File #551: "2013 ORWG History.pdf"

2013 ORWG History.pdf

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Oregon Wing
Civil Air Patrol
2013 Historical Update

January 1, 2013 thru December 31, 2013

Lt.Col. Winton. Adcock, Ph.D.
Historian Oregon Wing
Chaplain Major Marvin Owen
Assistant Historian Oregon Wing

FORWARD

Many events of Oregon Civil Air Patrol’s early history are tucked away in the memories of those
who played critical roles. Memories, faded documents and photos with unidentified people and
places, found in a closet, sometimes without reference dates, make the reconstruction of
events challenging at best.
That a volunteer organization such as Civil Air Patrol, with a set of missions so critical to the
state and nation could exist and grow for seventy-two years is nothing short of amazing. This
association of uncompensated professionals who give so much of their time, energy and
expertise is unprecedented in modern history. These “volunteers” are what makes the
organization so vibrant.
I am extremely proud of my association with such an engaging and dedicated group, especially
the members of Oregon Wing.
Winton Adcock Jr., Ph.D.
Lt.Col. CAP
Vice Commander, Oregon
Historian, Oregon
National Historian of the Year - 2013

i

Contents
FORWARD ...................................................................................................................................................... i
PROLOGUE – Early History ............................................................................................................................ 1
OREGON WING 2013 .................................................................................................................................... 3
CHAPTER I - COMMAND STAFF ..................................................................................................................... 4
Commander: ............................................................................................................................................. 4
Vice Commander:...................................................................................................................................... 4
2d Vice Commander:................................................................................................................................. 4
Chief of Staff: ............................................................................................................................................ 5
Inspector General: .................................................................................................................................... 5
Safety: ....................................................................................................................................................... 5
Chaplain .................................................................................................................................................... 5
CHAPTER II – AEROSPACE EDUCATION ......................................................................................................... 7
Staff: .......................................................................................................................................................... 7
Business Academy:.................................................................................................................................... 7
CHAPTER III – OPERATIONS........................................................................................................................... 9
Staff ........................................................................................................................................................... 9
Funding ..................................................................................................................................................... 9
Aircraft Management.............................................................................................................................. 10
Emergency Services ................................................................................................................................ 10
Assistance to Outside Agencies .............................................................................................................. 11
CHAPTER IV – CADET PROGRAMS ............................................................................................................... 12
Staff ......................................................................................................................................................... 12
Encampment ........................................................................................................................................... 12
Orientation flights ................................................................................................................................... 12
Awards .................................................................................................................................................... 13
Activities .................................................................................................................................................. 13
CHAPTER V – SENIOR MEMBER PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ............................................................... 15
Yeager Aerospace Award ........................................................................................................................ 15
LEVEL I – .................................................................................................................................................. 15
LEVEL II – Benjamin O. Davis Award ....................................................................................................... 15
LEVEL III – Grover Loening Aerospace Award ......................................................................................... 15
LEVEL IV – Paul Garber Award ................................................................................................................ 15
ii

LEVEL V – Gill Robb Wilson Award .......................................................................................................... 15
CHAPTER VI –SQUADRONS ......................................................................................................................... 16
AURORA COMPOSITE SQUDRON ............................................................................................................ 16
COLUMBIA COMPOSITE SQUADRON ...................................................................................................... 16
GRANTS PASS COMPOSITE SQUADRON.................................................................................................. 16
HIGH DESERT COMPOSITE SQUADRON .................................................................................................. 16
KLAMATH FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON ............................................................................................. 16
MAHLON SWEET COMPOSITE SQUADRON............................................................................................. 16
McMINNVILLE COMPOSITE SQUADRON................................................................................................. 17
MEDFORD COMPOSITE SQUADRON ....................................................................................................... 17
METRO SENIOR SQUADRON ................................................................................................................... 18
SALEM COMPOSITE SQUADRON............................................................................................................. 18
NORTHWEST COASTAL COMPOSITE SQUADRON ................................................................................... 18
WASHINGTON COUNTY COMPOSITE SQUADRON .................................................................................. 18
CLOSE .......................................................................................................................................................... 19
Appendix A - Professional Development Awards ....................................................................................... 20

