File #229: "Flight Patterns December 1966.pdf"

Flight Patterns December 1966.pdf

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,. F L I G H T PAT T E R N S
P, u a u o A ' r

9

RNAL cJu:rro

CMI. AIR PATROL AUXILIARY UNITED STATES

AIR FORCE

TOP SPEA~ USAF ENTERTAINERS FOR DINING IN
Stirring strains of the Bagpipes, the smooth voices of the Singing
Sergeants, strings of the Diplomats of the USAF Band a~A the measured cadences of the USAF Honor Guard will be heard the evening of
Februar7 2~ at Andrews Air Force Base Officers Club - all on behalf
of the National Capital Wing. Awards will be given to deserving CAP
staffers and friends of the organization.
W i n g C o m m a n d e r C o l . G e o r g e P. U p r i g h t w i l l p r e s i d e . A h o s t o f
civilian and military dignitaries will attend. Wives, husbands a~ia
adult friends of members are invited to attend.
Attire will be formal. (CAP males will wear uniform with white
shirt and black bow tie) AF and other military personnel will wear
w i n t e r m e s s d r e s s . Ti c k e t p r i c e s w i l l b e a n n o u n c e d i n n e a r f u t u r e .
WINQ CADETS EARNS) HONOP~ IN 1966
Cadet Roger Romack's diligence in CAP and hard work in school
l e d t o h i s r e c e i p t o f a $ 5 0 0 C A P s c h o l a r s h i p f o r t h e a c a d e m i c y e a r.
He's with the Wheaton-Silver Springs Cadet Souadron commanded by
Lt. Col. Charles Suraci. Congratulations!
A total of 18 Certificates of Proficiency and 17 Amelia Earhar~
A w a r d s w e r e m a d e t o W i n g p e r s o n n e l d u r i n g t h e p a s t y e a r. C o l . S u r a c i
notes that if each unit in the organization earns two COP's, the
national goal for earning such awards will be met.
TWO HONORAH[ ~IBER~HIPS IN CAP AWARDED
The Wheaton-Silver Springs Cadet Squadron awarded an honorary
m e m b e r s h i p i n C A P t o M r. L o u i s M e y e r s , e x e c u t i v e s e c r e t a r y o f t h e
YMCA in Silver Springs who is also a Major in the U.S. Army Reserve.
M r. G l e n n L a s h l e y, d i r e c t o r o f t h e s a m e Y ~ C A ' s m a n a g e m e n t c o m m ittee also received honorary membership. Both were cited for their
aid and assistance to CAP during the past several years.
AEROSPACE EDUCATION PROGRAM KEEPS BUILDING AND GROWING
F~ CAP members from the National Capital Wing and other organizations in C~P met at AndreWS Air Force Base NCO club Dec. l~th
to hear late news and suggestions on improving aerospace education
i n o u r w i n g . M a i n s p e a k e r w a s M r. B i l l R e y n o l d s , M i d d l e E a s t R e g i o n
A e r o s p a c e E d u c a t i o n Tr a i n i n g O f fi c e r, w h o r e p l a c e d M r. J a c k S o r e n s o n
of National Headquarters. Other guest lecturers included CAP Lt. Col.
William Everett of the Delaware Wing, a squadron commander with an
outstanding record for training Cadets and senior members~ CAP NaJ.
John Kunsmiller and Lt. Col. Charles Suraci of our wing discussed
current education affairs and plans to increase auality and ~uantity
o f c o u r s e s i n t h e w i n g . W i n g C o l a n d e r C o l . G e o r g e P. U p r i g h t g r e e t e d
the guests at the combined dinner and business meeting. Capt. Carlton
Hill~ a training officer at Wing Hq., also spoke to the group. Lt.Col.
H a r r y M . P r i c e , U S A F ; D i r e c t o r o f Tr a i n i n g ) M i d d l e E a s t R e g i o n u r g e d
that strong efforts to upgrade cadet and ~enior training continue.

