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o IE 9, NO. 3

M A X W E L L A F B , A L A . 3 6 11 2

MARCH 1977

NEC Okays
Aerospace Ed
Center Here

MAXWELL AFB, Ala.--At its December 1976 meeting here,
Civil Air Patrol's National Executive Committee approved a
proposal to establish a special center for the further development and promotion of CAP's aerospace education mission.

Tentatively identified as the
National Aerospace Education
Leadership Development
Center, authorities have indicated that its purposes and objectives will be:
1. To design and conduct activities aimed at the development of leaders and leadership
activities in aerospace education
nationwide;
2. To develop and help impleDOUBLE SPAATZ WINNERS--Two Air Force Academy cadets recently received Civil Air
ment aerospace education for
Patrol's Gen. Carl A. Spantz Award in a double ceremony at the academy. They are Cadet
cadets and senior members of
T h i r d C l a s s ( s o p h o m o r ~ ~ ] L , ~ . J s ~ ~ ~ ~ l m ~ a n ) ~ . . . . . . . . ~it .~A~Patro];
Orlando Rosado, right. Presenting the awards was Air Force Brig. Gen. Stanley C. Beck,
3. To establish and nurture
center, commandant of Cadets at the academy. Both cadets are from CAP's Florida Wing.
inter-organization relationships
Rosado is an alumnus of the Cutler Cadet Sq. in the Miami area while Atherton is associated
for the purposes of aerospace
with the Tallahassee Comp. Sq.
power and aerospace education;

CAP Band Plays At Inaugural
WASHINGTON, D.C.--Civil
Air Patrol's Bagpipe Band, an
activity sponsored by the
Brockton Cadet Sq.
(Massachusetts Wing), participated here Jan. 20 in the
Presidential Inaugural Parade
as a route parade band.
The band was stationed at 10th
Street and Pennsylvania Avenue
to entertain the crowds gathered
there to wait for the Inaugural
i)arade. The band played from 11
to 11:45 a.m. and from 12:30 to

l:lSp.m.
The band, which wears Scottish regalia, was invited to participate in the parade in
December and the invitation was
approved by Massachusetts'
Gov. Michael S. Dukakis.
The band was housed at Boiling AFB while in Washington. On
the evening following the
uarade, the band was guest of
the Andrews AFB commander
and a local Civil Air Patrol
squadron. Friday was taken up

with sightseeing in Washington.
The trip was made by van and
bus convoy.
Among the tunes played at the
parade were: Stars and Stripes
Forever, Battle Hymn of the
Republic, and America; Scottish
t u n e s : R o w a n Tr e e , F o r t y Second Highlanders, Green Hills
of Tyi'ol, Scotland the Brave,
Skye Waltz and Amazing Grace;
Irish tunes: The Wearing of the
Green, Boys from the County
Cork and Gary Owen.

4. To research, write, visualize
and publish aerospace education
instructional materials in all disciplines, at all levels (public,
private and parochial schools),
formal and informal;
5 . To e s t a b l i s h a v i s i t i n g
scholar program aimed at identifying, describing, and
publishing monographs, papers,
documents, editorials and
pamphlets on the aerospace

education issues of our times;
6. To expand the numbers and
quality of the aerospace education workshop effort; and,
7. To research, develop and
publish aerospace education
curricula for the benefit of those
involved in formal and informal
aerospace education.
The center will be collocated
at CAP National Headquarters.
It will be directed by the commander of CAP-USAF and his
aerospace education staff.
Operation of the center wil~
according to gmaance prowcied
by CAP's executive director,
national commander and the
NEC.
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

INSIDE INDEX
New Coarse .................. Page 2
NEAT School ................ Page 3
Ivan and You ................ Page 5
Aerospace
Answers ..................... Page 8
Cadet Awards .............. Page I1
Try An MBX ....... ~... .....Page 12
::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

First During 1977

Ground Teams Record Saves

MAXWELL AFB, Ala.-Ground
teams from Civil Air Patrol's Mississippi Wing successfully located a downed
aircraft on Jan. 3 and thereby

recorded the organization's first
three lives saved in 1977.
According to information
received here at National Headquarters, the search began when

a plane was reported missing .on
a flight from Dothan, Ala., to
Longview, Tex. The last known
position of the Aircraft was on
final approach inbound to
Hawkins Field, Jackson, Miss.,
in freezing rain.
After being notified of the
emergency by the Air Force
Rescue Coordination Center,
CAP ground teams located the
aircraft within a few minutes.
The teams used a handheld
direction-finder to track the
plane's emergency locator trans m i t t e r ( E LT ) s i g n a l i n t h e
southwest comer of the field.
The pilot and two passengers
were rescued and carried to a
hospital in Jackson.
Twenty. CAP members and ten
g r m m d ~ l ~ ~ ~ =

CUffw'd, t~mms~l~ ~d tl~ ~th ~ Ameri~s kit ~,~hl¢ { ,~u,.

PA G E Tw o _

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

MARCH 1977

Response 'Excellent'
At State Symposium
LOWRY AFB, Colo. -- Colorado's fourth annual Aerospace
Education High School Symposium was held here in mid-January with 236 young people from
over the state of Colorado attendinff.

Response to the one-day event
was termed "excellent" and
attendance had to be limited due
to the inability of the dining hall
at Lowry AFB to handle larger
numbers.
The theme of the Symposium
was "Strategic Aerospace
Power." A team from Strategic
Air Command Headquarters ,at
Offutt AFB, Neb., presented the
briefings which occupied the
first half of the day. Field trips
took up the second half.

Unit Wins
Over Icy
Weather

Purpose ot me symposia each
year is to promote an interest in
aerospace education at the high
school level. The latest one was
sponsored by the Air Force
Association Blue Barons
Chapter 129, Colorado; CAP's
Mile High Cadet Sq.; and the
Air Force Junior Reserve Ofricer Training Corps at Hinkley
High School.

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- With the
energy crisis and bitter winter
weather forcing hundreds of
students out of school here in
February, the Heselton Cadet
Sq. 802 still came out on top.
Ta k i n g a d v a n t a g e o f t h e
situation, this Civil Air Patrol
squadron held two meetings per
week -- one on Friday night in
addition to the regular Tuesday
night meeting. The additional
meetings throughout February
resulted in 20 extra training
hours for cadets.
The time was used not only for
study of CAP-related subjects
but also to study English and
practice reading skills. This
freed the regular meeting for
special programs. The additional meetings were held in
the hope of rounding out the CAP
program while assisting the
school systems while they were
:-~sed.

|

COMMITTEE MEET--Members of CAP's National Aerospace Education Advisory Committee meeting here in February included the above group. They are, front row, from left,
Harold R. Bacon, Robert E.McMinn, Dr. Merlyn McLaughlin, Dr. Mervin K. Strickler, Dr.
Hal J. Basham, Arthur N. Reitenouer Jr.; back row, from left, Dr. Wallace R. Maples, Dr.
Earnest D. Riggsby, John V. Sorenson, Brig. Gen. Carl S. Miller, Dr. Kenneth J. Groves,
and Dr. Frederick B. Turtle. Not shown, Dr. Ted Colton.

Advisory Committee Meets

MAXWELL AFB,--Civil Air
Patrol's National Aerospace
Education Advisory Committee
held its annual meeting Feb.8
and 9 here at CAP National HeadThe high school students from
quarters.
across the state who attended inThe committee, established in
cluded CAP cadets and Junior
1947, advises the commander of
ROTC cadets. The students
CAP-USAF and Civil Air
attending the event sponsor it
Patrol's national commander on
themselves, choosing the theme,
matters pertaining to aerospace
introducing the speakers and
education outside of Civil Air
generally running the entire
Patrol.
show.
The agenda included discussions of Air University supDue to the heavy response to
port, CAP-Air Force Junior
the invitations to attend, plans
ROTC programs, aerospace
are hy-iiiake it a two-day event
education Leadership Developnext Year so that more students
meat Course scheduled here this
may take part.
summer, and Aerospace Educa-

tion Workshops.
Air Force Lt. Gen. Raymond
B. Furlong, commander of Air
University, Air Force Brig. Gen.
Carl S. Miller, commander of
Hq. CAP-USAF and executive
director of Civil Air Patrol, as
well as CAP Brig. Gen. Thomas
C. Casaday, CAP national commander, all addressed the conference. Each pledged his support and charged the committee
to maintain a high standard in
CAP's Aerospace Education
mission.
Dr. Merlyn McLaughlin of Lincoln, Neb., is the newly elected
chairman of the committee. He
also served as its chairman
when it was organized in 1947.

Others attending the meet here
included: Dr. Hal J. Basham of
Rockport, Tex.; Dr. Ted Colton
of Atlanta, Ga.; Dr. Kenneth
Grove of Maxwell AFB, Ala. ;
D r. Wa l l a c e R . M a p l e s o , I
Murfreesbero, Tenn.; Arthur N.
Reitenouer Jr. of Claremont,
Calif.; Dr. Ernest D. Riggsby of
Columbus, Ga.: Dr. Mervin K.
Strickler of the Federal Aviation
Administration,
Wa s h i n g t o n , D . C . ; a n d D r.
F r e d e r i c k B . Tu t t l e o f t h e
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration, Washington,
D.C. John V. Serenson, Robert
E. McMinn and Harold R. Bacon
represented CAP National Headquarters.

",4 Significant Milestone'

Annual Course Set For Summer

aerospace education effort," he
MAXWELL AFB, Ala.--Civil
Air Patrol's National Aerospace
said.
Education Leadership DevelopSkilled LeadershipNeeded
ment Center in cooperation with
This annual course is designed
to revitalize aerospace educaMiddle Tennessee State University will present the first annual
tion nationwide by preparing
Ae r o s p a c e
those individuals who attend to
E d u c a t io n
Leadership Development Course
assume active leadership roles
at the local, state, regional or
here this summer,
national level. The greatest
The course, to run from June
weaknessinaerospace
27th through July 22nd, will be
oresented with the coo~ration education, both within and outof the Air Force's Air University
side of Civil Air Patrol, is the
and will utilize Air University
lack of informed skilled
facilities,
leadership at all levels, acBrig. Gen. Thomas C.
cording to observers. This
Casaday, CAP national comcourse is designed to eliminate
that weakness by preparing inmander, has been most endividuals to perform effectively
thusiastic in his support
. in these leadership roles,
~and feels that this comprehenThe course is not limited to
sire leadership development
Civil Air Patrol members but is
course will fill a long-existing
open to anyone who qualifies. It
need. Gen. Casaday has asked
will consist of four main areas of
CAP commanders at all levels to
take positive action in promoting activity,
It will deal with "Aerospace
the month-lung course here this
Problems and Issues" by definsummer. "It is a significant
ing the major aerospace issues
milestone in Civil Air Patrol's

of our time. It will develop an
a w a r e n e s s o f t h e d i ff e r e n t
perspectives of the various
segments of the aerospace community and an ability to express
and defend a personal viewpoint
on the issues.
Objectives ToBe Explained
Part|c-lpants will a-I~6 become
familiar with aerospace education resources, actual and potential, at local, state and regional
levels. The Objectives of these
organizations at the national
level will be explained and the
major resources available from
each of these agencies discussed.
The course will help participants identify personal
strengths and weaknesses insofar as leadership skills are
concerned and will develop
abilities in areas of cornmunication, human relations,
and group discussion leadership
techniques.
Each attendee will devise a

nl m amum mum m mn mum ~, Hi m one no m n amml n m m anlm m m nm m m m n n m m mnnmu m m m u m m m m m m

[)etach and Mail to: National Hq Civil Air Patrol (El)E) Maxwell AFB. AL 36112
A P P L I C AT I O N F O R M
(Please Print or Type)
Name

Street Address

Aerospace Education Activity

City

M,~ be ~m~.d ~f~ y.,~ 1,1~

State Zip Code

Prior College (Degrees; Major; School)

Prior College (continued)
Check One:
[] Undergraduate Credit (6 Semester Hours)

(Enclose S50,00 check or money order as advanced
registration fee--not refundable after June 15, 19771

[] Graduate Credil (6 Semester Hours)

Payable to CivilAir Patrol (AE)

personal plan of action for
leadership in aerospace education within his sphere of influence.
The course of study will place
major emphasis on small
seminars and individual study. A
segment of the course, primarily
dealing with leadership skills,
will be taught by Air University
faculty members and will deal
with leadership skills applicable
to any field of endeavor. The Air
University Library, one of the
outstanding collections of
printed materials on aviation in
the world, will also be available
for use by participants in the
course.
Attendance Limited
Attendance for the session will
be limited to 150 students
selected from those who apply.
Selection will be based on a
demonstrated interest in
aerospace education, such as
attendance at an aerospace
education workshop and/or
aerospace education activity,
or organizational membership.
Middle Tennessee State University will award six semester
hours of undergraduate credit to
those participants completing
the course.
The Aerospace Education
Leadership Development
Course provides an outstanding
opportunity for participants to
hear speakers of national
renown and to be exposed to
situations fostering individual
development not heretofore
available to them. Those planning the course are looking
forward to a productive,

meaningful session this summer
with participants from all areas
of the aerospace community.
CAP's National Aerospace
Education Leadership Development Center, one of the sponsors
of the course, was established
Dec. 11, 1976, by National Executive Committee resolution to
provide an organizational entity
for administration and implementation of the CAP
aerospace education mission.
The center is located at National
Headquarters and is directed for
CAP by the commander of CAPUSAF and his aerospace education staff.
AU Quarters Provided
Those who attend will stay in
single rooms at the Air Universi-.
ty student quarters (two rooms
share a bath). The cost is $2 per'
day per person for a total cost of
$54 for 27 days.
They may eat at the Officers'
Field Ration Mess. The Cost is
approximately $4 per day for
three meals, making a total cost
of approximately $108 for the 27
days.
The registration fee is $213.
The total cost for registration
fee, room and meals will,
therefore, be approximately
$375.
To apply for the course, complete and mail the application
form printed below, postmarked
on or before June 1, 1977.
Enclose a check for $50 (nonreturnable after June 1977). Mail
to: Hq. Civil Air Patrol (EDE),
Maxwell AFB, Ala. 36112. For
additional information, call AC
205-293-5387.

MARCH 1977

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

pAGETHREE

Cadets Act As 'Victims'
To Assist In Exercise
J A M E S TO W N , N . Y. - - T h e
Jamestown Eagle Cadet Sq.
helped out a local hospital
recently by acting as mass disaster "victims" during a training exercise. The purpose of the
exercise was to keep the
Jamestown General Hospital
current with a state law requiring hospitals to hold external disaster drills biennially.
According to Ron Fryzel, the
hnspitaladministrator, the dE-

aster drills are practiced to keep
the hospital "in shape" in case
of a real disaster. Thus,.in keeping with a real disaster situation,
the drill was not known ahead of
time to the nurses and doctors on
duty.
The CAP unit got into the act
when they entered the hospital
wearing imitati9n war wounds
from the Jamestown Naval
Reserve Center. The moulage

COORDINATION TESTA prospective CAP cadet tries out
a machine which tests a person's coordination while Cadet
John Abt, right, of the West Richmond Cadet Sq. (Virginia
Wing) and another prospect look on. Occasion was a recent
r e c r u i t i n g d r i v e a t a R i c h m o n d s h o p p i n g c e n t e r. T h e
squadron had a display which included the machine set up at
the mall.

Year's Records Prove
'Flyingest' Unit's Boast
D AY TO N A B E A C H , F l a . - The "flyingest unit in the
Florida Wing" has proven that it
really is.
At a commander's call in 1976,
Florida Wing Commander Col.
Henri Casenove remarked that
the "Daytona Beach Comp. Sq.
is the 'flyingest' unit in the
Florida Wing."
Now that all the figures are in
and revorts compiled for the

Officer Named
To Preparedness
Unit Position

BRISTOL, Conn. -- The
Bristol Comp. Sq. has named Lt.
Col. George W. Laplante to the
Area One Staff of Civil
Preparedness in Newton, Conn.
Col. Laplante will function as a
liaison officer to Area One which
coordinates civil preparedness
in 33 area towns. He will be
assisted by Cadet Thomas P.
DeBonee in the field of radio
communications.
The squadron has supported
Area One Emergency
Operations Headquarters in the
fields of communications,
message center work and flood
duty.

p a s t y - e a r, t h e - w i n g c o m mander's statement can be
verified by the squadron's
Operations Report.
A corporate-owned Cessna 150
is assigned to the squadron.
Records indicate that this craft
logged 535.1 hours flying time
during 1976, a figure which the
squadron believes a record for a
single Cessna 150.
During 1976, the squadron had
on its roster 11 student pilots, 11
private pilots, four holders of
commercial certificates, and
three certified flight instructors.
And, during those 535.1 hours
flight time logged on the aircraft, 10 persons made their first
solo flights and five became
private pilots.
In addition to the corporateowned Cessna, squadro_n
members own four other c-150s,
two C-172s, one GrummanAmerican Trainer and one Comanche 400, all of which fly uncounted hours on cadet orientatiun, search and rescue, and
civil defense missions. None of
this is included in the 535.1 hours
of the Operations Report.
Z~y~ua Beach Comp. Sq.
is, indeed, doing its best to maretam Civil Air Patrol's rqmtatidm
as a "flying org~V~tm."

set, which contained everything
from fractures to radiation
burns, was obtained by the Eagle
Squadron commander, 2nd Lt.
James Ferguson. The squadron
holds its meetings at the Naval
Reserve Center.
"The drill would have been a
lost cause without the moulage
s e t , " F r y z e l s t a t e d . " M r.
Ferguson saved us a rat race to
find one."
According to Rick Robinson, a
member of the disaster committee in charge of the drill, the
Civil Air Patrol was just what
they needed. "We ~vere looking
for young, active adults willing
to give their time and effort in a
community ~rvice. That can
only spell One thing--CAP!" "
The cadets were taken by
hospital personnel to the various
places for treament screaming
and "bleeding" realistically. According to Fryzel, the acting was
so good that the Eagle Squadron
is a likely candidate for the next
drill. "You were fantastic!" he
said.
Those participating in the
drill, all CAP members were:
Joline Allen, Scott Boss, John
Ceci, Clifford Dennis, John
France, John Gedz, Stephen
Gedz, Troy Gesaman, Steve
Gullberg, Kevin Inwood, Kevin
Kochersberger, Michael Montagna Jr., Chris Norberg, John
Pavlock, Bob Sinicki, Frank
Werren, Quenton Yeager and the
squadron commander.