iii

PROLOGUE – Early History
Prior to World War II, men like Oregon’s Harry Coffey were concerned about how world events
might affect the nation’s security. Coffey, an early bird of aviation, was prominent in Oregon’s
aviation community and was instrumental in obtaining and establishing federal support for
aviation curriculums for public schools. Oregon was first to have state laws governing aviation
and to have an aviation ground school for high school students. In 1939 the National
Aeronautical Association took on the cause of the National Defense program. A resolution to
train pilots and mechanics was presented to the United States Congress, The Civil Aeronautics
Authority (forerunner of today’s Federal Aviation Administration) and the Oregon State Board
of Education.
Coffey and other Oregon aviation enthusiasts were instrumental in the formation of the
National Aeronautic Association (NAA) whose purpose was to encourage advancement in all
phases of aviation. Throughout 1940 the NAA worked diligently for Air Defense Programs by
constantly alerting the general public to the essential role air power must play in the defense of
the nation. Similar groups, the Civilian Air Reserve, the Civilian Air Force, the Oregon Flyers, The
Oregon Sportsmen of the Air, the Aero Club, the Airplane Owners and Pilots Association
(former name of today’s Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association – AOPA) and others formed the
nucleus of today’s Civil Air Patrol.
In 1941, Fiorello LaGuardia, the national Civilian Defense Director appointed Mr. Leo Devaney,
Oregon State Director of Aeronautics as Oregon’s first Wing Commander. Mr. Harry Coffey from
Portland, was also issued the first Oregon federal war-time flying permit after the attack on
Pearl Harbor and was appointed as one of five civilian representatives on the general planning
staff of the national organization of Civil Air Patrol. Five hundred of the state’s 1,600 licensed
pilots quickly joined the organization and began training. One of the first Oregon squadrons was
formed in Hillsboro with B.E. Bradley as Squadron Commander. Pilots began an 80 hour ground
course in preparation for what was to come. They studied topics such as patrol reconnaissance,
courier and tow target flying. By 1942 a number of Oregon pilots were being called to
1

“undisclosed” bases for tours of duty of 30 to 90 days duration. The majority did their tours of
duty, returned home and slipped back into civilian roles. One member, Harry Hewitt, of Eugene,
Oregon was killed while on liaison patrol.
Throughout the years Oregon Civil Air Patrol has continued its tradition of service to the state
and nation.

2

OREGON WING 2013
The Pacific Coast Region (PCR) of Civil Air Patrol comprises, Alaska, California, Hawaii, Nevada,
Oregon and Washington. Over the last seventy-two (72) years Oregon wing has been a viable
force in Civil Air Patrol and continues that tradition. Oregon continues as one of only a few
states in the nation that does not receive any state monetary support. The primary goals for the
year were:
1. Increase efforts to obtain state funding and/or increase state and local use of CAP by
seeking partnerships and MOU’s (Memorandum’s of Understanding) with other
agencies.
2. Establish wing-wide fund raising program and sustainable projects that produce
revenue. This was partially completed through re-establishment of a Wing Magazine
and receipt of advertising revenues.
3. Improve command and leadership performance and develop new staff members by
strong encouragement of attendance to professional development training as a prerequisite for command and staff positions.
4. Improve transparency and communication through information sharing throughout the
wing, including re-energizing the wing website.
5. Stress flying proficiency and safety by utilizing the maximum number of SARS
(exercises), Flight clinics and other civilian training opportunities, such as the FAA Wings
program and AOPA online safety webinars.
6. Completion of successful Staff Advisory Visit and Compliance Inspection.

3

CHAPTER I - COMMAND STAFF
A wing is only as effective as its command. Over the past seventy-two years Oregon wing has benefited
from many great commanders and staff. We had a good year in 2013 and are looking forward to a more
productive one in 2014.

Commander: Colonel John Longley, joined Civil Air Patrol in 1997. Received a Bachelor of Arts
with honors at San Jose State College and a Master of Arts in political science, public
administration, and public law from the University of California at Davis. Colonel Longley served
in the active United States Air Force between 1969 and 1973 including service with Military
Assistance Command Vietnam. After being discharged from the military he served as a
California City Manager for 32 years in 5 different cities. He serves currently as the Airport
Director for Klamath Falls, Oregon. Col. Longley has served in Civil Air Patrol for over 17 years,
achieving Level 5 in his professional development curriculum, with master’s ratings in cadet
programs and emergency services. He has served as commander, deputy or vice commander, of
a unit, group or wing. Colonel Longley is a general aviation pilot with over 800 hours of flight
time. He is married for 40 years with three adult children and 10 grandchildren.

Vice Commander: Lt. Colonel Winton Adcock, joined Civil Air Patrol originally in 1976 while in
the U.S. Army. He served numerous overseas tours before returning to Civil Air Patrol in 2003.
Lt. Col. Adcock graduated with Honors from Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia with a
Bachelor of Arts degree in Military History. He also holds Master of Arts degrees in Military
History and International Relations, and a Doctorate in International Relations. Lt. Col. Adcock
recently retired from his position as Director of Technical Support Services and Social Media for
a multinational technology company. He is also a pilot and is married with three adult children.
Lt. Col. Adcock’s primary focus is as Government Relations Advisor and Historian.

