File #560: "2013 Asheville Composite Squadron NC-019.pdf"

2013 Asheville Composite Squadron NC-019.pdf

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SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
RCS: AVL HO (CAP) 201

HISTORY
OF THE
ASHEVILLE COMPOSITE SQUADRON
1 January – 31 December 2013
Assigned to
North Carolina Wing, Civil Air Patrol

Stationed at
Asheville Regional Airport, North Carolina

JOSEPH E. MYERS
Maj, CAP
Squadron Historian

CHARLES C. PARKER, III
Capt, CAP
Commander

DATE SIGNED
LOUIS V. TOMS
TSgt, CAP
Assistant Squadron Historian
OFFICE OF ORIGIN:
DERIVED FROM:

AVL CAP/HO
MULTIPLE SOURCES

If declassified, review document to ensure material is not CONFIDENTIAL and exempt under NCGS
§132-1.2 (2002), before making public release.

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SECURITY NOTICE AND ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROLS
(U) The overall classification of this document is SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED and
derived from multiple sources to reflect the classifications given the information derived from
source documents. It contains information affecting security of the United States and emergency
response capabilities of the State of North Carolina. The law prohibits transmitting or disclosing
the contents of this document to an unauthorized person in any manner. Handle according to the
provisions of NCGS §132-1.7, Sensitive Public Security Information, and 26 USC 61 §6104.
Publicity of information required from certain exempt organizations and certain trusts. Restrict
distribution and dissemination of its contents on a strict “need-to-know” basis. For a list of
records supporting this derivative classification, see the source citations for portions and
paragraphs and the list of supporting documents.
(U) SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED information appears on pages 9, 13, and 14 and in
Supporting Documents SD029.
(U) This document contains information protected under NCGS §15A-16.05, Limitations on
use of membership lists. CONFIDENTIAL BUT UNCLASSIFIED information appears on pages
3, 6, 7, 8, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, and 37and in Supporting Documents SD009.
(U) If declassified, review the document to ensure material is not CONFIDENTIAL BUT
UNCLASSIFIED as defined in NCGS §15A-16.1, Corporate Records, and 26 USC 61 §6104,
Publicity of information required from certain exempt organizations and certain trusts, before
making a public release.

i
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Security Notice and Administrative Controls ............................................................................ i
Table of Contents ......................................................................................................................... ii
List of Illustrations ...................................................................................................................... iii
Chronology ................................................................................................................................... iv
Aerospace Education ....................................................................................................................1
Cadet Programs ...........................................................................................................................3
Operations .....................................................................................................................................8
Aviation......................................................................................................................................9
Emergency Services .................................................................................................................11
Personnel ......................................................................................................................................15
In Memoriam ..........................................................................................................................16
Outreach ......................................................................................................................................16
Special Events ..............................................................................................................................18
Resource Management ...............................................................................................................20
Wrapping Up and Looking Forward ........................................................................................21
Appendices
A. General Squadron Information ............................................................................................22
B. Personnel Statistics .................................................................................................................24
C. Cadet Achievement Awards ..................................................................................................25
D. Senior Achievement Awards .................................................................................................27
E. Aircraft Data Sheets ...............................................................................................................28
F. Asheville Regional Airport Diagram ....................................................................................30
G. Staff Duty Assignments .........................................................................................................31
Glossary of References and Supporting Information ..............................................................38
References ................................................................................................................................38
Abbreviations and Acronyms ..................................................................................................38
Terms .......................................................................................................................................39
Gazetteer ..................................................................................................................................39
List of Resources .........................................................................................................................41
Historical Documents ..................................................................................................................43
Distribution List ..........................................................................................................................45

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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Tables
Table 1: Cadet Achievements for 2013 ...........................................................................................4
Table 2: Encampment Attendance for 2013 ....................................................................................6
Table 3: Cadet Command Staff........................................................................................................7
 

Photos
Photo 1 C/2Lt Angela Waltman and C/SrA Noah Phillips Spartanburg SC Glider Weekend ........3
Photo 2 Capt William Wallace and Cadet Ground Team during Wing SAREx ............................5
Photo 3 C/2Lt Eli Boothe and Capt Stephen Bloemsma ...............................................................11
Photo 4 C/MSgt Morgan MacDonald at First Aid Class ..............................................................12
Photo 5 Lt Col William Fleming Air Marshalling at Mountain Fury ............................................13
Photo 6 Lt Col Joseph Weinflash Presents Recognition Plaque to Lt Col Robert E. Auger .........19
Photo 7 Approved Emblem ............................................................................................................22
Photo 8 Functional Emblem ..........................................................................................................23
Photo 9 Functional Emblem ..........................................................................................................23
Photo 10 Cessna 172 ......................................................................................................................31
Photo 11 Cessna 182 ......................................................................................................................32
Illustrations
Illustration 1: Asheville Regional Airport Schematic ...................................................................29

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CHRONOLOGY
Asheville Composite Squadron
1 January – 31 December 2013

Date
January
3
10
17
18-20
24
31

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Group 1 SAREX
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting

February
7
9
14
21
22-23
23
28

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) First Aid / CPR Course
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) NC Wing Cadet Competition
(U) NC Wing Historian’s Conference
(U) Squadron Meeting

March
7
14
21
23-24
28
April
4
5-7
11

Event

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Cadet Change of Command
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) NC Wing Aerial Photography Class
(U) Squadron Meeting

27-28

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Model Rocketry Weekend
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Dedication of Hanger 4 as the Robert E. Auger Center
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Geocaching Introductory Navigation Development Hike
(U) Non-Emergency Find
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Lt Col Ray Davis Receives Wright Brothers Award
(U) North Carolina Wing SAREX

May
2

(U) Squadron Meeting

18
20
21
25

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9
16
23
30
June
1-2
6
13
20
21-23
23-29
27
28-29

July
4
11
18
19-26
25

August
1
8
15
22
29

September
5
6-8
12
19
20-22
21
26
October
3

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting

(U) Henderson County Air Fair
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Mountain Fury
(U) North Carolina Wing Summer Encampment
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) NCEM Community Emergency Response Team Train the Trainer
Course

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) USAF / CAP SAREVAL
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Change of Squadron Chaplains
(U) CAP Capabilities Exercise with Buncombe County Rescue Squad

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Cadet Beaver Dam Ropes Course Exercise
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Cadet Bowling Night

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) USAF / CAP SAREVAL
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Model Rocketry Weekend
(U) Asheville Regional Airport Air Show and 5K Run
(U) Squadron Meeting

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Cadet Change of Command


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4-6
10
17
24
26
31

(U) North Carolina Wing / South Carolina Wing Joint Conference
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron website goes live
(U) Squadron Meeting

November
2
5
7
14
21

(U) Glider Orientation Flights
(U) Honor Guard for SPC Jason Shelton
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting

December
5
7
12
14
19

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Christmas Party
(U) Weaverville Christmas Parade
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Wreaths Across America
(U) Squadron Meeting

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THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY

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(U) A lineage provides the fabric for an organization to link the present to the past. During
World War II, civilian aviators took off from primitive and hard surface runways across this
nation to conduct civilian “air guard” missions.1 Born out of the necessity of a world war, Civil
Air Patrol (CAP) squadrons and coastal patrol units worked in harmony with Civil Defense
personnel to protect America from foreign enemies while responding to disasters. The
contributions of these founding citizen airmen and airwomen facilitated congressional
recognition of the CAP as a non-profit auxiliary of the United States Air Force (USAF) in 1948
(10 USC 909 §9441). These early aviators inspired unit esprit d ‘corps and altruism expected
from all senior and cadet personnel today. With over sixty-nine years of heritage, the
preservation of historical knowledge is important to demonstrating that today’s airmen and
airwomen are following in the footsteps of the founding members.
(U) Asheville has, in one form or another, had an operational CAP squadron for over sixty
years. Very few units in the state and nation can claim this feat of lineage. Our pedigree comes
from the efforts of previous historians to preserve an accurate account of squadron
accomplishments and shortcomings. Through this catalog of annual histories, current CAP
personnel are able to learn and improve educational opportunities and mission readiness. Annual
chronicles, like this one, enable future CAP generations to emulate past leaders while forging
their own historical markers. This document also enables military historians to gain a greater
insight into the martial history of western North Carolina. It is for these few reasons that the
squadron historian works diligently to provide a precise and unbiased account of the unit’s
chronology.
(U) This narrative seeks to preserve the historical facts for the Asheville Composite Squadron
during the period of 1 January through 31 December 2013. Information within this history
provides an orderly catalog of facts by functional area. These sections include aerospace
education, cadet programs, and operations. The operations section will deal with emergency
services activities, personnel accomplishments, community outreach, and resource management.
Materials contain an inventory of source documents and multimedia used to support the content
of this narration of events. Cataloged within this volume and saved to a portable electronic
saving device, source documents and multimedia are actually separate volumes of this report.
The arrangement of the Asheville Composite Squadron’s annual history comes from combining
formats provided in CAP Pamphlet 5, Handbook for Civil Air Patrol Historians and AFI 84-101,
Historical Products, Services and Requirements.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
(U) The beginning of the year always poses a hurdle for Squadrons. Eyes wide open, cadets
and seniors envision a wide variety of activities that meet or exceed CAP mission goals. After a
short twelve months, one looks back and marvels at the achievements while longing for more
time to get in all the activities. This section reflects the Squadron’s commitment to advancing
aerospace education within the unit and community. Since understanding the world around us,
humans have sought out the ability fly. Ancient Greeks pondered the pros and cons of flight with
1

Kit Benson and Organ Benson. “Lieut Gill Robb Wilson,” Find a Grave 15 May 2006:
(http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=14291740) (accessed on 10 Feb 2010).