FLIGHT PATTERNS
ITtS A BIRD - IT'S A PLANE - IT'S A OJLLISIONL m
The frequency and cost of plane-bird collisions, military and
civilian, are increasing. Future annual damage to engines alone may
run $4 to $5 million annual~v says a report of the Air Force Office
Of Scientific Research.
The sad facts were given recently at the annual meeting of the
A m e r i c a n A s s o c i a t i o n f o r t h e A d v a n c e m e n t o f S c i e n c e i n Wa s h i n g t o n .
A USAF pilot was killed and others injured in 1966. ~ officials
say they lost a helicopter and two crewmen from a "birdstrike."
Air Force officials reported the "bird menace is growing" as ai~
speeds and Jet usage increase. A tab of $i0 million a-year for such
damage may come as birds strike engines, air intakes, windscreensj
canopies, flaps and landing gears.
AF pilots are reauired to report bird strikes. In 1962; 53 bird
incidents were reported. This rose to 70 in 1963 and 145 in 19~.
In 1965, all bird strikes were reported, regardless of damage; and
the total reached 8391 Figures for the past year are being compiled.
T h e F e d e r a l A v i a t i o n A g e n c y, t h o u g h n o t r e o u i r c d t o r e p o r t s u c h
collisions, says commercial lines have noted some 300 incidents per
year since 1961.
Federal officials who met in California last year heard research
reporters say that "no complete solution to the bird-aircraft collision problem" seems possible. A hopeful note comes from the observed "hawk response" - the bird instinct to avoid aircraft.
NN WING DII~CTOR OF CADET TRAINING
ISt Lt. William R. Hurst, a ~ year veteran of CAP service, and
a r e p o r t e r f o r t h e C o m m e r c e C l e a r i n g H o u s e i n Wa s h i n g t o n , h a s b e e n
a p p o i n t e d D i r e c t o r o f C a d e t Tr a i n i n g f o r t h e W i n g .
A f o r m e r m e m b e r o f t h e M o r r i s t o w n a n d K n o x v i l l e S q u a d r o n s ' , Te r m - ;
essee Wing; he started as a CAP cadet in 1955. Positions he has held
i n c l u d e t h a t o f C a d e t C o ~ m m n d e r, C o m m a n d a n t o f C a d e t s a n d G r o u p I X
Director of Senior Training.
A GOOD IDEA FOR CADET SQUADRONS.
A t r i p t h a t o t h e r s c u a d r o n s c a n d o q u i t e e a s i l y, a f t e r a d v a n c e
request; is the one made recently by Montgomery Squadron members to
the Smithsonian's old aircraft storage area in Suitland; Md. Capt.
Bertrand H. Stephenson, C.O. of the Congressional Group reports it
was a most interesting visit (on a Dec. Saturday morn) and would be
beneficial to cadets.
F L I G H T PAT T E R N S i s a m o n t h l y p u b l i c a t i o n o f t h e N a t i o n a l C a p i t a l
W i n g H q . ; Wa s h i n g t o n , D . C . A d d r e s s a l l c o r r e s p o n d e n c e t o ; M a j . H a p
H a r r i s ; I n f o r m a t i o n O f fi c e r, N a t ' l . C a p . W g . ; O M R , B o x 4 ~ i ; B o i l i n g
A F B ; Wa s h i n g t o n , D . C . , 2 0 3 3 2 .

FLIGHT PATTERNS
CHRISTMAS TREES BRINO

CASH F O R p L A N E S a E ~ U I ~

Montgomery Senior Sq. enlarged its treasury with the long ~eno f C h r i s t m a s t r e e s , t h a t i s . Vo l u n t e e r s m a n n e d t h e i r t r e e s a l e s t a n d
from 10 a.me to lO p.m. seven days a week before Christmas at the
W i l d w o o d S h o p p i n g c e n t e r. O n e o f t h e s q u a d r o n m e m b e r s q u i p p e d , " S h o w s
what you can do by needling people."
20 YEAR ANNIVERSARY FOR WING C~FICER
Congratulations to Lt. Col. William H. Rhodes who is celebrating
h i s 2 0 t h y e a r o f v o l u n t a r y s e r v i c e t o h i s c o u n t r y w i t h C A P. T h e
affable senior officer now serves the wing as its Director of Operations and Director of the Cadet Guard.
TOP AWARD EARN~
Robert A. Johns of the Virginia Group has been awarded CAP's
Meri~rious Service Award. Due to a gremlin, papers announcing this
event went to the Virginia Wing instead of the Virginia Group. The
delay in receipt hasn't phased Capper Johns, he's working hard as
ever across the Potomac.

