spared Ohio the worst of her wrath. Nevertheless, elements of the Ohio
Wing of the Civil Air Patrol proudly contributed hundreds of volunteer hours to photographing
the storm’s damages along the Atlantic coast of the northeastern United States. A tropical wave
originating in the western Caribbean developed into Tropical Storm Sandy on 22 October. By 24
October, Sandy grew in strength to a Category 1 hurricane, crossed over Jamaica, and
strengthened into a Category 2 hurricane. The storm moved through the Bahamas, weakened,
and reformed as a Category 1 hurricane on the 27th. In the early morning hours of 29 October,
Sandy moved north-northwest and came ashore approximately five miles southwest of Atlantic
City, New Jersey as a post-tropical cyclone with wind speeds up to 90 miles per hour. In the
aftermath of the storm’s destructive forces in the northeast, federal and state emergency
management personnel, elements of the National Guard, armed forces, and volunteers of the
CAP responded to the disaster.
OHWG personnel received order to stand by on the evening of 3 November 2012 for
possible deployment. On Sunday, 4 November, these volunteers received orders to deploy until
the sixth. Two Cessna 182s and six personnel from Ohio Wing Squadrons OH-085, OH-139, and
OH-244 flew to Concord Municipal Airport, Concord, New Hampshire. The OHWG aircrews
joined other countless CAP volunteers and 66 other CAP aircraft in support of the Federal
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The aircrews consisted of Captain Curt Rowe
(mission pilot), Major Jerry Pearsall (mission observer), with 2d Lt Jeffrey Marshall (mission
scanner/aerial photographer) in one aircraft, and Captain Allen Koglmier (mission pilot/mission
observer), Major Frank Martinjak (mission pilot/mission observer) and Lt Col Carl Woodruff
(mission scanner/aerial photographer) in the other.

32

Commencing on 5 November, the aircrews received their mission tasks in the frigid
below-freezing temperatures. Aerial photography missions represented the order of the day. Due
to inclement weather on the sixth and seventh, the OHWG aircrews stood down flight operations.
During this down time, Captain Rowe, Lt Col Woodruff, Major Martinjak, and 2d Lt Marshall
used the remains of a cardboard box, packing material, and some duct tape donated by the New
Hampshire Army National Guard to construct an improvised camera mount to hold cameras at a
45 degree angle for each aircraft.
Lt Col Woodruff explained the situation calling for this improvised mount:
During the week that we spent on the coast taking photos, we were flying for
several hours each day at an altitude that varied from 3,000 feet to 6,000 feet, where
temperatures were below freezing. The existing setup in our aircraft is as follows: there is
a small hinged window that is centrally located in the left-side window of the aircraft.
This small window flips down inside the plane to allow the photographer to place the
barrel of the camera through the opening. One can imagine that there is lots of cold air
coming in around the camera at all times.
Lt Col Rick Crepas, from the Michigan Wing, suggested a Styrofoam plug. We
used a piece of Styrofoam approximations four inches thick and measuring about twelve
by sixteen inches. These measurements are approximately and only matter to the extent
that that Styrofoam will maintain its position by being wedged into the larger window
frame. We made a hole in the Styrofoam to coordinate with the position of the hinged
window and the size and angle of the camera barrel.
This device further served to block the frigid air from entering the aircraft and improved crew
comfort considerably. Furthermore, the New Hampshire Army National Guard graciously
allowed the CAP to hanger their aircraft in hangers used by the guard’s then-deployed
Blackhawk helicopters when a storm moved in on the sixth.
With clear skies, the crews returned to the skies on the eighth. The crews flew sorties
around New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Jersey from their New Hampshire
base. A typical sortie involved flying a series of waypoints. Starting with a specific coordinate
position, aircrews followed a magnetic compass heading and flew at an indicated airspeed of 90

33

knots. The photographic missions involved a series of turns, with usually six flight legs of 15
miles each before reversing course and repeating the legs in succession. Each mission lasted
approximately four hours and the OHWG aircrew each flew between nine to ten sorties. During
the sorties, the aerial photographer took photographs at five second internals to provide full
coverage of the storm-affected areas for use by state and federal officials. Regarding the storm
damage, Major Pearsall recalled how
Most of the areas that our aircrew flew over were inland and there was not very much
damage. We did fly over some coastal areas which had piers and boat docks torn up with
boards floating and noticed that the sand (beach and just offshore) had been shifted. New
soundings will have to be made in these areas so they are not hazards to navigation for
marine craft. All told, 2d Lt Marshall took over 8,000 photographs.
After completion of the initial deployment, the Civil Air Patrol Area Command asked the
aircrews if they could extend their deployments. Both aircrews readily agreed to continue flight
operations. On 10 November, Major Martinjack and Lt Col Woodruff ended their deployment
due to other commitments. Captain Koglmier stayed at the mission base and flew sorties with
other available aircraft, including sorties piloting a Gippsland GA8 at the request of the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers for FEMA and Corps personnel. The second aircraft piloted by
Captain Rowe with Major Pearsall and 2d Lt Marshall ended their deployment on 14 November.
Recalling the experience, 2d Lt Marshall’s comments are emblematic of the men and
women in the OHWG and the Civil Air Patrol today. Writes 2d Lt Marshall,

34

As a fairly new CAP member, I was pleased to get a chance to apply the knowledge and
experience I gained from attending the National Emergency Services Academy and from
wing and squadron training activities. I was impressed by the dedication and
professionalism of the flight crews and the mission base team. As in any large complex
operation, problems occurred, but the group drawn mostly from the Great Lakes Region
worked well together to resolve the issues and successfully complete the mission. One of
the reasons I joined the Civil Air Patrol was to participate in major operations like this
one. I enjoyed the deployment, and I feel that we provided a significant service in the
disaster recovery effort. Future disasters are inevitable, but I'm confident that the Civil
Air Patrol is equipped and trained to respond effectively.

Figure 37. One of the two OHWG Cessna 182s deployed to New Hampshire, seen here in one of
the NH Army National Guard hangers.