LEARNING TO RAPPEL DOWN CLIFF IS PART OF
TRAINING AT SOME SCHOOLS.

NEAT Schools Challenge
To A II Cadets Who A ttend
The National Emergency
Assistance Training (NEAT)
Schools offer a challenge to all
cadets in Civil Air Patrol.
The schools offer approximately one-week courses at
various training sites around the
country. Four schools will be
offered this year, each testing
and developing abilities perhaps
unknown to the participant.
The curriculum includes
rigorous training in leadership,
survival, and land search and
rescue techniques to prepare
cadets to function effectively as
members of CAP land search
and rescue teams. The training
offered has often been called
"Ranger schools" or "Ranger
training." The ground search'
and rescue training will complem m m m m m m m u u m m m m m

ment the established flying
search and rescue capabilities of
Civil Air Patrol.
The schools this year will be as
follows:
PUERTO RICO, June 3-11,
commanded by CAP Maj. Bartolo
Ortiz. Basic and advanced
courses offered at this school.
WASHINGTON, June 19-27,
located near Tacoma, Wash.
Commanded by CAP Lt. Col.
Charles Young. Courses offered
include basic, advanced, expert,
cadet staff, and senior member
training in command and
leadership.
IOWA, June 18-July 2, located
in Ottumwa. Commanded by
CAP Col. William Cass. Basic
and advanced course offered at
this school.
m

m m m m

m m m m m m

m m

m m m

PENNSYLVANIA, July 9-17,
located at Hawk Mountain train,
ing area. Commanded by CAP
Lt. Col. John McNabb. Courses
offered include basic, advanced,
expert, field medical, cadet
staff, and senior member training in command and leadership.
The Iowa and Washington
schools will supply food for all
students and this will be
reflected in higher school fees.
Students attending other schools
will be required to bring their
own food for the entire duration.
The first step for those interested in attending one of the
National Emergency Assistance
Training Schools is to fill out the *
attached coupon below and mail
it to the address shown.
m m

m m m m m m m m m m

To: LT. COL. JOHN MclIABB, CAP
526 Acorn Street, Philadelphia, Penn. 19128

I am interested in attending the 1977 NEAT in
Please send me the necessary farms and full details and infarmatien far the schenl.
Rank.

Name

Squadron¸

Iddmss

~

"-=--

m m

PAGE FOUR

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

-.~IARCH 1977
.-

Executive Director's Comments
i

Needed R e v i t a l i z a t i o n
B y BRIG. GEN. CARL S. MILLER,
USAF
Executive Director

Aerospace Education has
been a stated mission of Civil
Air Patrol for nearly 30 years,
and for 30 years it has remained in a position of relative
neglect by both Civil Air Patrol
and the United States Air
Force. During the last six
months this has
changed land
our aerospace
education mission has
eived a
needed revital-~ .....
ization.
The first
"shot in the arm" came from
Lt. Gen. Raymond B. Furlong,
commander of the United
States Air Force Air University. Immediately upon the Air
University's assuming major

command responsibility of
CAP-USAF last July, Gen.
Furlong pledged his support to
Aerospace Education. But, anlike many such pledges which
become empty promises, action was forthcoming immediately.
Already Air University has
approved establishment of the
National Repository for
Aerospace Education Instructional Material as an adjunct of
Hq. CAP-USAF; established
procedures enabling aerospace
education workshops to obtain
Air Force speakers; and
provided the facilities and
many of the instructors for the
four-week Aerospace Education Leadership Development
Course to be held at Maxwell
AFB next summer. (See article
on page 2.)
The second source of' support
is from the new CAP National

C o m m a n d e r, B r i g . G e n .
Thomas C. Casaday, CAP. The
"National Commander's
Comments" column in the
January 1977 issue of Civil Air
Patrol News reflects Gen.
Casaday's deep interest, in
aerospace education and here
again the pledge has not been
an empty promise. At the
December National Executive
Committee meeting, the NEC
established the CAP National
Aerospace Education
Leadership Development
Center at CAP National Headquarters (story on page 1).

manders.
The third action which will
revitalize Aerospace Education is my reorganization of
Hq. CAP-USAF which combined Senior Training and Cadet
Training under a new Deputy
Chief of Staff for Training. This
allows the DCS Aerospace
Education to function solely in
the aerospace education area,
with the freedom and flexibinty to plan and implement
'programs such as the
Aerospace Education
Leadership Development
Course and many others.

The first task to be undertaken by the center is sponsorship of the Aerospace
Education Leadership
Development Course// and
Gen. Casaday not only endorsed the course but solicited support and promotion in a strong
letter to all CAP wing com-

Aerospace Education now
takes its place as a mission of
Civil Air Patrol equal to
Emergency Services and the
Cadet Program, both structurully and functionally. We exp e c t g r e a t n e w a c complishments in this important area of endeavor.

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Georgia Member Cited
For Longtime Service
ATLANTA, Ga.--A longtime
member of Civil Air Patrol, Lt.
CoL Harry Sims, was recognized
recently here at the Georgia
Wing conference for 35 years of
service to the organization.
Col. San Riley, the wing commander, presented him a Certificate of Appreciation.
Col. Sims joined CAP early in
June 1941 in the Montgomery,
Ala., Sq. He served there as
engineering officer and later
became squadron commander.
Still later, he became commander of Alabama Group 3.
While serving as group cornmander, he organized an all-

black unit at Tuskegeo Institute,
In 1951, Col. Sims transferred
to the Georgia Wing at Dobbins
AFB, Marietta, where he was
appointed director of Aircraft
Maintenance. From 1951 to 1974,
he served in a variety of wing
assignments, including that of
air inspector and safety officer.
From 1974 to 1976, he served as
special adviser to the wing commander, special assistant to the
wing commander, and wing
historian. At the present, he is
inactive due to a hip injury but
intends to return to active status
in 1977.
Col. Sims' date of rank as
lieutenant colonel is1956.

National Commander-' .....

. . . . . . . B r i g . G e n . T h o m a s C . C a s a d a y, C A P
E x e c u t i v e D i r e c t o r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B r i g . G e n . C a r l S . M i l l e r, U S A F
D i r e c t o r o f I n f o r m a t i o n . . . . . . . . . .= ............... I t . C o l . H e r b e r t A . B a b b , U S A F
.
, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editor .......
CIvilJAir Patrol News Is on official p~hikation of Civil Air Patrol, a private benavalent ot.
poration which IS also an auxiliary of the United States Air Force. It is publlchad monthly at
Headquarters, Civil Air PatroI-U.S. Air Forca/OI, Building 714, Maxwell AIrlS, Ahi. 36112.
Opinions expressed herein do not negessarlly represent those of the U.S. Air Force or any of
its departments, nor of the Civil Air Patrol Corporation.
Editorial copy should he sent to: HQ. CAP-USAF/OIIN, Editor, Civil Air Patrol Hews, Maxwell
AFll, Ala. 36112.
Civil Air Patrol News does not publish any commercial advertising. However, it does publish
official notices from its own Education Materials Canter (Bookstore) and CAP Supply Depot.
Puhiishad by mall subscription at $2 per year. Civil Air Patrol membership includes subscrip.
tion duos.
Sesend class postage paid at Montgomery, Aia. 36104.
Pestmastorz Please send Form 3579 to HQ. CAP-USAF/DPD, Maxwell AFll, Ala. 36112~

VOLUME 9, NO. 3

MARCH, 197-7

HIGH-LEVEL PRESENTATION--Delaware Gov. Sherman
W. Tribbltt, left, made the presentation in December when
C A P C a d e t M a r y E . S t o n e , c e n t e r, r e c e i v e d t h e B i l l y
Mitchell Award. Cadet Stone is the daughter of Lt. Col. and
M r s . J a m e s E . S t o n e o f D o v e r. D e l . P r e s e n t f o r t h e ~
ceremony was Cadet Stone's mother, right. Gov. Tribbitt's
term of office ended in January.

Cadet Svo~ Nominated to Academies
L A FAY E T T E , I n d . - - A
member of the Indiana Wing's
Purdue Cadet Flight, Cadet
Nancy Svoboda, has been
nominated to two U.S. service
academies.
Indiana Rap. Floyd Fithian
nominated her. Cadet Svoboda,
who has been active in Civil Air
Patrol for four years, remains
hopeful that either the Air Force

Academy or the U.S. Military
Academy will accept her.
During her four years of
membership, two of them spent
in the Florida Wing, she has held
a number of staff positions, including administration officer,
information officer, color guard
commander, squad leader, flight
sergeant, first sergeant, flight
commander, executive officer,
and cadet commander.

For the benefit of all
members of Civil Air Patrol,
the latest statistics of search
and rescue activities
throughout the organization
are shown below.
.... ~ilese areunofficial figures
compiled by Directorate of
Operations at CAP National
Headquarters.
(As of Feb. 6,1977)
Number of Missions ......... 4
5
Number of Aircraft ......... 243
Number of Sorties ..........413
Flying Hours ............... 741.5
Personnel .................... 1208
Mobile Radios ................ 285
Fixed Radios ................. 238
Saves .............................. 3
Finds ............................

MARCH 1977

PAGE FIVE

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

National Commander's Comments

I VA N . . . a n d Y O U !
By Brig. 6en. THOMAS C. CASADAY
National Commander
In Washington, D.C., on June
19, 1973, our Secretary of State
W i l l i a m P. R o g e r s a n d h i s
S o v i e t c o u n t e r p a r t , M r. A .
Gromyko, signed the accords
which have come to be known
as the Nixon-Brezhnev Talks.
These accords provided for
cooperation between the United States and
Soviet Union in
the broad area
of transportation. Item 5 ofE
that agreement dealt with
education and training in civil
aviation.
John V. Sorenson, deputy
chief of staff, Aerospace
Education, Headquarters, Civil
Air Patrol -- U.S. Air Force,
was invited to participate as a
member of .the official U.S.
delegation. The delegation
visited the Soviet Union in
December 1976. Because of the
importance of youth motivation in aviation and aerospace
education to our overall mission I have asked Mr. Sorenson
for his impressions.
"In August 1976 in Dallas,
Tex., I made a presentation to
the Soviet delegation for Item
5. Civil Air Patrol missions in
each area were featured. As a
result, youth motivation in
aviation was included as a formal part of the Item 5 talks.
Hence my invitation to participate.
"The chief of the delegation
was Dr. Mervin K. Strickler
J r. , F e d e r a l A v i a t i o n A d ministration. The other
m e m b e r s w e r e D r. J a c k
E g g s p u e h l e r, O h i o S t a t e
U n i v e r s i t y ; D r. R o b e r t
. Houston, American Airlines,
and Jack Hunt, president,
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical
University, who because of
urgent business just prior to
departure had to cancel. My
impressions follow:

U.S.-U.S.S.R. --A General
Comparison
"In any direct general comparison of the two countries in
aviation technology, the Soviet
Union is clearly behind the
United States. In some other
aviation areas they are equal to
us and in two vital areas, (1)
the decision making process
(ability to determine what is
best and make the right decision for civil aviation) and, (2)
in a positive national attitude
concerning aviation, they are
clearly ahead of the United
States. Their attitude, zeal and
crusading spirit in and for civil
aviation is so superior to our
national attitude that it is
frightening.
Five Schools In Four Cities
"We visited five schools -two in Leningrad, and one each
in Krivoy Rog, Kremenchug,
and Kiev. They were all schools
of the Ministry of Civil Aviation and run by Aeroflot, the
state airline. We were provided
detailed briefings and tours of
each -- no limitations. The
Leningrad Academy of Civil
Aviation and the Kiev Institute
of Civil Aviation were especially impressive and as good or
better than anything I have
seen in the United States. The
other schools were for the
training of technicians, airline
service agents and beginning
pilots. By our standards they
were not as sophisticated; by
their standards they were
great improvements over the
past.
The Student, The Teacher, The
Classroom
"I found Ivan, the student,
highly motivated, carefully
supervised, and dead serious
about aviation and his role in it.
The teachers were
professionally qualified and extremely deep in practical experience. All were skilled and
current in Aeroflot activities
they were teaching. The
classrooms -- some were poor,
some were good and some were
superior by our standards. The
Soviet Union advantage I
observed there was that

technicians were being trained
on the actual equipment they
would be working with in service. In short, 100 per cent
transfer of skills from the
classroom to the actual
Aeroflot equipment.
Performance Standards
"Young men and women all
over the Soviet Union are
waiting to sit for examinations
for Aeroflot service schools.
Take the technician school at
Krivoy Rog for example. Ivan
sits for 25 days for his examination. This is after
approval by local and Republic
Communist party leaders. He
must pass in the upper 20 per
cent to be considered and his
career area is determined
before he sits for the examination. School is six classes
per day with two hours of
supervised homework per day,
with examinations weekly,
monthly and at semester's end.
There is an annual exam also.
On the annual exam one failure
is allowed. If on the second
exam there is a failure the student is sent home. They accept
no substitute for performance.
You either perform to the standards set or you don't remain.
The Krivoy Rog School issues a
certificate of completion, not a
diploma. The diploma is later
authorized only after his performance, behavior and attitude are found to be at or
beyond the standards set. His
employer authorizes the
diploma. This kind of accountability may not be too bad an
idea in the United States -think of it, no diploma until you
can demonstrate that you have
the skills, attitude and that you
can perform at the level expected.
Attitude: Their Superiority
"I am a former coach. Any
coach will assure you that in
the long haul there is one element and one element alone
that will sustain an individual
or team -- that is a positive attitude based upon discipline. I
have stated that they are
behind and in some cases their

materials are by our measurement 15 years old. Compared to
us in some areas they are substandard. Compared to
themselves, however, their
growth and increased
sophistication has been explosive. This attitude they display is the enthusiasm and zeal
that I lived with in the United
States shortly after World War
II. It is real. There is only one
place in the United States that I
have found this same attitude
and zeal and seriousness of purpose -- in cadet and composite
squadrons of Civil Air Patrol
where the program is run by
cadets and seniors with high
demands and no substitute for
performance. You can fault
them for living in a society that
is closed, and I can assure you
that it is, and for being
inferior in some ways. The
competition is in the world
marketplace between the
United States and the Soviet
Union and those elements that
are most important for the long
haul are to be found in favor of
the Soviet Union -- not the
United States.
"Two hundred years ago,
there was a confrontation on
the green at Concord.
'Minutemen,' a term familiar
to CAP, met and defeated a
highly trained, well equipped,
sophisticated group of Britons.
The Minutemen had inferior
equipment and no formal training but their attitude was that
of a burning desire to succeed.
The British had reason to laugh
and probably did, that is until
they were beaten. If civil aviation is a competition in the
international marketplace, and
in my opinion it is, then we
could make the same fatal mistake today with relationship to
the Soviet Union that the
British made 200 years ago -that of underestimating the
competition. I pray we won't
do this. Attitudes will defeat
you more quickly than anything
else. That is Why CAP and its
positive attitude is so terribly
important to this country and
its aviation future."

PAGE SIX

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

CHANGE OF COMMAND--Col. H--arry J. flowes, second from left, outgoing commander of
the Alabama Wing,: gets kiss from his wife at recent change-of-command ceremony in Birmingham. Looking on ai'e l~rtg. Gen. Thomas C. Casaday, left, national commander, and
Col. Oscar K. Jolley, commander of the Southeast Region, both of whom are former
Alabama Wing commanders. Col. Howes, who holds an award given him at the ceremony,
was succeeded by Lt. Col. Duke C. Bradford.
_

MARCH 1977

JET RIDE--Cadet James West, named Outstanding Cadet
at the 1976 Arizona Wing Cadet Encampment, poses aboard
an Air Force F-5E at Williams AFB, Ariz., site of the eneampmeat. As part of his award, Cadet West received a ride
in a T-38 Talon jet trainer. He is a member of the Arizona
Wing's 355th Cadet Sq. 105.

CAP News
In Pictures

COLLISION BRIEFING-Air Force Capt. Jim Burich, center, flying safety officer of the
4th Tactical Fighter Wing; seymour Johnson AFB, N.C., briefed members of CAP's Goldsburo (N.C.) C0mp. Sq. recently on mid-air collision avoidance. In his talk, be emphasized
military traffic in the area. Examining chart are, from left, Capt. Gary Horenkamp, 2nd Lt.
John Brooks, MaJ. Rose Sweesy, and SM Frank Bowling, all members of the squadron.
i~*=. .~,,, ~, ,~ .,..., ~ ~ ,~,~ ~

....

PAUSE oN-~-uR~-MemI~rs of ~p~Iveda Comp,Flt, 81, California Wing, pause for a
p .hetograph_while on tour recently of the 84,000-ton aircraft carrier, USS Constellation. at
!Su Diego. Twenty-six members o] the CAP unit spent a day touring the huge ship. They are
Ituding beside the elevator which is used to lift airplanes from the hanger deck to the flight

deck.