2d Vice Commander: Lt. Colonel Ted Tanory was born and educated in Portland Oregon, receiving
a Bachelor’s degree in Electronics Engineering from Portland State University. He joined CAP as a cadet
in 1956. Progressed in the cadet program, earning a Certificate of Proficiency and attained the rank of
C/Major while assigned as Cadet Commander of Portland Squadron #2. Lt. Col Tanory Joined the Oregon
4

Air National Guard in 1958 and retired in 1992 with 34 years of combined US Air Force and Air National
Guard service. He served an additional 3 years in CAP while also a member of the Air National Guard
from 1964 to 1967 as Deputy Commander for Cadets at the Gateway Squadron and rejoined CAP after
retiring from the workforce in 2002. He was selected as Commander of Metro Senior Squadron and also
held positions on the Oregon Wing Staff. As a member of Oregon Wing Staff he has held numerous
positions including, Emergency Services Training Officer, Counterdrug Officer, Director of Professional
Development, Director of Safety, Inspector General. In June 2013 Lt. Col. Tanory assumed the role as
Oregon Wing’s second Vice Commander with a focus on squadron operations.

Chief of Staff: Major Richard Ouellette joined CAP after a successful career as an Aerospace
Industry Executive. He is the glue that keeps the staff running well. His organizational skills kept
Oregon wing on track in fulfilling the “fourth” mission of CAP. That “fourth” mission is all the
administrative overhead required to run an effective organization.

Inspector General: Lt. Col. John Barringer led the charge, insuring all directorates completed
all requirements for the Wing Compliance Inspection, held in December. Oregon’s “Successful”
rating along with several “highly successful” divisional ratings is proof of Major Barringer’s
attention to detail and excellent program management.

Safety: Captain Randy Ireson, Director of Safety, keeps everyone focused on safety and it was a safe
year – no significant mishaps. The worst was one aircraft tire damaged on landing. The usual minor slips,
cuts, etc. mostly from cadet activities. The wing safety program received a Highly Successful rating in the
Compliance Inspection. We began training several new Mission Safety Officers, one of whom completed
the qualification during 2013. One more completed in early 2014 and a second is almost there. In
combination with SUI visits, Captain Ireson visited numerous squadrons during the year to discuss their
safety programs.

Chaplain Major Marvin Owen joined Civil Air Patrol in 2010 as part of the 492nd Emergency Services
Composite Squadron in Casper, Wyoming, later transferring to the Oregon Wing in 2012. He’d previously
served in the U. S. Army, including tours of duty in Germany and Vietnam. Maj. Owen holds a Bachelor
of Business Administration degree in Management from the University of Texas at Arlington, a Master of
Business Administration degree in Personnel and Industrial Relations from the University of North Texas,
and Master of Divinity and Doctor of Ministry degrees from Southwestern Seminary. Maj. Owen
5

currently serves as Senior Pastor of a church on the Oregon coast, He is qualified as Mission Chaplain,
Mission Scanner and Mission Observer. Maj. Owen has a master rating in professional development, a
senior rating in chaplaincy and technician ratings in aerospace education and cadet programs. He has
been married for 40 years and he and his wife have two adult children and five grandchildren.

6

CHAPTER II – AEROSPACE EDUCATION
Staff:


Major Hilda Pereyo – Director of Aerospace Education – comes to CAP with a strong education
background. Her excellent tutelage has served Oregon wing has consistently led the way in
aerospace education, receiving numerous regional and national awards and as evidenced by a
“Highly Successful” rating in the wing Compliance Inspection held in December. Major Pereyo
also serves as Director of Education at the Evergreen Aviation Museum in McMinnville, Oregon.

The objective of the Aerospace Education program is to provide an understanding of the aerospace
world and its importance in our society today. This is accomplished through a two-prong approach of
educating cadets and seniors; and educating the general public through formal education institutions
and programs such as CAP’s special programs for educators and free STEM (Science, Technology, and
Engineering & Math) kits for educators.

Business Academy:
The Oregon CAP Aerospace Education program is highlighted each year by the Michael King
Smith Business Academy, sponsored by Evergreen Aviation and The Evergreen Aviation Museum, Home
of the Hughes Hercules, better known as the Spruce Goose, in McMinnville, Oregon. Evergreen Aviation
graciously hosts the academy and its business leaders provide attendees with significant insight into
what it takes to run an aviation related business. The culmination of the week’s activities include cadet
presentations to Evergreen Executive staff on their projects. Major Pereyo, who has served as the
academy’s director for five years, and a host of both senior and cadet leaders from around the country
organize this week long leadership training. Cadets from across the nation, who are clearly destined to
be tomorrow’s leaders, vie for attendance at the academy. Next year’s plans include additional support
from several other major aviation corporations.