35

Figure 38. 2d Lt Jeffrey Marshall, mission scanner/aerial photographer, seen here photographing
damages caused by Hurricane Sandy. He is using an improvised camera mount, cobbled together
from cardboard, packing waste, and a roll of duct tape. 2d Lt Marshall took over 8,000
photographs during his ten day deployment.

Figure 39. Maj Jerry Pearsall, Capt Curt Rowe, and 2d Lt Jerry Marshall at the mission base.

36

CHAPTER VI – HOMELAND SECURITY
WING STAFF
Director of Homeland Security
Deputy Director
HS Officer (North)
HS Officer (Central)
HS Office (South)
HS Liaison Officer (Intel) to Ohio DHS
Linguist to Ohio DHS
HS Operations Officer

Lt Col Ted M. Stults II
Maj Mike Bodnarick
1st Lt Gregory Sarbach
CMSgt David Pollinger
Capt Lee McIlwain
Capt John M. Jackson
Maj Carey A. Girgis
Lt Col James Yarbrough

NARRATIVE
Throughout the year, OHWG aircraft were involved in repeated NORAD training
operations. On 2 February, one aircraft and six personnel participated with another aircraft from
the Indiana Wing in a First Air Force Air Sovereignty mission AMALGAM VIRGO 12-01,
designed to hone NORAD’s intercept and identification operations. The OHWG aircraft served
as an intercept target for a U.S. Customs and Border Protection aircraft to assist NORAD in
preparing the airspace security for Super Bowl XLVI. From May through December, OHWG
aircraft successfully completed eleven AFNORTH FERTILE KEYNOTE exercises, wherein
CAP aircraft act as intruders to permit USAF fighter interceptor training of aircraft operating at
low altitudes and speeds.
OHWG Homeland Security personnel networked with state and federal law enforcement
and emergency services personnel at workshops and or training programs. In no particular order,
OHWG personnel attended meetings of the Columbus Department of Health Emergency
Services, Hamilton County Communications Center, Medway Drug Enforcement Agency, Ohio
Adjutant General, Columbus Health Department, FBI, Jackson County Emergency Management
Agency, Columbus Metro Medical Response System, and Ohio Emergency Management
Agency.

37

CHAPTER VII – TRANSPORTATION
WING STAFF
Transportation Officer
Asst Transportation Officer

Lt Col Carl Woodruff
Capt Sharron Woodruff

NARRATIVE
The Ohio Wing Transportation Department is quite pleased with the performance of its
fleet of vehicles and the vehicle custodians who kept them rolling in 2012. All vehicles in the
wing passed their annual inspections in 2012. In FY2012, the wing added two 2012 Ford
Expeditions, one 2012 Dodge Caravan and a 2011 Dodge Caravan that was received courtesy of
the national commander, Major General Charles Carr. This was his personal vehicle, and he
designated Ohio as the wing to benefit from its replacement.
OHWG Transportation continues to supply vehicles on an ongoing basis for squadron
events throughout the state and beyond. The cooperation of the vehicle custodians allowed for
the easy flow of the fleet to provide the transport of cadets and seniors all year round.
OHWG vans supplied transportation for several major activities in 2012:
1. GLR Cadet Competition in April
2. The Tri-Wing Guided Training Exercise in April
3. Cadet Encampment in June
4. National Cadet Competition in June
5. The Law Enforcement Program in July
6. National Blue Beret in July
7. Provided transportation in Columbus for the International Air Cadets in July
8. National Emergency Services Academy in July and August
9. D-Day Program in August
A recent change in OHWG vehicle repair/maintenance procedures allows the vehicle
custodians to carry out needed repairs and maintenance on the vehicle in their custody without
using personal or squadron funds followed by reimbursement, a procedure that has been
followed for many years at the OHWG. The new procedure allows the wing to pay directly for
these expenses, making the process less painful for those who care for the vehicles in the wing

38

fleet. Wing Finance Officer Capt Beth McGail suggested the procedure, and it was later edited
into its present form by Ms Emily Reeves, Col Greg Mathews, Maj James Caines, Lt Col Carl
Woodruff and Capt Sharron Woodruff.

39

CHAPTER VIII – GOVERNMENT RELATIONS
WING STAFF
Government Relations Advisor

Lt Col Paul Bronsdon

NARRATIVE
On 1 March, six senior and cadet members of the OHWG traveled to Washington, D.C.
for CAP’s National Legislative Day. These included OHWG commander Col Gregory Mathews,
OHWG government relations advisor Maj Paul Bronsdon, C/Capt Adam Campbell, C/Capt Jared
Mohler, and C/Maj Joshua Schoettelkotte. Major General Charles Carr accompanied the Ohio
delegation during visits with Senator Sherod Brown, Congressman Pat Tiberi, and Congressman
Steve Austria. Discussion topics included the wing’s service during World War II, FY2013
appropriations, and legislative support to award the Congressional Gold Medal to the World War
II CAP members.
This latter action saw marked improvement to gain the support of the Ohio Congressional
delegation. Throughout CY2012, the OHWG secured the backing of the majority of the Ohio
Congressional delegation for H.R. 719 and S. 418 in the 112th Congress. The cosponsors of this
legislation included Senators Sherrod Brown and Rob Portman, and Representatives Bob Gibbs,
Tim Ryan, Jim Renacci, Steve Stivers, Steven LaTourette, Betty Sutton, Steve Austria, Bill
Johnson, Bob Latta, Michael Turner, and Steve Chabot. Although the bills did not win
Congressional approval, the work in securing co-sponsorship from over half of Ohio’s delegates
holds promise for greater acceptance of the CAP Congressional Gold Medal legislation in the
113th Congress.

40

Figure 40. L to R: OHWG/CC Col Gregory Mathews, CAP Command CMSgt Lou E. Walpus,
MG Charles Carr, CAP National Chaplain Col J. Delano Ellis, C/Maj Joshua Schoettelkotte,
C/Capt Jared Mohler, General’s Aid Capt John Khattar at the steps of the Capitol Building, 1
March.