L I B R A RY B O O K - - C u r t i s M o o r e , l e f t , l i b r a r y d i r e c t o r,
looks over a copy of "Hero Next Door" with Capt. James
Dial, deputy commander for cadets of the Lebanon VFW
Comp. Sq. 307 (Pennsylvania Wing). The book was among
CAP literature presented to the Lebanon Community
Library by Capt. Dial on behalf of the squadron. Similar
presentations were also made to other libraries in the area.
(Daily News Photo)

MARCH 1977

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

PAGE SEV|N

Three Lost Aircraft
Create Busy Week
TUCSON, Ariz.--In six days of
airborne check of local landing
intensive searches recently,
fields. At the same time, ground
Civil Air Patrol air and ground
teams, led by Ist Lt. Dwight
crews from the Arizona Wing
Gray, headed toward the Texas
located three "m~ssing aircraft,
Canyon area where the lowall in different parts of the state.
flying aircraft had disappeared
The wing's third find in less
into the clouds.
than a week came on Jan. 28
Deep in the canyon where Inwhen Maj. R.J. Ebaule and SM
dian Chief Cochise once built a
Paul Leonard, both of Deer
stronghold, SM Robert East
Valley Sr. Sq. 302, located a
found the wreckage of the missBeech Debonaire which had been
ing Mooney. East used a borrowmissing for a week.
edhorse to reach the crash site,
"The aircraft was found inlocated in rough terrain on a
tact, but upside down," said Lt.
6,500-foot-high ridge. There were
Col. Warren M. Dreyer, comno survivors.
mander of the Arizona Wing
On the same day, pilots from
Group III wh~) served as mission
the William Rogers St. Sq. were
coordinator. Dreyer s~aid that
assigned to search for a Cessna
the crash site was about 21 miles
421 reported lost from radar in
northwest of Prescott, the
heavy clouds on a flight from
destination of the single-engine
N o g a l e s t o Tu c s o n . L a s t
Beech.
reported position for the twinAir Force paramedics
engine aircraft was near 9,500parachuted onto the rugged site
foot-high Mount Wrightson,
atop a 4,950-foot-high ridge, and
halfway between the two cities.
reported the death of the pilot.
F i r s t L t s . R o b e r t W. a n d
Patches of snow and ice in the
Carolyn Milkey, piloting the
area had hampered CAP
squadron's Cessna 182 and
searchers all week.
fighting heavy rain and a lowerThe absence of an emergency
ing ceiling, reported a scar in the
l o c a t o r t r a n s m i t t e r ( E LT )
mountain foliage at about 9,000
signal from the crashed aircraft
feet.
had also hampered searchers.
Later that day, 2nd Lt. Robert
Arizona Wing pilots say that
C. Netherton and his observer,
when an aircraft crashes in an
SM Kenneth D. Turner, both of
inverted position--such as the
the William Rogers Sr. Sq., were
Beech--its ELT signal is tranflying Netherton's Cessna !50
smitted directly into the ground.
and searching an area near the
This is largely due to the fact
scar reported earlier on Mount
that antennas are traditionally
Wrightson.
placed atop the aircraft.
"Clouds and rain were forcing
"A solution," said Lt. Col.
us lower," said Netherton, "and,
Theodore N. McElroy, comas we turned to stay clear of the
mander of the William Rogers
weather, Turner spotted what he
Sr. Sq., "would be to require two
thought was wreckage." Several
ELT antennas, one on top and
low-altitude passes confirmed
one on the underside of the airtheir find, and the pair stayed in
craft."
the area to fix the site on radar
The missing Debonaire had
and to map roads and trails
been the object of an intensive
leading to the crash site.
six-day search that covered the
Once back in Tucson, Turner
entire northern portion of the
volunteered to help helicopter
state.
rescue teams find the crash site,
On Jan. 22, the day the search
They arrived back at the scene
began for the Beech, the Arizona
at dusk, but found no survivors.
Wing recorded two other finds in
Weather--low clouds, frequent
one busy day. At dawn, CAP perheavy rain and snow showers,
sonnel were already alerted for
and a sometimes dense fog--was
the search for a missing Mooney
a factor in all three accidents.
Mark II, overdue on a crossSubsequent CAP search miscountry flight across the
sions were also hampered by the
southern portion of Arizona. A
weather.
member of Willcox St. Sq. 401
Air and ground teams from all
had sighted what he thought to
across Arizona participated in
be the aircraft flying low, under
the three searches. According to
the heavy clouds, with its wheels
Col. Alan B. Thomas, Arizona
down.
W i n g c o m m a n d e r, C A P a i r
A CAP aircraft piloted by 1st
crews flew more than 125 hours
Lt. R.F. Hartnmn, commander
during the six-day period.
of the Benson St. Sq. 404, flew an

PASSING THE TIME--What do you do on a jet flight home from the National Drill
Competition at Maxwell AFB, Ala., when you've won second place? If you're the California
Wing team, representing the Pacific Region, you polish and shine your new trophies as
Cadets Helen Baise, left, Mark Roberts, Lisa Taylor and Glen O'Brian are doing. The team
was runner-up in the over-all competition and winner of the Panel Quiz. (Photo by Maj. B.
Storey)

St. Louis Area
Members Take
Stiff Training
ST. LOUiS--Eighteen cadets
and six senior members from
various squadrons in the St.
Louis area were the first participants in a rigorous training
program held recenUy.
Called ESTEX (Emergency
Services Training Exercise), it
emphasizes the importance of
well-trained ground teams in
search and rescue operations.
The program is the brainstorm
of Cadet Fred Deckard, a
member of the Lafayette Cadet
Sq. and one of the instructors.
ESTEX consists of several
weekend bivouacs during which
the trainees "learn by doing"
such items as map and compass
reading, rappelling, shelter
building, wilderness survival,
communications and first aid.
Teamwork is heavily stressed
throughout the entire program,
in addition to rigid safety
procedures.

Senior Members
Get Certificates
ST. LOUIS, Mo. -- At a recent
awards ceremony here, 16 Civil
Air Patrol senior members from
the St. Louis area received
Aerial Radiological Monitoring
certificates.
Each member had successfully completed an eight-hour
course conducted jointly b y
CAP's Missouri Wing and the S[.
Louis County Offices of Disaster
Planning and Operations.
The training officer from the
S t . L o u i s C o u n t y o f fi c e , T.
Beuson Morgan, officiated at the
ceremony. Three sets of aerial
radiological monitoring equipment were also presented to Lt.
Col. Joseph Septer, CAP Group
I I c o m m a n d e r, f o r u s e i n
Missouri Wing Operations.

exwessed t
balls recovered during the search, some of which
base commander.

A nniversary Dinner
Scene Of Presentation
ROANOKE, Va.--Cadet David
O. Fitts received the Gen. Carl
A. Spaatz Award here in early
December at the Virginia Wing
anniversary dinner. Making the
presentation was U.S. Navy Lt.
Cdr. Paul E. Galanti.

where he was a member of the
school's soccer and track teams.
At present, he is a sophomore
cooperative education student at
Virginia Polytechnic Institute,
majoring in mechanical
engineering.

Cadet Fitts, 19, is the son df
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Fitts of
Richmond. He was graduated
from John Marshall High School

His Civil Air Patrol activities
have included a trip to Norway
during the 1975 International Air
Cadet Exchange, serving as
cadet commander of his unit for
a year, attending the Air Force
Academy Survival Course at
Colorado Springs, serving for a
year and a half as a member of
the Virginia Wing Cadet Advisory Council, and attending the
cadet Solo Encampment at Lexington, Va. He earned his private
pilot license in September 1976.

Georgia Unit

Helps Save
Lives Of Trio
DUBLIN, Ga.--The Dublin
Comp. Sq. was credited in early
January with helping save the
lives of three men in an area
near here.
The three had entered the
woods near the Oconee River on
Friday night, Dec. 31, for the
purpose of hunting.
During the night, the
temperature dropped to 13
degrees and the men became
lost and disoriented. The river
began to rise and they were
trapped on a small island.
The Lauren County sheriff's
department and the local civil
defense unit launched a search
for them at 6 a.m. on New
Ye a r ' s D a y. C A P ' s D u b l i n
Comp. Sq. was called in at 11
a.m. to assist and put a plane
into the air by 12:05. Within 15
minutes, Capt. George Pierce
and Dan Young, the air crew,
spotted the missing men. They
directed the sheriff's department and civil defense workers
to their aid.
Eighteen CAP members
assisted in the search.

Cadet Kensok Gets
Gen. Spaatz Award
BISMARCH, N.D.--North
Dakota Gov. Arthur A. Link
presented Civil Air Patrol's Gen.
Carl A. Spaatz Award recently to
CAP Cadet Gary Kensok in a
ceremony here.
Cadet Keusok, who also won
promotion to cadet colonel in
earning the award, is cadet commander of the Fargo-Moorhead
Cadet Sq. His award was the
fourth time the Spaatz Award
has ever been presented in North
Dakota.
Col. Maurice Cook, North
Dakota Wing commander, and
Air Force Maj. Douglas
Brosveen, liaison officer in the
wing, also participated in the
ceremony.
Station KXJB-TV from Fargo,
N.C., flew to Bismark to record
the event for "Eyewitness TV
News."

IPAQI El .QI~.

MARCH 1977

IVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

,

Routine Orientation Flight
Halted For Rescue Effort
BOWIE, Md.--It was the first
clear day in a long while and
ideal for cadet orientation
flights, scheduled for all moruiug at Freeway Airport near
Bowie. Involved were cadets of
the Bowie-Beinir Comp. Sq.

Wright-Pat
Visit Rules
Outlined
WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB,
Ohio--The Great Lakes Liaison
Region office is occasionally
asked to arrange aerospace
education workshop tours and
other Civil Air Patrol visits to
this base and to the U.S. Air
Force Museum located here.
H o w e v e r, t h e Wr i g h t Patterson Base Information Office has established procedures
for arranging tours and is
organized to respond to such requests. Therefore, those interested in these tours should
contact the Base Information Office here. The office should be
contacted well in a~lvan~ to
effect proper coordination.
The initial contact letter
should include all details of the
proposed trip, including times of
aiTivai and departure, mode of
travel, number of people~
facilities to be included on the
tour, and other pertinent information as required.
Correspondence should be
addressed to:
2750 ABW/OI
Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio.
Telephone inquiries may be
made to: AC (513) 257-4317 or to
AC (513) 257-6310. Ask for Sgt.
Stresak.
Problems have also been noted
with the conduct of Civil Air
Patrol personnel visiting WrightPatterson AFB facilities. Those
planning trips should make sure
that CAP visitors are adequately
supervised. On some occasions
in the past, the CAP image has
not been helped by misconduct in
the BOQ and at other base
facilities. Senior member escorts must be dependable,
reliable and on duty throughout
the visit.

While the cadets waited, Capt.
To m J o n e s a n d L t . R o b e r t
Russey decided to go around the
pattern once again to make sure
all was normal with the
squadron's Cherokee 140 ("40
Gulf").
While turniny~back for ronwa~v
18, Capt. Y6nes-noticed a
homebuilt Mustang starting to
move down the runway for
takeoff, which would leave the
runway clear for a normal
approach and landing. Later,
w h i l e t u r n i n g o ff t h e a c t i v e
runway, Capt. Jones saw a pile
of crumpled aluminum some 50
yards from the end of the
runway,
He realized that it was the
Mustang and quickly ran "40
Gulf" off into a field and both
men sprinted for the crash,
The two occupants were alive,
but screaming to be pulled out as
the plexiglas bubble stuck and
their legs were caught up under
the panel when the seats to
which the safety belts were
fastened broke loose. In ad-.
dition, high octane gasoline was
pouring over the hot engine from
the partially inverted fuel tank

behind the engine.
Joined by Stanley
Rodenhauser, one of the airport
owners, they dragged the men
clear after breaking the bubble
away and entering from below
through the separated wing
roots. Ail three rescuers received
~6ds--~6m the jagged
plexiglas.
Meanwhile, Capt. Vera Rollo
the squadron's check pilot,
radioed the airport to call the
rescue squad. Within a few
minutes, the Maryland State
Police medivac helicopter was
on the scene to transport the two
crash victims to
the
hospital. Both _survi'ved. _
Cadets of the squadron supplied first aid to the victims
midheIped provide security over
the crash scene for the Federal
Aviation Administration.
When the first crash had been
secured, news arrived that a
Stearman biplane had crashed at
a nearby drag strip. A senior
member and two cadets sped to
the scene and provided security
there until relieved by members
of CAP's Bethesda-Chevy Chase
Cadet Sq.

Smilin' Jack's Story

Author Of Comic Strip
Vrites Story Of Life
CAP Col. Zack Mosley is a
charter member of Civil Air
Patrol who helped found the
organization. He is a veteran
pilot and flew with CAP's
Coastal Patrol during World War
II, earning for himself an Air
Medal for his civilian efforts,

to fly and only learned in order
to make his strip authentic. But
in later years, he flew hundreds
of thousands of miles in his own
airplanes and commercially as
he travelled to nearly all parts of
the world, gathering background
material for "Smilin' Jack."

He is also the author of the
world-famous cartoon strip,
"Smilin' Jack," an authentic
aviation adventure strip which
ran for 40 years. The strip, which
was retired in 1973,was beloved
by millions of aviation-minded
readers over the world.
Now Zack has told the story of
his years of flying and the
background story of "Smilin'
Jack" and how it came to be, his
adventures in aviation and in
producing the strip. He calls his
book "Brave Coward Zack."

The book is available at the
CAP Bookstore at a discount
price to members. The regular
price is $6.95 plus 50 cents
postage. The Bookstore price to
members is $5.95 and the
Bookstore will pay the postage.
This represents a saving of $1.50.
The book will be sent by U.S.
Postal Service, Fourth ClassBook Rate. If you desire quicker
delivery by United Parcel Service, enclose an additional 80
cents.
The book is published by
Valkyrie Press, Inc., 2135 First
Avenue South, St. Petersburg,
Fla. 33712.

Why does he call himself a
"brave coward?" Well, it seems
that, originally, he was afraid

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Webb Air Force Base
Hosts Texas Squadron
WEBB AFB, Tex.--Webb Air
Force Base has begun hosting
the weekly meetings of Civil Air
Patrol's Dragonfly Comp. Sq. at
Big Spring, Tex.

the first meeting included Col.
Ron R_ainey, sector commander
from Lamesa, Tex., and Col.
Jim McMichael, vice commander of CAP Group 16 from
Midland, Tex.

The first night was a special
one for the squadron since it
featured moving into a new
building and picking a new
name--the Dragonfly Comp.
Sq.--and meeting with representatives of its new sponsor, the
Air Force's 3389th Flying Trainins Sq. (FTS).

Approximately 20 persons
from Lamesa, Tex., and Col. Jim
acquainted with their adoptees.
Included were Air Force Lt. Col.
Hugh Pace, commander of the
3389th FTS, and Air Force
Lt. Col. Arthur Shumate, student
squadron commander.

The new name was selected
since it represents the attack
version of the Cessna T-37, the
aircraft which the 3389th flies.
CAP dignitaries on hand for

Commander of the CAP
squadron is Ist Lt. David Bates.
Air Force Capt. Marvin E.
James of the student squadron is
liaison officer to the CAP unit.

Virgin Islands Unit Chartered,
Commended For Civic Work
S T. C R O I X , V i r g i n
Isiands---Civil Air Patrol's St.
Croix Comp. Sq., a part of the
Puerto Rico Wing, was officially
chartered here in December.
Col. Rodolfo Criscuolo, commander of the Puerto Rico Wing,
made the official presentation of
Charter No. 52901 to SM James
D o l l o ff , c o m m a n d e r o f t h e
squadron. SM Norine Dolloff, administrative officer, assisted in

4 ) THAT WINGSPAN IS
WIDER THAN THAI'OF ONE
-[liE WO~LD~" SMALLEST
MAN-EAR,TYING
AI~.PLANES.I

ERO :ASTRO ®

Id'l ~'~J.. ~~

WELCOME TO WEBB--AIr Force Capt. Gary Barber, left,
who is a second lieutenant in Civil Air Patrol, welcomes CAP
1st Lt. Davis Bates, commander of the Dragonfly Comp. Sq.
(Texas Wing) to Webb AFB. The squadron now holds its
meetings at Webb. Capt. Barber is fixed wing safety and
transportation officer at Webb.

the ceremonies.
C l e m e n t L . S a c k e y, a d ministrative assistant to the
governor of the Virgin Islands
for St. Croix, read Gov. Melvin
H. Evans' letter of congratulations and then gave a talk
of his own, commending the
organization for the outstanding
civic work in community projects which the entire unit has
accomplished since its inception.

, " 7",SPAN oF -rile , ,it NFX-r "~
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(Conrtesy of Zack Molley and Chicago-N.Y. News Syndicate)

1
21

MINN, -

MARCH 1977

Northeast Region
Two members of the 399th Comp. Sq.
(Connecticut Wing) were honored at the
squadron's Awards Night recently. Second
Lt. Theodore B. Clark was named Outstanding Senior for 1976 and Cadet Rose-Marie
Torielli was presented the Outstanding
Cadet Trophy for 1976... The Red Service
Ribbon Silver Star Clasp was recently
awarded to Maj. Donald E. Hall of the
Cape Cod Comp. Sq. (Massachusetts
t~mg). Maj. Hall has been commander of
squadron since 1965 ....
Cadets and senior members of the Gen.
Carl A. Spaatz Sq. (Pennsylvania Wing)
participated in a two-day comping trip
recently. Cadets taking part in the bivouac
were Donald W. Grill, Handy Fox, Robert
C. Jones, Johnny Bradford, Gerald Brens i n g e r, D a v i d W, K r a n s s , R o b e r t
Reifsnyder, Randy D. Kreider, Thomas A.
Manley, Robert W. Maaley and Richard
Magners.
Cadet Brian L. Sheaffer of the Capital
City Cadet Sq. 302 (Pennsylvania Wing)
has been selected as the Central Pennsylvania Group 30 Cadet of the Year for
1976 .... Members of the Woonsocket
Comp. Sq. (Rhode Island Wing) are attending a seven-week course on first aid.
Capt. Albert Rivard, commander, along
with Cadets Vickie and Lisa Rivard, Ray
Jalette, Mike Hefferuan, Victoria Laidler
and laurie Bernard are participating in
the course.
Cadets Sharon Burr and Barbara
Gonnevile have been" reappointed to the
Cadet Advisory Council, Connecticut
Wing. They are members of the Bristol
Comp. Sq .... Plattsbargh Cadet Sq. 1,
New York Wing, celebrated its 10th anniversary recently . . .Members of the
.Adirondack Mountain Group (New York
Wing) recently attended the annual Commander's Call at Stewart AFB, N.Y. While
there, the members participated in
management and leadership training
seminars. Those attending were: Maj.
Robert Rauscbaber, Capt. Ben Hausdorf,
1st Lt. Jerry Silver, Cadet Mike lange and
Maj. Frank Stanley ....