7

1- Business Academy Director Hilda Pereyo
gets promoted to Major

Cadets at the MKS Business Academy 1

Figure 2 Getting some simulator time

8

CHAPTER III – OPERATIONS
Staff
Development of training programs, accident prevention, aircraft management and emergency services
support requires the commitment of the most knowledgeable, qualified and dedicated staff.





Lt.Col. David Ayers, Director of Operations, Emergency Services Officer,
Counterdrug Officer
Major Arnie Rosenthal, Standardization/Evaluation Officer
Major Bob Weyant, Aircraft Maintenance Manager

Funding
FY 2013 Budget shown in chart below.

FY 2013 Budget
AF Training
FY 2012
FY 2013
Total Authorized $
30,424 $ 29,528
Unused $
2,834 $ 2,215
Net Used $
27,590 $ 27,313
O-Rides
Total Authorized $
Unused $
Net Used $

7,438 $ 7,183
386 $ 253
7,052 $ 6,933

Maintenance Flights
Total Authorized $
Unused $
Net Used $

4,300 $ 4,500
89 $ 253
4,211 $ 4,247

Table 1 - FY 2013 Budget

9

Aircraft Management
Hours flown by aircraft with 2012 comparison shown in table below:

Flying Hours by Aircraft
2012
2013
N101SP
147.2
88.1
N293CP
220.8
115.7
N4934N
76
98.7
N9433X
147.9
135.3
N98426
190
29.4
N9883E
129.4
91
N567CP
283.2
136.1
N591CP
210.7
181.3
N99100
68.7
159.4
Total 1473.9
1035
Table 2 - Hours Flown by Aircraft Tail #

Emergency Services
Oregon Wing continues to struggle with maintaining a strong base of mission qualified personnel. This
has been exacerbated by the decreasing number of ELT alerts after the decommissioning of the 121.5
satellites. A focus has placed on increasing support to other DOD and State organizations in support of
their missions.

Mission Qualified Personnel

2012

2013

Incident Commanders
Mission Pilots
Observers
Scanners
UDF Team Members
Ground Team Leader/Member
GES

7
16
63
81
77
4/38
364

6
19
58
76
38
10/23
252

Table 3 - Mission Qualified Personnel

As evidenced by the table below, the number of SAR missions in Oregon for 2013 was very small. This
makes it extremely difficult to maintain aircrew, base mission staff and ground team proficiency.
Significant effort was placed in 2013 with plans for additional focus in 2014 on increasing training and
proficiency opportunities.

10

2013 SAR Missions
2-Nov ELT South of Portland
14-Nov ELT Roseburg
12-Dec ELT Eastern Oregon
1-Feb ELT Medford
28-Feb ELT Portland
8-Apr Missing Skier Ashland
15-Apr ELT Portland
31-Jul ELT Aurora
Table 4 - 2013 SAR Missions

Assistance to Outside Agencies


APAS (Speaker) – aircraft mounted speaker system for Tsunami warning and other
airborne warning requirements




F15


Communities counting on 2 hour response

Training sequence successfully concluded with 142 FW







Included 2 unique missions for the Air Guard.

Working on Memorandum of Understanding agreement with 173 Fighter Wing.

GIIEP




Involved many squadrons

Equipment on loan from National Guard.

Completed Memorandum of Understanding with Oregon State Office of Emergency
Management to cover emergency missions. This MOU can be used as a model for nonemergency missions which the agency would fund.

11

CHAPTER IV – CADET PROGRAMS
Staff


Major William Ray – Director of Cadet Programs.

The ORWG Cadet Programs received a "Highly Successful" rating due to the outstanding professionalism
of all the Oregon Wing members that worked tirelessly to provide an outstanding program for the
Oregon cadets in 2013.

Encampment
The annual “Winter Eagle Cadet Encampment" was held on the campus of the Western Oregon
University at the Oregon Military Academy from December 26-31. Over 120 cadet and senior staff
participated in this highly successful event.

Orientation flights
Oregon wing was able to increase its Cadet O-Ride performance for the year 2013. Thanks to all the
support staff and pilots who helped make this possible.

Cadet O-Ride Participation
Medford
34
Klamath Falls
17
Washington County
32
Grants Pass
13
Salem
36
High Desert
21
Mahlon-Sweet
18
Aurora
13
Columbia
31
McMinnville
15
NW Coastal
8
Table 5 - 2013 Cadet O-Rides

12

Awards
Two significant events occurred in 2013 for Oregon Wing as two former cadets graduated from Military
Service Academies. Former Washington County Squadron Cadet, now U.S. Army 2Lt. Tommy Milligan
graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point. 2Lt Milligan is now serving with the
82d Airborne in Ft. Bragg, N.C. and just completed his Ranger training.
Also another former cadet from Washington County Squadron, now USAF 2Lt Dylan Halums graduated
from the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs and was sworn in by Oregon Wing ViceCommander, Lt. Col. W. Adcock. 2Lt Halums is now assigned to Hickham Field, Hawaii and just
completed his Air Liaison Officer Qualifications.