Figure 41. OHWG delegation in the halls of Congress.

41

Figure 42. Col Mathews and MG Carr speaking with a member of Senator Portman’s staff.

Figure 43. C/Capt Jared Mohler addressing a question from Senator Portman’s staff.

42

APPENDIX I
LINEAGE AND HONORS DATA – 2012
Unit Designation:

Ohio Wing Headquarters Civil Air Patrol

Location:

Building 306, Defense Supply Center, Columbus, Ohio

Higher Headquarters:

Great Lakes Region Headquarters Civil Air Patrol

Commander:

Col Gregory L. Mathews

Vice Commander:

Lt Col Theodore Shaffer (Operations)
Maj Clyde Bowman (Support)
Maj James Caines (Support)

Units Newly Assigned:

None

Attached Units Disbanded:

OH-297, Muskingum County Flight, Zanesville, OH

Aircraft Assigned:

8 Corporate Aircraft, 1 Glider

Awards and Decorations:

National Mission Award, OHWG Cadet Programs for GLR
National Historian of the Year, 1st Lt Frank Blazich, Jr.
OHWG Cadet of the Year, C/Lt Col Sara Fishbein
OHWG C/Officer of the Year, C/Capt Megan L. Beatty
OHWG C/NCO of the Year, C/CMSgt Benjamin Kindel
50 Years of Service, Lt Col Richard G. Slone
50 Years of Service, Lt Col David L. Hickinbotham

43

APPENDIX II
2012 AWARDS
SENIOR
Distinguished Service Medal
Col Carl E. Jividen
GLR-OH-000
Exceptional Service Award
1st Lt Frank A. Blazich

GLR-OH-001

Commander’s Commendation
Lt Col Raymond Francis
GLR-OH-001
Lt Col Walter D. Murphy
GLR-OH-001
Lt Col Carl Woodruff (2)
GLR-OH-244
Maj Mike T. Bodnarik
GLR-OH-001
Maj James Caines
GLR-OH-001
Maj Frank R. Martinjak
GLR-OH-244
Maj Marc Pagan
GLR-OH-001
MajJerry Pearsall
GLR-OH-001
Capt James Goodman
GLR-OH-001
Capt Anita L. Heilman
GLR-OH-261
Capt Allan J. Koglmeier
GLR-OH-244
Capt Sharon Woodruff
GLR-OH-001
Capt Curt Rowe
GLR-OH-001
2d Lt Jeffrey Marshall
GLR-OH-085
Achievement Award
Lt Col Kenneth C. Voyticky
Maj William R. Pawson
Capt Paul Creed
1st Lt Jeffery T. Wold

GLR-OH-252
GLR-OH-096
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-188

CADET
Bronze Medal of Valor
Christmas Mary Rowlands

GLR-OH-051

Commander’s Commendation
Trevor Luth
GLR-OH-197
Kindall Sanders
GLR-OH-156
General Carl A. Spaatz Award
Bonnier C. Wilshire
GLR-OH-229

44

General Ira C. Eaker Award
Andrew McNany
GLR-OH-004
Amelia Earhart Award
Megan Beatty
Kaleb D. Decker
Tyler R. Dockum
Cierra Duckworth
Wyatt Evans
Benjamin Harvey
Kenny Ish
Caleb King
Brad Kirby
Aubry Lindauer
Jacob Lowe
Mercer E. Martin
Scott T. Mayer
Derek McGuckin
Riley O’Grady
Brendin Peters
Dakota Raduenz
Bonnie C. Wilshire

GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-188
GLR-OH-284
GLR-OH-278
GLR-OH-231
GLR-OH-004
GLR-OH-188
GLR-OH-288
GLR-OH-032
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-278
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-288
GLR-OH-278
GLR-OH-156
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-282
GLR-OH-229

Billy Mitchell Award
Thomas Bailey
Jordan Baker
Corey Best
Bernard Blust III
Austin A. Buck
Andrew R. Campbell
Anthony K. Cardarelli
Jesse A. Church
Daniel Clegg
Emily Conroy
Cierra Duckworth
Caleb C. Durfee
Jacob Ezzo
Benjamin Fecher
Joseph Italia
Kevin Kerth
Nicholas Kucko
Mercer E. Martin
Scott Mayer
Austen Peters
Trenton Ratliff
Hunter L. Reichenbach

GLR-OH-078
GLR-OH-078
GLR-OH-004
GLR-OH-078
GLR-OH-115
GLR-OH-219
GLR-OH-279
GLR-OH-157
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-278
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-282
GLR-OH-096
GLR-OH-078
GLR-OH-278
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-288
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-209
GLR-OH-278

45

Billy Mitchell Award
Robert A. Riggs
Zachary Shaffer
Patrick Smith
Andrew Stoneburner
Nathaniel Turner
Douglas C. Woischke
Anthony Logan Zinkhon

GLR-OH-231
GLR-OH-078
GLR-OH-139
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-037
GLR-OH-139
GLR-OH-037

Wright Brothers Award
Vincent N. Allen
Cipriano A. Apolinario
Kiber A. Baden
Jesse Bailey
Shawn Bailey
Joshua D. Beasley
Bryce Q. Beckner
Jackson Benegasi
Ben Betulius
Vanessa Betz
Ethan Bores
Jonathan Brown
Joshua Burton
Courtney A. Byrd
James Carey
Kirsten J. DeWitt
Jayden L. Dickson
Luke DiPadova
Andrew S. Fansler
Noah Fecher
Kyle Fix
Brandon S. Flowers
Brittney E. Foster
Logan Frazier
Kraig E. Gruss
Nathan Gruss
Brian D. Haight
William C. Hammond
Kenrick Harcourt
Philip Holmes
Dane G. Johnson
Stephen Keiter
Cameron Kerr
Ethan A. Koehler
Austin Koeller
Jacob Lathers