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEwS

Southwest Region

Southeast Region
an Aerospace Education Symposium given
by personnel from the Strategic Air Command. Cadets attended a one-day session
of lectures, discussions and displays.
Those attending were: Cadets Dave Metcalf, Doug McGrath, Dave Omffins, Kathi
Leute, Linda Legg, Jamie Gordy, Jeff
Gordy, Cheryl Trapnell, Mark Buchner,
Lanny Lister, Mark Nash, Gerry Gordon,
Mark Flowers, Dave Rushing and Bob
Hampert ....

Members of the Shelby Co. Comp. Sq. 1
(Tennessee Wing) recently aided the U.S.
Navy at the Memphis Naval Air Station
Open House. Cadets worked guarding aircraft, controlling crowds, directing traffic
and passing out programs .... Cadet
Richard Jones of the Orlando Cadet Sq.
(Florida Wing) has earned his pilot wings.
Also, Cadet Steve Radloff of the same
squadron was awarded a check for his
solo ....
The Experimental Aircraft Association
held its mid-winter "Fun'n Sun Fly-ln" in
Fourteen cadet members of the
January at the Lakeland, Fla., Municipal
Missoula Comp. Sq. (Montana Wing) have
Airport. Members of Group III (Florida
completed the standard first aid and perWing) were called upon to help. Ap- sonal safety course. Included in the course
p r o x i m a t e l y 5 0 c a d e t s a n d s e n i o r s were techniques for artificial respiration,
directed car parking, communications, poison treatments, and bandages and
and night aircraft patrol. Such a good
splinting. Cadets completing the course
job was done that EAA plans to ask for
were Tom Polsin, Rose Sipes, Matthew
assistance again next year...
Martiuack, Robert Arnston, Brad Allen,
Capt. Albert Sceschaaf, director of InKen Coston, Vince Bakke, Doug Mallary,
formation for the Florida Wing has been
Mike Marquart, Vince Fender, Carol
named as the Outstanding Senior Member
Felde, laura Hay, Dave Knndson and
o f 1 9 7 6 b y S p a c e fl i g h t 6 , O r d e r o f Robert Felde.
Daedalians. Cadet Richard M. Lynch was
named as the Outstanding Cadet Member
of 1976 .... The Orange County Sheriff's
Department landed their helicopter at the
Orlando Cadet Sq.'s (Florida Wg.)
m e e t i n g r e c e n t l y. M e m b e r s o f t h e
Fourteen cadets from the St. Charles
squadron were briefed by the pilot on the Cadet Sq.(Missouri Wing) assisted
structure, equipment and mission of the
citizens of their city dig out of their worst
helicopter...
blizzard in years. The cadets went from
house to house, shovelling driveways and
sidewalks. Cadets assisting were: Robert
Surer, Janel Saner, Scott Breckearidge,
Greg Smith, Al Underdown, Jack Conley,
Mike McNutt, Greg Land, John Green,
The Utah Wing conference was recently
Tammy Sanders. Tony Pollad, Mike
held in Salt Lake City. At the banquet and
Basse, Van Basse and Jim Stoeker...
ball following the conference three awards
were received by the Ogden Senior Sq.
Ten members of the Des Moines Comp.
They were: Squadron of the Year, ComSq. (Iowa Wing) traveled by van recently
mander of the Year and Information Ofto Chicago, Ill. for a sight-seeing tour of
ficer of the Year..
the "Windy City." Part of their tour inMembers of the Mile Hi Cadet Sq.
cluded the Museum of Science and In(Colorado Wing) recently participated in
dustry..

No. Central Region

Rocky Mt. Region

Middle East Region
Cadet John Kazyak, cadet commander
of Howard Comp. Sq. (Maryland Wing)
recently completed private pilot ground
school and is well on his way towards his
private pilot license. John has recently
received a Congressional nomination to
the Air Force Academy. "None of this
would have been possible without the help
of CAP," stated John. "I'm sold on CAP
and would like to do my part to help
anyone coming in for the first time."
Sixteen members of the Easton Comp.
Sq. (Maryland Wing) recently visited the
Smithsonian Institution's National Air and
Space Museum in Washington, D.C.
Squadron members were able to view
firsthand and receive general knowledge
of all aerospace activities .... First Lt.
Ken Buseman and Cadet Michael
J MeGowan of the Morgantown Comp. Sq.
(West Virginia Wing) are maintaining a
recruiting display at the Morgantown Airport. The display consists of posters,
photos and other information and is changed once a month ..... Members of the
Carroll Camp. Sq. (Maryland Wing)
gathered recently for the squadron's Annual Awards Ceremony and Banquet.
Cadet Mark T. Murphy was named !976
Cadet of the Year and Capt. Richard Jordan was named 1976 Senior of the Year.
Three members of the Cherry Point
Comp. Sq. have attended the Ground
Rescue Instructors Course given at Andrews AFB, Washington, D.C. First Lt.
Rick Rozzell, Cadet Steve Yates and 1st
Lt. Kevin Campbell learned of new rescue
techniques and removal of injured from
vehicles and buildings ....

PAGE NINE

New Arizona Wing Cadet Advisory
Council members are Cadet Robert Scott
of Phoenix, chairman; Cadet Paul Cannon
of Tucson, vice-chairman; Cadet RoseMary Grasko of Phoenix, recorder... A
recent Arizona awards banquet honored
Lt. Col. Terri Boucher, former wing director for Cadet Programs. Col. Boucher
retired from CAP after 20 year's service..
Col. Simon Fried, USAFR, reports that
his son, now Air Force 2d Lt. Simon Fried
J r. , i s a t M a t h e r A F B u n d e r g o i n g
navigator training. It. Fried is a former
Arizona Wing cadet and senior member of
Squadron 104 in Tucson:

Pacific Region
Darlene Fletcher, a member of the
Paine Field Sq. (Washington Wing) has
recently attended the Mission Staff School
and has become qualified to fly as a mission pilot. Darlene earned her private
pilot's license in 1974 and her commercial
license in 1975... Ojai Cadet Flight 102
(California Wing) was awarded first prize
for the Color Guard in the annual Christmas Parade held in Oxnard, Calif. The
winning team was composed of Cadets
Larry Jones, Tim Metzinger, Richard
Benbrook, and Andy Kastaer...Two
members of the Merced Co. Sq. 147 received awards at a recent dinner held to
celebrate the 35th anniversary of CAP.
Those receiving awards were: Capt.
David Coleman, Grover Loening
Aerospace Award and Maj. Helen May,
Grover Loening Aerospace Award ....
R. G. Fowler Cadet Sq. 114 (California
Wing) assisted at the Officer Careers
Symposium at San Jose State University~
The cadets acted as guides, directing
visitors to the proper location and attended the symposium to learn about future
opportunities open to cadets .... Cadet
members of the Mendocino Comp. Sq. 6
(California Wing) recently travelled to
Warm Springs Valley, Nev., for a weekend
of sail planing. In addition to sail planing,
the cadets visited the University of
Nevada's planetarium to view the star
show. Those enjoying the aerospace
weekend were Cadets Diane Caldera, Jeff
a n d J e r r y Ya t e s , l a r a R a y, M a r k
Farmer, Vince Gullette, Dan Foley, Todd
Netherton, Mark Van Wyhe, John
Thomason and Ron Heald .....
Green River Comp. Sq. (Washington
Wing) recently received Lt. Col. Floyd
MacSpaddea as squadron commander and
Cadet Kasmir Zaratkiewicz as cadet commander ....Cadet Bill Campbell, has been
selected as cadet commander of the Paine
Field Sq. (Washington Wing). Bill has
been a member of CAP for four and a half
years and was selected as outstanding
male cadet of the squadron in 1974..

EMERGENCY TRAINING--Utah Wing cadets on a recent tour of Mather
AFB,Calif., learn how to make an emergency exit from a jet trainer. Some 45
cadets sad eight seniors made the trip to visit the base. In the photo, from
left, are: Cadet Robert Heaaeman, Air Force Maj. Jerry Eisinger (in
backgroumi), Utah Wing LO, Cadets Steve Smith, Richard Barmes and Mike
Lowe (seated in trniler). Stamflng by at right to offer assistance is Cadet

Caro~ sk.~.

Cadet Gary Lorimm'e of the Albany
Comp. Sq. (Washington Wing) was awarded the Cadet of the Year Award here
recently. Lorimore has been involved in
the cadet program since 1970...Bradley L.
Johnson, a former cadet commander of
the Northshore Comp. Sq. (Washington
Wing) was named Cadet Commander of
the 905th ROTC Detachment at
Washington State University. Cadet Johnson also is one of eight Washington State
University ROTC cadets selected for Air
Force pilot training after graduation .....
Bill Duft, a local general contractor and
father of Cadet Scott M. Daft, of the
Ashland Comp. Sq. (Washington Wing)
recently donated time and materials
toward the completion of the Ashland Sq:
hangar ....

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

PAGE TEN

MARCH 1977

All-Out Effort Pays
In Searc.h For Boy
FAYETTE, Ala.--An all-out
effort by members of the local
Civil Air Patrol unit and other
volunteers paid off in early
January when a 15-year-old boy
was rescued after being lost
overnight in a swamp.
The lifesaving search became
necessary when young Rusty
Barnes failed to return home

from a hunting trip. After
spending most of the night
searching himself, the lost boy's
father asked for help early the
next morning.
The Fayette Civil Air Patrol
launched four planes to search
for the boy and was joined by
members of the police and

Big Array Of Visitors
To A ttend '77 Meeting
N A S H V I L L E , Te n n . - - T h e
National Congress on Aerospace
Education for 1977, sponsored in
part by Civil Air Patrol, will convine here March 31 through April
2 at the Hyatt Regency Hotel.
An array of international and
nationally prominent visitors
will be present. Representatives
from the aerospace industry of
the Soviet Union, Britain and
France will make presentations.
Included will be representatives
from the U.S. government, in addition to local and statewide
leaders in aerospace education.
Gen.. Leigh Wade, the only
remaimng pilot of Americans
1924 'round-the-world flight, will
join Kamal Naguib, honorary
president of the International
Aerospace Education Committee, Dr. Jack Eggspuehier of
Ohio State University, and World
War H flying ace Gregory "Pappy" Boyington in reliving part of
the history of the development of
aviation.
The current NBC television
show, "Baa Baa Black Sheep,"

Squadron 105
Wins Arizona
Wi n g H o n o r
TUCSON, Ariz. -- The Arizona
Wing'# 355th Cadet Sq. 105 was
selected here in January as
Cadet Squadron of the Year for
1976 in Arizona.
"Among the criteria used in
selecting the outstanding unit,"
said Capt. Ralph Charlip, wing
director of Cadet Programs,
"were unit growth, the number
of individual achievements and
orientation flights, encampment
attendance, and total participation in CAP activities."
Squadron 105 is sponsored by
the Air Force's 355th Tactical
Fighter Wing at Davis-Monthan
AFB and is one of three CAP
cadet squadrons in the state
sponsored by Air Force units.
F i r s t L t . D o n a l d W y m e r,
Squadron 105 commander, and
Cadet Eric Vogt, cadet commander, accepted the trophy at
the annual Arizona Wing Cadet
Conference.
More than 120 cadets and
senior members attended the
weekend meeting. During the
conference, cadets attended a
Search and Rescue Clinic,
received moral leadership
training, and flew FA Phantom
flight simulators during a tour of
the base.

s h e r i ff ' s d e p a r t m e n t s , t h e
Fayette Rescue Squad and
friends and neighbors.
CAP Senior Member Dan
Smith, flying his own aircraft,
spotted Rusty waving his arms
from a log in a beaver pond. The
plane returned to the local airport and acquired radio equipment on the same frequency as
that of the sheriff's department.

Returning to the area, the CAP
pilot spotted the lost boy, but
this time there was no
movement. Directions were iramediately radioed to rescue
workers who reached the area in
a short time and pulled the boy
is based on the exploits of "Papfrom the icy water.
py" Boyington and his World
Rusty was carried out of the
War II Black Sheep Squadron
swamp and the first few minutes
which operated in the Pacific
in the hospital emergency room
T h e a t e r. B o y i n g t o n i s a
seemed to confirm the worst;
Congressional Medal of Honor
there was no pulse. The boy was
winner.
wrapped in warm towels and
The National Congress on
after a few minutes he went into
Aerospace Education is an anconvulsions. A few hours later,
nual meeting involving all
he was able to tell what
aviation-oriented educational
happened.
organizations. In addition to the
He bad become lost in the
discussion of aviation in the
swamp and had decided to pull
United States and other
up a log and to wait and hope for
countries, individual seminars
help to arrive.
plus discussion and audio visual
The CAP plane circling
group meetings will be held.
overhead told Rusty that help
The program is to begin at 8
was on the way, but he lost cona.m. each day. Approximately
sciousness before rescue
700 persons are expected from
workers on the ground could
around the nation and several
foreign countries for the three- ~ r~each him~ ~a~lhefell into the icy
water.
day meet.
In his first moments of conThe registration fee was $35 if
sciousness in his hospital room,
mailed prior to March 1, 1977, or
he was able to describe in detail
$ 4 0 t h e r e a f t e r. A d v a n c e
how the CAP plane looked as it
registrations may be mailed to
circled above.
National Headquarters, Civil Air
Patrol, attention of ED, Maxwell AFB, Ala. 36112.
In addition to Civil Air Patrol,
the congress is sponsored by the
Federal Aviation Administration, the National
Aeronautics and Space AdROCHESTER, N.H.--Civil Air
ministration, and the National
Patrol's Highlander's Comp. Sq.
Aerospace
Education
was commended here recently
Association.
by a pilot who credited the

INSTRUCTIONAL PROPS--Capt. Rainville uses simulated
aviation equipment in teaching aerospace subjects.

Firm Donates Money
For Instructional Aids
WA P P I N G E R S FA L L S ,
N.Y.--CAP Capt. Robert A.
Rainville, a member of the
H u d s o n Va l l e y G p . a n d a n
employee of International
Business Machines Corp. (IBM),
has received a $900 grant from
the firm for use by Civil Air
Patrol.
Capt. Rainville, inspector for
the Hudson Valley Gp. who also
serves as an instructor, convinced IBM of the need. The money
was used to purchase audiovisual equipment and materials
which will be used in teaching
aviation courses to cadets and
senior members.
"The money given to CAP by

IBM will allow me to purchase
the instruction equipment so
badly needed to enhance our
ground school program," Capt.
Rainville said at hearing the
news of the donation. "It should
improve considerably the
classroom-learning process by
increasing subject retention and
student participation. In addition, although my time is
strictly voluntary, I foresee an
enhancement of my capabilities
as an instructor, while at the
same time, I satisfy one of the
prime missions of CAP."
Aerospace education is the
field which he has been most interested in during the last two
years.

Speaker at Celebration

Pilot Thanks Squadron For Help
squadron and CAP with being instrumental in saving his life
after he crashed last August in a
heavily wooded area in Evans

CHECKING UP--Cadet Roger J. Hartman of the Greenville (S.C.) Comp. Sq. checks out
engine on small plane prior to takeoff during South Carolina Solo Encampment. Cadet
Hartman was one of eight cadets who attended the seven-day encampment. All seven soloed
despite rata part of the time and heavier than usual traffic during the week.

Notch, Gilead, Maine.
The pilot, Aleck Anderson, 60,
of Goffstown, N.H., was keynote
speaker for the 35th anniversary
celebration for the local CAP
squadron. The squadron assisted
with the search for Anderson at
Skybaven Airport, the base of
activities. Evans Notch is some
100 miles from Rochester.
Anderson bad gone into a controlled crash when he became
lost due to lack of visibility on his
return home from a visit with a
relative in Caribou, Maine. He
was unhurt in the crash which
demolished his 1958 Tri-Pacer.
Found after three days in the
woods, Anderson, and his wife
also, gave testimony to the outstanding efforts of the New
Hampshire and Maine Wings of
Civil Air Patrol. They credited
God, the Bible and the prayers of
many with saving the pilot's life.
He had high praise for the survival training and the search and
rescue training given to all pilots
and the cadets in the CAP
program.
U.S. Coast Guard Lt. Cdr.
Robert Scobie of the Coast
Guard Cutter "Active," and Air
National Guard Capt. John
Watson of Pease AFB, N.H.,
also spoke during the open house
celebration, citing their involvement with Civil Air Patrol.
--From Foster's Daily
Democrat, Dover, N.iI.