Activities
April saw the Cadet Color Guard Competition at the Oregon Military academy in Monmouth, Oregon.
The Salem Composite Squadron won the competition and went on to represent the Oregon Wing at the
regional competitions in California.
In May: Major William “Billy” Ray assumed the Director of Cadet Programs position from Col Virginia
Thompson.
June: The new CAC members were appointed to represent their squadrons. C/Lt Madeline Kuhn of the
McMinnville Composite Squadron was chosen as the CAC chairperson, C/Capt Brewer of the Klamath
Falls Composite Squadron as the vice chair and C/Lt Grove of the Medford Composite Squadron as the
CAC recorder. C/Maj Monasmith from the Medford Composite Squadron was selected as the Regional
CAC chairperson for the Pacific Coast Region.
July: Oregon wing hosted the NCSA-Michael King Smith Aviation Business Academy in McMinnville. It
was directed by the Maj Hilda Pereyo the ORWG Director of Aerospace Education and William Ray the
ORWG Director of Cadet Programs served as the Executive Officer. We also had many ORWG squadron
commanders and squadron staff members serving as the national activity staff.
Aug: ORWG held our annual Model Rocketry weekend in Tillamook, Oregon. The Tillamook Squadron,
commanded by Major Mike Walsh, hosted the event. There were over 30 student and staff members at
this popular activity.
13

Sept: A joint ORWG and WAWG glider O-ride event was held in McMinnville Or. With over 60 cadets
signed up to fly. Due to a major aircraft mechanical malfunction we only managed to get close to 40
cadets up in the air.
The Oregon Wing Conference was held at the Portland Air National Guard base in Portland. We had
great cadet participation with Capt. Naas and Major Pereyo putting on a fantastic AE program for the
cadets in the on PANG "Starbase" computer lab.

14

CHAPTER V – SENIOR MEMBER PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
The Professional Development Directorate received a “highly successful” rating in this year’s Compliance
Inspection. Oregon members continued to excel and take advantage of training opportunities to
increase knowledge and professionalism.

Yeager Aerospace Award
Twenty-six (26) senior members achieved the Yeager Aerospace award in 2013.

LEVEL I –
In 2013, thirty-two (32) new senior members completed Level I training

LEVEL II – Benjamin O. Davis Award
Squadron Leadership School is one of the requirements for the Davis Award and nine (9) senior
members completed this requirement for Level II.

LEVEL III – Grover Loening Aerospace Award
Eleven (11) seniors completed all requirements, including the Corporate Learning Course to
complete their Level III in 2013

LEVEL IV – Paul Garber Award
Region Staff College is a milestone event in Senior Professional Development and Oregon had
five (5) seniors complete this requirement to attain Level IV and the Garber award.

LEVEL V – Gill Robb Wilson Award
National Staff College is the pinnacle of Professional Development in Civil Air Patrol. Only a
select few ever attain this highest professional level. In 2013, Oregon had two (2) of its senior
members reach this prestigious level.

15

CHAPTER VI –SQUADRONS
There are twelve squadrons within the Oregon wing, one of which is a senior squadron located in the
metro Portland area.

AURORA COMPOSITE SQUDRON
Located in Aurora, Oregon and commanded by Captain Michael Schrock, the Aurora squadron
has a very active program. The squadron is a regular participant in activities at the Oregon Wing
Operations Center, which is co-located with their meeting place at Aurora State Airport.

COLUMBIA COMPOSITE SQUADRON
Commanded by Major Margaret Martin, the Columbia squadron is located on the Portland Air
Guard Base in Portland, Oregon. Columbia squadron plays a significant role each year in
organizing “Wreaths Across America” for the wing. It also supports regularly internment honors
for veterans at local veteran’s cemeteries.

GRANTS PASS COMPOSITE SQUADRON
Captain Daniel Ash commands the Grants Pass Squadron. The squadron, although small, is very
active in local community outreach programs.

HIGH DESERT COMPOSITE SQUADRON
Located in Bend, Oregon, Captain Mike Wissing, originally a native of South Africa commands a
composite squadron known for its vibrant cadet rocketry and Remote Control Model aircraft
program.