GLR-OH-139
GLR-OH-139
GLR-OH-139
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-279
GLR-OH-296
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-139
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-209
GLR-OH-288
GLR-OH-277
GLR-OH-296
GLR-OH-003
GLR-OH-197
GLR-OH-296
GLR-OH-004
GLR-OH-070
GLR-OH-282
GLR-OH-278
GLR-OH-156
GLR-OH-156
GLR-OH-288
GLR-OH-231
GLR-OH-231
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-004
GLR-OH-279
GLR-OH-157
GLR-OH-278
GLR-OH-295
GLR-OH-003
GLR-OH-279
GLR-OH-282
GLR-OH-016

46

Wright Brothers Award
Matthias M. Lewis
Trent Lindsay
Julia A. Lowe
Daniel Luddeke
Nathanael Lydy
Marissa Matassa
Janelle N. May
Jonathon Michels
Alex R. Miller
Samuel Mines
Jake D. Morton
Matthew Moskowitz
Joey Noppert
Kevin Panfil
Brock A. Pears
Daniel Pohlod
Jacob S. Purcell
Seddrick Quick
Christmas Mary Rowlands
David Royak
Sly D. Sampson
Gregory T. Sandefur
William G. Schaffer
Jennifer L. Snay
Jacob Staton
Noah Stewart
Kyle A. Synder
Nicholas Thompson
David J. Trate
Brian C. Walters, II
Allen Wegner
Evan B. Wessels
Lauren Wheeler
Bradry Wilson
Robert Wilt

GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-278
GLR-OH-078
GLR-OH-177
GLR-OH-037
GLR-OH-296
GLR-OH-278
GLR-OH-156
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-278
GLR-OH-219
GLR-OH-229
GLR-OH-003
GLR-OH-210
GLR-OH-277
GLR-OH-003
GLR-OH-278
GLR-OH-051
GLR-OH-131
GLR-OH-278
GLR-OH-285
GLR-OH-219
GLR-OH-188
GLR-OH-284
GLR-OH-032
GLR-OH-139
GLR-OH-156
GLR-OH-032
GLR-OH-037
GLR-OH-229
GLR-OH-139
GLR-OH-231
GLR-OH-139
GLR-OH-051

47

APPENDIX III
OHIO WING COMMANDERS
Earle L. Johnson
Col George A. Stone, Jr.
Col John R. McGuire
Col Edmund P. Lunken
Col John O. Swarts
Lt Col Lyle W. Castle
Col Robert H. Herweh
Col William W. Kight
Col Patrick R. Sorohan
Col Gerald M. Tartaglione
Col Leon W. Dillon
Col Claude H. Fore, Jr. (interim)
Col Marjorie J. Swain
Col Loren G. Gillespie
Col Larkin C. Durdin
Col Leslie S. Bryant
Col Carl C. Stophlet, Jr.
Col Jacquelyn L. Hartigan
Col Robert M. Sponseller
Col Michael J. Murrell
Col Charles L. Carr
Col David M. Winters (interim)
Col David M. Winters
Col Gregory L. Mathews

1 Dec 41 – 1 Apr 42
7 Apr 42 – 1 Jun 47
1 Jun 47 – 17 Jul 51
17 Jul 51 – 23 Sep 53
23 Sep 53 – 14 Sep 57
14 Sep 57 – 12 Aug 60
12 Aug 60 – 6 Dec 63
6 Dec 63 – 8 Dec 67
8 Dec 67 – 1 Jun 70
1 Jun 70 – 1 Jun 74
1 Jun 74 – 4 Jan 78
4 Jan 78 – 1 Dec 78
1 Dec 78 – 20 Feb 83
20 Feb 83 – 6 May 87
6 May 87 – 31 Dec 89
31 Dec 89 – 1 Jan 92
1 Jan 92 – 1 Oct 94
1 Oct 94 – 19 Sep 98
19 Sep 98 – 4 Aug 99
4 Aug 99 – 14 Sep 03
14 Sep 03 – 1 Mar 07
1 Mar 07 – 6 Jun 07
6 Jun 07 – 11 Jun 11
11 Jun 11 – Present

48

APPENDIX IV
BRIEF INTERVIEW WITH COLONEL MATHEWS
1. For CY2012, how would you summarize the activities of the wing?
Overall, the wing is making good progress. We have an excellent wing staff and many
dedicated commanders and staff members at both the group and squadron levels. Their
dedication and support is what makes CAP work well in Ohio.
Recently at wing, we appointed a new Emergency Services Director and he is working
with the ES team to re-vitalize the wing’s capabilities. This process will take some time but a
good foundation has been laid. The Wing’s SAR/DR Evaluation by CAP-USAF is scheduled for
June and will be held in conjunction with the Michigan Wing. Aerospace Education is once
again a vital part of the Ohio Wing and activities to engage cadets and senior members alike
have been planned throughout the year. Cadet Programs has increased cadet involvement in
wing, regional and national level activities. The Cadet Advisory Council has been re-established
and a cadet representative attends wing staff meetings. OH-051 represented CAP at the national
CyberPatriot competition and at the 2012 GLR Drill Competition. Finally, Wing staff members
have been preparing for a Staff Assistance Visit that will be held in August 2013.
2. What concerns from CY2013 did the wing manage to correct in 2012?
Ohio Wing’s emergency services capabilities have been a concern. Over the past few
years, the emergency response force, particularly mission base staffing, had been maintained by
a hand-full of members without any plans for personnel replacement or mission sustainment. The
wing needs more qualified Incident Commanders, Operations Section Chiefs and Planning
Section Chiefs, among others. The ES team has established a plan to build capacity however, this
is a slow process given the amount of training and experience required for advancement in each