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the tale of Icarus. Within this tale, Icarus’ father fashioned a pair of wings so his son could
escape the Minoans in Crete. Before handing over the wings, Daedalus warned about flying too
close to the sun for it would melt the wax holding the wings together. Icarus would not heed his
father’s warning and ventured too close to the sun before plummeting back to earth.
(U) One might say that this is mythology and has nothing to do with actual flight heritage. I
would argue that it may be a tall tale but there is an interest for us. Our story of aviation began
thousands of years ago as an idea. Scientists, philosophers, inventors, artisans, and a host of
individuals looked into the heavens and imagined what it would be like to take to the skies. In
the 1700s, people began to reach into the heavens through tethered and free floating flight via
lighter than air craft. Since these early days of aviation, people continue to seek a break free the
bonds of earth. With the invention of powered flight, aviators have sought to push the limits of
physics. To meet the challenges of today and tomorrow, the CAP aerospace education fuels our
natural fascination in aerodynamics and aviation history. This section views the unit’s aerospace
education achievements under direction of the Squadron’s Aerospace Education (AE) Officer.
Maj James R. McNab and other dedicated AE members have inspired unit personnel to achieve a
greater insight into aviation heritage.
(U) Before one can take to the skies, they should understand the principles of flight. CAP
provides opportunities for cadets to understand the principles of aviation through hands on
demonstrations of concepts. This is usually accomplished using model rockets and balsa wood
gliders. Through these models, cadets learn about aerodynamics and jet propulsion. Of the
various activities offered through the aerospace education program, the rocketry weekend serves
as the hallmark because it lays a foundation for further exploration of science. The Squadron
conducted its rocketry weekend event of September 20th.2 Senior members supervised cadet
construction of models and their launching. Cadets used everything from alka-seltzer to
commercial grade rocket motors to demonstrate propulsion to put sixteen rockets into the air.
Successful completion of activities resulted in the award of rocketry badges to C/Amn Seairra
Davis, C/A1C Kayla Dutcher, C/Amn Alixandra Fagnant, Cadet Alexander Johnson, and C/A1C
Daniel Moorhead.3
(U) There are many activities difficult to classify. Operations, cadet activities, and aerospace
activities all have a central footing. This commonality is why I choose to feature a special event
held in early November here. On the second, Lt Col Merlin Phillips took a couple of cadets to
visit our neighbors to the south. The Spartanburg Composite Squadron offered orientation flights
to C/2Lt Angela Waltman and C/SrA Noah Phillips.4 Each cadet participated in multiple sorties
for as much as twenty minutes per flight. Lt Col Phillips assisted operations by using a Gator to
pull out about 4,000 feet of cable for the glider winch.5 Cadets and seniors enjoyed the days’
events. Lt Col Phillips hopes that the Squadrons can conduct joint activities such as this one.
Through these connections, cadets and seniors can build comradeship while expanding the roles
and missions of the Civil Air Patrol organization.

2

SD024.
Ibid.
4
SD016.
5
Ibid.
3



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(CBU
U/DECL 20191231) Aero
ospace educa
ation is not s
strictly a cad or flying program. Th
det
he
reality is that Civil Air Patrol wa seniors a cadets to become en
A
ants
and
o
nthusiasts of America’s
aviation h
heritage. Wi the focus on cadets, i is easy to u
ith
it
understand h some may overlook
how
senior ae
erospace edu
ucation. This is understan
ndable given that cadets earn their ra based on
n
ank
n
their und
derstanding of aerospace science and heritage. On the senior side, Nation Headquar
o
d
nal
rters
established the Briga
adier Genera Charles E. Yeager Aer
al
rospace Educ
cation Achie
evement Aw
ward.
earn this dist
tinction by completing a online cou with exa
an
urse
amination. D
During 2013, the
,
Seniors e
Squadron recognized 1Lt Scott S
n
d
Stevens as a r
recipient of the Brigadie General C
er
Charles E. Ye
eager
Aerospac Education Achieveme Award.6
ce
n
ent
(U) Th
hrough emai and week meetings the Squadr
ils
kly
s,
ron’s AE pro
ogram admin
nistrators wo
orked
diligently to inspire and educate. This effort is not as sex as flying a glider or bu
y
a
xy
uilding a roc
cket
but these exchanges have a larger impact. Be
e
h
efore the read misunde
der
erstands my p
position, the is
ere
nothing w
wrong with these and oth types of events. We are looking at conservat
t
her
tion of effort
t.
Glider clinics and roc
cketry weekends may on reach fiv to ten mem
nly
ve
mbers. On th other hand the
he
d,
Squadron AE team took full ad
n’s
m
dvantage of t opportun
the
nities while s
seeking alter
rnative avenu
ues
7
to advanc STEM ac
ce
ctivities. Thi effort tran
is
nslates into a
approximatel 258,000 h
ly
hours of
meaningf instructio to the gen
ful
on
neral public a within th squadron In 2014, th squadron’s AE
and
he
n.
he
team exp
pects to reach out to more schools an involve th communit in underst
h
nd
he
ty
tanding the
importan of the CA in educat
nce
AP
tional awaren
ness. Instead of looking at life throu a rearview
d
ugh
mirror, th squadron’ AE team a
he
’s
ambitiously waits to exc
ceed 2013’s A program by conduct
AE
m
ting
300,000 h
hours instruc
ction.

CADET PROGRAMS
 

6
7

 SD009. 
STEM eq
quates to scienc technology, engineering a mathematic
ce,
and
cs.



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(U) There are few programs that actively target the development of moral character within
today’s youth. Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Heritage Girls, and a handful of other focused programs.
The alternative to these programs may or may not instill the traits necessary to demonstrate
leadership, self-awareness, and community engagement. Through these activities, one becomes a
responsible adult. Society must counteract harmful behaviors by making available constructive
alternatives to teens. Effective mitigation programs include an investment of psychosocial
resources.8 CAP is one of a few non-profit groups dedicated to shaping individual confidence in
today’s youth while giving them a sense of community. A successful cadet program cadre
understands the importance of meeting this challenge and provides alternatives that encourage
cadets to become engaged in community enrichment rather than personal destruction. The
Asheville Component Squadron’s cadet education team embraces the many external challenges
and offers young adults with substitute pursuits that build individual traits while fostering
community engagement.
(U) Senior and cadet leadership engages in a yeoman’s pursuit to provide an exceptional
cadet program. Their effort provides a successful measure to increase personal growth while
facilitating teamwork. Civil Air Patrol recognizes leadership qualities by bestowing militarystyle rank to illustrate a cadet’s mastery of core program objectives and values. Junior members
begin their career as a cadet basic. Much like a pickle describes someone who goes off to basic
training without any service stripes, a cadet basic represents someone who is new to the world of
the Civil Air Patrol program. This becomes the foundation for the cadet leadership to begin the
educational and engagement process. As the journey continues, the Cadet Airman Basic learns
from others to acquire skills that increase their knowledge of aerospace and leadership. Through
active participation, the cadet moves through the ranks to become a Cadet Colonel. During 2013,
Squadron Cadet Programs Commander acknowledged leadership and skills by promoting 38% of
the cadet corps (see appendix C). These promotions signify the cadet corps desires to become
active in local, state, and national activity as is evident by the catalog of activities reflected in
this chronicle.
Achievement
General J. F. Curry
General H. H. “Hap” Arnold
Mary Feik
Wright Brothers
Captain Eddie Rickenbacker
Charles A. Lindbergh
General Jimmy Doolittle
Dr. Robert H. Goddard
Neil Armstrong
General Billy Mitchell
Amelia Earhart

Number
7
4
9
7
6
5
6
6
5
5
1

(U) Table 1: Cadet Achievements for 20139

8

Frank F. Furstenberg, Jr. and Mary Elizabeth Hughes. “Social Capital and Successful Development Among AtRisk Youth.” Journal of Marriage and the Family 57, no. 3 (August, 1995): 581.
9
Data compiled from CAP e-Services.



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(U) Th success of our cadets is no small feat. Junior members m balance t personal
he
o
s
must
the
l
requirem
ments of scho family, f
ool,
friends, and s
sometimes w
work against those of the Squadron.
t
e
Through this delicate balance and the suppor of family a friends, cadets are ab to effecti
e
d
rt
and
ble
ively
manage t
their externa commitme with tho of CAP. S
al
ents
ose
Squadron leadership und
derstands the
ese
external s
strains faced by all mem
d
mbers but esp
pecially by th cadet corp It is for t reason, t
he
ps.
this
the
Civil Air Patrol attem to squee all its ac
r
mpts
eze
ctivities in du
uring the three months o a cadet’s
of
summer v
vacation. Th
hese program are highly competitive and seek to advance sk in aeros
ms
y
o
kills
space
education emergency services, a leadershi As with p
n,
y
and
ip.
previous yea the cadet corps of the
ars,
t
e
Asheville Composite Squadron d
e
e
demonstrated their dedic
d
cation to pers
sonal growth The proof of
h.
f
their com
mmitment is evident in a cadet’s achi
ievements an promotion history. Th commitm
nd
n
heir
ment
reflects g
greatly upon themselves and their fam
milies.
(U) Th are man events ov the year t sparks th competiti spirit boi
here
ny
ver
that
he
ive
iling within our
cadet cor None of which is mo importan than the N
rps.
f
ore
nt
North Carolin Wing Cad Competit
na
det
tion.
The even includes in
nt
ndividual and team comp
petitions des
signed to hav cadets illu
ve
ustrate their
knowledg of Civil Air Patrol an military cu
ge
A
nd
ustoms and c
courtesies. W
Winning team move on to
ms
participat in regiona and nation competiti
te
al
nal
ions. The NC Wing Cad Competiti was held at
C
det
ion
d
10
the North Carolina Ju
h
ustice Acade
emy – East C
Campus in Salemburg on February 2
n
22-23. Cad
dets
receive e
evaluations by fellow cad
b
dets, seniors, and USAF personnel. T
These exami
inations incl
lude
materials on Air Forc heritage, d and cer
s
ce
drill
remonies, an aviation hi
nd
istory. Asheville would field
a team to show how we do things in the mou
o
w
s
untains of we
estern North Carolina. A
After the two day
11
competition, Ashevil
lle’s cadet te would re
eam
eceive an ov
verall second best. Cad C/2Lt Lo
d
dets
ogan
Lueck an C/A1C Ti
nd
imothy Kant received special recognition. The both score the highes on
ter
ey
ed
st
12
written exams within their bracke
n
ets. Echo L
Loud to all th
hose who pa
articipated.
(U) Th ability to use a compa and read a
he
ass
d
map is ch
hallenging. Just ask anyo who had to
J
one
d
complete an orientee
e
ering program for skill
m
proficien
ncies. Civil Air Patrol me
A
embers must
t
become f
familiar with compass na
h
avigation in
order to l
locate downe aircraft or prevent on
ed
ne
from bec
coming a lost hiker. The reality is tha
t
at
traditiona orientee
ally
ering courses are usually not
s
y
much fun and allow wiggle room to wonder upon
n
w
m
your targ without much effort. Therefore, h
get
m
how
does one provide qua
ality training and mitigat
g
te
some of t boredom The simpl answer is
the
m?
le
geocachi Popular with avid hi
ing.
ikers, geocac
ching
is an orie
enteering cou where h
urse
hidden treasu are plac at each p
ures
ced
point. Individ
duals use a
compass and map to locate each point and re
ecord the trea
asure. These courses teach the
e
participan to navigat using a m
nt
te
make while pa
aying close d
detail to trail signs. Thro
l
ough these sk
kills,
the navig
gator can bet locate ob
tter
bscure article that lead t discoverin a downed aircraft or l
es
to
ng
d
lost
person.
10