KLAMATH FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON
Lt. Col. Teresa Longley commands the Klamath Falls squadron. The squadron is housed in
facilities at the Kingsley Field Air National Guard Base in Klamath Falls. Squadron personnel
worked throughout the year to increase community awareness both on base and in the civilian
community of the missions of Civil Air Patrol and how it serves the community. K-Falls has
worked over the past year to increase its presence in the local community

MAHLON SWEET COMPOSITE SQUADRON
Commanded by Capt. Roxanne Cole, the Mahlon Sweet Composite Squadron enjoyed a busy
year with regular involvement in squadron, local and wing activities including SAREX’s and

16

training. The squadron currently has 24 members—nine senior members and fifteen cadets. An
emphasis has been placed on nurturing cadets for greater responsibility and developing ground
teams. Though there are currently no cadet officers, the squadron does have four cadet Chief
Master Sergeants who will be eligible for their Mitchell awards over the next few months.
The squadron has participated in four major community activities and has seen a majority of its
membership involved. These activities include:

1) Toys for Tots
2) 2) Memorial Day services with color guards at three local cemeteries in Eugene
and Springfield
3) Wreaths Across America, and

4) A chartered relationship with the Boy Scouts.

McMINNVILLE COMPOSITE SQUADRON
Lt. Col. Scott Hall is commander of the McMinnville squadron. The squadron has a close
relationship with the Evergreen Aviation Museum and performs a number of educational
support missions there and in the local community.

MEDFORD COMPOSITE SQUADRON
The Medford Composite squadron is commanded by Captain Herman Dennington. Medford
squadron has grown significantly during 2013 with a strong focus on cadet activities. The
squadron also assists in numerous activities on the Medford airfield in support of the field’s
Strategic Air Command KC-97 fuel tanker, which is used for parties and special activities.
17

METRO SENIOR SQUADRON
A heavy focus on Emergency Services operations keeps Oregon’s only senior squadron, located
on Portland Air Base engaged in training and proficiency operations. The squadron is
commanded by Major Billy Jackson.

SALEM COMPOSITE SQUADRON
Commanded by Major Dennis Wyza in Salem, Oregon. Salem Squadron took home the
Outstanding Squadron of the Year award at the wing banquet celebrations.

NORTHWEST COASTAL COMPOSITE SQUADRON
Located on the Pacific Coast in Tillamook, Oregon is commanded by Major Michael Walsh. Each
year, NW Coastal hosts a rocketry weekend and campout. This year was no different and was
enhanced by special assistance from the Tillamook County Sheriff’s office who instructed cadets
and seniors on the fine art of rappelling from the Sheriff’s department’s rappelling tower.

WASHINGTON COUNTY COMPOSITE SQUADRON
Captain John Clarey commands Hillsboro, Oregon’s Washington County squadron. In May, two
former Washington County cadets, Tommy Milligan and Dylan Halums, graduated from U.S.
Military Academy at West Point and U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, respectively. A
great year for Washington County.

18

CLOSE
Overall, Oregon Wing had a very successful 2013 and is looking forward to an even more prosperous
2014. A successful Compliance Inspection which included a number of “highly successful” ratings shows
the wing knows how to conduct its business. The wing demonstrated its ability to deliver on all three of
its missions and continue to provide great service to the community, state and nation.
On behalf of the Wing Commander, Colonel Longley; the Wing Vice-Commanders, Lt. Colonels Adcock
and Tanory, and the entire wing staff a very heartfelt “THANK YOU” to the members of the wing for a
job “well done.”

19

Appendix A - Professional Development Awards

PCR-OR-000
PCR-OR-001

CAPID
415944
505616
429937

472101
PCR-OR-007

142413
474527
491623
532621

PCR-OR-016

362123
511149
511460
511515
514904

529708

531617
534302

PCR-OR-034

107491
125262
283313
369712

420757
504247

513316

2d Lt
2d Lt
Maj
Maj
Maj
Maj
Maj
Maj
Maj
Maj
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Lt Col
Lt Col
Lt Col
Capt
Capt
2d Lt
2d Lt
1st Lt
1st Lt
1st Lt
1st Lt
2d Lt
2d Lt
2d Lt
SM
SM
2d Lt
2d Lt
2d Lt
Maj
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
SM

Angelika Rambo
Pilar Davami
Alan P Sandner
Alan P Sandner
Alan P Sandner
Alan P Sandner
Marvin R Owen
Marvin R Owen
Tamera J Ohlund
Tamera J Ohlund
Herman R Dennington
Herman R Dennington
Max C McHatton
Max C McHatton
Mark V Tollefson
Mark V Tollefson
Mark V Tollefson
Lindsey K Dike
Lindsey K Dike
Thomas M Holland
Meghan E Nameny
Victoria A Nameny
Ronald D Justice
Ronald D Justice
Ronald D Justice
Brian J Smith
Brian J Smith
Brian J Smith
Paul E Prange
Paul E Prange
James Leroy Hart
James Leroy Hart
James Leroy Hart
Janet N Bell
Robert P Gennrich III
Robert P Gennrich III
Andrew J Lucas
Andrew J Lucas
John M Kelly
John M Kelly
John M Kelly
Roger L Parish
Randall R Widell
Randall R Widell
Randall R Widell
Toni L McNeal