49

of the higher level qualifications. The ES team works closely with Operations in planning for
exercises and real-world deployments. The Operations team has works diligently to improve the
readiness and safety status of all wing assigned aircraft. Through the acquisition of a new
consolidated maintenance facility, Operations has increased the availability of mission ready
aircraft by weeks during a given calendar year. As an example of this coordinated effort between
ES and Operations, the Ohio Wing was able to quickly and effectively respond to Hurricane
Sandy relief efforts this past winter.
Other areas of concern that have improved greatly over the past year are Finance and
Logistics. The wing has a very strong Director of Finance who has a very good grasp of the
wing’s finances. Bookkeeping is up to date and accurate, as accomplished by our Wing
Administrator. Also, the wing’s Logistics Officer and Communications Officer have done
outstanding jobs of accounting for and maintaining accurate inventories of assigned vehicles and
equipment. On a whole, the wing’s directors are doing good jobs of managing their respective
sections and are keeping their areas aligned with the requirements and regulations.
3. List the projects that in your opinion best represent the capability of the OHWG’s
membership?
1. Hurricane Sandy disaster relief mission
2. FEMA mission in SW Ohio for tornado damage assessment
3. 2012 Cadet Encampment
4. Aerospace Education trip to the National Museum of the USAF
5. Upgrading of the maintenance records for the wing’s aircraft fleet
6. Acquisition of the new consolidated maintenance contract for the Ohio Wing
7. The Ohio Wing’s cadet orientation flight management program
8. The wing’s excellent vehicle management program
9. The Ohio Wing Historian’s receipt of National Historian of the Year Award

50

4. The wing made great strides in operations and cadet programs. What unsung aspects of wing
activities do you believe warrant attention?
1. Upgrading of the maintenance records for the wing’s aircraft fleet
2. Acquisition of the new consolidated maintenance contract for the Ohio Wing
3. Management of the wing’s cadet orientation flight management program
4. Management of the wing’s vehicle management program
5. Management of logistics and communications
6. Exemplary administration and personnel management at the wing level
5. With your first full year as wing commander under your belt, how would you evaluate your
performance? What areas of the wing require greater attention? Did you achieve your personnel
and wing benchmarks for CY2012?
I would rate my performance as “satisfactory.” Time is the biggest challenge that I’ve
had to face. Working a full-time job limits my ability to work with other organizations and
agencies such as Ohio EMA and the Ohio National Guard. Also, and perhaps most importantly,
it limits my visits to squadrons. I am making an effort to visit more squadrons this year. My
benchmark for the year, through the direct efforts of the Director of Finance and Wing
administrator, was moving the wing’s finance rating from “Very High Risk” to “Successful.” We
will be aligning the wing’s strategic plan with the strategic plan from NHQ that was recently
briefed at the Winter Command Council Meeting.
6. For CY2013, what problems, if any, from CY2012 do you see the wing resolving? What
accomplishments of CY2013 do you desire to see built upon?
We must continue to build the capacity of our emergency services mission. While we are
capable of responding sufficiently for a few days, we are weak in sustaining operations over an
extended period of time. We must improve in our ES sustainability. Aerospace Education will
continue to grow and expand. Efforts are being made to grow the AE program is school sand
involve more teachers in the program. Cadet Programs will continue to expand on our

51

opportunities for cadets to be more involved in regional and national activities. As these
opportunities expand, we expect to see a greater retention in senior grade cadets and increases in
tenures of cadet memberships. This year’s Staff Assistance Visit will allow us the opportunity to
review our progress and make adjustments accordingly.

52

APPENDIX V
SQUADRON INSIGNIA FOR 2012
An effort has been underway to gather examples of all squadron insignia in use in the
Ohio Wing, as well as the heraldry and significance of each insignia, including the name of the
designer(s) and date of approval. This information has been published as a heraldry guidebook
online with continuous edits and additions as information comes available. Listed below are
images of all the insignia currently in use, as well as miscellaneous and obsolete insignia once
used by the OHWG’s units and its predecessor wing.

53

OHIO WING HEADQUARTERS

Ohio Wing, unknown, 20 October 1950

OH-001, Frank Blazich, November 2011

OH-999, Frank Blazich, June 2012

54

GROUP I

OH-032, unknown, unknown

OH-044, Michael Purvis and Eric Reiman,
August 2012

OH-078, Eric Reiman, April 2008

OH-244, unknown, unknown

55

OH-288, Richard Fugate, Steven Fugate,
And Scott Fugate, October – December 2008

56

GROUP III

OH-051, William Hrinko, July 2004

OH-096, Christopher Smith; William Krause,
1998

OH-219, unknown, unknown

OH-277, James Wilson, September
2010

57

GROUP IV

OH-003, Jeff Bechtel, 2009

OH-004, unknown, unknown

OH-058, unknown, unknown

OH-131, Paul Mullen, USMC, 1943

58

OH-236, unknown, unknown

59

GROUP VI

OH-064, unknown, unknown

OH-188, unknown, unknown

60

GROUP VII

OH-037, Rob Goodreu, Tim Kelley, 2008

OH-043, Milton Caniff, 1956

OH-070, unknown, unknown

OH-197, unknown, unknown

61

OH-282, unknown, unknown

OH-284, unknown, unknown

OH-285, unknown, unknown

62

GROUP VIII

OH-085, Christopher Axene, Ethan List
Marc Pagan, and Steve West,
February-March 2009