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

..~_A.RCH 1977

Cadet Awards For Two Months
Mitchell A wards--December 1976
Robert V. Johnson ......... 01041
Karmin K. Tanner ......... 01065
Carla M. George ............ 01075
Wanita J. Sommers ........01075
Hobson L. Jones ............ 01075
Sandee A. Thurmnn ........01~0
David R. Mitchell .......... 01093
Gene A. Snlith ............... 01093
John L. Kallerson .......... 01094
Michael D. Lawrence ..... 01006
Phillip D. Norris ........... 1006
0
Russell S. Doty ............. 00045
Brian K. Daly ............... C~0G0
William K. Sorrell. Jr ..... 00009
William A. Kay ............. 0009
0
Patrick J. McGili .......... 0009
0
David Horulk ................ 02071
David A. Carroll ............ 02094
Glenn S. Beer ............... 03034
David E. Reese. ............ 04007
Lee M. Rump .'. ............. 04042
David L. Smith .............. 04151
Darren A. Waters .......... 04151
William E. Crenan ......... 04210
Mark A. Kopluski .......... 04510
Patrick L. McHargue ..... 04820
James F. Ster. nI .......... 04220
Lawrence D. Toigo ........ 042~
Kalph E. Cobb ............... 048~
Stevan C. Stnntan ...........043~
William J. Norton .......... 04348
John B. Norton. Jr ......... 04346
Giua M. Duran .............. 04375
Kenneth R. Beko. n ....... 04M4
Jimmy R, Steinnmtz ...... 04~4
Mark R. Speckman ........ 06070
Julia A. Kleewcin .......... 06070
Paul S. Land ................. 00158
David L. Chaffins .........00148
Douglas H. McGrath ...... 00148
Richard P. Homer ....... 06004
Keith R. Barrett ............ 08022
Renald J. Percival ......... 0 ~
David R. Petig ..............
Rose M. Torielli ............ 00948
Margo J. Martin ............ 0 ~
Mary R. Swan ............... 00009
Francis E. Swan ............
Carl W. Donnvan ........... 07015
Daniel G. Lehman .........
Charles D. Bacak ........... 08116
Michael J. West ............ 08110
Douglas A. Moyec ..........00117
Mary J. shnnahan .......... 08159
Susan E Caaley ............ 08159
Pamela J. Wilbec .......... 08108

NancyA L~ ................ 08159
Evelyn M. Healey .......... 08159
D,vial K. Milnnr ............
06425
- --Brlan-l~. Berr~.=..~ ,.. ~, = ~0o46
Alnn B. Berry ............... 00043
Llaa A. Johason ............. m04S
Cynthia E. Yarhrongh .,.. ~I
Robert C. Miller ............ ~ I
James A. Pitzec ............ 0~37
Scott L. Smith ............... 10~7
Cynthia S. Coward ......... 10097
Knyla A. Powers ........... 10100
Douglas D. High ............ 10100
Laurie L Hanson .........11041
Kelth L. I~ ........... lllm
Mark G. Daly ................ l l l m
Eric I~U~.~........ ~.....T. ~..~lXfll
- Jmmu A. JmlmvMty ........ 111gl
OrviBe $. Lestlr ........... =11296
Patrtcia E. Delanny ..f....'I1200
Clark L. Wlls ................
11205
Charles T. Swafford ....... I12~
Michael T. Patten .......... 11254
Nancy L. Kobel ............. 11255
Doris A. Jnnrgen ........... l l X l
Susan L. RaHerty .......... I12~
Christopher J. Spear ...... 120~
Thomas E. May ............. 12100
Bruce E. Viers .............. 14~9
Joe T. Hardesty ............. 10909
Larry G. Ritehey .......... ~
1
Albert C. Reus Jr ........... 15)14
Eric P. Falconer ........... 17066
James F. Sinclair .......... 170~
David J. Wyndimm .........170a
Dennis E. Rale .............. 10013
Gary S. Swigert ............. 10013
Rorlan W. Friedman ...... 18071
James P. Taylor ............ 18071
Corinne A. Kokosz#,a ......10971
Jo~ph C. Tenny ............ 20~0
Marie L. Knott ........... 20G~0
Niua L. Trump .............. 20107
Dean N. Jones ............... 20117
Brian D. Chupallo .......... 20117
-Timothy D.Roberts ........ 20145
William L. Simpson ........ 20176
William N, Edgar .......... 20240
Dean P. McCannnli ........ 20243
20253
Jeff L. Daek .................
Marty E. Kolka ............. 0261
2
Julie K. Senrles ............. 21006
Patricia A. Schnnuner.... 21017
John H. Ftanels Jr ......... 21042
Mark D. Palmer ......... 21080
Femand M. Espinn ........ 21080
Pat A. Hahnrman .......... 21113
F~'ed L. Wond ............... 12051
Jolm M. Hardin ............. 23003
Wayne A,Politte ............
Mark W. Julian .............
Terronce P. Mccann ...... 25054
David A. Pohly .............. 25~4
John T. Chenny .............
Tony L. Uttecht .............
Harold R. Klein .............
Matthew J. Taylor ......... 2'/062
2"/062
Rofanl A. Lcel ..............
Hans F. Maryak ............ ~010
Scott C. Dcedy .............. ~010
Everett F. Avery. Jr ...... 580~/
George M. Buzzell .........
Mildred Clmst~t ...........
Thomas M. Wells ........... ~0~
J e ff r e y D . ~ r . . . . . . . . .
Arthur G. Gok~ ........

Walter R. Parry ............ 58007
Michael G. Hciser .......... 29007
Kurt Scbee ................... 29084
Kenneth P. Bednarcik .... 29089
Robert J. Chastanet .......2~00
Margaret A. O'Hare ....... 29092
Chris D. Thomaen .......... 29092
Gerald P. Daugherty ...... 31022
Daniel M Cart ............... 1022
3
Earl Hedge .................. 3 1 ~
Warren V. Lay, HI ......... 31092
Stephen J. Rusin ............31130
Kenneth F. Viscesi ......... 51158
Cathi A. Mooney ............ 31167
Daniel G. Peters ........... 31173
Bruce K. Lindder ........... 31238
Louis R. Casal .............. 31288
Tr o y L . ~ n . . . . . . . . . . . 31294
Jonathan C. Hughes .......31333
Edward M. Cruz ............ 31339
James D. Barnes ........... 32019
Paul D. shankland ......... 32029
Charles S. Williams ........32111
Donald H. Guyton .......... 34070
Richard A. Bitt ............. 34153
William H. Wortmnn ...... 34167
Kent L. Taylor .............. 34184
David L. Boulton ........... 34219
Nathan J. Fair .............. 35078
John M. Frost ............... ~#078
Mark A. Evins ..............
Anthony R. Gihnore ....... 36019
Anthony M. Krueger .......~008
Wayne R. Stevenson .......
36042
David T. Lang ............... M0$0
Mark J. Abbott .............. 36055
Casoy M. Mathewsen ...... 58o7s
Terry L. Campbell ......... 37011
George T. Imhargta ....... 370~/
Bruce P. Slifer .............. 37133
Jeffrey A.Fennnll .......... 37145
Terry L. Warner ............ 37109
James D. Betlyon .......... 37109
Donald W. Shinskie ........37191
Albert C. Ehrmann ........ 37214
D. A. Pritchard. Jr .........
Robert J. Wilhelm ......... 37265
William F. Kelley .......... 38016
Bryan W. Cooper ........... 38015
Steven P. DeSalvo ......... 58025
David B. Harvey ...........
Michael J. shedgraes ..... 38025
Mary J. Hisey ............... 580~5
Kevin M. Andersen ........ 08025
Chris C. Costa ............... 38033
Roger G. Guillemette ..... 38035
Albert E. Miller. 111 ....... 39019
Michael W, Baugh .......... 39019
Phillip A. Chnfln ........ ~ . . . ~ Francis B. Gregory, Jr... 39064
Michael J. O'Neill ..........
Kevin M. ROup .............. 40018
Timothy P. Pittrmm ....... 40001
Tommy B. Wade ............ t l l M
Jeffrey S. D. Flaldan ...... 42076
Marsha J. Black ............ 48131
Karen S. ~gel ......... 42154
Frank M. Worteli ........... 42187
David R. Siegert ............ 482~
TedE. Kramm ............... 42330
Mike A. Sawyer .............
Christopher B. Griggs..... 48~7
Lorri A. Elkins .............. 5002
4
Pare E. Dixon ............... 450~
Mark A. Woedard .......... 450@1
Eden J. Alt ...................
George C. Ruby ............. 45117
Eric A. Boysnn .............. 48117
Joseph D. Kinnrd ........... 4,5120
Dennis R. Brooke .......... 4~02
Mel/nda R. Stratton ....... 46002
Gary M. EIlestad ........... 46004
Richard L. Davenport,,,,. 46013
Christopher D. Furman... 4~@0
Joseph F. Johnstone .......59044
4
Terry L, Perry .............. ~
Brian M Rusch ............. 40900
Ronald C. Pfeiffer, Jr ..... 48064
Richard N. Meuigoz ....... 48144
Craig A. Jordan ............. 48109
Paula A. Wonson ........... 49019
Douglas B. Smith ......;.... 50017
Dale J. Wallington ......... 50C~
Del R. Foster ................ 50023
Scott H. Pmgfll ............. 51050
Harry Huber ................. 51048
David L. Nelson ............ 51048
Slmne L. Waldeo ............51048
Carlos Acevedo ............. 52002
Juan Garcia .................
52002
W, Floranciani .............. 52002
Leonardo Pabon ............ 52002
Martha I. Justiulann ....... 52002
Juan Nunaz .................. 52002
Dennis J. Matius ........... 52002
Victor W. Wheeler .........
Frank Irizarry ..............52002
Julio F. Toro ................ 52002
Victor Garcia ............... 52002
Freddie Sanehez ............52027
Jose R. Gareia .............. 52027
Elsie Gomes ................. 52027
Carmen Sarrann ............ 52027
Hector C. Diaz .............. 52027
Pedro G. Cruz ............... 52007
Roinaldo Osori0 ............ 52~7
Rane M. Rodriguez ........52027
Tomes Fleclm ...............
Maritna Martinaz .......... 52027
52027
FausUno Mcieedez .........
Armando Figueron ........ 52027
Alberto Cnnvas .............
Annette Areizaga ........... 52035
William Areizaga ...... ,... 52085
Hermes Crespo .............
Maria V. Mareial ........... 520~
Mlgual Donceli .............. 52000
E]ha I Torres ................ 520~5
Lois A. Bravo ...............
Re~ Smnot .................. 52000
Mirtam ~ ............
Wnnda Suto ..................