SD007
Ibid.
12
Ibid.
11



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(U) On 20 April, a contingent of seniors lead by cadets performed a geocaching in the Mills
River area of western North Carolina.13 The day’s events began with cadets receiving basic land
navigation training. Instruction included preparing a team for deployment and conducting
equipment checks. When ready, cadet leaders navigated senior members to the area of operation.
The operation included two ground teams with one communications team. Cadets would manage
search and communications operations under the watchful eyes of the senior members. When
geocaching events concluded, ground teams returned to the Asheville Regional Airport. Cadets
and seniors learned a great deal from the exercise and plans were set in motion to conduct a
future event. This event proved that thinking outside the box can enhance training while having
fun. I tip my hat to the cadets for planning and executing this activity.14
(CBU/DECL 20191231) One of the most accessible summer programs available to the cadets
are encampments. Cadets from across the state and nation attend a one-week program. These
programs enable members to hone their skills in emergency services and leadership. Attendees
participate as a trainee or staff. Staff members have the responsibility for insuring safety and
making the encampment successful for all. During last summer, members of the Asheville
Composite Squadron made their presences known within the Middle East Region. A total of
eight cadets attended encampments in North Carolina and South Carolina (see Table 2). In
conjunction with the encampments, C/CMSgt Rob Reeves would serve on the staff at Hawk
Mountain in Pennsylvania. Through their actions and leadership, the Squadron has greater
effectiveness during disaster response and search operations.
North Carolina Wing Encampment
Camp Butler National Guard Training Center
23 June 2013 – 29 June 2013
C/CMSgt Caleb Freeman
C/CMSgt Jarrett Poto
C/CMSgt Rob Reeves
C/TSgt Ethan Reynolds
South Carolina Wing Encampment
McCrady National Guard Training Center
23 June 2013 – 29 June 2013
C/2Lt Jacob Davis
C/2Lt Morgan MacDonald
C/SMSgt Alexander Hopkins
C/MSgt Molly Boothe
Ranger Academy
Hawk Mountain State Park
6 July 2013 – 14 July 2013
C/CMSgt Rob Reeves
(CBU/DECL 20191231) Table 2: Encampment Attendance for 201315
13

SD022
Activity not recorded. Information provided from first person experience by the writer.
15
Data compiled from CAP e-Services.
14



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(CBU/DECL 20191231) Advancement is a key component of recognizing ones
achievements. The other form is changing command. This activity symbolizes the leadership’s
recognition that a member of the unit has demonstrated the attributes necessary to lead more than
a small group. During 2013, the cadet corps held two command change ceremonies. The first
recognition event occurred in late winter. On the evening of 14 March 2013, cadets recognized
the transfer of command from C/Capt Andrew Moore to C/2Lt Katherine Houston.16 Cadet
Moore had served in the capacity since 7 September 2012. Over the period, the cadet corps
achieved state, region, and national recognition. This was not an easy undertaking as a large
number of our experienced cadets aged out. In the face of these odds, C/Capt Moore was able to
maintain an active program with younger and less experienced cadet cadre. We salute the
achievements of Cadet Moore and look forward to a new era under Cadet Houston with this
ceremony.
(CBU/DECL 20191231) Having served as cadet commander for seven months, C/2Lt Katie
Houston turned over the reins of command responsibility to C/2Lt Eli Boothe. On 3 October
2013, cadet and cadet senior leadership formed the troops at the vacant Odyssey Aviation
facilities at the Asheville Regional Airport. 1Lt Dennis Fagnant presided over the activities.17
This ceremony included the assignment of C/SMSgt Caleb Freeman as the First Sergeant and
C/2Lt Morgan MacDonald as Executive Officer.18 Seniors and cadets join in recognizing the
achievements of former commander C/2Lt Katie Houston while vowing support to the incoming
commander C/2Lt Eli Boothe. 1Lt Fagnant announced the assignment of other cadets into key
leadership roles. List of all appointments are:
C/2Lt Eli Booth
C/2Lt Morgan MacDonald
C/2Lt Logan Lueck
C/2Lt Jared Carpenter
C/SMSgt Caleb Freeman
C/CMSgt Jacob Davis
C/CMSgt Rob Reeves
C/MSgt Molly Boothe
C/MSgt Alec Hopkins
C/2Lt Angela Waltman
C/CMSgt Johnathan Hobbs
C/Maj Andrew Moore
C/MSgt Timothy Kantner
C/SMSgt Zachery Cannon
C/SSgt David Briggs
C/MSgt Jerrett Poto

Commander
Deputy Commander
Executive Officer
Assistant Executive Officer
First Sergeant
Flight Commander
Flight Commander
Flight Sergeant
Flight Sergeant
Emergency Services Officer
Assistant Emergency Services Officer
Aerospace Officer
Assistant Aerospace Officer
Safety Officer
Drug Demand Reduction Officer
NCOIC

(CBU/DECL 20191231) Table 3: Cadet Command Staff19
16

SD020
SD025
18
Ibid
19
Ibid
17



SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
(CBU/DECL 20191231) Flying is one of the cornerstones of the cadet program. The idea of
punching holes in the clouds provides a big draw. Through units like the Asheville Composite
Squadron, Civil Air Patrol provides opportunities for cadets to experience aviation while
expanding their knowledge of aviation and flight operations. At the base of these programs,
Squadron aviators volunteer their time and experience to provide opportunities for cadets to
experience a chance to fly. Over the year, Lt Col Ray Davis and Lt Col Wallace Courtney
introduced cadets from around the region to the love of flying. Once completing their first flight,
Squadron flight leaders provide certificates to those cadets. These certificates recognize the
cadet’s first orientation flight. Lt Col Davis and Lt Col Courtney presented certificates to C/Amn
Symatha Briggs, Cadet Michael Brooks, C/A1C Kayla Dutcher, C/Amn Alizandra Fagnant,
Cadet Alexander Johnson, Cadet Joshua McGlinsky, C/Amn Nolan Middlemas, C/A1C Daniel
Moorhead, Cadet Nathan Rice, and Cadet Ariel Wallace during 2013.20 Through this
accomplishment, these cadets are able to continue their flight education to become solo pilots.
(U) The final cadet event of the year is usually the Winter Encampment. Except for 2012,
seniors and cadets from the Asheville Composite Squadron conduct the event at the Justice
Academy in Edneyville. During 2012, Middle East Region had to cancel the encampment due to
the lack of financial support. In winter 2013, the Middle East Region awarded the encampment
to the Goldsboro Composite Squadron. This was necessary to provide a winter activity while
reducing costs associated with these events. The change in location would also provide eastern
North Carolina units with the ability to attend an encampment without the additional costs
associated with travelling seven hours to Edneyville. This switch was heart wrenching but
understandable. Senior and cadet leadership received assurances that Asheville will host the
winter encampment in 2014. We salute the achievements of the Goldsboro Composite Squadron
while looking forward to bringing the encampment back to the Western Branch of the North
Carolina Justice Academy in Edneyville for 2014
(U) As indicated earlier, cadets and seniors begin the year with expectations to conquer the
world. These events sometimes fall by the wayside as they compete for other activities. Through
these shifts, the cadet corps demonstrated their professional dedication to the Squadron and CAP.
The achievements represented in this historical record reflect great credit upon the cadet
leadership and dedication of the cadets. I mention this as it is important to view cadet
achievements as the sum of all its parts. Regardless of status, everyone must work together to
meet the challenges and overcome them successfully. Without teamwork, the cadet corps would
lack the ability to respond appropriately to CAP mission objectives. Acting as a binding agent,
the senior Cadet Education Officers instill the cadets with the education necessary to become the
leaders of tomorrow. As demonstrated in this history, the Asheville Composite Squadron (seniors
and cadets) actively collaborate to excel professionally and academically. The squadron expects
that programs will expand during 2014 and provide more opportunities for the next generation of
civil and military leaders.

OPERATIONS
(U) When discussing operations, we really are examining two distinctive functions. The first
being flight and the second covering emergency services. These features comprise the bulk of the
20

Information extracted from CAP eServices.



SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
Civil Air Patrol’s mission. To understand the importance of operations, one must understand its
foundation. After the First World War, American aviators return to the States with an idea that
civil aviation could protect against foreign invaders. This concept was necessary given the U.S.
Army’s hesitation to invest in a non-traditional weapon of war. CAPs founding members
solicited state and federal officials in order to establish a civilian air force. On the eve of the
Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Congress approved CAP as a component of civil defense.
Civilian pilots took to the skies towing targets for the Army Air Forces, identified fires for the
Forestry Service, and protected shipping for the Merchant Marine. These activities plus the
adoption of aviation instruction to students proved to the government that the CAP was a
valuable resource. When the war concluded, military commanders and government officials felt
that CAP proved its value to national defense.
(U) Seventy-two years have come and gone since the founding of CAP. Squadrons and flights
prepare for the protection of America’s skies much as they did in 1941. Many state and local
governmental entities embrace the value provided by CAP resources in augmenting professional
emergency response activities. This civil reliance means Squadron leaders cannot afford to
become complacent with maintaining personnel and equipment readiness. Over the past year,
Asheville Composite Squadron members undertook an aggressive training schedule while
adapting to changes in the unit’s weekly meeting location. This section provides sub-sections
dealing with aviation and emergency services. This section will collectively strengthen an
understanding of how the Squadron met or exceeded local, state, and national response
objectives during 2013.

Aviation21
(SBU/DECL 20191231) One huge achievements of the year owes its credit in large part to the
resourcefulness of our aviator-instructors. Since 2008, the county has struggled to extract itself
from a downturn in the economy. The decline caused federal agencies to withhold support from
auxiliary activities in order to shift funding to core services. America is slowing regaining a
footing economically and as such the Asheville Composite Squadron has weathered the storm
unscathed. This resilience is evident in the number of flight hours achieved during FY13. Over
this period, the Squadron flew 517.2 hours.22 These hours include cadet flight training (47.5
hours), cadet orientation flights (115.2 hours), mission aircrew training (73.7 hours), mission
pilot proficiency flights (56.9 hours), and new pilot checkout and training (61.2 hours).23 This is
a remarkable achievement when we compare number of flights flown in FY10 (456), FY09
(433), and FY08 (396).24 Since FY11, the Asheville Composite Squadron pilots flew over 500
hours on the C172 and C182 aircraft.25 Great job!
(U) Of these numbers, the two that have the greatest significance are those achieved for cadet
flight training and cadet orientation flights. These figures include hours conducting the
21

Information represented in this section represents activities for fiscal year 2013. This was done to insure
continuity between reports given to the Air Force and maintained by the Squadron. In both circumstances, the
federal fiscal year runs from 1 Oct 2012 to 31 Sep 2013.
22
SD014
23
Ibid.
24
Ibid.
25
Ibid.



SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
Squadron’s flight academy program. These clinics teach an intensive curriculum that gradually
progresses the cadet understanding of flight from the classroom to actual flight. Ultimately,
instructors hope to inspire a cadet to become proficient in order to achieve a solo flight. The
Asheville Composite Squadron has held a flight clinic for the past six years at the Asheville
Regional Airport.26 Monumental in its own right but this year’s academy had its own significant
achievement. On February 15, Asheville’s C/Capt Andrew Moore conducted his first solo
flight.27 He represented the sixteenth graduate approved to fly solo within the Asheville
Composite Squadron Flight Academy. Lt Col Ray Davis presented C/Capt Moore with a
certificate upon completion of the flight.28 This achievement speaks volumes to the dedication
and service of Cadet Moore.
(U) There is no way to predict when a training event will morph into a real-world activity.
The expectation is that the laws of constants apply… start as a training affair and end as a
training affair. This is ideal but not practical. On 21 April 2013, Lt Col Wallace Wally Courtney
and Capt Rheta Perkins where conducting O Flights with Asheville and Shelby Composite
Squadrons.29 The team returned to the Asheville Regional Airport. While inbound, the aircrew
heard an ELT at frequency 121.5. Maj Rob Masson would serve as Incident Commander and
notified AFRCC of the transmission. Lt Col Courtney, Capt Perkins, and Capt Yount would
leave Asheville Regional Airport in N727CP. With signals strong over the Moore County
Airport, the aircrew would land and undertake the roles of UDF. Conducting a ramp check, the
team isolated the tone within a Citation jet.30 This event would cap an almost 14 hour duty day.
Team members would receive official credit for a non-emergency find.31
(U) On 7 June, air operations demonstrated the importance of the Asheville Flight Academy
and the cadet mentorship. On this day, C/2Lt Eli Booth soloed under Capt Stephen Bloemsma.
Cadet Booth becomes one of a few Squadron cadets to achieve their solo flight status.
Monumental in its own right, there is another remarkable component about this flight. Capt
Bloemsma soloed during the Asheville Composite Squadron’s flight academy on 3 August
2008.32 He credits Lt Col Richard Auger and Lt Col Ray Davis for his interest in aviation and
desire to inspire cadet aviators. SM Bloemsma stated “CAP gave me an opportunity to fly at a
young age… and sparked that interest in aviation that led me to continue on my training, and I
am very grateful for that.”33 He now trains cadets for the Squadron. Lt Col Davis stated that “the
volunteer cycle continues” with this flight.34

26

SD015
Ibid
28
Ibid.
29
SD006
30
Ibid.
31
Ibid.
32
SD014
33
SD002
34
SD014
27

10 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

SENSITIVE B
BUT UNCLA
ASSIFIED

(U) Th Asheville Composite Squadron h many ach
he
e
e
has
hievements t its credit. These would not
to
d
be possib if it were not for its d
ble
e
dedicated me
embers. On 2 June, Lt C Wally C
25
Col
Courtney prov
ved
th
why the S
Squadron is second to no On that day, Lt Col Courtney completed his 250
one.
t
l
Orientati Flight.35 He achieved this milesto at the Oxford-Hende
ion
d
one
erson Airpor (KHNZ).36
rt
The orien
ntation progr combine moral lea
ram
es
adership and pre-flight in
nstruction be
efore taking t
to
the skies. National Headquarters recommend one to two Flight Orie
H
ds
o
entation prog
grams per ye
ear.
Students completing their first O Flight recei a certific addressing the signif
ive
cate
ficance of th
he
cadet’s a
achievements Lt Col Cou
s.
urtney’s ded
dication serv as a credi to the Asheville Comp
ves
it
posite
Squadron and its aero
n
ospace missi to inspir tomorrow’ leaders.
ion
re
’s
(U) In many respe
n
ects, aviation is the lynch
n
hpin in successfully achieving the m
missions of th
he
Civil Air Patrol and Asheville Co
r
A
omposite Sq
quadron. Air assets are pa of cadet p
art
programs,
aerospace education and emergen services in varying d
ncy
s
degrees. Thi requires th dedication of a
is
he
n
core cadr of aviators willing to v
re
volunteer their time and effort to ma things ha
ake
appen. The
Asheville Composite Squadron is truly grateful for our a
e
e
aircrews for m
making thing happen. T
gs
Their
dedicatio and profes
on
ssionalism in
nsured 210 h
hours of pilo and aircrew ground tra
ot
w
aining by
Squadron ground and flight instru
n
d
uctors.37 Thr
rough these activities, th unit had n safety
he
no
violation for 2013. This may no seem big b the families of our ca
ns
T
ot
but
adets appreci the extra
iate
a
mile und
dertaken by our volunteer professiona Conduct
o
r
als.
ting the miss
sion and brin everyone
ng
home saf is somethi everyone can apprec
fe
ing
e
ciate. Semper Vigilans!
r

Emerge
ency Servi
ices
eniors began the New Ye participat
ear
ting in traini designed to enhance the
ing
d
(U) Cadets and se
ission readin
ness. Beginni on 18 Ja
ing
anuary, the A
Asheville Composite Squ
uadron travel
lled
unit’s mi
38
to Shelby to participa in the No Carolina Group 1 Se
y
ate
orth
a
earch and Re
escue Exerci
ise. Wester
rn
North Ca
arolina and upper South Carolina par
u
rticipants lea
arned skills f incident command,
for
ground te
eam, commu
unications, a specialized skills. Lt Col Merlin Phillips esta
and
ablished the
35

SD005
Ibid
37
Ibid
38
SD017
36

11 

SENSITIVE B
BUT UNCLA
ASSIFIED

SENSITIVE B
BUT UNCLA
ASSIFIED
communi
ications hub for operatio with the assistance o Asheville cadet’s Robert Reeves a
b
ons
of
and
39
Noah Phi
illips. The Asheville co
ontingent sp three day outdoors weathering temperature
pent
ys
es
ranging f
from 28 degr
rees at night to 59 degrees during the day. Shelb Composite Squadron
t
e
by
leadershi organized the training to be a com
ip
d
g
mbination of formal train
ning mixed w practical
with
l
exercises Former As
s.
sheville Com
mposite Squa
adron Comm
mander, Lt Col Robert Ba
auer served as
0
the encam
mpment’s co
ommander.40
(U) A
Annually, Lt Col “Butch” Phillips con

nducts a first
aid cours for Squadr personne This year that training
se
ron
el.
r
41
would tak place on February 9.4 Squadron personnel
ke
attended a first aid an cardiopul
nd
lmonary resu
uscitation
(CPR) co
ourse at the Asheville Re
A
egional Airp
port. Lt Col
Merlin “B
Butch” Phill conducte the sessio attended
lips
ed
on
by senior cadets, an family. H is able to d
rs,
nd
He
draw upon h
his
experienc as a certi
ces
ified Emerge
ency Medica Technicia
al
an
to addres student co
ss
omments and concerns. S
d
Students
learned th basics of first aid, injury emergen
he
f
ncies, and
environm
mental injurie Conducte in module students
es.
ed
es,
demonstr
rated their kn
nowledge to perform wi
o
ithin the
standards established by the Ame
s
d
erican Heart Association
t
n.
The final test came with the stud
l
w
dent’s ability to perform
CPR and use an auto
d
omatic extern defibrilla (AED).
nal
ator
Students successfully completing the course received
y
g
certificat
tion by the American He Associat
A
eart
tion’s
Heartsav
ver® First Ai
id/CPR curri
iculum.42
On
L
Davis receiv the covet Wright B
ved
ted
Brothers Master Pilot wa
ard
(U) O 25 April, Lt Col Ray D
by the Fe
ederal Aviati Adminis
ion
stration.43 Th recognitio celebrates Colonel Da
he
on
s
avis’ over fif
fty
44
years of s flight op
safe
perations. He began hi career with the United States Air F
is
h
d
Force workin as
ng
5
an air tra
affic controller in 1959.45 Through th years, he w
he
would go on to work wit NASA an the
n
th
nd
early spa flight mis
ace
ssions. After thirty years of service w NASA, Lt Col Dav would ret
r
s
with
,
vis
tire
and move to Georgia where he co
e
a
onnected wi the Civil Air Patrol. W the Ash
ith
With
heville
Composi Squadron he has become a value asset in fli
ite
n,
ed
ight operatio and aerospace educa
ons
ation.
Lt Col Davis serves as operations officer, mi
a
ission pilot, f
flight instruc
ctor, check-p
pilot, check-pilot
46
6
examiner and FAA FAAST repre
r
F
esentative. The Ashevi Composi Squadron salutes
ille
ite
n
Lieutenan Colonel Ray Davis’ a
nt
R
achievements and value t the unit’s readiness.
s
to

39

Activity not recorded. Information pr
rovided from fi person exp
first
perience by the writer.
Ibid
41
SD019
42
Ibid
43
SD021
44
SD005
45
Ibid
46
Ibid
40

12 

SENSITIVE B
BUT UNCLA
ASSIFIED

SENSITIVE B
BUT UNCLA
ASSIFIED
(U) E
Except for 20
011, the
Ashevill Composite Squadron
le
e
hosted a Mountain F
Fury flying c
clinic
successf
fully since 20 This
005.
aviation clinic provides CAP
members with practi experien
ical
nce
in navigating the top
pography of
southern Appalachia Experienced
n
a.
aviators mentor and evaluate les
ss
experien
nced crews. C
Course
instructions provide an opportun
nity
for aviat to land o primitive
tors
on
mountain airstrips an locate
n
nd
simulate downed ai
ed
ircraft. The
program’ goal seeks to provide familiarity t aircrews so they may u
’s
s
to
understand h flying in a
how
n
mountain range is dif
n
fferent from the piedmon and coasta regions of the state. D
nt
al
f
During the
weekend of 21 June, the Asheville Composit Squadron hosted twen mission p
d
te
nty
pilots with ei
ight
47
corporate aircraft. Pilots initiall receive classroom inst
e
P
ly
truction befo taking to the skies. A the
ore
o
At
conclusio of events, trainees con
on
,
nducted 32 f
flights totalin 45 hours.48 Through these events
ng
.
s,
pilots aro
ound the regi improve their proficiencies with the ultimate goal being to aid search
ion
e
h
e
and recov
very of down aviators in mountain
ned
s
nous terrain.
.
(U) O
Over the perio of 28-29 June, Lt Col Merlin Phil
od
l
llips and TSgt Louis Tom participa
ms
ated
in the No Carolina Office of E
orth
a
Emergency M
Management Commun Emergen Response
t’s
nity
ncy
(CERT) T
Team Train the Trainer Course.49 Th program, offered at th University of North
he
he
y
Carolina at Asheville provide sk required to conduct CERT training. Program explores C
e,
kills
d
m
CERT
oring how to deliver thos elements t a diverse audience.50 Instruction
o
se
to
elements while explo
d
th
CERT Coord
dinator, Patty Moore. Th course had several
y
he
d
provided by the Nort Carolina C
communi para-prof
ity
fessional and profession participan from arou western North Carol
d
nal
nts
und
lina.
Upon com
mpletion of the course, L Col Philli and TSgt Toms becam the primary instructo
Lt
ips
t
me
ors
for the A
Asheville Com
mposite Squ
uadron. Through their dedication, the Asheville C
e
Composite
Squadron cadets and seniors can acquire CER skills loc
n
RT
cally.
91231) Duri 2011, the United Stat Air Force revised ho it would
ing
e
tes
ow
(SBU/DECL 2019
atrol emergen readines Prior to th change, A Force ev
ncy
ss.
his
Air
valuators would
evaluate Civil Air Pa
ne
e
s
ing
dividual state and territor This
e
ry.
determin a Wing’s effectiveness by evaluati each ind
arrangem proved too costly. T
ment
t
There was also a need to evaluate how Civil Air Patrol eleme
ents
coordinat response efforts to address an un
ted
e
ndefined inci
ident. Wing level incidents may show
that asset effectively address tar
ts
y
rgeted incide but they fail to demo
ents
y
onstrate a co
oordinated
response. The new fo
ormat would determine n only Win effectiven but regi
d
not
ng
ness
ional response