OH-115, Guy Zierk, January 1994

OH-139, Just Baier, Tim Miller, and
Dan Schoessler, 2007

OH-157, Tracy L. Kawasaki, 1994

63

OH-210, unknown, unknown

64

MISCELLANEOUS AND OBSOLETE INSIGNIA
PRE-OHIO WING

Civilian Air Reserve, circa 1940

65

WORLD WAR II

Group 1 and 4, circa 1943

Cleveland Courier Service,
circa 1942 – 1945

Coastal Patrol Base No. 14, Panama City, Florida, circa 1942 – 1943

66

GROUP INSIGNIA

Group 1 and Group 2

Group 4 (?) and Group 7

67

SQUADRON INSIGNIA

Akron-Canton Composite Squadron 2003
Chillicothe Cadet Squadron 1403

Cleveland Squadron 405
Cleveland Senior Emergency
Service Squadron 406

68

Columbus Cadet Squadron 806
Cushite Cadet Squadron 407

Dover Bay Cadet Squadron 1107
Eagle Squadron 410

69

Black River Senior Squadron 405
Lunken Composite Squadron 103

North Canton Composite Squadron 278

Peregrine Cadet Squadron 402

70

Ohio Wing Staff (rocker)
Fairborn Composite Squadron 703

Findlay Composite Squadron 188
Mohican Composite Squadron 501

71

Western Hills/Cincinnati Squadron 104

Wright-Patterson Composite Squadron 104

Columbus Senior Squadron 801

72

TRAINING SCHOOLS

Ground Search and Rescue School

Advanced Ground Team Training

73

APPENDIX VI
HISTORICAL NOTES
In 2012, the wing historian located a forgotten member of Coastal Patrol Base No. 14
(CP-14), Carl E. Jividen. On 19 April, the wing historian interviewed Jividen in his home in
Londonderry about his experiences as a mechanic and observer at the base in Panama City, FL
from August 1942 to December 1943. Rising from the rank of corporal to flight officer, Jividen
followed his CAP service by joining the USAAF, finishing the war as a second lieutenant flight
engineer on B-29 Superfortresses at Maxwell Field, Montgomery, AL. On 8 September at
DSCC, Col Robert Arn, himself a pilot at Coastal Patrol Base No. 14, promoted Jividen to the
rank of colonel in the CAP. OHWG commander Col Gregory Mathews then bestowed Jividen
with the Distinguished Service Medal for his wartime service to the CAP and nation. Jividen’s
interview is published on the OHWG website for all to read and enjoy.

Figure 107. L to R: Cols Carl E, Jividen, Robert E. Arn, and Gregory Mathews, OHWG/CC.

74

Brigadier General Earle Levan Johnson and the Origins of the Ohio Wing
The Ohio Wing can proudly trace its origins back to September 1941, prior to American
entry in World War II. While the history of the Civil Air Patrol is broadly known, few are aware
of the background of the war time commander of the CAP, and founder of the Ohio Wing, Earle
Levan Johnson. An Ohio State University football player, diversified businessman in Cleveland,
and three-time member of the Ohio General Assembly, Johnson’s involvement in politics and
aviation would culminate in March 1942 with his appointment as national commander of the
CAP. Under his tutelage, the CAP blossomed during World War II into a viable instrument of
homeland security for the Office of Civilian Defense (OCD) and later the United States Army
Air Forces (USAAF).
On 29 January 1895 in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, Levan Merritt and Nellie
(Hartshorn) Johnson welcomed the birth of their son, Earle Levan. In 1903, the family moved
west and settled in Painesville, Ohio, making their home on Old Orchard Farm, three miles west
of the town. In his formative years, Johnson worked with his father on the farm and attended
public schools, graduating from Painesville High School in 1914. That fall, he entered OSU to
pursue a college education. At OSU, Johnson played right guard for the Buckeyes on the 1915,
1916, and 1919 football teams. At 6’3” tall and 190 pounds, Johnson was a defensive starter on
the 1916 Buckeye football team which won the first Big Ten championship in school history.
Johnson entered officers’ training school at Fort Benjamin Harrison (Lawrence, IN) following
entry of the United States into World War I. With the death of his father in 1917, however,
Johnson returned to Painesville to run the family farm and that of his close friend, David Ingalls,
during World War I. Johnson returned to campus in 1919 to finish his education, graduating with
his Bachelor of Science in agriculture in 1920.

75

While Johnson produced food to win the war, his friend Ingalls took to the skies over
Northern France to fight for the Allied cause. In 1917, Ingalls enlisted in the United States
Navy’s (USN) aviation branch and arrived in France in September. During combat in 1918,
Ingalls became the first fighter ace in the history of the USN (and only USN ace in World War
I). After the war, Ingalls would finish a degree at Yale in 1920 before earning an LLD from
Harvard and entering the law profession. Maintaining his close friendship with Johnson, Ingalls’
aviation experiences would greatly influence Johnson in the 1920s and serve as the catalyst for
Johnson’s pursuit of a pilot’s license at the end of the decade.
Following graduation, Johnson returned to Painesville to pursue his fortune. On 15
October 1921, he married Miss Doris Doan of Cleveland, and vigorously engaged himself in
various business activities in the Cleveland area. He established the Johnson Land and Building
Company and the Earlevan Realty Company to fuel an interest in real estate. Additionally, he
held the title of vice president for the Northern Ohio Insurance Corporation and worked as a
sales representative for Cadillac and LaSalle Motor Cars in Cleveland.
After the death of his father, Johnson found himself assuming his father’s position on the
Lake County Republican Central Committee beginning in 1917. In 1926, Johnson and Ingalls
both won elections to the Ohio House of Representatives, the first of three consecutive terms for
Johnson. While members of the Ohio General Assembly, Ingalls began to cultivate and refine
Johnson’s interest in aviation. Beginning in 1928, Johnson and Ingalls worked with other
members of the Ohio Joint Legislative Committee on Aviation to recommend aviation legislation

76

Figure 108. Colonel Earle L. Johnson, circa 1945.

77

Figure 109. The 1916 Ohio State football team. Johnson is fourth from the right on the back row.
for the state. In January 1929, Johnson earned his private pilot’s license. Two months later in
March, Ingalls introduced the Ohio Aeronautics Act to establish the Ohio Bureau of Aeronautics
under the office of the Secretary of State. Passed unanimously by the Ohio General Assembly,
the act represented the first general aviation law in Ohio.
Johnson and Ingalls often flew together from Cleveland to Columbus for their legislative
duties and in April 1930 Johnson earned his commercial pilot’s license. In 1931, Johnson served
on the Ohio Aviation Committee and was named a trustee of Lake Erie College for Women. The
following year, Johnson managed Ingalls unsuccessful campaign for the Ohio governor’s office.
With the inauguration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1933 and passage of the
twenty-first amendment, Johnson returned to Cleveland as vice president of the Leisy Brewing
Company. Although no longer an elected official, Johnson retained a strong interest in aviation
and kept active in his community. He participated in the Lake County YMCA, served as
chairman of the “Come to Cleveland Committee” of the Cleveland Advertising Club, and was
active in the Masons, Odd Fellows, Rotary International, University Club, and the Cleveland Big
Ten Club, among others.

