File #35: "Flight Patterns June 30, 1966.pdf"

Flight Patterns June 30, 1966.pdf

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F U G H T PAT T E R N S
P U B L I C AT I O N
cnni-

AIR

OP

PAT R O L

N AT I O N A I .
AUXILIARY

CAPITOI.
UNITED

WING
S TAT E S

AIR

PORCE

June 30, 1966

GENERAL ROLLEN ANTHIS, CQHMiUlDER^ HEADQaABTERS COMMAND^ UIOTSa) STATES AIR FORCE,
aad his antlro Staffs participated in a ceromonor honoring departing Billing Air
Foroa Base ooomander COL* FRAHK £• MAREK, an Honorazy Xsmber of Civil Air Patrol
and National Capital Winge Col. Vvnk vas given a Certificate of Appreciation
by the General Foulois Squadron in recognition of his stqjport of Boiling-based
CAP organisation* COL* DANIEL £• EVANS JR«, National Capital Ving Consoander,
presentcKl the certificate on behalf of the squadron* Other CAP lasnibers were
present at the ceremoBgr were OAFT* HAROLD HARRIS, VCLng Infoznation Officer, and
CVfO LORRAINE PQiRON, Executive Officer of the General Foulois Squadron*
NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS HAS ISSUED a number of new CAP Regulations and Manuals
governing joai^- phases of cadet and senior menibership, including oeiid>orsfaip applica
tion procedures, senior osmber promotions, the asiibership year, cadet and senior

training programs (with several new requirenants for senior aenbers), and cadet

and senior nenber oedalsp ribbons and certificates* Some of the chafes are ninor
while in other areas it appears that National Headquarters has oooqpletely "rewritten
the book*"

CHANGES IN PROCEDURES REFERRED TO IN ABOVE ITEM PROMPTED the Wing Deputy for
Personnel, Col* Robinson, to issue the following statement to unit ccumaanders and
personnel officers s

"Tour attention is directed to M6nth:iy BuUstin Number 6, 20 Juno 1^,
from National Headquarters*

"These publicatims and forms are Very Import^t Items and should be
discussed with your senior personnel because they are mandatory for pro
motions*

"Applications for promotions of senior members will not be processed by
this Headquarters unless the mandatory requirements have been coiBpleted*"
COL* ROBINSON BSiPHASIZED THAT IT IS IMPGRTANf THAT COIQttHDIlK} CWICERS and their

Personnel Officers fajBLliariae themselves with these publications as soon as
possible and "pass the word" to all lasmbers of their respective units*
THE WING COMMANDER HAS AGAIN EMPHASIZED the iiqfMirtance of suhnitting reports
that are required on tins* and in accordance with the wisropriate implemantlnff

directives* A RECWl!H$mE IN 10 REPCETINQ PROCEDURES requires that the

narrative report form be submitted along with the card form, even when the report
ing unit has nothing to report for the period* If the narrative report isn't
included the card form cannot be forwarded to National Headquarters*

USE OF SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBERS as CAP Serial Numbers for newly-Joined members
has been extended to the cadet ranks as well as the senior ranks in sosmi cases*

A letter will be sent to unit commanders on this subject imd appropriate
regulations may have alrea(i^ been mailed from National Headquarters*

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P U B L I C AT I O N
CIVIL

AIR

OF

PAT R O L

N AT I O N A L
AUXILIARY

CAPITOL
UNITED

WING

-

S TAT E S

AIR

FORCE

Ie
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u q lo i
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The carrier pigeon is back. It's
now 150 feet long and growing.
It's fa.st and getting faster. In
a few years its speed (over 1,400
miles an hour) will make it capa
ble of winging its way across the
Atlantic in three hours or less.

A Paul Bunyan tale? No. It's
the all-cargo jet plane, launched
in this country in 1963.
But there is a touch of Bunyan
in the phenomenal growth in air
shipments of perishable farm
products since the giant jet was
introduced. A recent ERS survey
of several major airlines shows

Cut flowers, these carriers re
port, make up two-fifths of their
total farm product volume. Shrub
b e r y, p l a n t s a n d o r n a m e n t a l
greens also travel in large quan
tities by air.
The all-cargo jet can haul more
than 40 tons of freight nonstop
coast to coast or 35 tons nonstop
f r o m N e w Yo r k t o P a r i s . A n d i t ' s

vegetables in the year ended June

versatile, too. It can be changed
as needed to part-cargo, part-pas
senger or all-passenger service.
Largely because of the cargo
jet's speed, size and multiple use
features, airlines have been able
to cut agricultural freight rates
sharply. In 1961 rates averaged

1965

the

between 18 and 20 cents a ton-

traffic volume as recently as 1961.

mile. By 1965 the average was

the volume of fresh fruits and
was

four

to

five

times

3

down to 12 cents, with fruit and
berry rates as low as 7 cents.
In 1964 one major airline cut
rates on fruits and vegetables

shipped from Los Angeles to Chi
cago by 17 to 40 per cent, to New
York by 26 to 44 per cent. As a
result, California air shipments of
strawberries to Chicago jumped
46 per cent in 1965, compared
w i t h 1 9 6 4 ; t h o s e t o N e w Yo r k
climbed 25 per cent.
Lower air rates are a boon to

shippers. Now they can ship reg
ularly by air, instead of using the

mode only when a commodity is
in short supply. This is reflected
in total air shipments of straw
berries out of California last year.
At 1,100 carlot equivalents, they

P U B L I C AT I O N
CIVIL

AIR

OF

N AT I O N A L .