R)mum MAKES PALS
O l n e y, M d . w a s t h e s c e n e o f a p i g r o a s t f o r h u n g r y m e m b e r s o f t h e
Montgomery Senior Sq. The top-notch flyers in this unit were the
g u e s t s o f L t . C o l . J o h n S t . C l a i r, M i d d l e E a s t R e g i o n O p e r a t i o n s
O f fi c e r. A w i l d p o r k e r f r o m t h e G e o r g i a s w a m p s , ~ e w a s c l a s s i fi e d a s
" To n g u e t a n t a l i z i n g " b y l u c k y g u e s t s . S e t t i n g f o r t h e r o a s t w a s
Cole S1. Clair's farm, with its very old, charming house that has
s e e n m u c h M a r y l a n d h i s t o r y.
CGMMUNICATIONS MEN STRENGTHEN THEIR SIGNALS
Wing Conmunications Officer Capt. Norm Chipps, aided by WO Joe
Moltz have erected a new antenna for the base communications trailer
at Montgomery County Airport. It was ticklish business, reference i
all the regulations on antenna height, etc. However the two intrepid
broadcasters have now greatly enhanced the ',reach" of the station.
BRITISH ACCENT A~~A'~:,, BY OFFICER
~espite the name Hiram Lopez, our Ass't. Wing Co~unications
Officer insists on talking with his newly acquired British accent.
Seems the new style pronounciation came from his recent TDY in
Britain for NASA. While there Lt. Lopez flew in British light aircraft and now has some wild tales about the RAF and civvy f~ge

ARMY FLIGHT TRAINING GETS TEMPORARY INCREASE
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A temporary increase in the number of Army pilots to be trained
has been approved by Secretary of Defense. All primary helicopter
t r a i n i n g , n o w c o n d u c t e d a t F t . W o l t e r s , Te x . 9 w i l l b e e x p a n d e d t o
h a n d l e t h e t r a i n i n g l o a d , i n c r e a s e d f r o m ~ i 0 t o 6 1 0 p i l o t s m o n t h l y.
Advanced flight training and transition training are carried out
a t t h e A r m y A v i a t i o n C e n t e r, F t . R u c k e r, A l a . I t ' s o p e r a t i n g a t f u l l
capaci~.
MUSEUM OF FLIGHT MEDIC~E ESTABLISHED
A e r o s p a c e M e d i c a l D i v i s i o n H q . , B r o o k s A F B , Te x . i s h o m e f o r t h e
new repository of flight history and artifacts. Air Force has begun
intensive search for old medical equipment, records for historic decumentation, and other items on development of aerospace medicine.
AIR FGRCE PLANS PURCHASE OF 176| 0-2 'SUPER SKYMASTER' AIRCRAFT
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The Air Force is purchasing 176 Cessna O-2's modified to military
specifications for use primarily in forward air controller9 liaison
and observation functions.
A ~.5 million letter contract was awarded to Cessna Aircraft Coo
a s p a r t o f a n e s t i m a t e d $ 11 . 7 m i l l i o n c o n t r a c t t o p r o c u r e t h e 0 - 2
a s a o n e - f o r - o n e r e p l a c e m e n t f o r t h e O - I " B i r d D o g " n o w u s e d b y FA C s
in Vietnam. NatCap Wing I0 Hap Harris will write an article on the
twin-engined plane for AIRMAN magazine in near future.
M ~ O FOR PII~TS AND OBSERVERS
M e s s a g e r e c e i v e d r e c e n t l y f r o m C A P N a t ' l H q . r e a d s : " Yo u r a t t e n t i o n i s d i r e c t e d t o P a r. i o f C A P R 7 6 - 3 d a t e d 1 8 J u n e ' 6 5 A i r l i f t
o f P e r s o n n e l w h o a r e n o t m e m b e r s o f C A P a n d C h a p . 9 , P a r. 4 & 5 o f
CAPM 190-1 dated Jul. '66, Xnformation Officers handbook.
r a i n t h e b e s t i n t e r e s t o f C A P, i t i s m a n d a t o r y m e n t i o n e d d i r e c t i v e s
be complied with. Request you brief all mission pilots on the importance of these directives to insure that only properly authorized
personnel are carried in CAP Corporation aircraft or in CAP member
owned aircraft while on an Air Force Authorized mission.
NE~ FAA HANDBOOK
N e w h a n d b o o k t i t l e d ~ U . S . S t a n d a r d f o r Te r m i n a l I n s t r u m e n t P r o cedures," has been published. It's for use in establishing or revising instrument flight procedures used by pilots landing at military or civilian airports.
COL. FERGUSON APPOINTED WING EXECUTIVE OFFICER
Lt.Col. Ruth Ferguson, long experienced CAP officer has moved to the
executive post from previous Job as Director of Administration. The
hard-working lady will also serve this sun~er as colander of the
cadet encampment. Lt. Col. Costello Robinson will be deputy CO.