78

On 3 August 1939, Ohio Governor John Bricker appointed Johnson as director of the
Ohio Bureau of Aeronautics, serving as director until 1945, when the bureau was replaced by the
Ohio Aviation Board. As bureau director, Johnson’s early work involved assisting with the
Civilian Pilot Training Program (CPTP) established by the United States Civil Aeronautics
Administration (CAA). The CPTP program intended to train and create a large reservoir of
civilian pilots, whereby selected aviators could be chosen for advanced training as military pilots
in the event of war. Johnson and the Aeronautics Bureau assisted Ohio communities and
developers in the construction of airports to feed the
increasing national defense effort. In promoting
aviation in the state, Johnson and the bureau began
to court aircraft manufacturers to construct plants in
Ohio to meet burgeoning demand for aircraft and
parts by the War and Navy Departments.
The outbreak of war in Europe in September
1939 coincided with Johnson’s considerable
knowledge of developments in civil aviation in the
United States. But as the land, air, and naval forces
of the German Third Reich stormed across Western

Figure 110. Johnson as director of Ohio
Bureau of Aeronautics, circa 1940 – 41.

Europe in 1940, aviation enthusiasts began to consider means to organize and utilize civilian
aviators in the United States for defense purposes. In Toledo, Milton Knight, vice president of
the Libbey-Owens-Ford Glass Company, incorporated the Civilian Air Reserve (CAR) on 17
November 1938. The organization intended to “plan, develop, organize, sponsor and carry into
effect a program for developing and maintaining a broader interest in aviation,” and sought to

79

“promote the further development, experience and training of amateur flyers and others
interested in aviation in a manner that would enable them to be of substantial value in any
program of national defense and in any period of national emergency.” Organized along military
lines with ranks and uniforms, the organization’s volunteer pilots and aircraft practiced
formation flying, navigation, meteorology, radio communication, aerial photography, theory of
flight, and aircraft and engine maintenance to augment the nation’s air defense forces should the
government request their services.
Subsequent CAR units developed across the country from 1939 to 1941. From the
original Toledo unit, CAR units formed in numerous states, including Massachusetts, Maine,
Connecticut, Pennsylvania, New York, Utah, Florida, and Colorado. In July 1940, shortly after
the fall of France and with the Battle of Britain barely a week old, Knight began to schedule a
national convention to establish a permanent, national Civilian Air Reserve. In October 1940, the
Aeronautical Advisory Council for the CAA of the Department of Commerce appointed Knight
to chair a committee to plan for the establishment of a national program. The same year, the
Airplane Owners and Pilots Association launched a similar organization, the Civil Air Guard.
Elsewhere, Gill Robb Wilson, a veteran aviator from World War I, editor of the New
York Herald Tribune aviation page, president of the National Aeronautics Association (NAA),
and director of the New Jersey Bureau of Aviation, foresaw the use of the nation’s civilian
aviation resources for war following a visit to Germany in 1936. Convinced that war was
imminent, Wilson in the summer and fall of 1940 used the NAA to urge support for the Civilian
Air Reserve and Civil Air Guard efforts, albeit as a private and not exclusively federal effort.
In March 1941, just prior to the OCD’s establishment on 20 May, the Aeronautical
Advisory Council’s committee recommended that a Civil Air Reserve be formed under the CAA.

80

This program would organize civilian aviation assets in each state to supplement regular military
forces in the event of emergency. Months later, OCD director Fiorello LaGuardia, a former
World War I aviator, appointed an aviation committee for the OCD to develop a blueprint to
organize civilian aviation resources nationally. LaGuardia’s committee included Wilson,
publisher Thomas H. Beck, and newspaperman Guy P. Gannett. The men crafted a program
known as the Civil Air Defense Service using civilian flyers for home defense and disaster relief
in event of a national emergency. Wilson put the plan to work in New Jersey beginning in July,
with operational objectives including aerial liaison, assisting with civilian evacuation in
emergencies, guarding public works and industrial areas, and supplementing and assisting
military aviation. Wilson’s Civil Air Defense Service program would serve as the direct model
for the Ohio Wing and the Civil Air Patrol.
Johnson kept abreast of these national developments and maintained correspondence with
Knight. In late August 1941, Johnson called a meeting of civilian flyers in Ohio to meet for the
development of a Civil Air Defense unit for Ohio. On 19 September 1941, Johnson publicly
announced the creation of the Ohio Wing of Civil Air Defense Service; recruiting for the wing
commenced on 22 September. Johnson saw this organization as a means to counter military
authorities’ possible grounding of civilian aviation in the event of war. A volunteer organization,
the wing would be organized like the Army Air Corps, with a training program much like the
Civilian Air Reserve. The ultimate goal, as Johnson articulated to potential members, would be
to create “better disciplined, better informed, and more effective civil air personnel – a personnel
which is equipped to render efficient auxiliary service if the nation goes to war or a personnel
which will be constructively better fitted for civil aviation if war should be avoided.”

