File #1582: "FLWG - 2016 History.pdf"

FLWG - 2016 History.pdf

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HISTORY OF
FLORIDA WING
CIVIL AIR PATROL
Auxiliary of the United States Air Force

01 January 2016 - 31 December 2016
 

 

Page 1 of 224

HISTORY
of
FLORIDA WING
CIVIL AIR PATROL
AUXILIARY OF THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE

Prepared By
Joseph J. Martin, Colonel, CAP
Florida Wing Historian

Reviewed By Col. Luis Garcia, CAP
Florida Wing Commander

 

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COMMANDERS APPROVAL LETTER
 
 

 
 
FROM THE DESK OF THE WING COMMANDER 
 
One of the difficult tasks of a Commander is to ensure their units are on 
the right course and leveraging the best instruments to validate the 
heading. The Historical Narrative is a key tool to provide lessons learned, 
document actions accomplished, how it was achieved and who enabled 
part of it. 
 
This document captures the wing’s trajectory and the members’ great 
accomplishments that include the completion of a major Disaster Relief 
mission that encompassed multiple wings and two regions and over 5,000 
flown flight hours. 
 
It is my honor to serve as the Florida Wing Commander and hereby present 
the 2016 Florida Wing 
Historical Narrative. 
 
 
Colonel Luis Garcia, CAP 
Florida Wing Commander 
 
 

 

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
TITLE PAGE ................................................................................................................................... 2
COMMANDER’S APPROVAL LETTER ..................................................................................... 3
TABLE OF CONTENTS .................................................................................................................. 4
INTRODUCTION OF UNIT STAFF & BRIEF UNIT NARRATIVE .......................................... 5
NARRATIVE
CHAPTER I: DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS .............................................................................. 5
CHAPTER II: DIRECTOR OF AEROSPACE EDUCATION ........................................................ 5
CHAPTER III: DIRECTOR OF CADET PROGRAMS .................................................................. 6
APPENDIX I: Chapters I-III - Data and Statistics .......................................................................... 8
APPENDIX II: Unit Staff - Data and Statistics
Unit Listing ........................................................................................................................ 15
Unit Command and Staff Listing ........................................................................................ 17
APPENDIX III: Director of Logistics – Data and Statistics ......................................................... 21
APPENDIX IV: Director of Communications – Data and Statistics ............................................. 22
APPENDIX V: Director of Professional Development - Data and Statistics ................................ 24
APPENDIX VI: Staff Officers - Data and Statistics
Administration ................................................................................................................... 26
Personnel ............................................................................................................................ 27
Recruiting and Retention .................................................................................................. 28
Plans and Programs ............................................................................................................ 28
Public Affairs ...................................................................................................................... 28
Information Technology .................................................................................................... 30
Finance - Financial Statement ............................................................................................ 31
Chaplain ............................................................................................................................ 34
Historian ............................................................................................................................... 34
Health Services ................................................................................................................. 34
APPENDIX VII: Special Staff Officers – Data and Statistics
Inspector General .............................................................................................................. 35
Safety ................................................................................................................................ 35
Government Relations ....................................................................................................... 35
Legal ................................................................................................................................. 36
APPENDIX VIII: Other Data
Online News Articles ........................................................................................................ 39
Wing Span Magazines .................................................................................................... 133
Personnel Logs and Other Data ...................................................................................... 178
SRQ Composite Squadron History .................................................................................. 191
Annual Report .................................................................................................................. 195
Financial Statements ........................................................................................................ 204
Chaplain/Character Development CAPF 34 Data ........................................................... 220
 
 

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INTRODUCTION OF UNIT STAFF & BRIEF UNIT NARRATIVE
The Florida Wing as of 31 December 2016:
Wing Commander
Vice Commander
Chief of Staff

Col Henry Irrizarry
Lt Col Luis Garcia
Lt Col Rafael Salort

SUMMARY NARRATIVE OF MAJOR ACTIVITIES
Chapter I

OPERATIONS

We worked two Hurricanes – Hermine and Matthew
We also worked two Airshows --- MacDill Airfest and Sun N Fun
We had the following additional activities;
Check pilot school
State Hurricane exercise
Constant Watch Communications exercise
Florida ES Academy
Training missions -- 77 Funded and 18 Non Funded
1st Air Force – 18
Corporate -- 41
Homeland Security – 30
Disaster Relief --- 6
ELT --- 91
REDCAP --- 5