47

SD008
Ibid
49
SD014
50
Ibid
48

13 

SENSITIVE B
BUT UNCLA
ASSIFIED

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
capabilities. We and others from North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia would jump into
the middle of the new format over the week of 19-28 July.51
(SBU/DECL 20191231) Events kicked off with a notification from the North Carolina Wing
opening mission 13-T-6361 on 25 July.52 Information regarding the exercise quickly went out for
status of air and ground crews. Air Force evaluators directed a scenario that simulated a
hurricane hitting the east coast. Post-incident, Wing would re-station assets closer to the impact
areas. This required Asheville elements to go east. On 25 July, Lt Col Joseph Weinflash sent a
request to unit personnel for redeployment to Burlington. Personnel would provide and augment
Headquarters communications and ground team elements.53 On 26 July, a contingent from
Asheville left for Burlington and established operations through the end of the evaluation.54 As
this was the first of its type, participants adjusted well and overcame many obstacles. Evaluators
certified the three Wings to continue operating as an effective resource in disaster response.
(U) Incident command system preaches integration of assets to provide the greatest level of
effort in contingency response and management. Over the past year, the North Carolina Wing
actively sought out connections with the North Carolina Office of Emergency Management to
provide greater capabilities for responding to incidents. As part of this effort, the Asheville
Composite Squadron actively promoted Civil Air Patrol capabilities with local emergency
management and response agencies. On July 25, a contingent of Squadron seniors and cadets
conducted a capabilities exercise for the Buncombe County Rescue Squad.55 The event
demonstrated how ground and air assets could coordinate activities to aid in locating a lost hiker.
Buncombe County Rescue Squad had particular interest in maintaining communications with a
base camp.
(U) The event began with Capt James Matthews leading a team of seniors and cadets into the
Shining Rock Wilderness Area. The ground team comprised Maj Kim Gibson, 1Lt Sharon
Waltman, C/1Lt Julie Waltman, C/CMSgt Angela Waltman, C/MSgt Caleb Freeman, C/TSgt
Jarrett Poto, and C/SrA Noah Phillips. SM Stephen Bloemsma and Maj Arnie Andreson took to
the air.56 Lt Col Merlin Phillips managed communications traffic between aviation and ground
assets. Representatives of Buncombe County Rescue Squad were present to understand Civil Air
Patrol capabilities. This assessment was important as most local communications systems go out
when one goes into the back woods of western North Carolina. Lt Earle Tilton, Buncombe
County Rescue Squad, was impressed by the range of capabilities. He felt that coordinating
efforts with the Asheville Composite Squadron could add a force multiplier to response
activities.57 The hope is that this will serve as a foundation for future collaborative activities
between the two entities.

51

SD027
SD029
53
SD028
54
Ibid
55
SD023
56
Ibid
57
Ibid
52

14 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

PERSONNEL58
(U) How does one measure leadership? This is a question that management researchers have
spent years studying and writing about. The variations in theories are as numerous as the amount
of studies. After years of studying management theory, I believe I might have the answer to this
perplexing question. Leadership is dependent upon the quality of personnel. In turn, these
individuals require professional leadership. These symbiotic relationships will result in the
stronger personal, managerial, and organizational growth. Over the past twelve months, several
senior members received recognition for their contributions advancing the mission of the Civil
Air Patrol. Their accomplishments demonstrated their dedication to duty while reflecting great
credit upon the support of the Squadron and its leadership.
(U) We often get caught up with selling Civil Air Patrol on its aviation, emergency services,
and cadet activities. Article upon article focuses on these as topic areas. Outside the spotlight,
there is another world of administrative and command personnel that move mountains to keep
the unit running with little to no recognition. On July 25, Chaplain Everett Woodcock turned
over the spiritual welfare of the unit to Chaplain Arthur Slagle.59 Lt Col Joseph Wienflash
informed the members in attendance of Chaplain Woodcock’s twenty-year tenure as Squadron
Chaplain.60 Chaplain Arthur Slagle provided some additional words in praise of the Chaplain’s
dedication through the years. The event concluded with the Commander presenting a Ten
Commandments Challenge Coin to him.61 Squadron personnel will miss his moral leadership and
words of wisdom.
(U) Rare is the occasion that a cadet progresses through the ranks to become a senior member.
More often than not, life and its responsibilities force one to pursue their lot after leaving the
cadet corps. Juggling personal obligations and a Civil Air Patrol career is what Capt Stephen
Bloemsma has done. Joining the Asheville Composite Squadron at 14, he fell in love with flying
following his first orientation flight.62 After graduating from the cadet cadre, Capt Bloemsma
undertook a job with Western North Carolina Aviation. During fall 2013, he achieved a unique
honor by rating as a commercial aviator. This achievement places Capt Bloemsma in an
exceptional group. He is one of a few classified as the youngest to achieve commercial pilots
license. Capt Stephen Bloemsma credits this achievement to the inspiration provided by the
Asheville Composite Squadron.63 His dedication and the dedication of other cadets is why the
Civil Air Patrol program is a success.
(U) Winter signals the winding down of non-mission activities for most CAP squadrons. The
highlight of winter activities is the gathering of friends and family for the holidays. In keeping
with family togetherness, the Asheville Composite Squadron holds a Christmas party. This
year’s party took place at the Trinity Baptist Church on December 7.64 Coordinated by Maj
58

In this section, personnel identify matters related only to the squadron’s senior corps. Author identifies cadet
achievements under the cadet activities segment of this history.
59
SD023
60
SD013
61
Ibid
62
SD002
63
Ibid.
64
SD003

15 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
Barbara Bow, the event solicited everyone to bring a dish for sharing with others. Several of the
member’s spouses and cadets helped to decorate the hall. The official party kicked off at 1700
hours. Scheduled for two hours, the event took every second of that time as everyone rejoiced in
past achievements and being with friends. Wishing everyone a happiest of holiday seasons, the
Christmas party symbolized the close of official unit activities for 2013.

In Memoriam
(U) A composite squadron has the unique ability to see the value of younger and older
generations working together to advance aerospace education. These interactions preserve the
history and heritage of the Civil Air Patrol. When someone passes, emptiness occurs that never
really heals within the unit. The Asheville Composite Squadron prides itself on being a family.
As with many families, this one comes with its ups and downs. During the year, the Civil Air
Patrol family got smaller by two. These losses represent pieces of history lost to the sands of
time. We faced our first loss on August 6 when Mrs. Doris Burnett Burrell of Clyde passed
away.65 During World War II, Mrs. Burrell served his country as a pilot within the Civil Air
Patrol.66 As part of the greatest generation, the Asheville Composite Squadron salutes their
efforts that enabled the Civil Air Patrol to become a respected civil defense force.
(U) Later in the year, the Squadron would lose one of its cherished benefactors and valued
members of its family. On December 20, Lieutenant Colonel Robert Eaton Auger passed away at
the North Carolina State Veterans Homes in Asheville.67 Lt Col Robert Auger had served as a
pilot and pilot instructor during World War II and the Korean Conflict. During his years in
Asheville, he was a valued component of the unit’s aerospace education. He donated time and
financial support to provide an excellent program. Earlier in the year, the Asheville Composite
Squadron recognized Lt Col Auger’s support by dedicating its new facilities as the Lt Col Robert
E. Auger Center.68 Squadron seniors and cadets will miss him deeply. We bow our heads in
prayer and appreciation and to him and his family.

OUTREACH
(U) Community outreach is an important component but often overlooked activity within a
squadron’s pursuits. This maybe because these activities are not always as glamorous as
tromping through the woods or punching holes in the clouds. Public awareness brings other
values to the squadron. These activities bolster unit morale, recruitment, or public awareness just
to name a few. Outreach can also require more attention and time than the traditional duties
associated with the Civil Air Patrol mission. It is possibly the additional work that deters many
from pursuing an active outreach program. Whatever the reason, successful organizations will
always find a way to promote community enrichment activities. Although there is always room
for improvement, this section addresses the active engagement by the Asheville Composite
Squadron over the course of the past twelve months.

65

SD004
Ibid.
67
SD001
68
SD010
66

16 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
(U) Beginning in 2012, the Asheville Regional Airport has held an Air Fair /5-K run. These
events are open to the general public and provide a unique opportunity for Asheville Composite
Squadron to connect with the community. On 21 September, unit personnel took to the tarmac to
assist airport visitors while engaging interested individuals regarding the Civil Air Patrol.69 This
effort provided a static aircraft display. Squadron personnel also took advantage of the 5-K run to
stretch their legs. Runners run the runway while aviation officials insure that no aircraft attempt
to land during events. The Asheville Composite Squadron dedicated ten seniors and three cadets
for this event. 1Lt Dennis Fagnant transported cadets to and from the Rocketry Weekend to
insure a large presence at the event.70 It is also important to note, that C/Amn Nolan Middlemas
was recruited the previous year at this same event.71 The Asheville Composite Squadron looks
forward to many more years of supporting this event.
(U) Civil Air Patrol recognizes the achievements of those who put others over their own lives.
This is why we often salute those who serve the community and nation. There are some who
make the ultimate sacrifice for us. On 2 November, the Asheville Composite Squadron sent a
contingent to the Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport to pay respect to Army Specialist
Jason Shelton.72 A graduate of Madison High School, SPC Shelton was stationed in Germany
with the 709th Military Police Battalion. He was recipient of the Operation Enduring Freedom
service medal.73 The military flew his remains to Greenville where the Patriot Guard escorted
him back to the mountains of western North Carolina. Lt Col Joseph Weinflash lead the
contingent of the Asheville Composite Squadron to served as SPC Jason Shelton’s honor guard
in Greenville. With this event, we honor the sacrifices of all who have fallen in the line of duty.
(U) December held the last major event for Squadron personnel and those of the greater Civil
Air Patrol family. Wreaths across America has civil and veterans organizations place wreaths on
the tombstones of veterans. Wreaths made possible through donations. As with previous efforts,
Maj Barbara Bow was the catalysis for the Squadron’s success. During the year, members of the
Squadron raised money for wreaths for the national ceremony on December 14. On the day of
the event, seniors and cadets met at the Veteran’s Cemetery in Black Mountain.74 Others in
attendance included local high school ROTC units, Patriot Riders Motorcycle Club, Blue Star
Mothers, and the Buncombe County Fire and Sherriff’s Honor Guard. With the laying of over
492 wreaths, this year marked the largest event at Black Mountain.75 This effort was due in large
part to the effort by Maj Barbara Bow. Hats off to an excellent effort!
(U) Over the past twelve months, the Squadron’s public affairs team was active in their
pursuit to inform the community of unit activities. To achieve awareness, the public affairs team
interacted with local media outlets. The fruits of their printed labors helped to create portions of
this historical record. On the radio front, public affairs officers generated over 600 public service
announcements through WZGM 1350 am.76 Local communities could learn about the Civil Air
69

SD025
Ibid.
71
Ibid.
72
WLOS (local ABC affiliate) broadcast reference unavailable.
73
SD012
74
SD026
75
Ibid.
76
SD030.
70

17 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
Patrol and the programs offered by the Asheville Composite Squadron. This interaction led to an
interest by mountain residents to become a member of the unit. Information also helps to build
bridges with the local response community who might not realize the services offered by the
Civil Air Patrol. The Squadron has seen a grown in membership thanks to the effort of the unit’s
media relations team effort.
(U) Community engagement is challenging. National and Wing requirements often impose
requirements necessary to achieve mission readiness. This direction often overlooks the
importance of outreach in programming. Successful squadrons find the perfect balance of
mission necessity and community engagement. We are able to see their successes in the form of
increased media coverage, program sponsorships, and increased recruitment. Over the past
twelve months, the Asheville Composite Squadron demonstrated balanced program. The
outcome of the unit’s achievements is evident by the awards and recognitions received. As
always, we owe our successes to the hard work and dedications of everyone in the Squadron.
Echo Loud!