81

With the establishment of the Civil Air Patrol on 1 December 1941, Johnson shifted his
development of the Ohio Wing of Civil Air Defense to conform to the new CAP plans. Thanks to
the foresight of Knight and Johnson, Ohio found itself at the forefront of state CAP wings. On 24
December, Johnson went to Washington to serve as the Assistant Executive Officer for the CAP.
By late January 1942, the Ohio Wing was the second largest CAP wing in the nation. On 27
January, national CAP commander, Major General John F. Curry, appointed Johnson as
executive officer at national CAP headquarters, replacing Gill Robb Wilson. In late March, the
Army assigned Curry as commander of the Fourth District Air Corps Technical Training
Command, and elevated Johnson to the position of national commander of the CAP. On 1 April
1942, Johnson entered the USAAF at the rank of captain and formally assumed the command of
the CAP. For the remainder of World War II, Johnson guided the CAP in 48 states into a viable
instruction for the nation’s defense, ranging from antisubmarine coastal patrol operations, to
courier service for war industries, border patrol, target towing and tracking, and a cadet training
program for the USAAF. By the end of World War II in 1945, tens of thousands of civilian
participated in CAP wings and squadrons in every corner of the nation.
For his service, Johnson rose to the rank of colonel in the USAAF in 1944. For his
leadership of the CAP, the Army awarded Johnson the Legion of Merit. In April 1945, the Army
reassigned Johnson to the 2000th Army Air Forces Base Unit in Fort Worth, Texas, followed
shortly thereafter by assignment to the Army-Navy Liquidation Committee for the disposal of
surplus aircraft in North Africa. Following this work, Johnson returned to the states and resumed
command of the CAP. Johnson’s other wartime decorations consisted of the Army
Commendation Medal with two oak leaf clusters, the American Campaign Medal, EuropeanAfrican-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal, and World War II Victory Medal.

82

On 16 February 1947, Johnson lifted off from an airfield in Cleveland at the controls of a
C-45 Expeditor. Accompanying Colonel Johnson were USAAF Staff Sergeant Kenneth Wood of
Williamsport, Pennsylvania and USMC Private Edward J. Malovic of Cleveland, who was
hitching a ride to Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina. Shortly after takeoff at
around 2,000 feet, one of the aircraft’s engines reportedly exploded, followed by the aircraft
nosing over and plummeting to the ground and crashing in the suburb of North Royalton just
before 1:00PM. All three men aboard the aircraft died on impact. At the time of Johnson’s death,
his promotion to brigadier general was pending before the Senate Armed Forces Committee, and
in January Army Air Forces Chief of Staff General Carl Spaatz had recommended Johnson for
the Army Distinguished Service Medal in recognition of his “inspiring leadership and devotion
to duty” in leading the CAP. Both honors would be awarded posthumously. Johnson received
full military honors as he was laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery.
Without Earle Johnson’s steady leadership and promotion of civil aviation in Ohio and
the United States – in peace and war – the Civil Air Patrol may not have survived the end of
World War II. Whereas the Office of Civilian Defense, CAP’s creator, ceased to exist in the
summer of 1945, by the summer of 1943 CAP’s success in coastal patrol operations caught the
attention of the army and navy. Encouraged by CAP’s proven capability, on 29 April 1943,
President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9339, transferring the CAP to the War
Department, thereby making the CAP the auxiliary of the USAAF, and later the United States
Air Force. Today, the Ohio Wing and the Civil Air Patrol remain viable instruments in the
promotion of aerospace power, development of American youth into tomorrow’s leaders, and
assisting state and federal officials in protecting the nation and its resources during peace and
war.

83

Figure 111. Johnson in Washington as Executive Officer of the CAP, January – March 1942.

Figure 112. Johnson’s military decorations as they would appear posthumously.

84

GLOSSARY OF ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS
AE
AEMS
AEO
AEX
AFNORTH
AFRB
AFRCC
AFB
ANGB
ARS
CAA
CAP
CAR
CDEX
CP-14
CPR
CPTP
CY
DDR
DHS
DoD
DREX
DSCC
ES
FBI
FEMA
FM
FY
GLR
GTE
HF
IACE
ICS
IG
NAA
NCO
NCOLA
NESA
NHQ
NMUSAF
NORAD
OCD
O-rides
OHWG

Aerospace Education
Aerospace Education Members
Aerospace Education Officer
Aerospace Excellence Program
Air Forces Northern
Air Force Reserve Base
United States Air Force Rescue Coordination Center
Air Force Base
Air National Guard Base
Air Reserve Station
Civil Aeronautics Administration
Civil Air Patrol
Civilian Air Reserve
Counterdrug Exercise
Coastal Patrol Base No. 14, Panama City, Florida
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Civilian Pilot Training Program
Calendar Year
Drug Demand Reduction
Department of Homeland Security
Department of Defense
Disaster Relief Exercise
Defense Supply Center, Columbus, OH
Emergency Services
Federal Bureau of Investigation
Federal Emergency Management Agency
Frequency Modulation
Fiscal Year
Great Lakes Region
Guided Training Exercise
High Frequency
International Air Cadet Exchange
Incident Command System
Inspector General
National Aeronautics Association
Non-Commissioned Officer
Non-Commissioned Officer Leadership Academy
National Emergency Services Academy
National Headquarters
National Museum of the United States Air Force, Dayton, OH
North American Aerospace Defense Command
Office of Civilian Defense, 1941 – 1945
Orientation Flights
Ohio Wing Civil Air Patrol

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OSU
PDO
SAR/DR
SAREX
STS
SWAT
TAC
TLC
TREX
USAAF
USAF
USMC
USN
VHF
WPAFB
YMCA

The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Professional Development (also Professional Development Officer)
Search and Rescue / Disaster Relief
Search and Rescue Exercise
Space Transportation System
Special Weapons and Tactics
Tactical Officer
Training Leaders of Cadets
Training Exercise
United States Army Air Forces
United States Air Force
United States Marine Corps
United States Navy
Very High Frequency
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, OH
Young Men’s Christian Association

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LIST OF SOURCE DOCUMENTS
SD01

2013 Legislative Day OHWG Annual Statement

SD02

Wing Calendar for 2013

SD03

OHWG Encampment Cadet Staff Organizational Chart

SD04

OHWG Encampment Newsletters

SD05

OHWG Spring 2012 Aerospace Education Newsletter

SD06

OH-051 press release on 2012 CyberPatriot National Finals Competition

SD07

OHWG IACE 2012 Report

SD08

OHWG Encampment Cadet Staff Training Newsletters

SD09

OH-004 Newsletter, February 2012

SD10

OH-070 Newsletter, January 2012

SD11

OH-282 Newsletter, February 2012

SD12

OH-282 Newsletter, March 2012

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