PAGE ELEVEN

Unit Adds
Activities
Program

Carmen J Rodriguez ......52105
Ivette Redriguez ........... 52119
William E. Rosaly ......... 52125
Jeanette Ramos ......... 52035
Scgnndo J. Aviles .......... 52100
Francisco Ramos .......... 52125
Iraida Letriz .............. 52035
Nelson Vincenty ............ 52119
Edgar A. Salinns ........... 52035
Carlos Garallua ............. 52105
Jose A. Irizarry ............. 52119
Ray A. Santana ............. 52129
MILWAUKEE, Wisc.--The
Carlos G. Esquerdo ........52100
Anibul Lugo ................... 52119
Wilberto Colon .............. 52129
Osvaldo Florus .............. 52035
621st Wisconsin Cadet Sq. here
Alberto Colon ............... 52129
Efrain Alma .................52035
Laura Labioza .............. 52100
David Aseneio ............... 52119
Edwin R. Cortes ............ 5203~
Angel Vega .................. 52100
Herson Astacio ............. 52119
Edna Guzman ........... 52129
has discovered that the best way
Juan C. Montanes ...... 52035
Xavier Cruz .................. 52100
Katherine Corporan ....... 52129
Luis E. Perez ................ 52119
to attract and retain cadets is to
Mnyra E. Torres ........... 52100
James A. Thompson .......52129
Jose A. Lozada .............. 52035
Ivellisse Acevedo .......... 52119
have a good activities program.
Victor M. Ocasio ........... 520~5
Alberto Rios ................. 32100
Waldemar Vega ............ 53119
Darling Vallejo ............52129
Jorge L. Meaux ............. 52035
Reinedo Martinez .......... 52100
Quinones M. Lugo .......... 52129
Jose Otero ................... 52119
So the squadron officers inVictor M. Delgado ......... 52105
Pedro L. Gonzalez ......... 52129
Reynaldo Molinn ............ 52045
Nelson Asencio ............. 52119
itiated some activities and
Angeia K. Acevedo ......... 52129
Luis F. Marrero ............ 52045
Francisco Colon ............ 52100
Linda Redriguez ............ 52119
52111
F_,,duardo Segarra ........... 52129
Fundador Rodriguez ...... 52045
Luls A. Guzman ............
TorTes J. Aseneio .......... 52119
special classes that would inDonald R. Milan ............ 52116
Zoraida Vallejo ............. 52129
Miguel A. Ramos ........... 52~@
Freddie Zapata ............. 52119
terest the cadets and teach them
Silvia Ortiz ................... 52116
Alvin Guzman ............... 52129
Paul Calderon .........52009
Jorge E. Rozado ............ 52125
something at the same time.
52116 . Raul Rivera ................. 52125
Lais E. Laracuente ........ 52009
Roberto Martinnz ..........
Ada M. Esqui|in ............ 52082
Tw o o f t h e s e a r e c o m Chester J. Wojna ........... 52062
munications classes. A basic
Felix R. Sanjurjo ........... 52002
class focuses on basic operation
Awilda Montanez ........... 52082
Arlene Pares .................
of two-way radios and writing
Lee T. Wight ................. 02045
Michael A. Hamilton ...... 10952
Jose M. Felix ................ 52062
William C. Minter .......... 36034
00~0
radio messages. The advanced
Elisab~h J. Fox ............
Alan H. Johnson ............ 19012
Douglas G. Lurid ............ 36034
Farah M. Riveca .......... 52002
Blake A. Lawrence ........ 02056
Randolph D, Wildman..... 20072
Kevin D, Thompson ........36034
class trains for mission comJosephine Mates ............ 52062
Mark A. Ires ................02066
Jon G. Andre ................ 20192
Patti A. McKenver ......... 36042
Wilma Mains ................ 52002
munications and radio nets. The
Elizabeth L. Woodruff .... 02070
Dennis A. Hanson .......... 21010
Robert G, Zebrowski ......37026
Catherine Sanchez .........52062
Bruce R. Maxon ............ 02071
Collen R. Bankole .......... 21058
officers expect that all cadets
Mary E. Salvage ......... 37068
Luis A. Camaeho ........... 52062
Jeffrey S. Gaw .............. 04016
Bruce E. Bailey ............ 21044
Stanley A. Shrabet ......... 37068
Francisco Gonzalez ........52062
will eventually be experienced
Joseph E. Thomell ......... 04123
Randy F. Donahue ......... 21113
Anthony R. Doutsch .......37215
Luis Guzman ................ 52062
radio operators.
Gary E. Liswced ........... 04123
Allen G. Branch ............ 22049
Lawrence M. Tylec ........ 39019
Emesto Laseo .............. 52002
Lewis J. Mostowy. Jr ..... 06031
An emergency services class
David H. Davis ............. 22049
Stephen G. Bean ............4 1 ~
Gloria Velez ................. ~
David A. Lawson ........... 0~23
Bart C. Thicigus ............ 22057
Mciinda L. White ........... 42076
Rafael A. Diaz .............. 52~2
is taught by the squadron comDavid L. Mulligan .......... 0~$0
Thomas J. Nagorski .......24057
Clayton A. Fox .............. 42179
Maria D. Flores ............ ~
m a n d e r, 1 s t L t . Wa l t e r A .
Kevin LHenry ..............08116
William A. N. Cleary ...... 25038
John J. Siaud ................ 42195
Myriam R. Davila ......... 52064
Lisa V. Carmona ........... 08117
Frank B. Scott. Jr .......... 28010
Thompson. Its main objective is
Luls A. Camacho ........... 52064
Donald L. Anderson ....... 42279
Richard D. Howe ........... 08123
James J. Forti .............. 28010
Angel M. Gonzalez .........52004
C. R. Lauderdule. Jr .......42350
to prepare members for search
Charles D. Odell ............ 08237
Stephen A. Amitrann ...... 28044
Joseph E. Downs ...........45089
Victor Gonzalez .....: ...... 52064
and rescue problems and real
Danny B. Sullivan ..........
David J. Misisco ............ 580f~
Jonathan W. Jones .........45089
Publio Ortz .................. 52004
Stephen L. Pederscn ....... I1184
Robyn L. Davidsen .........58000
life disasters. The majority of
Iain J. Ronis ................. 45117
Richardo L. Ortiz .......... 52064
John A. Beaty ............... 11212
Bert W. Liakow ............. 29003
Wayne R. Sass .............. 45117
Mario L. Soto ................ 59004
the cadets should eventually
David M. Singleton ........ 11228
James R. Rutowski ........ 29003
Filiberto Asencio ........... 52066
Robert ~. M. Hanna ....... 48122
earn their 101 card.
Michael F. Rorlow ......... 11234
Mark R. Gates .............. 29092
Richard L. M. Hanna ......48122
Joseph Martinez ............ 52066
Randall L. Dean ............ 11254
Tom E. Nimmo ............. 20993
Richard L. Holldwny ...... 48082
Ramon Santaliz ............. 52066
The squadron has also
Lceh M. Reimer ............ 12123
Charles H. Vonthenen .....31228
Charles A. Palmer ......... 47020
Jaime Ojeda ................. 52066
purchased an old ground-school
Chris J. Hare ................ 12132
Michael J. Roth ............. 31296
Ricke Weinheimer ......... 47060
Belvet Pabon ................ 52066
Nathan A. Weinsaft ........ 14056
course and now all of the cadets
Russell P. Vaughn ......... 32111
Douglas S. Schrceder ...... 48002
Cathy Ortiz .................. 52066
Kenneth C. Builard ........ 16007
Kevin E. Parlier ............ 32134
Eric Hilerio .................. 9006
5
Kim L. Amharian .......... 50011
are able to enjoy firsthand inDarryl J. Hebert ........... 16014
James R. Murphy .......... 34015
Anthony Palermo .......... 52066
Frances A. Nelson ......... 51048
strnctions on flying. The course
James A. Houchans ........ 8052 '
1
John T. Benedict ........... 34037
William R. Bulmer ........ 51048
Jorge L. Perez .............. 52066
William L. Cooper. Jr ..... 18052
can be further enhanced by
James R. Otte ............... 34114
Benito Sada .................. 52066
Angel L. Ferrer ............. 52066
relating it to the squadron's
Alberto Cappas ............. 52066
Cessna 150.
Wilfred Perez ............... 52066
Milton L. Sada .............. 52066
Mauru I. Tom ............... 52088
Charles M. Allindar ........ 01016
L. L. DiGiantemasao ....... 20038 Nickolas Wingeren ......... 37082
Tixareliy Rodrtguez ....... 52066
20117
Thomas G. Bouidin ........ 01093
Michael S. Sadowski .......
Joseph E. Rodosky .........37146
ROUI A. Velez ................ 52066
Stuart James Vankirk..... 20117
Gerald P. Kelly ............. 37109
Kevin Keaveney ............ 00005
Maria F. Feliciann ........ 52066
Kevin M. Wine .............. 20117
Maria T. We~zy) ............ 37214
JdrgeL\ ffam~. _.~... Z. : V.. . ~-" ~ M. Dreyer .........
Luaen M. Klann ............ 20164
Randy E. Sherman ......... 04220
Keith D. Kotay .............. 37265
Melvin E. Ibanez ........... 52079
Mykolas J. Balanda ........20176
John J. Pacciorlni ..........
Rod A. Coffey ............... 38015
Rofael Vargas .............. 52079
21006
Daniel J. Martinez ......... 04294
Brian P. Bristol .............
Douglas P. Burdick ........ 58004
Jose R. Mnniz ............... 52079
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y.--Maj.
Philip R. Spioelli. Jr ....... 05041
Michael R. Moen ........... 21021
Jeffery L. Risher ........... 39064
Jalme Mnniz ................. 52079
Allan F. Pogorzelski, comBruce A. Becglny ........... 21021
Jeffrey W. Knntsen ........ 05041
Mark T. Harrington ....... 40031
Rene E. Hemnndez ........52079
21058
Peter A. Sandbem ......... 00041
Paula D. Griffin ............
Migdalia Caban ............. 52079
Kirk F. Jolts .............. 41094
mander of CAP's Westchester
Stephen A. Rogers .........00009
David N. Kaplan ............ 21048
Ana M. Feliciann ........... 52079
William M. Culdwcil ...... 48154
Group (New York Wing), recentPeppy E. Peyman .......... 22057
Mark S. Welters ............ 00145
Michael H. Ramonn ....... 42190
Lifts Acosia .................. 52079
ly became the first American to
Vincent G. Crossley ....... 23059
Robert R. Stout ............. 07011
Jeff D. Arnold ............... 45117
Jesus Hemandez ........... 52079
Audrey G. Cooper ..........08004
John L. Gruszewski ........ 23076
Pedro J. Torres ............. 52079
John A. Gilbert ............. 46028
receive the Outstanding Service
Carlos R. P. Roque ........ 08159
Robert R. Deming ......... 23588 D, ennis K. Turner ............48000
52079
Norberte E. TorTeS ........
Award of the Air Cadet League
Cheryl A. Bricker .......... 06293
Vicki S. Johnson ............ ~
Michael T. McGewan ..... 47060
Edwin Ruiz .................. 52079
Genevieve B. Kelley ....... 25013
Gregory W. Fowler ........ 08000
Buddy L. Lawlis ............ 47060
of Canada.
Miriam Molina .............. 52094
Robert T. Dearma~ ..... 05065
Susie L. Braaten ............ 25033
52~4
Mare E. Schneider ......... 48048
Janette Qulnones ...........
James P. Otte ............... 2~058
Squadron Leader (Ret.)
Albert H. Beverldge ....... 0~007
John E. Jones ............... 48064
Norberto Fred .............. 52094
Alexander J. Rivera ....... 29080
Kevin W. Greeley ........ 11109
Robert W. CowgiIL II ..... 50043
Ricerdo Hemandez ........52094
H e r b e r t B r e h n ; R C A F,
Brian K. Kowaiski ......... 11254
Susan A. Malick ............ 29096
Alejandro Cruz .............. 52094
Scott S. Black ............... 51014
presented the award during a reRalph B. Barreca ........... 29096
Walter M. O'Brien ....... 11254
Michael D. Amore ......... 51030
Rohite Pinto ................. 52094
Storey C. Sorensen .........30033
cent visit. It honored (he major's
Matthew P. Ford ........... 11262
Georgia L. Hughes ......... 51044
Wllfredo Santos ............. 52~4
James E. Nikodem ........ 31130
Maria D. A. Santos ......... 52004
Dawn P. Brown ............. 11262
Ricardo Rosario ............ 52045
work over the past 10 years in
William H. Schroder ....... 31141
Dohra E. Brown ............ 11262
Edwin Cruz .................. 2062
5
Edmando Velazquez ....... 52004
developing and coordinating the
Paul A. Scott ................ 11271
Richard E. Poliuski ....... 31173
Vilmarie Thrres ............52094
Zauia I. Tortes .............. 52066
Gary L. Wilson .............. 12126
Clifford J. Hrenyo .......... 31227
Edna Rodriguez ............ 52066
annual exchange of visits
Luis Alvarez ................. 520#4
David M. Rytell ............ 31227
Pinllip B. Tolle .............. 15008
Wilson Molina ............... 52094
Ricerdo Rarnos ............. 52094
between members of the Air
Dennis A. McKinnon ...... 17006
James F. McIntyre ........ 31296
Reynaldo Serrann .......... 52105
Guiliermo Ortiz ...........52084
Cadet League's Canadair Wing
Thomas J. Lennen ......... 31328
C. A. Schneider ............. 10903
Marlbel Rosa ................ 53100
Juan P. Ortiz ................ 52094
Ronald A. Righter .......... 10923
Tracy L. Kawasaki ........ 34210
Angel P. Simpson .......... 52116
and of the Westchester Group.
Priscilla Del Hoyo ......... 52094
Guy L. Marangeni .......... 18023
C. Lynnice Harris .......... 35008
52116
Amalla S. Marreru ......... 52094
Eladio Perez ................
Patrick M. Fitzgerald..... 18044
Christopher K. McGraw.. 36007 Neftali Camacho ........... 52119
Maj. Pogorzelski has been a
Jorge L. Nieves ............. 52094
18071
36019
Jose A. Vazqnnz ............ 52094
Teri S. Hanna ...............
Waoda J. Ruddell ..........
Awilda I. Rivera ......... 52122
member of CAP since 1959 when
Roy J. Mathieu ............. 19043
Ronald D. Flanagin ........ 36019
Carlos Montuluo .......
David Marantes ............ 52129
he joined a squadron in Yonkers
Stephen M. Saghy .......... 20038
John P. Kiska ............... 37049
Reinaldo Tortes ............ 52094
Timothy Brady ............. 20038
Charles J. Locescio ........ 37068
Frank Medina ............... 52097
as a cadet. He has served in a
Israel Colon .................. 52097
number of positions since that
Luis E. Rivera .............. 2097
5
time.
Wanda T. Melendez ........52097
Lisnndra Pedrasa .......... 52097
Barbara Apente ............ 52097
James G. Flavell ........... 01016
Mark P. Westrick .......... 20175
Christopher M. Skiba ...... 37133
Alejandro Roldan .......... 52097
Don F. Morgan .............. 04292
Jean Paprocki. Jr .......... 29080
F.S. Zahnrowski. Jr ....... 37172
Federico Aguiar ............ 52097
Stephenr J. McKinney ...... 29093
Thomas M. Kowalke ...... 04345
Michael J. Rekoske ........ 48112
52097
Garibaldi Ortiz .............
Richard M. Lynch .......... 08293
Henry J. Muller ............. 31039
Gary T. Ambarian ......... 50011
Marlen Pina ................. 52~7
John M. Finegan ............ 090~
W. Rodney Roberts. Jr.... 32019
Horace T. S. Tang ....... 51030
Nelson Millan ............... 52087
Evans C. Jacobsen .........11251
Scott R. Kirkman .......... 34027
Cintron E. R. Lopez ....... 52066
EAST
GREENWICH,
Osman O. Aloyo ............ 52097
David L. Layng ............. 11251
George B, Feeler ........... 34197
Santos Antonetti ............ 52116
Edwin Ramos ............... 520@7
R.I.--Fourteen members of the
Jeffrey C. Cohen ............ 37021
Eric D. Vanderlinden ..... 13002
Osvaldo Lopez .............. 52119
Daisy Melendez ............. 52097
Wakefield Comp. Sq. here parTina M. Villa ................ 10900
Kurt A. Wallace ............ 37061
Mary E. Preston ........... 52126
Joseph J. Thomas .......... 52097
Joseph M. Streb ............ 18085
David Kearns ................ 37133
ticipated in December in a
Daniel Hemandaz .......... 520~7
Jose A. Lugo ................. 52097
weekend Map Reading and ComOlga R. Camacho ........... 52097
pass Course. Instructor for the
Benjamin Ramos ........... 52097
course was Army Capt. Eric
Edisberto Cotto ............. 52097
Jose A. Qulnanes ........... 52097
Braman.
After staying overnight at
HOLLOMAN AFB, N.M. -Israel Miranda .............. 52097
Capt. Braman is a fulltime
Holloman, they toured the InterMembers of two New Mexico
Luis G. Nievus .............. 52097
helicopter instructor with the
Mario A. Redriguez ........ 52097
cadet units, Albuquerque Cadet national Space Hall of Fame at
Hector Soto .................. 52097
Rhode Island Army National
Sq. 1 and T-Bird Cadet Sq. IV,
Alamogordo where they saw acHector L. Luna .............. 52097
Guard and is an infantry officer.
toured facilities of the Air
tual space flight instruments and
Nancy A. Gorgalez ......... 52097
Arnaldo Rivera ............. 52097
Force's 49th Tactical Fighter
other objects pertaining to
He is a former Civil Air Patrol
Carmen M. Genzalez ...... 52097
cadet.
Wing here recently.
historic space fl!ghts.
Juan A. Cruz ................. 52097
They were shown training
Edgardo Matlas ............ 52097
One in every four school
Jesus M. Rodriguex ........52097
films of Holloman AFB and of
children has a vision probJuan A. Rivera ..............
the new F-15 Eagle, which will
Edwin Cordova ............. 52097
lem, according to The Nasoon be put into service. They
Maria Del C. Cruz .......... 52~7
tional Society for the PreJuan N. Morales ............ 52098
also toured life support facilities
vention of Blindness. Make
Lonrdes Carrasquillo ......52008
of the 49th and enjoyed training
sure your child's eyes are
Juan R. Cruz ................. 520~
Vannssa Fapendez .........52~8
"flights" in F-4 full system
ch'ecked and get necessary
Judy Y. Riveru .............. 52100
simulators.
treatment.
Paul A. Aguayo ............. 52105

Mitchell A wards--January 1977

Earhart A wards--December 1976

New Yorker Gets
Canadian Award -

Mitchell A wards-January 1977

Army Infantry Officer
Teaches CAP Course

New Mexico Units Tour Holloman

PAGE TWELVE

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEW~

MARCH 1977.

!

17 iii

By MAJ. E. L. LEWIS, CAP

virg~, Wtng

Reflect for a few moments on the last
SARCAP or REDCAP in which your
squadron participated. How well did
things go? Was it well organized? Did
everyone (or anyone) know what to do?
H o w l o n g d i d i t t a k e t o g e t a s t a ff
assigned? To set up a general briefing?
To get air crews assigned and briefed? To
get search aircraft airborne? To get the
ground teams assigned, briefed and dispatched? And how about the flow of information? The development of an intelligence picture? And? And? And?
Well, isn't that why we have SARCAPs?
Yes, but a SARCAP is a costly, timeconsuming training operation which requires a lot of preparation. Typically, (1)
the lessons are learned the hard way by
making mistakes; (2) many opportunities
to learn from experience are lost in the
complexity and rush of events; (3) most
of the participants do not get an adequate
picture of the over-all operation; (4) not
enough time is devoted to an in-depth
critique; (5) it is difficult (if not impossible) to run a practice mission which
lasts more than one or two days; (6) and
finally there is inevitably a lot of milling
around, confusion, and wasted training
time.
Try An MBX
So, what's to be done? Try an MBX (or
Mission Based Exercise)! This is a
simulated mission patterned after the Air
Force Command Post Exercise (CPX) or
"war game." The concept is quite simple
and does not suffer most of the disadvantages I just mentioned. How does it work?
Start by getting together two or three of
your squadron members with emergency
service experience and work up a
scenan . " This "is a fancy term for a "0
"

description of all the details (the who,
what, when, where and how come) of
your simulated mission. Then prepare a
list of SAR assets which may be used in
the mission.
In order to keep the exercise
manageable and enhance the training
value and enjoyment of the exercise, it is
useful to create on paper a non-existent or
"make-believe" wing which consists of
five or six squadrons and has available
eight to 10 search aircraft, a like number
of vehicles and 25 to 30 emergency
service-qualified air crew and ground
team personnel. For your notional
("make believe") SAR forces, you should
specify aircraft and vehicle capabilities,
personnel qualifications, communications
capability and outside support agencies
available. Include a "make believe"
phone list and communications plan.
Use Two Groups
To conduct your MBX, the participants
are divided into two groups-- the Mission
Staff (four to eight members) and a
Control Group (three to five members).
The-Control Group will simulate the
notional forces and the "outside world"
and should be headed by an experienced member who is well-versed in
emergency services, doctrine and
procedures.
The group may be set up on opposite
sides of a large room, or preferably in adjacent rooms connected by a simple
means of communication (such as
hattery-powered intercom, fieldphones,
etc.). Each group should have charts
covering the exercise area (sectionals
work well) with acetate or plexiglas
covering and a supply of grease pencils to
lay out and manage the problem. Add the
appropriate SAR forms, pencil and paper
and the staff is ready to plan, program,
control and documentthe mission.

Control Of Time
Aside from economy, the major advantage of a MBX is the ability to control
time: This is easily done by making a
"fake" clock for each from poster board
to keep track of "Exercise Time," which
may be conveniently advanced in halfhour increments (i.e., 0e00, 0830, 0900,
etc.). The Control Group can "slow
down" the Exercise Clock to allow more
real time for the Exercise Director (who
monitors the Mission Coordinator and
mission staff activities) to answer questions, clarify hazy procedural areas or
expand on a decision process. And, of
course, the Exercise Clock may be speeded up to prevent slack periods.

Determining Outcome
The Control Group uses some simple
m e~od_ef determining the outcome of
each effort initiated by themissiun staff.
This can be done by preparing a decision
table based on the Probability of Detection Tables in CAPM 50-15. An alternate
scheme is to use index cards with posible
outcomes which are selected at random
or in accordance with certain required
conditions. In addition, the Control Group
can introduce real and false leads through
"phone calls" from "witnesses." The
variations introduced should be consistent with the experience level of the mission staff.

The Exercise Director (like the Control
Group head) should be an experienced
qualified mission coordinator who is wellversed in doctrine and principles.

~ae MBX rrmy be ~ on a k~
basis (one or two hours a Week for several
weeks). Variations (such as conducting
actual briefings and debriefings, news interviews, interrogation) may be added as
well as adverse occurrences (bad
weather, a search vehicle or air craft acc i d e n t , p e r s o n n e l i n j u r y, e t c . ) t o
demonstrate the doctrinal way to handle
such situations.

Alert Call
START THE EXERCISE! Ring-a-ling!
A call from the "Wing Alerting Officer"
(the Control Group) directs the Mission
Coordinator to call the "Rescue
Coordination Center"to receive his
mission briefing. All communications go
to the Control Group.
The mission staff then alerts the "SAR
forces" by stimulating phone calls to the
wing. By a random process (such as tossing dice) or on a predetermined basis, the
Control Group informs the staff which of
the personnel, aircraft, vehicles, radios,
etc., will be available and when. Using
these "make-believe" assets, the mission
staff conducts the mission using the
doctrine,- procedures and principles outlined in CAPM 50-15 and related
publications ....

And It's Fun
Sound useful? It is--and FUN. One note
of caution: An MBX cannot take the place
of a SARCAP. But a balanced training
program incorporating formal classroom
emergency services training and the and
the MBX concept should provide a much
better understanding of what is going on
and enhance the value of the SARCAP
for everyone.
(If you have any comments 0~
suggestions, write to Major E.L. Lewis,
C A P, F r e d e r i c k s b u r g C o m p o s i t e
Squadron, Virginia Wing, P. O. Box 811,
Fredericksburg, Va. 22401.)

"A" "A- *
Author Leads Double Life

What lext---A n A ircraft Carrier for CAP ?

The author of the MBX article
above, CAP Maj. E.L. Lewis,
leads something of a double life.
Although he is a CAP pilot in his
spare time, and has been for
years, in his working life he is a
Naval aviator with the rank of
lieutenant commander in the
Navy.
"Cdr2' Lewis entered the U.S.
Naval Academy at Anapolis in
1958 and won a number of awards
during his four years there. He
was graduated in 1969. and commissioned as an ensign. In 1964,
he completed his Naval flight
training.
This was followed by a twoyear stint as a flight instructor.
From 1965 to 1969, he was a light
jet attack pilot, flying the A-4
Skyhawk. He made a combat
cruise to Southeast Asia in 1968
and flew 87 combat missions
over North Vietnam and Laos.
In 1969 and 1970 he again served as a flight instructor. From
1970 to 1972 he attended the
Naval Postgraduate School.
From 1973 to 1975 he was
operations officer for Attack
Squadron 113, flying the ATE
Corsair. He attended the U.S.
Marine Corps Command and
Staff College in 1975 and 1976.
Since that time he has been chief
of Naval Material's Combat
Systems Advisory Group.
He has been selected for
promotion to commander (equal
to lieutenant colonel in the Air
Force) in mid-1977.
"Maj." Lewis joined CAP in
1953 as a cadet in St. Peterburg,
Fla., and served as a cadet until

1958. He completed the cadet
program, earning a Certificate
of Proficiency in 1957. He was
cadet commander of the
Pinellas Cadet Sq. in 1957 and, in
1958, was appointed chairman of
the Group III Cadet Advisory
Council.
After being graduated from
the Naval Academy, he joined
CAP again in 1962 as a senior

member in Pensacola, Fla.
Since that time he has served in
a number of positions ranging
from commandant of cadets in a
local Florida sqtmdron to the
Florida Wing staff. He has served in the Florida Wing, California Wing, Mississippi Wing, and
is currently deputy commander
for seniors with the
Fredericksburg Comp. Sq. (Vir-

ginia Wing).
He is a resident of Bethesda,
Md., although affiliated with the
Virginia Wing. He is a CAP command pilot with more than 3,000
hours of flying time and is rated
as a mission coordinator.
About the MBX idea, he had
this to say:
."I just began toying with this
(the MBX idea) about six years

ago while attending the Naval
Postgraduate School in
Monterey, Calif. A bright young
C A P c a d e t o f fi c e r, n a m e d
Michael Burs, gave me some
assistance in developing a first
"cut" at the concept which we
tried with some success in
California.
"I then received orders hack
to sea duty, so the idea lay dormant till this last year. While
attending the Marine Command
and Staff College in Quantico, I
transferred
to
the
Fredericksburg Comp. Sq. in
Virginia. I suggested using the
MBX concept in lieu of a planned
SARCAP several months ago.
"Capt. Sberw(~ Smith (CAP
rank), who is an analyst at the
Navai Surface Warfare Center
at Dahlgren, Va., and Capt.
Frank Haas (CAP rank), who
works for TWA, provided invaluable assistance as we
developed a detailed package to
apply the MBX concept to CAP
needs.