SPECIAL EVENTS
 

(U) One could accurately deduct that any event with the Civil Air Patrol is special. As we
have seen over the course of this report, there are many occasions for seniors and cadets to
network. Encampments, exercises, training, and the list go on and on. Of the dozens of activities,
conferences provide the greatest opportunity for members to engage in professional development
within a social environment. Traditionally, Civil Air Patrol conducts these events annually at the
wing, region, and national level. Conferences provide members with an understanding of trends
within the organization while recognizing those who excel. These events either focus on general
trends for the members or specialized instruction for those within the aviation sector. Every once
and a while, something rate occurs that depart from this standard.
(U) Over the years, Capt Joseph Meyers has promoted the concept of a historian conference.
During 2012, he became an assistant to the Wing Historian Lt Col Phil Saleet. With this
assignment, Capt Meyers voiced the concept to the new Wing Historian. This inquiry would
become the catalyst to making a conference happen. Over a six-month period, the Wing historian
team put together a program and advertised it to North Carolina and the Middle East Region. The
event would take place on February 23, 2013 at the Wing Headquarters in Burlington, North
Carolina.77 Instructors included Lt Col Phil Saleet, Capt Joseph Meyers, and TSgt Louis Toms.
Presentations outlined Civil Air Patrol history, Historian specialty track, museum and archival
practices, and oral histories.78 Attendees came from units from around North Carolina. The
dedication of Lt Col Saleet catapulted him to national staff and Capt Meyers would become the
North Carolina Wing Historian.
(U) The Historian’s Conference was not the only significant special event in 2013. There was
one of higher significance to the unit. Over the past couple of years, Asheville Composite
Squadron members have had no consistent home. During 2012, Western North Carolina Aviation
and the Asheville Regional Airport leased the unit Hanger 4. This was monumental as it brought
77
78

SD011
Ibid.

18 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

SENSITIVE B
BUT UNCLA
ASSIFIED
the unit b
back to the airport. Since acquiring t space, a d
a
e
the
dedicated tea of senior and cadets
am
rs
s
have retr
rofitted the facility to me Squadron requiremen This incl
fa
eet
n
nts.
luded but no limited to t
ot
the
stabilizat
tion of the floor, installin a stairway and addressing safety concerns. In
ng
y,
nformation
technolog specialist wired the b
gy
ts
building to a
allow for Wi access. I mid-sprin the City o
i-Fi
In
ng,
of
Asheville approved the certificat of occupan Membe would fin
e
t
te
ncy.
ers
nally have a p
place to rest
t
their hat.
(U) O evening of 11 April, th Asheville Composite Squadron fo
On
he
e
formed with family and
friends to dedicate th unit’s new home. With a hundred in attendanc Lt Col Jo
o
he
w
h
ce,
oseph Weinfl
flash
dedicated Hanger 4 as the Lt Col Robert E. A
d
a
l
Auger Center The ninety
r.
y-one year o Auger wa
old
as
79
present to receive thi honor. R
o
is
Robert Auger had served as an aviato in the Arm Air Force
r
or
my
e
0
during W
World War II and the Air Force durin the Korea Conflict.80 Over the ye
ng
an
ears, Lt Col
Robert E Auger prov
E.
vided suppor to the Squ
rt
uadron’s cadet programs. Capt Clint Parker,
Squadron Public Aff
n
fairs Officer, stated “Com
mmander We
einflash thou
ught it fitting to honor a man
g
who serv his count as part of what’s com to be know as the gr
ved
try
f
me
wn
reatest gener
ration and wh
ho
has been supportive of this squad
o
dron, both fin
nancially an as an inspirational role model.”81 L
nd
e
Lt
er
ly
with
or
ked
adron for this recognition
s
n.
Col Auge was visibl pleased w this hono and thank the Squa

here
ny
vents that oc
ccur over the year. The d
e
difficulty is i the ability to
in
y
(U) Th are man special ev
identify e
each of them for inclusio in a chron
m
on
nicle of this n
nature. In m instances, we are luc
most
cky
in that so
omeone mentions these a
activities to s
someone wh catalogs th event for others to
ho
he
appreciat In the cas of the Ash
te.
se
heville Comp
posite Squad
dron, I have to thank Cap William
pt
Wallace’s thorough note taking d
n
during the w
weekly meetin These e
ngs.
events may n be includ
not
ded
in this se
ection but the have a pla somewhere in this re
ey
ace
eport. On occ
casion, we m somethi
miss
ing
79

SD010
 Ibid.  
81
 Ibid.  
80

19 

SENSITIVE B
BUT UNCLA
ASSIFIED

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
of importance because of the individual modesty or lost references. Therefore, I would like to
recognize the achievements of the unit and its members as being noteworthy events. These
include but not limited to those who received awards, been promoted, or graduated from special
Civil Air Patrol programs.

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
(U) There are many things we take for granted while conducting CAP business. Who does the
unit turn to when they need a part or resource? What space are you using to conduct weekly
meetings? Where are you going to park the aircraft when you don’t have a lease agreement?
How can you log members into WIMRs without computers? There is a substantial list of
questions that most of us never have to worry. This is due to the yeomen’s level work achieved
by a dedicated few. Their dedication enabled the Squadron to seamlessly address unit, Wing,
Region, and National commitments.
(U) The squadron began the year meeting and operating out of the Lacy Griffin Building at 91
Wright Brothers Way in Fletcher. This facility once served as the permanent residency of the
Asheville Composite Squadron. Beginning in 2009, the Asheville Regional Airport Authority
(ARAA) required the use of the Lacy Griffin facilities to generate income. Western North
Carolina Aviation would use the vacated facilities to establish a flight clinic. While acquiring the
Lacy Griffin Building, ARAA began looking for a suitable replacement for the Squadron.
Meanwhile, unit members shuffled from the Western Justice Academy in Edneyville to the NC
Army National Guard armory in Asheville. In 2012, airport authorities negotiated a lease with
unit leadership for occupation of Hanger 4. With a lease in hand, a group of dedicated unit
carpenters and electricians worked to bring the neglected facilities up to code. This would take
several months of intensive labor.
(U) With conditions vastly improved, the Asheville Composite Squadron officially moved
operations to the Lt Col Robert E. Auger Center in April. Once moved, the unit looked toward
improving the hanger’s condition. The goal was creating usable spaces for cadet and senior
operations. In order to proceed, leadership had to obtain a building permit. This became a minor
issue as new rules clashed with the requirements met during the original construction. To meet
the new requirements, Squadron leaders obtained the specialization of an architect. This
acquisition required the remapping of the hanger facilities to address Buncombe County
concerns. Active collaboration between the parties came to a successful conclusion in December.
Buncombe County would issue a permit for the unit to remodel facilities. The unit will begin
soliciting labor and technical assistance from the membership to meet the goals of the
revitalization of the Auger Center.
(U) Construction was not the only infrastructure activity the unit engaged during the past
twelve months. With the new facilities, the Squadron worked diligently to integrate multimedia
into the balance of informing members of activities while promoting recruitment over the years.
This is no simple undertaking. Too much or too little information could make force the searcher
become frustrated to use your resources. Ease of information access was the primary goal in
unit’s transition from its old domain to one using Druple. Lt Col Weinflash appointed 1Lt Scott
Stevens to evaluate and reestablish the unit’s web presence. Requesting input from the
20 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
leadership, he organized and developed a site that reasserts the Squadron’s information access
goals. The site went active on 26 October.82 This new site includes a blog, member area, and
frequently asked questions. Unlike the previous site, this one features a public face that provides
information relevant to potential recruits. Specific resources are hidden within membership pages
much like National’s eServices portal.

WRAPPING UP AND LOOKING FORWARD
(U) This historical document chronicles the activities and accomplishments of the squadron
and its personnel during the year for 2013. The research team collected a variety of resources to
present information in a representative timeline of activities. Information related to some
activities was unavailable to the historical team. This created pockets in describing the complete
story of the unit’s actions during the year. The downside to missing information is that that some
squadron and individual triumphs may be absent from this annual. We can only request that you
forgive us for these oversights. It is our hope that you find that this annual history overcomes
these minor oversights to preserve the spirit of squadron’s individual and collective
achievements for 2013.
(U) Over the past twelve months, squadron personnel made great strides in maintaining
mission readiness. Aircrew instructors and ground team leaders train personnel to the highest
caliber. This is evident in the squadron’s response capabilities during training and real world
contingency activities. The squadron has become a leader in navigating in the mountains that it
conducts an annual flying clinic for the region and wing. Ground team leaders work to provide
training that meets acceptable practices of civilian emergency services practitioners by having
them conduct training for squadron personnel. This means that cadets and seniors are able to
integrate with the operations of local recovery efforts. Aviation and emergency services is only a
small component of the past year. Squadron personnel learned about the Air Force, gave back to
the community, and built unit esprit d ‘corps. Because of squadron personnel, several members
received recognition from the Wing, National, and veteran’s organizations.
(U) Two-thousand and fourteen promises to be an exciting year for the squadron. In late
January, the Asheville Composite Squadron will change commanders. This brings pining for the
old while celebrating the new. As we transition, Wing will challenge air and ground crew across
the state to perform at its best. Units will prepare and fulfill mission requirements of the annual
SAREx. As the year progresses, Squadron aviators will work to develop and pull off a Mountain
Fury clinic. . June and July will bring national and regional events such as summer camps and
other events provide cadets and seniors with activities involving hands on missions. When the
cadets return to school in August, the unit will turn to continued community engagement and unit
proficiencies. Then comes winter when the squadron historian prepares to collect and write about
the achievements of the squadron and its personnel. As these events and others occur, the unit
remains ever vigilant to meet the goals of searching for downed aircraft in the mountains of
Western North Carolina.