20

Award/Level
YEAGER
YEAGER
GARBER
LV4
LV5
WILSON
GARBER
LV4
LOENING
LV3
LOENING
LV3
LOENING
LV3
LV1
MBRRBN
YEAGER
LV1
MBRRBN
YEAGER
YEAGER
YEAGER
DAVIS
LV2
YEAGER
LV1
MBRRBN
YEAGER
LV1
MBRRBN
LV1
MBRRBN
YEAGER
YEAGER
LOENING
LV3
GARBER
LV4
DAVIS
LV2
YEAGER
YEAGER
DAVIS
LV2
YEAGER
LV1

Completed Date
12 Feb 2013
12 Feb 2013
06 Jun 2013
06 Jun 2013
11 Nov 2013
11 Nov 2013
16 Aug 2013
16 Aug 2013
09 Sep 2013
09 Sep 2013
29 Aug 2013
29 Aug 2013
29 Jul 2013
29 Jul 2013
18 Jun 2013
18 Jun 2013
08 Sep 2013
28 Aug 2013
28 Aug 2013
22 Jan 2013
28 Oct 2013
26 Oct 2013
14 May 2013
14 May 2013
26 Oct 2013
17 Apr 2013
17 Apr 2013
26 Oct 2013
03 Sep 2013
03 Sep 2013
23 Nov 2013
23 Nov 2013
26 Oct 2013
02 Nov 2013
16 May 2013
16 May 2013
21 Oct 2013
21 Oct 2013
16 Aug 2013
16 Aug 2013
06 Feb 2013
05 Nov 2013
12 Sep 2013
12 Sep 2013
14 Jul 2013
23 Oct 2013

517233
517693
521932
524478
526401
PCR-OR-037

197102

503253

503256

504938
538300

PCR-OR-042

445801
455480
475684
530672
531282
532252

PCR-OR-050

396204
416407

479740
491749
526123

SM
2d Lt
2d Lt
Capt
Capt
1st Lt
1st Lt
2d Lt
2d Lt
2d Lt
2d Lt
MSgt
MSgt
MSgt
MSgt
1st Lt
1st Lt
1st Lt
Capt
Capt
Capt
2d Lt
2d Lt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Maj
Maj
Capt
Capt
1st Lt
1st Lt
1st Lt
1st Lt
2d Lt
2d Lt
Capt
Capt
2d Lt
2d Lt
2d Lt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt

Toni L McNeal
Megan Anne Loynes
Megan Anne Loynes
Bradley J Naas
Bradley J Naas
John E Mackey
John E Mackey
Mark R Tenkate
Mark R Tenkate
Zhen Wu
Zhen Wu
Daniel L Ash
Daniel L Ash
Daniel L Ash
Daniel L Ash
Becky J Marin
Becky J Marin
Becky J Marin
Leo J Marin
Leo J Marin
Leo J Marin
Janice K Slusser
Janice K Slusser
Leslie J Castle
Leslie J Castle
Leslie J Castle
Robert S Magi
Robert S Magi
Hilda E Pereyo
Hilda E Pereyo
W Randall Ireson
W Randall Ireson
Bernard C Hoene
Bernard C Hoene
Mark A Trujillo
Mark A Trujillo
Justin M Alderman
Justin M Alderman
Steven A Burns
Steven A Burns
Brandon Q Massey
Brandon Q Massey
Brandon Q Massey
Mike J Wissing
Mike J Wissing
Donnel Lee Lang
Donnel Lee Lang
Gerald R Campbell
Gerald R Campbell
Gerald R Campbell

21

MBRRBN
LV1
MBRRBN
DAVIS
LV2
LV1
MBRRBN
LV1
MBRRBN
LV1
MBRRBN
GARBER
LV4
LV5
WILSON
LV1
MBRRBN
YEAGER
DAVIS
LV2
YEAGER
LV1
MBRRBN
LV1
MBRRBN
YEAGER
LOENING
LV3
LOENING
LV3
LOENING
LV3
LV1
MBRRBN
LV1
MBRRBN
LV1
MBRRBN
DAVIS
LV2
LV1
MBRRBN
YEAGER
LOENING
LV3
LOENING
LV3
LV1
MBRRBN
YEAGER