OPEN HOUSE -- Cadet Jerry Kerns, standing, ~ Linda Miller, 2nd Lt. Patricia Czyzewicz,
and Cadet Darryl Sharkey tell prospective member about the CAP program during open
house staged by the Coraopolis Comp. Sq. (Pennsylvania Wing) at the Greater Pittsburgh
International Airport recently. Films of squadron activities were shown, an information
booth answered questions and distributed CAP literature and the Ranger team gave a
demonstration during the festivities.

"It has been tested through
several iterations at the local
level and at a recent Middle East
Region weeked emergency services training seminar. T~his
package has been enthusiastically endorsed by a number of experienced mission coordinators.
These field tests have provided
sufficient validation data to
'trouble-shoot' the package. It is
now being submitted via
channels for wider use."

~i ~ii ~i~i~ cAPBulletin ont d " ~ .......................
1 0 . N E W A N D R E V I S E D C A P P U B L I C AT I O N S :
a. CAPR 0-2, "Numerical Index of CAP Regulations, Manuals, Pamphlets,
and Leaflets," 2 February 1977, supersedes CAPR 0-2, 26 July 1976.

a i r t i m e . - W E N E E D Y O U R C O O P E R AT I O N
; s . Yo u w i l l b e t h e b e n e fi c i a r y.
your community will get to know you
~tters of the radio stations you are
? - U S A F / O I W, M a x w e l l A F B A L 3 6 11 2 .
nailed to you on a first-come, first9 a r l y.

b. CAPR 10-1, "Preparing and Processing Correspondence," 17 January
1977, supersedes CAPR 10-1, 21 October 1970.
c. CAPR 10--2, "File Maintenance and Record Disposition," 1 February
1977, supersedes CAPR 10-2, 23 September 1970.

~S. In the past two or three years,
t-her staff agencies at National Headsomething like the following to
Rtrol flies in aerial search and
i flies 80 percent of all hours experations in the United States" or
y 80 percent of all flying hours exdirected by the Air Force Rescue and
pplied by the operations section here
at neither of these statements is prehours CAP flies varies from year to
ges out, over a period of years, to
refore, in order that all CAP members
units speak with one voice, each of
wing statement in this connection:
ours flown on search and rescue misue and Coordination Center." -This
g "three-fourths" or "more than 75
ew statement will impress the audience
s contributions in the field of aerial

d. Change 2, CAPR 77-1, "Civil Air Patrol Vehicles," 7 February 1977,
has been published.
e. CAPR 900-2, "Use of Civil Air Patrol Seal and Emblem; Use and
Display of the United States Flag and Civil Air Patrol Flags," 14 January
1 9 7 7 , s u p e r s e d e s C A P R 11 - 1 , 2 0 A p r i l 1 9 6 8 , a n d C A P R 9 0 0 - 2 , 2 0 A u g u s t 1 9 6 8 .
f. CAPF 57, "Files Maintenance and Disposition Plan," February 1977,
has been published (not distributed below region).
DAP
11 . R E S C I N D E D C A P P U B L I C AT I O N : C A P P 1 5 0 - 3 , " C A P - - A n A v i a t i o n O r g a n i z a t i o n Level I Study Guide," July 1972, has been rescinded.
DAP

:i

JOIN THE U. S. AIR FORCE -- THE AEROSPACE TEAM

oi ii

!i!!:i:i:i:i i i i i!! !~i~ i!!iiiiiii!ii:i:i:!:i:!:i:i:i:i:i:i:i:{:i:!:i:i:i:i:~::::::::::: :::::::::::::::::::::::::: .::: ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: ....:.:-:.:.:-:-:.:.:.:.:~ :. ::::::::::::::::::::::: ::::::::::::::::::: ::::: i:i: i:i:i ::::::::::::::::::::::: i:~:i:i:i:i:i:i:"." :i:!:i:i:i:i: i i~!!!
RE.
Changes to CAP dues--at all
ar in conjunction with the new fiscal
notices are dispatched by National
first notices to July renewals will
, any dues changes des£red for fiscal-a1 Headquarters (DPH) no later than
need for a change in membership dues
t should be forwarded immediately to
Approved changes should then be formander to arrive no later than 15
DPH
several recent instances where families
tional Headquarters of the member's
, in response to renewal reminders,
re the responsibility of each unit comnecessarily reminding the bereaved
o send the newspaper, mail, etc., beT has not been deleted from National's
follow the instructions in CAPR 35-2
ship listing. In those cases where a
d, a duplicate death notification
original notice was misrouted or lost
tion, CAPR 35-2 is being revised with
ers should watch for this publication.
DPH

PEOPLE DO READ THE"'SAFETY CORNER"
~
"
:"iiiiiiiiiii!~iiiii
T
ii!!~ii{ii!i{ii!!i!~i
i i i ~ i i i i i i i i i i i ~ h e J a n u a r y 1 97 7 " S a f e t y C o r n e r , , c o n t a i n e d a c o n d e n s e d v e r~s i 'o n
{iii!i!iiii!ii!ii!ii
of a recent twin-engine aircraft accident during IFR conditions. The
opinion of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) was iniii::iiiiiiiii~iiii!
::iiiiiiiiii~iiiiiiil
c l u d e d , f o l l o w e d b y a d d e d e m p h a s i s o f a n o t h e r a g e n c y. T h e p r o b l e m
of condensing a voluminous accident report into a short article leads
:iii!~iiiiiii~iiii
to omission of some of the circumstances surrounding the accident.
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii::i
u n z o r ~ u n a t e l y , t h i s m e a n s s o m e o f t h e f a c t s a r e n ' t f u l l y L -r e s e n t e d
n
iiiii!iii!i!iiii-~i!
~
':::::::::::::::::::
" "'""°""
a nd an observant reader can take issue with the article.
On the other hand, it may be fortunate that parts of the article
were open to discussion because we now know that people do read
t h e S a f e t y C o r n e r. W e r e c e i v e d a l e t t e r f r o m a N e w Yo r k m e m b e r
w h o d i s a g r e e d w i t h s o m e o f w h a t w a s s a i d i n t h e a r t i c l e . To S t e v e thanks for keeping us on our toes.
Back to the intended message of the article which was: don't
hesitate to declare an emergency when a problem becomes serious.
Regardless of facts and opinion, points to be considered in that accident and others is whether a "standard" or "normal" emergency
existed, and when and by whom was it determined?

R S A N D N AT I O N A L AWA R D S . R e q u e s t s f o r
uld be forwarded to National Headach scheduled meeting of the NEC in
ve screening prior to consideration
DPH

onal Headquarters receives an average
erly addressed by office symbol (current
ditiously processed to the person you
office symbol or one we do not underthose properly addressed are processed.
ing each letter to de~ermine the ad~ii{iii
rs from both units and individuals
C P N , C P N I , C P P, E d u c a t i o n a l M a t e r i a l s
DPY are now obsolete symbols? Please
o CAPE 10-1, dated 17 January 1977, and
DAA

:E -- THE AEROSPACE TEAM

Environmental conditions, aircraft and equipment characteristics,
traffic densities, proficiency levels, and physical/psychological conditon of aircrew members, controllers, mechanics, and meteorologists, etc., combine to produce situations which are often interpreted
differently before, during, and after the incident. In short, what is
considered as emergency to one individual may not be perceived by
o t h e r s a s a n e m e r g e n c y.
\ Anyone--pilot, controller, or other--can declare an emergency.
It may sound melodramatic and possibly be too late for assistance,
but at least the message will be clear.
All safety officers are encouraged to discuss what constitutes an
"emergency" during the monthly safety briefings; it should be interesting to note how opinions vary And REMEMBER, emergencies occur

~!i!!iiiiiii on the ground also! No procedure provides a perfect panacea!

':':':':':

..
iill

i~il

i

....~iF!;ii~!i!;i;i~i~!~;;~!!!~i!!i!i!!!!i;ii;ii;iiii~ii;~i~i~ii~ii~i~!~!~i;!~!;i~!~!~!~i~;~i~i~i~;ii~i~i~i~!~!~!~!~;~!~!~i~i~!~i~!~i~i~i~!~;~;;;~;~i~i;i~!~i~i~i~i~i~ ~:~: ~.~;~i~?~i~!~i~!~i~;~:~!~i~i~i~i~

1976 Wing Effectiven:
300

700

2
9

12

13

14

CONNECTICUT
MAINE

I

NEW JERSEY
NEW YORK

VERMONT

TOTAL
MIDDLE EAST

TOTAL

.

.

.

TOTAL
.

.

.

.

i

= 2 4 5 . 6 5 ; 4 6 4 . 5 I. _ 8 2 7 . 8 : 5 0 0
360
0. 373.7. 538.1 =500
=~00
256.0
344.7_ 568.8 =500
300
326.3
~712.57
129.8
244.19 300
1366.70
422.4
596.9
0
~00
2159.49
635.5
681.7
500
270
.
427.9
557.2
3 7 4 . 0 3 355
. 9 5 6. 7 4

KENTUCKY
M~CHIGAN
OHIO
WISCONSIN
.

1907 :i000
1876
971
'
1545
= 948
1850
998
1760
984
1825
968
,2065
, 996
1 8 3 2 . 6 , 980.7

"-300
300
~,00
:1095.50 535.9 652.4 500
6 8 9 . 0 0 , 5 2 8 . 9 5 4 4 . 8 , 2 2 2 . 2 2 ,300
878.0
5 3 2 . 2 5 7 2 . 3 4 4 5 . 0 1 328.57
I
m

G R E AT L A K E S

.

928
,2000 1200.0 ~1500.0,1200.0 ~200
0
,
0
965
1975
800.87 854 1 718.0 1200
500
,1500
968
1793
. i 1 9 7 . 8 3 , 11 3 4 . 2 3 9 6 . 6 ,
0
~
0
,
0
i
,1530
1700,0 1500.0.1200,0 . 0
. 982
0
0
956
,1490
1000
.l~0O
= 1 4 0 7 . 0 9 1 6 9 6 . 6 : 6 2 2 . 6 1200
,1428
. i 1 5 3 . 8 5 , 1 0 0 4 . 6 . 4 0 2 . 4 1200
:i000
1500
. 996
998
,2000
1 1 3 6 . 3 6 , 1 5 0 0 . 0 _ 5 4 1 . 7 1200
i 500
1500
808
i051
. 6 4 0 . 0 , 1 5 0 0 . 0 . 1 2 0 0 . 0 1200
500
1500
9 4 6 . 4 4 1 6 0 1 . 9 . 111 6 . 9 6 i 1 7 1 . 3 L 7 5 5 . 7 8 . 9 3 3 . 3 3 . 4 4 4 . 4 4 1 0 0 0

i

~3386.72 ' 551.3 = 720.1:500
0 357.9 251.1 500

WEST VIRGINIA

.

,1363
2145
1890
2015

0 : 5 3 9 . = 511 6 0 . 0 3 9 2 . 8 6 : 2 4 0
5
1_
223.35 522.4
768.5
500
~,00
751.28 689.5
509.0
500
360

l

VIRGINIA

INDIANA

i00
300
20
300

1

DELAWARE
MARYLAND
NATIONAL CAPITAL
NORTH CAROLINA
SOUTH CAROLINA

~LLINOIS

,500
500
500
0

1500
=500
:1961
2020
2 5 2 . 6 3 470
725.65
0
500
.375
1982
500
300
2024
3781.22
]1586.35 499.3= 528.0:361.4 .307.22 1940.6.

=
=

RHODE ISLAND

.

591.3
670.8
596.8
609.7
6 1 1 . 8 871.3
536.8= 860.1
700.0
0
569.7
0

! 32.29

P E N N S Y LVA N I A

!.

4380.85, 417.1.
2822.52
588.2
0
288.2
1643.33
263.2

i

MASSACHUSETTS
NEW HAMPSHIRE

.

1705
:1730 :1855 i
1823
1865
1680
1776.3,
:

1210 :1200.0 1310.1. 64/.5 1200
0 [1500
,1500
.500
' 1255
1228-05,1426,81 709.9 ~200
RS00
:1250
.ii19.23 1500.0~ 791.6 1200
LI000
1878
"i000
:1700.0 : 1500.0:1200.0 1200
~500
i000
. 976.5 ii00.0 1500.0~ 632.3 1200
1500
1000
_I 500
1642 :1680.561 1500.0!1200.0 1200
;i000
1500
, 800 ,1700.0 , i085,1:880,7 , 300
1 2 8 7 . 4 1 3 8 9 . 6 9 , 1 4 0 3 I Z ~ 8 6 5 . 1 4 ~ 0 7 1 . 4 3 , 7 8 5 . 7 11 5 0 0

'

'

!

145]
_1 7 0 0 . 0 ~9 2 0 . 6 . 7 5 5 . 6. J P n n
.
.
:1401
= 850.0 ~1273.7. 572.4 120(I
749
.1033_33 1014.8 872.8 1200
.1351
.1200.0 1486.8i 766.4 L200
1483.5.1354.17:461.0 518.4 .L200
111 6 1 4 1 3 . 3 3 1 4 0 6 . 3 1 3 4 8 . 0 L 2 0 0
, 878
903.67,1258.6 ,1258.47 i095.3] 638.93,1200
! 954
934
R53
. 950
853

:

.

'
'
LlO0('l .1~1313
.

.

.1000,
L 500
L1000
0
[I000
r~ 750

SOUTHEAST

ALABAMA
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
M,SSISS,PP
,
PUERTOR,CO
TENNESSEE
NORTH CENTRAL
IOWA

M I N N E S O TA
MISSOURI
NEBRASKA
N O RT H D A K O TA
S O U T H D A K O TA
,

l

578,9
355.3
596.1
385.5
369.7
484.2

i

637.8
521.6
237.9
627.4
555.7
615.8

0
0
500
456.52
500
500

1500
1500

I 000
1 5 3 3 1 6 5 3 1 3 1 . 5 ! 11 2 . 8 L 2 0
2190 i942 ''1502'"1580:0'4798.8,8798.50'L200I1000 1500
,2120 1992 2000 :1481,25',1500,0!1200.0 ' 200 1500
!1000

i

i

5356.68
0
3776.08
3700.0
6685.54
0

KANSAS

T O TA L

'f[20 ! 894

.500
.300
_340
.~00

,

~500
"1

~00
~,00

.5491.0 , 523.,7 . 6,87.1 , 500
823.53 , 389.5 = 592.8 = 500
~3600.0 3,2,1.1. 575.4 ,500
.3179.56 , 509.2 . 609.8 , 500
:292.5,6 , 430,7 i ii6]itIL 8 , 500

T O TA L

i,
i

2650.53 443.4 348.0 500
1808.96 397.4 857.8 500

.