82

 Asheville Composite Squadron Blog 

21 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

APPENDIX A
GENERAL SQUADRON INFORMATION
As of 31 December 2013

Unit Designation

Asheville Composite Squadron (MER-NC-019)

Previous Designations

Asheville Senior Squadron (1957-1976)
Asheville Squadron (1945-1957)
Western Carolina Squadron (1942-1945)

Authority

Civil Air Patrol National Organization Charter

Higher Headquarters

North Carolina Wing (MER-NC-001)

Commander

Maj Joseph A. Weinflash (July 2009-Present)

Deputy Commander – Seniors Lt Col William L. Fleming (12/2/2011-Present)
Deputy Commander – Cadets

1 Lt Dennis A. Fagnant (5/3/2012-Present)

Cadet Commander

C/2Lt Logan M. Lueck (10/3/2013-Present)
C/2Lt Katherine Houston (3/15/2013-10/3/2013)
C/Capt Andrew Moore (9/7/2012-3/14/2013)

Station

Asheville Regional Airport

Aircraft Flown

Cessna 172
Cessna 182

Awards and Decorations

Unit Citation (2011)

Approved Emblem:
Significance: Traditional Air Force squadron
type design. Insignia features CAP aircraft
flying over the city of Asheville. Disc contains
the Asheville Composite Squadron’s designation
NC-019 and Civil Air Patrol. The outer scrolls
identify the unit’s motto Echo Loud and identify
the city of Asheville. Insignia size slightly larger
than traditional Air Force squadron emblem
patterns. Approved emblem approved in 2010.

 
22 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED
Functional Emblem:
Significance: Rectangular insignia. Emblem
presents a cartoon image of the squadron’s
aircraft in profile. Presented on the side of the
aircraft are “N99700” and the CAP emblem. The
figure of Gumby sits in the pilot’s seat. Beneath
the aircraft image, “NCO19 SEMPER GUMBY”
is in quotes. This image symbolizes the
flexibility of the unit and its personnel to
accomplish the mission.

Significance: Disc face contains two OR bands
used to separate the key elements. Outer disc
provides the unit’s designation in AZURE on an
ARGENT field. The wording presented is
“Civil Air Patrol” in the Chief position while
“Asheville Sq, NC 019” appears in the base.
Inner disc present a predominantly ARGENT
Cessna-type aircraft flying over a mountain
range. The mountains signify the predominant
terrain feature of western North Carolina and the
home of the Asheville Composite Squadron.

23 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

APPENDIX B
PERSONNEL STATISTICS
As of 31 December 201383
(SBU/DECL 20191231) Senior Members (77)
Enlisted
1
>1%

Officer
58

76%

Cadet Sponsor
17
22%

Patron
1

>1%

(SBU/DECL 20191231) Cadet Members (51)
Enlisted
23
45%

Officer
10

Cadet
20%

18

35%

(SBU/DECL 20191231)Gender (128)
Seniors
Male
Female
67
10

83

Male
41

Cadets
Female
10

Data compiled from CAP e-Services. 

24 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED

SENSITIVE B
BUT UNCLA
ASSIFIED

APP
PENDIX C
CADE ACHII
ET
IEVMENT AWARD
T
DS
As of 31 D
December 2
2013

 

 

84

Amelia E
Earhart
C/Capt Chr
ristopher Hew
witt

General Billy Mitc
chell
C/2Lt Eli B
Boothe
C/2Lt Jacob Davis
b
C/2Lt Morg MacDona
gan
ald

C/2Lt Ta
aylor Parker
C/2Lt A
Angela Waltm
man

Neil Arm
mstrong
C/2Lt Eli B
Boothe
C/2Lt Jacob Davis
b
C/2Lt Morg MacDona
gan
ald

C/2LT A
Angela Waltm
man
C/CMSg Rob Reeve
gt
es

Dr. Robe H. God
ert
ddard
C/2Lt Eli B
Boothe
C/2Lt Jacob Davis
b
C/2Lt Morg MacDona
gan
ald

gt
Hobbs
C/CMSg Johnathan H
C/CMSg Rob Reeve
gt
es
C/MSgt Caleb Freem
man

General Jimmy Do
oolittle
C/2Lt Jacob Davis
b
C/CMSgt Ja
arrett Poto
C/CMSgt R Reeves
Rob

gt
Hopkins
C/SMSg Alexander H
C/SMSg Timothy Ka
gt
anter
C/MSgt Caleb Freem
man

Charles A. Lindbe
ergh
C/CMSgt Ja
arrett Poto
C/SMSgt A
Alexander Hop
pkins
C/SMSgt Timothy Kante
er

C/MSgt Molly Booth
he
C/MSgt Caleb Freem
man

Captain Eddie Ric
ckenbacke
er
C/CMSgt Ja
arrett Poto
C/SMSgt A
Alexander Hop
pkins
C/SMSgt Timothy Kante
er

C/MSgt Molly Booth
he
C/MSgt Caleb Freem
man
C/TSgt E
Ethan Reynol
lds

Wright B
Brothers
C/CMSgt Ja
arrett Poto
C/SMSgt A
Alexander Hop
pkins
SMSgt Tim
mothy Kanter
84

man
C/MSgt Caleb Freem
C/TSgt E
Ethan Reynol
lds
C/SSgt D
David Briggs

Data com
mpiled from CA e-Services.  
AP
.

25 

SENSITIVE B
BUT UNCLA
ASSIFIED

SENSITIVE B
BUT UNCLA
ASSIFIED
C/MSgt Mo Boothe
olly

Mary Fe
eik
C/TSgt Ethan Reynolds
C/CMSgt Ja
arrett Poto
C/SMSgt A
Alexander Hop
pkins
C/MSgt Mo Boothe
olly
C/SSgt Dav Briggs
vid

Benjamin Carp
penter
C/SrA B
C/SrA N
Noah Phillips
C/A1C K
Kayla Dutche
er
C/A1C D
Daniel Moorh
head

General H. H. “Ha Arnol
ap”
ld
C/TSgt Ethan Reynolds
C/SrA Benj
jamin Carpen
nter

C/A1C K
Kayla Dutche
er
C/A1C A
Austin Medfo
ord

General J. F. Curr
ry
C/TSgt Ethan Reynolds
C/A1C Aus Medford
stin
C/A1C Dan Moorhead
niel
d
C/Amn Sym
mantha Briggs

s
C/Amn Seairra Davis
C/Amn A
Alizandra Fag
gnant
C/Amn N
Nolan Middle
emas

26 

SENSITIVE B
BUT UNCLA
ASSIFIED

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

APPENDIX D
SENIOR ACHIIEVMENT AWARDS
85

As of 31 December 2013

Grover Loening Aerospace Award
Maj Michael West

Benjamin O. Davis , Jr. Award
1Lt Dennis Fagnant
1Lt Constance Leggett

1Lt Scott Stevens

General Charles Yeager Aerospace Education Award
1Lt Scott Stevens

Membership Award
2Lt Teresa Cannon
2Lt David Hosking
SM William Bell

85

SM Harold Fiedler
SM Charles Johnson
SM Alexander Myers

Data compiled from CAP e-Services.  

27 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

APPENDIX E
SQUADRON AIRCRAFT

CESSNA 172 SKYHAWK86

Type

Four seat light aircraft

Purpose

Search, reconnaissance, communications, transport.

Performance
General
Horsepower
Top Speed
Cruise Speed
Stall Speed (dirty)
Gross Weight
Empty Weight
Fuel Capacity
Range
Aircrew
Take Off
Ground Roll
Over 50 ft Obstacle
Rate of Climb
Ceiling
Landing
Ground Roll
Over 50 ft Obstacle

150
122 knots
115 knots
43 knots
2300 pounds
1315 pounds
42.00 gallons
417 nautical miles
Pilot +3
865 feet
1525 feet
645 feet per minute
13100
520 feet
1250 feet

86

“Cessna 172 I Skyhawk Performance and Specifications.” PilotFriend Aircraft Database, nd:
(http://www.pilotfriend.com/aircraft%20performance/Cessna/1/15.htm) (accessed on 31 Dec 2009).  

28 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

CESSNA 182 SKYLANE87

Type

High performance four seat light aircraft

Purpose

Search, reconnaissance, communications, transport.

Performance
General
Horsepower
Top Speed
Cruise Speed
Stall Speed (dirty)
Gross Weight
Empty Weight
Useful Load
Fuel Capacity
Range
Aircrew
Take Off
Ground Roll
Over 50 ft Obstacle
Rate of Climb
Ceiling
Landing
Ground Roll
Over 50 ft Obstacle

230
143 knots
135 knots
54 knots
2550 pounds
1540 pounds
1213 pounds
55.00 gallons
443 nautical miles
Pilot +3
620 feet
1020 feet
620 feet
1020
610 feet
1290 feet

87

“Cessna 182 Performance and Specifications.” PilotFriend Aircraft Database, nd:
(http://www.pilotfriend.com/aircraft%20performance/Cessna/3/3.htm) (accessed on 31 Dec 2009). 

29 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

APPENDIX F
ASHEVILLE REGIONAL AIRPORT DIAGRAM

30 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

GLOSSARY OF REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION
References
AFI 85-101, Historical Products, Services, and Requirements
AFI 84-105, Organizational Lineage, Honors, and Heraldry
CAPP 5, Handbook for CAP Historian
CAPR 210-1, The Civil Air Patrol Historical Program
Department of the Army. Organizational History. Washington, DC: Center for Military History,
1999.

Abbreviations and Acronyms
§
AE
AED
AFB
AFI
Asst
AVL
C
CAP
CBU
CD ROM
CERT
CPR
DDR
DECL
ECI
ELT
ES
FAA
FEMA
ft
HO
JROTC
MER
NASA
NC
NCGS
RCS
ROTC
SAR
SAREVAL

Section
Aerospace Education
Automated External Defibrillator
Air Force Base
Air Force Instruction
Assistant
Asheville or Asheville Regional Airport
Cadet
Civil Air Patrol
Confidential But Unclassified
Compact Disk – Read Only Memory
Community Emergency Response Team
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Drug Demand Reduction
Declassify
Extension Course Institute
Emergency Locator Transmitter
Emergency Services
Federal Aviation Administration
Federal Emergency Management Administration
Feet
History Office
Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps
Middle East Region
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
North Carolina
North Carolina General Statutes
Record Control Symbol
Reserve Officer Training Corps
Search and Recovery
Search and Recovery Evaluation
38 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 
SLS
U
US
USAF
USC

Senior Leadership School
Unclassified
United States
United States Air Force
United States Code

Terms
Argent (White or Silver) - Positive: daylight, innocence, perfection, purity, truth, and wisdom.
Negative: blank, cold, ghostly, spectral, and void.
Azure (Blue) – Positive (light blue): calm seas, charity, cold, constancy, daylight, devotion,
innocence, plant Jupiter, loyalty, piety, sincerity, sky, thinking, and truth. Negative (dark blue):
doubt, discomfort, night, and stormy seas.
Disc – Shape on which the heraldic devices, symbols, or elements of a unit emblem are
displayed. The disc of today originated with a roundel, which consisted of a white five-pointed
star in a blue circle, with a red disc in the center of the star. The roundel was displayed
unofficially on early USA Signal Corps airplanes, adopted officially in 1917 for airplanes, and
later evolved into the national star and bar aircraft marking of today. The US Air Force adopted
the disc in the early 1950s as the official shape for squadron emblems.
Element – In an emblem design, a symbol or group of symbols, such as a constellation or bundle
of arrows, portraying a single characteristic, trait, or concept.
Emblem – An officially approved symbolic design portraying the distinctive history, mission,
and general information of an organization. It is an important, abiding element of the
organization’s heritage.
Functional Emblems – Unofficial, non-unit emblems locally designed, authorized, and
displayed. These are often referred to as “morale patches.”
Or (Yellow or Gold) – Positive: Constancy, dissemination, divinity, elevation of mind,
excellence, highest values, honor, illumination, intellect, intuition, justice, light, loyalty,
magnanimity, riches, ripened grain, sun, supreme wisdom, and wisdom. Negative: cowardice and
treachery.
Unit – A Civil Air Patrol organization with no headquarters. Squadrons and numbered flights are
units.