23 Oct 2013
15 May 2013
15 May 2013
22 May 2013
22 May 2013
06 May 2013
06 May 2013
01 Feb 2013
01 Feb 2013
21 Jan 2013
21 Jan 2013
07 Mar 2013
07 Mar 2013
23 Sep 2013
23 Sep 2013
03 Sep 2013
03 Sep 2013
08 Oct 2013
13 Sep 2013
13 Sep 2013
08 Oct 2013
20 Aug 2013
20 Aug 2013
14 Dec 2013
14 Dec 2013
11 Dec 2013
14 May 2013
14 May 2013
16 May 2013
16 May 2013
23 Apr 2013
23 Apr 2013
08 May 2013
08 May 2013
24 Apr 2013
24 Apr 2013
11 Jun 2013
11 Jun 2013
08 Oct 2013
08 Oct 2013
03 Apr 2013
03 Apr 2013
14 Jul 2013
06 Jun 2013
06 Jun 2013
16 Aug 2013
16 Aug 2013
03 Feb 2013
03 Feb 2013
12 Feb 2013

535688
535827

536851

540317

540519

PCR-OR-055

390758
426137
488174
512248

PCR-OR-065
PCR-OR-073

504467
514325
530392

535405

536972

PCR-OR-085

187476
188275
525333

PCR-OR-099

142412
240432
337978
500648
528028
532764

Maj
Maj
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
Capt
SM
SM
SM
2d Lt
2d Lt
2d Lt
1st Lt
1st Lt
Maj
Maj
Capt
1st Lt
1st Lt
1st Lt
1st Lt
1st Lt
1st Lt
1st Lt
1st Lt
2d Lt
2d Lt
2d Lt
2d Lt
2d Lt
2d Lt
Maj
Maj
2d Lt
2d Lt
SM
SM
Lt Col
Lt Col
Capt
Capt
SSgt
SSgt
Maj
Maj
2d Lt
2d Lt
2d Lt

John R Taylor
John R Taylor
Karen B Cardin
Karen B Cardin
Karen B Cardin
William D Conklin
William D Conklin
William D Conklin
John R Eckholt
John R Eckholt
John R Eckholt
Marvin A Kennedy
Marvin A Kennedy
Marvin A Kennedy
Nicholas W Culbertson
Nicholas W Culbertson
Donald R Cole
Donald R Cole
William E Guske
Robert D Winkelman
Robert D Winkelman
Marco A Minato
Katherine M Lyon
Katherine M Lyon
Andre A Martin
Andre A Martin
Andre A Martin
Michael C Marsh
Michael C Marsh
Michael C Marsh
Benjamin Ivan
Benjamin Ivan
Benjamin Ivan
Earl C Dryden
Earl C Dryden
Larry J Snell
Larry J Snell
Vincent C Billet
Vincent C Billet
Scott A Hall
Scott A Hall
Michael E Reed Sr
Michael E Reed Sr
Patrick T Dukes
Patrick T Dukes
Michael L Roberson
Michael L Roberson
Adam M Wirth
Adam M Wirth
Catherine S Frederic

22

LV1
MBRRBN
LV1
MBRRBN
YEAGER
LV1
MBRRBN
YEAGER
LV1
MBRRBN
YEAGER
LV1
MBRRBN
YEAGER
DAVIS
LV2
LOENING
LV3
YEAGER
DAVIS
LV2
YEAGER
LV1
MBRRBN
LV1
MBRRBN
YEAGER
LV1
MBRRBN
YEAGER
LV1
MBRRBN
YEAGER
LOENING
LV3
LV1
MBRRBN
LV1
MBRRBN
GARBER
LV4
DAVIS
LV2
DAVIS
LV2
GARBER
LV4
LV1
MBRRBN
LV1

27 Aug 2013
27 Aug 2013
04 Sep 2013
04 Sep 2013
26 Oct 2013
08 Oct 2013
08 Oct 2013
26 Oct 2013
12 Nov 2013
12 Nov 2013
05 Dec 2013
02 Dec 2013
02 Dec 2013
30 Nov 2013
07 May 2013
07 May 2013
18 Jul 2013
18 Jul 2013
22 May 2013
07 May 2013
07 May 2013
08 Oct 2013
07 Jan 2013
07 Jan 2013
22 Apr 2013
22 Apr 2013
13 May 2013
22 Aug 2013
22 Aug 2013
06 Aug 2013
23 Sep 2013
23 Sep 2013
05 Nov 2013
16 May 2013
16 May 2013
17 Nov 2013
17 Nov 2013
16 Jan 2013
16 Jan 2013
15 Apr 2013
15 Apr 2013
29 Sep 2013
29 Sep 2013
14 May 2013
14 May 2013
28 Sep 2013
28 Sep 2013
12 Mar 2013
12 Mar 2013
11 Jun 2013

PCR-OR-114

516667

2d Lt
SM
SM

Catherine S Frederic
Dia V. Norris
Dia V. Norris

23

MBRRBN
LV1
MBRRBN

11 Jun 2013
11 Sep 2013
11 Sep 2013