1500
1500
~500
,1500

,2180
,2165
,2185
,2~60

I ~ 0

3 i

2000
; 998
. i 0 1 5 . 7 9 , 1 5 0 0 . 0 11 2 0 0 . 0 . L 2 0 0
_1090.22 1389.5_ 440.4 . 0
~ 890
!1810
~I000
1710
. 996.77.1041.0.1200.0 1200
'~ ~),,,5~:,,~ 1759.2_1302.89 1257.3_ 994..621000

:18 , 19 0 :,093. :14194

6 0
.200
~80
,L60
400

,1768
2030
11980
2160
,2137

~80

i

i 779
. 936
, 535
, 921
. 990

:0

i 7 6 6 . 0 . 1 2 0 0 . 0 111 9 3 4 6 8 . 7 0
, 11 2 4 , . 9 3 7 . 5 , 1 5 0 0 . 0 : 9 7 3 . 1 7 0 0
,135--8_5.1413.64, 885.6. 324.6 300
1514.5.1636.36,1414.4. 962.3 ~1200
.1271.5. 925.0 548.9_ 770.6 . 0

Ii000
LI000
Llooo
[1000

1500
1500
1500
1=;013

1000 ; 00
500
_ 500
.i000
.I000
.i000

1500
1500
~500
~500
1500

12531.23 490.8 630.1 500 ~80 ,1950 , 976 ,1975 0,1700.0 , 888.9. 821.0 $200 .i000 1500
~ 1 4 % ~ 9 3 , 4 6 > . 8 _ 5 A 5 . 6 3 5 0 . 9 3 0 8 . 5 7 . 1 9 7 8 , 8 6 5 . 2 9 1 3 0 0 . ~ . 1 3 1 8 . 8 4 11 3 3 . 1 _ 6 6 9 . 3 6 . 4 8 5 . 7 . 8 5 7 . 1 4 . 1 5 0 0

SOUTHWI~'I~ '"

AR,ZONA
ARKANSAS
LOUISIANA
NEWMEXICO
OKLAHOMA
TEXAS

' 0 ' 294.7' 890.7 '308.33
13312.53 371.1 653.1 500
781.07 544.7 736.2 500
}981.65 , 336.8 771.3,
0
0
6 11 . 8 6 1 5 . 3 5 0 0
0
11 9 . 7 1 0 0 8 . 1
35.71
TOTAL

~00
220
~00

'2105 1986
2185
[ 941
2145
919
,1976
645
2056
957
1761
965
,2038
,902.2

i 60
200
500
~ 0 1 2 . 5 4 , 3 7 9 . 8 7 7 9 . 1 , 3 0 7 . 3 4 263.33

R O C K Y M O U N TA I N

COLORAOO
IDAHO
MONTANA
UTAH
WYOMING

'

TOTAL

0
i
4 0 3 . 9
0
156.6 518.4
0
Ii0
"~005.34'331.6 585.4 '166.67 225
"3456.8 '355.3" 126.3 '478.26 1200
222.22 163.2 536.5 181.82 140
1536.87 282~i , 498.~ ,265.35 215

: 1755 2
7
1325
1353
1649
1219

5 919 3
.
714
707
942

:1868 :1700.0:1299.0:753.8:200
,1478
. 831.58,1021.8661.6 , 0
.2000
718.23.1500.0.1200.0 ~200
,1764
,1700.0 , 879.3° 300.0 ,.200
1591
1230.0
957.5 708.2".200
11 6 5 . 5 7 2 0 . 1 7 6 0 1 . 2 4 0 8 . 2
0
1 6 4 4 . 4 11 5 0 . 0 i 0 4 3 . 1 2 6 7 1 . 9 7 _ 8 0 0
1387 0 [0 6 7 . 6 5 i 0 8 3 . 3' ' 3 8 7 . 5 0" . 2 0 .0 .
3
' 5
~ 0
785
[427.78 876.9
247.3
0
977
6 3 8 . 8 9 1 2 11 . 6
623.4 .200
1356
920.0 1500.0
255.4 .200

576
I177
~ 2 ~ 4 . 5 5 1 7 1 0 . 6 120.0 --200
: 1 4 6 0 . ~ " 7 7 1 . 6 ] ] 1 3 6 . 4 ~ 11 2 1 , 7 7 L I 0 7 6 . ~ L 3 2 6 . 7 2 . 9 6 0

:i000
i500
0
~500
.i000
~500
i000
~500
i000
1500
i000
1500
833.331500
. ' i . 0 .0 .
0
500
500
i000
i000
_ 800

[500
0
0
[500
1500
900

PA C I F I C
ALASKA

3274.45' 300.0 169.8 ' 0
575'.10 309.2 450.5 . 0
248.70 368.4 650.1 500

CALIFORNIA
HAWII
N E VA D A
OREGON
WASHIN GTON

T O TA L

[I00'
~00
[00
0 , 367.1. 679.3 ,{1500
~00
406.6 169.5 500
$00
172.66
4 11 . 8
731.2
333.33 ~60
7 11 . 8 2 3 6 0 . $ ' 4 7 ~ . ~ : 3 0 5 . 5 6 ! 7 6 . 6 7

[2059
' 878
2085
913
1315
. 792
.1865
965
2046
. 870
1930
. 934
.1883.3 _ R92

"
'
] i 1 6 1 . 5 'L 7 2 2 . 7 3 1 1 4 5 5 . 9 4 5 5 . 4 0
:1063.5:816.25 736.2 317.2 700
, 625 ~i19.23 1500.0 i012.0 _200
2000 ! 630.0 465.5_ 379.0 1200
,1520 1597.5 1280.i 802.7 1200
,1696 ~25.0
866.3_ 386.3 1200

,]34z~3~nGR ~s ~nsn a:

11000
]500
1000
1~00
JSChq
1000
1500
_ 500
1000
1500
1000
1500
558,77,~i~,7 , ~ 1 6 . 6 7 i 5 0 0

Evaluation Program
25,000
, TOTAL

WING RELATIVE STANDINGS
I. Georgia ........................... 2,062.55
2

27. Pennsylvania ................14,751.28

2. Nebraska ......................... 22,019.25

28. Alaska ..................... . ...... 14,514.28

3. North Carolina ............... 19,871.12

29. Oklahoma ...................... 14,467.55

4. Tennessee ....................... 18,419.87

30. New York ......................14,422.43

5. Alabama .......................... 18,060.78

31. Maryland ................... 14,398.5
i...

6. Iowa ................................. 17,675.98

' 32. Rhode Island ................. 14,368.06

7. Virginia ........................... 17,199.61

33. Washington ................... 4,088.36
1

8. South Dakota .................. 17,103.03

34. Colorado..... ................... 13,782.4

5. Senior Training

9. Florida ............................ 6,843.21
1

35. Indiana ........................... 13,584.65

6 . SAR and CD Effec-

I0. Massachusetts .............. 16,811.24

36. Ohio ................................ 13,456.07

II. Vermont ........................ 16,799.92

37. South Carolina .............. 13,400.8

7. Communications

12. Minnesota ...................... 16,784.93

38. West Virginia ................ 13,298.47

i

8 . Aircraft Operations and

13. Mississippi .................... 16,592.12

39. Connecticut ................... 13,278.22

14. Maine ............................. 16,543.5

40. Hawaii ...........................

O0
O0

'18,060.'78'

9. Cadet Awards

15. Louisiana ....................... 16,375.95

41. Montana ........................ 13,069.15

oo

.22,062..55.
.16,592.,12,
.16,366.,02,
.18,419,87.
.18.0~7.~ .

16. Puerto Rico ................... 16,366.02

42. New Jersey ...................13,057.23

17. Utah ............................... 16,119.06

43. Delaware ....................... 12,814.46

18. Wisconsin ...................... 16,057.57

44. Nevada. ......................... 12,572.4

19. Missouri ........................ 15,940.51

45. California ......................12,501.7

20. Arizona .......................... 15,406.78

46. North Dakota ................ 12,144.25

21. New Mexico .................. 15,069.55

47. Kentucky ....................... 11,805.68

22. National Capital ...........
15,038.11

48. Texas ............................. 11,136.83

23. Arkansas ....................... 14,977.96

49. Wyoming ....................... 0,596.14
1

24. Michigan ....................... 14,876.56

50. New Hampshire ............. 9,950.13

25. Oregon ........................... 14,861.9

51. Kansas ................... . .........9,487.5

26. Illinois ....................... . .... 14,849.65

52. Idaho ................................ 8,047.98

~13,278.122
.16,543.5
, 1 6 , 8 11 . , ~ 4
q:qso.N3
_ 1 q_O57.~q

1976
Evaluation
Criteria
1. Membership Growth

.14,751.28+
.14,~68..~6,
,16,799.,92,

2 . Information Officer
Effectiveness
3. Accident Prevention

,00
oo
O0
O0
0

.14,398.~ .
,15,038.~I,
_19,871.12,
.13.400.,B ,
.17,199..51.
.13,298..~7.

92.86

~15.145.,~ ,

0o

O0
O0
0
O0
O0
O0
50.0

O0
00

O0
50.0
O0
0
O0
O0
O0
O0
0
28.57

oo

O0
O0
O0
O0
O0
66.67

I

i
I

I

14,849..55.
13~584..55
=ii,805.58,
14,876.56

t

13,456.,37
16,057.,57
14,105.,0 ,

" 6,843.1<

4. Flight Clinic Attendance

tiveness/Training

Maintenance

10. Encampment Attendance
11. Cadet Flight Orientation
12. Wing and Region Cadet

17,675,!981
9,487..5
16,784.,93,
15,940.51.
22,019.,25,
12,144~25,
17,103,03.
15,87%~,
15,406,1781
14,977,96
16,375.95
15,86~.55
14,467.55
11 , 1 3 6 ~ 8 3 '
14,572i41
13,782'4 '
8,047,98,
13,069 15
16,1191q61
iQ,596i14,
12,322+9 ,
i

i

!4,514+28

12.5o1+7o
13,267+68.
12,572,4 ,
14,861.9
14,088+36
13+63~!+

Activities
13. Aerospace Education
Workshops
14. Development of an Annual External Aerospace
Education Plan
15. Chaplain Program Effectiveness
16. Financial Accounting

13,267.68

R E G I O N A L R E L AT I V E S TA N D I N G S
1. Southeast .............................. 18,057.4
2. North Central ........................ 15,879.4
3. Middle East ........................... 15,145.9
4. Southwest ............................. 14,572.4
5. Northeast .............................14,442.4
6. Great Lakes ..........................14,105.0
7. Pacific ................................. 13,634.4
8. Rocky Mountain ......................12,322.9

CIVIL AIR PATROL

©

BULLETIN

Q

'CAP Bulletin Cont'

day to satisfy every request
in the distribution of CAP ra
With your cooperation, the pe
i. and support you. Send in the
MARCH 1977
HUMBER 3
i~personally going to cover to:
!i T h e t a p e o f C A P r a d i o s p o t s w
INFORMATION
serve basis. So get your ord
1. UNIT NEWSLETTERS. With the increase in the Information Program score
ii
i n t h e W E E P, t h e s c o r e a w a r d e d f o r p u b l i s h i n g u n i t n e w s l e t t e r s h a s b e e n
::
i:5.
A C C E P T E D S TAT E M E N T O N F L ~
increased. Therefore, you can help your wing score by publishing a unit
!i t h e D i r e c t o r a t e o f I n f o r m a t i 6
newsletter for your own wing, group, squadron, or flight. When you publish
quarters have generally used
i~:
a newsletter, put the full, correct name of your squadron, its address, and
describe the hours which Civi
y o u r w i n g a t t h e t o p o f t h e fi r s t p a g e . Yo u d o n ' t n e e d a f a n c y, s p e c i a l
ii r e s c u e o p e r a t i o n s : " C i v i l A 1
name. Just call it the "John Brown Composite Squadron Newsletter" if you
pended on aerial search and r
like. And it does not have to be professionally produced; a simple mimeo"Civil Air Patrol flies apprc
graphed sheet, can do wonders. Each time you publish a newsletter (at least
!i~ p e n d e d ' o n s e a r c h a n d r e s c u e n
one in every quarter, more often preferred), send a copy promptly to: HQ
!ii C o o r d i n a t i o n C e n t e r , " S t a t i e
C A P - U S A F / O I I , M a x w e l l A F B A L 3 6 11 2 . D o n o t h o l d t h e m f o r t h r e e o r f o u r
i:~ a t N a t i o n a l H e a d q u a r t e r s i n d J
m o n t h s a n d t h e n s e n d t h e m . Yo u w i l l n o t r e c e i v e a n y c r e d i t f o r t h e m i f w e
receive them after the score for the wing has been calculated and entered
!iii c i s e l y t r u e , t h a t t h e p e r c e n t
year, and that this percenta~
into the record.
OI :iii
:i: s o m e t h i n g m o r e t h a n 7 5 p e r c e z
and all news releases issued
2. CORRECT NAMES. When you submit news releases of any kind to news media
iii y o u i s u r g e d t o a l w a y s u s e t t
of any kind--including "Civil Air Patrol News"--use only full, correct
iii " C A P fl i e s t h r e e o u t o f e v e r )
names, correct rank or title, and correct identification of each person.
sions directed by the Air Fo~
Do not say "Lt Brown." Say "2d Lt John Brown." After you correctly iden~iiii s t a t e m e n t h a s m o r e i m p a c t t h ~
tify the person the first time, then you can say "Lt Brown." Do not use
!ii:
i:i: p e r c e n t " o r s i m i l a r p h r a s e s .
correct
nicknames--such as "Joe" Brown or "Ken" Jones or "Bill" Smith.
Use
Kenneth
i!!i w i t h a c l e a r e r u n d e r s t a n d i n g
names of the persons the first time you mention them--Joseph Brown,
squad! i ~i:~: s e a r c h a n d r e s c u e m i s s i o n s .
i
Jones, William Smith. Also, use the complete, correct name of your
ron, group, or whatever. Do not say simply "CAP Squadron 406." Say it
PERSONHEL
correctly: "John Brown Composite Squadron 406." After this first mention,
6. CHANGES TO THE WING DUES
then you can say "CAP Squadron 406."
OI
levels--are permitted only o]

year (July renewals). Since
3 . T O P U R C H A S E R S O F T H E 1 9 7 7 C A P S T O R Y S L I D E P R E S E N TAT I O N . W e a r e s o r r y
i : iH e a d q u a r t e r s 9 0 d a y s i n a d v a :
:
f o r t h e d e l a y i n p r o d u c t i o n o f t h e C A P S TO RY s l i d e p r e s e n t a t i o n . U n e x p e c t e d i ~ e m a i l e d o n / a b o u t 1 M a y. T !
b
copy and slide changes had to be made at the last minute to meet new coni!ii
year 1978 must be received b~
cepts. We expect the slide sets to be mailed out on or about 1 March.
:~
15 April. If any wing antic:
Thank you for your patience. For those of you who purchased the 1976 CAP
for the next fiscal year, th~
STORY slide presentation, there is an important change to be made in the
!iil t h e r e g i o n c o m m a n d e r f o r a p p ~
c o p y o f s l i d e n u m b e r 11 ( 8 0 % s l i d e ) . B e c a u s e o f t h e c h a n g i n g y e a r l y p e r warded to National by the re|
ii!ii
centage of CAP participation in SAR flying hours, new copy and a new slide
April.
havebeen developed. The new copy reads as follows:
iiill 7 . D E A T H N O T I C E S . T h e r e h a ~
Probably best known for its role in air search and rescue, Civil
;-:.: o f d e c e a s e d m e m b e r s h a v e n o t :
Air Patrol flies three of every four hours flown on search misiiii
!:{: d e a t h s e v e r a l m o n t h s a f t e r w a ~
sions directed by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center. In
surveys, etc. Death notific~
1976 CAP flew 17,604 hours in search and rescue missions. CAP
iiii! m a n d e r a n d t h e r e i s n o e x c u s ~
was credited with saving 34 lives. Over the past three years,
i!ii~ f a m i l y o f t h e i r l o s s b y c o n t :
:!:!:
Civil Air Patrol has flown 63,877 hours on 1,971 search missions
".v c a u s e t h e n a m e o f t h e d e c e a s ~
...
and saved 127 lives.
::::: m e m b e r s h i p r o l l s . ~ o m m a n d e r ~
:::::
and should screen the monthl]
(Add wing or local unit SAE participation.)
...~ii!im e m b e r ' s n a m e i s n o t p r o m p t l ~
:::::,
iiii!i s h o u l d b e s u b m i t t e d i n t h e e ~
The new slide to accompany the new copy will be duplicated shortly and
in the mail. As a matter of
mailed to all purchasers of the 1976 CAP STORY slide presentation.
In the.......i!!i!!! n e w t e l e p h o n e n u m b e r s , e t c .
OI !:{:~:!
meantime the new copy can be used with the old "80%" slide.
,
.:.:.:.

4 . C A P R A D I O S P O T S W I L L B E P R O D U C E D T H I S Y E A R . I n 1 9 7 6 , a f t e r a n n o u n c i n g :i:i:i: 8 .
C U T- O F F D AT E F O R P R O U O T I
the production of CAP radio spots, the radio budget was cancelled and the
i!!i!!i p r o m ~ w a - ~ - e - r s a - n d ~
::::::: q u a r t e r s a t l e a s t t w o w e e k s t
f u n d s c h a n n e l e d e l s e w h e r e . To t h o s e o f y o u w h o s e n t i n r e q u e s t s f o r r a d i o
s p o t s l a s t y e a r, y o u r n a m e s a r e s t i l l o n fi l e . Yo u w i l l r e c e i v e t h e t a p e
.......
i~i!ii o r d e r t o a l l o w t i m e f o r a d m i ]
o f C A P r a d i o s p o t s fi r s t . W E N E E D Y O U R C O O P E R AT I O N . L a s t y e a r o n l y 5 1
::i:i:!: b y t h e a p p r o p r i a t e b o a r d s .
::::::::
requests for CAP radio spot~ were received. Only 30 of the 52 CAP wings
.:.:.:.:
were represented. We received only one request from 15 of the 30 wings.
:i:i:!: ADMIHISTRATIOH
From 12 additional wings we received o---nly two requests. I think you will
ii!i!i!i 9.
USE PROPER OFFICE SYMBOL:
:.:.:.:.
agree that there is a great need for improvement. We offer you free of
:.:.:.: o f 3 , 0 0 0 e n v e l o p e s p e r d a y .
c h a r g e , C A P r a d i o a n d t e l e v i s i o n s p o t s . A l l w e a s k i s t h a t y o u p e r s o n a l l y ~i!~!!~i f fi c e s y m b o l ) , t h e e n v e l o p e
o
:~:{:~::
contact the radio or television stations in your local community and ask
.... W a n t z o r e c e i v e i t . I f t h e r ~
for their cooperation in airing the CAP announcements occasionally in
! i i i i ! ~ !. . . . s t a n d , t h e l e t t e r i s s e t a s i (
their public service time (free air time). Most stations are happy to
~i~!iii! T h e n t h e t i m e - c o n s u m i n g t a s k
cooperate with you and include CAP announcements in their public service
!i!!!i!i d r e s s e e . E x a m p l e : W e r e c e i ~
schedule. HOWEVER, keep in mind that stations do not have to give free
ii!!!ii~ w i t h s u c h u n k n o w n o f fi c e s y m l
air time to any specific group. There are just not enough hours in the
~iiiii!i.
.... C e n t e r . A l s o , d i d y o u k n o w :
.:.:.:.:.
-.'.v.. h e l p u s e x p e d i t e y o u r m a i l .
:::::::::
The Civil Air Patrol BULLETIH is published mon~ly. It contains o~icial announcements, in,rim changes to
i:i:~!:i u s e c u r r e n t o f fi c e s y m b o l s .
CAP publications, and other items of interest ~r all CAP members,
;:;:;:;::
....

~iliiiiii

.

JOIN THE U. S. All