Gazetteer
Asheville – A city in and the county seat of Buncombe County, North Carolina.
Asheville Regional Airport (FAA: AVL) – A class C airport in the town of Fletcher, 9 miles
south of the city of Asheville, in the state of North Carolina.
39 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

Bent Creek State Park – A state recreational park located in Buncombe County, North
Carolina.
Biltmore Forest – A city in Buncombe County, North Carolina.
Buncombe County – A county located in western North Carolina, United States.
Burlington – A city in Alamance County, North Carolina.
Camp Butner – A North Carolina National Guard installation located in Granville County,
North Carolina.
DuPont State Park – A 10,000 acre tract, located in Henderson and Transylvania counties in
western North Carolina.
Edneyville – A village in Henderson County, North Carolina and a suburb of Hendersonville.
Hendersonville – A city in and the county seat of Henderson County, North Carolina.
Kill Devil’s Hill – A town in Dare County, North Carolina. Kill Devil’s Hill was the first
successful powered flight.
Maxwell AFB (FAA: MXF) – A United States Air Force based located Montgomery County,
Alabama.

40 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

LIST OF SOURCE DOCUMENTS
 

SD001

SD002

SD003
SD004

SD005
SD006
SD007
SD008

SD009

SD010
SD011
SD012
SD013

SD014
SD015

SD016
SD017
SD018
SD019

“Lt Col Auger, Robert Eaton Memorial.” Moore Funeral Home at Forest Lawn. nd
http://hosting-9519.tributes.com/obituary/print_selections/97442307?type=1
(accessed on 3 January 2013).
Bindewald, Renee. “Pilot, 21, Credits Civil Air Patrol for his Success.”
BlueRidgeNow.com. 7 November 2013.
http://www.blueridgenow.com/article/20131107/ARTICLES/131109911?templ
ate=printpicart (accessed on 3 January 2014).
Maj Bow, Barbara. “Christmas Party.” Email. 1 December 2013.
“Doris Burnette Burrell Memorial.” Wells Funeral Home. 6 August 2013.
http://www.wellsfuneralhome.com/_mgxroot/obits/print.php?id=1232574&obit
_text=1&ma (accessed on 3 January 2014).
Col Crawford, David E. “NC Wing Pilot Completes 250 Orientation Flights.”
Carolina Wingspan (June, 2013): 3.
Lt Col Davis, Ray. “Todays flights & include active ELT find.” Email. 21 April
2013.
Capt Gallandt, Michael. “National Cadet Competition Results.” Carolina
Wingspan (February, 2013): 9.
“Group Holds Annual Mountain Pilot Training.” The Tribune Papers.com. 30 June
2013. http://www.thetribunepapers.com/2013/06/30/group-holds-annualmountain-pilot-training/ (accessed on 3 January 2014).
Millwood, Joey. “Pilot Honored for 50 Years of Safe Flying.” BlueRidgeNow.com.
15 May 2013.
http://www.blueridgenow.com/article/20130515/ARTICLES/130519889?templ
ate=printpicart (accessed on 3 January 2014).
National Headquarters, Civil Air Patrol. “Yeager (AESPM) Award Report CY 13.”
CAP eServices generated report.
Capt Parker, Clint. “Asheville Squadron Comes Home Again.” Carolina Wingspan
(April, 2013): 4-5.
Lt Col Saleet, Phillip. “Historically Speaking.” Carolina Wingspan (February,
2013): 4.
“SPC Shelton, Jason Memorial.” Together We Serve. nd
http://army.togetherweserved.com/army/servlet/tws.webapp.WebApp?cmd=Sh
adowBoxProfile&type=Person&ID=348875 (accessed on 3 February 2014).
1Lt Stevens, Scott. “Asheville Chaplain Steps Down after Years of Service.”
Carolina Wingspan (August, 2013): 7.
TSgt Toms, Louis. “Request for Assistance – Annual Squadron History.” Email. 5
February 2014. Response Lt Col Davis, Ray. “Request for Assistance – Annual
Squadron History.” Email. 5 February 2014.
Capt Wallace, William. “Asheville Cadet Completes First Solo Flight.” Carolina
Wingspan (February, 2013): 6.
Capt Wallace, William. “AVL cadets in gliders.” Email. 3 November 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes for 3 January 2013.” Email. 6 January 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Addition to Minutes for 31 January 2013.” Email. 2
February 2013.
41 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 
SD020
SD021
SD022
SD023
SD024
SD025
SD026
SD027
SD028
SD029
SD030

Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes from 14 March 2013.” Email. 15 March 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes for Meeting on 25 April 2013.” Email. 29 April
2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes from 2 May 2013.” Email. 3 May 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes for Meeting on 25 July 2013.” Email. 26 July
2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting on 26 September 2013.” Email. 28
September 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting – 3 October 2013.” Email. 6 October
2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Wreaths Across America 2013.” Email. 17 December
2013.
Lt Col Weinflash, Joseph. “Tri Wing SAREVAL.” Email. 17 July 2013.
Lt Col Weinflash, Joseph. “SAREVAL Ground Taskings.” Email. 25 July 2013.
WIMIRS. “[State-Wide-Alert] MSN: 13-T-6361 Alert.” Email. 22 July 2013.
Capt Parker, Charles. “Update Annual History With.” Email. 20 February 2014.

 
 
 

 

 

42 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

HISTORICAL DOCUMENTS
 

HD001

HD002
HD003
HD004
HD005
HD006
HD007
HD008

HD009

HD010
HD011
HD012
HD013
HD014
HD015
HD016
HD017
HD018
HD019
HD020
HD021
HD022
HD023
HD024
HD025
HD026
HD027
HD028
HD029
HD030

“Lt Col Robert E. Auger Obituary.” Asheville Citizen Times (23 December 2013)
http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/citizen-times/obituary-print.aspx?n=lt-colrobert-e-augur (accessed on 3 January 2014).
Carolina Wingspan, January 2013
Carolina Wingspan, February 2013
Carolina Wingspan, April 2013
Carolina Wingspan, June 2013
Carolina Wingspan, August 2013
Civil Air Patrol Volunteer, January-March 2013
Capt Parker, Clint. “N.C. Unit Regains Home at Airport, Names New Facility for
Auger, WWII Veteran.” CAP Volunteer Now (29 April 2013):
http://www.capvolunteernow.com/todaysfeatures/?nc_unit_regains_home_at_airport_names_new_facility_for_augur_w
wii_veteran&show=news&newsID=16483 (accessed on 4 February 2014).
Capt Parker, Clint. “N.C. Exercise Focuses on High-Altitude Challenges.” CAP
Volunteer Now (3 July 2013) http://www.capvolunteernow.com/todaysfeatures/?nc_exercise_focuses_on_highaltitude_challenges&show=news&news
ID=16988 (accessed on 3 February 2014)
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting – 10 Jan 13.” Email. 11 January
2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting – 24 Jan 13.” Email. 25 January
2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes for 31 January 2013.” Email. 2 February 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes from 7 Feb 13.” Email. 8 February 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes from 14 Feb 13.” Email. 15 February 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes for 21 Feb 13.” Email. 22 February 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Weekly Minutes from 28 Feb 13.” Email. 1 March 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes from 21 March 2013.” Email. 22 March 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes from 28 Feb 13.” Email. 1 April 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes for 5 April 2013.” Email. 5 April 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes for 11 April 2013.” Email. 12 April 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting on 16 May 2013.” Email. 17 May
2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Meeting Minutes – 23 May 13.” Email. 25 May 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Meeting on 30 May 13.” Email. 30 May 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes from 20 June 13.” Email. 21 June 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting on 27 June 13.” Email. 30 June 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Visitor Summary for 27 June.” Email. 2 July 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting on 11 July 13.” Email. 13 July 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes from 18 July 2013.” Email. 20 July 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Correction to Minutes for Meeting on 25 July 2013.”
Email. 26 July 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting on 1 August 2013.” Email. 2 August
2013.
43 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 
HD031
HD032
HD033
HD034
HD035
HD036
HD037
HD038
HD039
HD040
HD041
HD042
HD043
HD044
HD045
HD046
HD047
HD048
HD049

Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting on 8 August 2013.” Email. 9 August
2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting on 22 August 2013.” Email. 24
August 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Meeting Minutes – 5 September 2013.” Email. 6
September 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Additions and Corrections to Minutes.” Email. 7
September 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting for 12 September 2013.” Email. 13
September 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting – 19 September 2013.” Email. 20
September 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Correction to Minutes of Meeting – 19 September 2013.”
Email. 20 September 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “More Corrections to Minutes of Meeting – 19 September
2013.” Email. 20 September 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting – 10 October 2013.” Email. 13
October 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting – 17 October 2013.” Email. 18
October 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting for 24 October 2013.” Email. 25
October 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting for 7 November 2013.” Email. 8
November 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting for 14 November 2013.” Email. 15
November 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting for 21 November 2013.” Email. 22
November 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes for 5 December 2013.” Email. 6 December 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting – 12 December 2013.” Email. 13
December 2013.
Capt Wallace, William. “Minutes of Meeting on 19 December 2013.” Email. 20
December 2013.
Western North Carolina Chapter Military Officers Association of America, Inc.
Newsletter, Spring/May 2013
“Young Asheville Pilot Credits Success to Civil Air Patrol.” Asheville Citizen
Times. nd. http://www.citizentimes.com/article/20131201/NEWS/312010060/Young-Asheville-pilot-creditssuccess-Civil-Air-Patrol (accessed on 3 January 2014).

44 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED 

DISTRIBUTION LIST
OFFICE
AVL/CC
AVL/HO
NC WG/HO
MER/HO
CAP HQ/HO

COPY NUMBER
1
2
2
1
1

45 

SENSITIVE BUT UNCLASSIFIED