PAT R O L

CAPITOL

AUXILIARY

UNITED

WING
S TAT E S

AIR

FORCE

THE UBIQUITOUS BIRD (Cont'd.)
were about 50 per cent higher
than in 1964.

Shippers are also using air
freight for fast movement of fresh
figs, cherries, peaches, lettuce,
poultry, eggs, meats, seafood, ori
ental vegetables and many other
commodities.

Overseas air freight rates are
also going down. Last year the
rflres for meat from New York to
London were cut to 17 cents a

Looking ahead, airlines predict

a marked increase in agricultural
traffic. They point to such factors
as lower operating costs and fur
ther rate reductions due to bigger
and faster planes; better use
of equipment; better packaging;
more automation in freight han
dling at air terminals; growing
consumer demand for high quality
perishables and better service to
consumers on the part of shippers

pound for a minimum shipment

who choose air transport.
Much, of course, depends on

^•uit and vegetable rates were

mutations of the bird itself.
T h e t h r e e - h o u r N e w Yo r k t o
London schedule sV^ould start in

Of 2 ,200 pounds. Early this year

dropped to 16 cents a pound for
a minimum cargo of 1,100 pounds.
Some sales managers now see a
more regular flow of these air
borne items to overseas markets
as a result of the rate cuts.

the early 1970s when a super
sonic transport developed jointly

a six-story tail should be along
shortly thereafter. It's to be a
commercial adaptation of a U.S.

Air Force cargo transport still
on the drawing boards.

Even Babe the Blue Ox might
boggle at this transport's poten

tial. Some 2^0 feet long, it will
carry 125 tons of freight. It will

be 80 big that airlines may have
to make joint arrangements to fill

it. Some say the answer is simply
to fill it with loaded highway
trailer trucks, driven on at take

off, driven off on landing.
irixited tram THE FARM

USDA^ Magr 1966

by the British and French be
comes operational.
A slower but bigger bird with

CONORATULATIOliS TO CADETS WAl/TER C« VERTREACE, East Capitol Sqaadroiit and CHARI2S

HOUARD^ Fairfax Squadron^ idio vara judged Outstanding Cadat Officer and Outstanding

Gadet^ respeotivelyi at tkLa year's VfiLng Enoaiqpnient at McOuire Air Force Base^ N«J*
RiiiCENT SENIOR MEMBER PROMOTIONS^ announced lay HP* COL. COSTELLO M. ROBINSON^ Vling
Deputy for Personneli included M/U« JACK F. SCHULZ. luring Deputy for Materiel^ te

UEIfrSNANT COLONEL^ and 2m BENJAMIN T.L. HARDY, Ebcecutive Officer of the

Boiling Squadron, to FIRST LIElfTENANT. W/O LORRAINE PERRON, SMCUtiTo Officer of
the Oeneral Foulois Squadron, was promoted to CHIEF WARRANT OFFICER*

CADET ROGER ROMAOK of the Wheat on«-Sil7er Spring Squadron has been awarded a (500
science grant under the Civil Air Patrol Scholarship Progran, LT* COL« CHARISS
SURACI, his oomniander. has announced* Cadet Romaok will use the grant at the
University of Meuylana, Col* Suraci stated*
1

TEN CADET MEMBERS of the East Oapttol Squadron recently received AMELIA EARUAET
AWARDS. Thoy are WALTER C. VERTREACE, COIEMAN A* CHANDI£R, PEARL A. NXm,
YVONNE T. DIXON, WILLIAM C. DULAN7, STEPHEN E. NORBRET, DORIS K. STRONO, EDWARD 0.
THOMAS, and VERNON J. WOOD*

BILL? MITCHELL AWARDS were presented recentHy to Cadets RICK7 J. DUTSCH of the Old

Dondnion Squadront WILLIAM L* HARRIS and HARRT K« BEmON of the Fairfax Squadront

and CHARIES M« DOfolAS and FERRY C* HAMILTON of the Rolling Ridge Squadron*

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION'S PLANS for a National Air and Space Museum got the go«ahead

from the Senate which sent the |1|0 million bill to the l&ite House for ^proval*

Smithsonian Secretary S. DILLON RIPLET says construction funds idll be sought in
the next Congress* Site of the new facility will be on The Mall, across from the
National Oallery of Art*
That's

all

until

next

issue.

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