Total missions -- 286
Chapter II

AEROSPACE EDUCATION

Florida Wing continues to be a leader among all wings in CAP. In addition to the many AE
activities conducted on the squadron and group level, the wing organized and either directed or
participated in several important activities in 2016.
The wing-wide Air Force Space and Missile Museum volunteer program continues to involve
Florida Wing members who represent both the U.S. Air Force and CAP on public tours at Cape
Canaveral AFS. CAP members volunteered 61 person-days in 2016, which resulted in over 180
hours of participation.
The wing continues to support the CAP National AEO School by providing classroom instruction,
and conducting workshops and field demonstrations to educate participants in the CAP Model
Rocketry and Advanced Rocketry programs.
The wing has supported the Air Force Space Command Familiarization Course, a premier CAP
National Cadet Special Activity, since its inception in 1996. Wing members have supported the
event in various capacities over the years, and the DAE served as the Deputy Director in 2016.
The activity has garnered the attention and support of the National Staff through in-person visits,
 

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which has resulted in favorable reporting at the national level. Florida Wing also provides critical
logistical and transportation support.
The Spaceflight Orientation Course completed its third consecutive year in 2016. The 3 ½ day
course provides AEOs, AEMs, and commanders with a broad overview of space exploration and
spaceflight operations which then becomes a valuable AE resource at the unit level. The course
has also added the NASA Lunar Certification for all participants whereby they may request (for
temporary loan) actual lunar samples collected during the Apollo missions, for evaluation at their
units. While the course is sponsored and conducted by Florida Wing, it has attracted participants
from other areas within Southeast Region as well as other eastern and central states.
Florida Wing is in the process of partnering with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University to provide
CAP Volunteers to act as ambassadors who will serve as guest speakers for ERAU-sponsored high
schools throughout Florida. Additionally, those CAP volunteers who have aerospace and/or
aviation experience will have an opportunity to network for students to gain internships, or offer a
place of business within the industry to conduct field trips. In addition, the university is hoping to
tap into this important network when they need an adjunct faculty member who may be interested
in teaching opportunities. Florida Wing also provided speakers and breakout sessions at the
university-sponsored Gaetz Aerospace Institute Conference for aerospace educators held in
Daytona Beach.
No doubt, as a result of all these activities, Florida Wing was recognized by receiving the
Southeast Region Aerospace Education Mission Award at the 2016 CAP National Conference.
Chapter III

CADET PROGRAMS

Winter Encampment 2015‐16 
Total Attendees: 
Cadet Students 
Cadet Staff 
Senior Staff 
 
Summer Encampment 2016 
Total Attendees: 
Cadet Students 
Cadet Staff 
Senior Staff 
 
Winter Encampment 2016‐17 
Total Attendees: 
Cadet Students 
Cadet Staff 
Senior Staff 
 
GENERAL CARL A. SPAATZ AWARDS 

 
 
 
 

291 
 
 
 

169 
  80 
  41 

 
 
 
 

298 
 
 
 

 
176 
 78 
 44 

 
 
 
 

260 
 
 
 

 
   
   

C/Col Viviana L. Angelini

SER-FL-447
Clearwater Composite Squadron 
 
CADETS PARTICIPATION IN SPECIAL ACTIVITIES SELECTION BOARDS 
January 2016 
 
 
126 

 

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TEAMS IN AFA CYBER PATRIOT COMPETITION 
Total of 39 Teams 
 
CADETS PARTICIPATION IN FLORIDA LEADERSHIP ACADEMY 
April             2016 
 
88 
December  2016 
 
52 
 
CADETS PARTICIPATION IN ULTIMATE CADET CHALLENGE 
October 2016 
 
 
89 
 
CADETS PARTICIPATING IN COLOR GUARD ACADEMY 
May 2016 
 
 
42 
 

 

 

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APPENDIX I: Chapters I-III - Data and Statistics
OPERATIONS
A-3, DCS - OPERATIONS

Lt Col Luis Garcia
Flight Operations

Director of Flight Operations (Interim)
Asst. Standardization/Evaluation Officer
Asst. Standardization/Evaluation Officer
Wing Maintenance Officer
Asst Aircraft Maintenance Officer
CAMS Maintenance Officer-N
CAMS Maintenance Officer-C
CAMS Maintenance Officer-S
Asst Wing Maintenance Officer S
Chief Flight Operations Officer
Flight Training Officer
Asst Flight Training Officer
Cadet Flight Orientations Officer
COE Glider Operations Officer
ROTC Operations Officer
Orientation Ride Coordination

Lt Col George K. Schaefer
Lt Col Russ Reichmann
Maj David G Randa (Ady)
1st Lt Todd Wean
Capt. Mark Strobridge
1st Lt Charles E Colcord (Ady)
Maj James M Davis (Ady)
Lt Col Larry N Fernald (Ady)
Lt Col Larry N Fernald (Ady)
Capt Ben Moore (Ady)
Maj Enrique Mertins
Maj Richard Davis
1st Lt Lora Lewis
1st Lt Lora Lewis
1st Lt Lora Lewis
1st Lt Lora Lewis

Mission Operations
Director of Mission Operations
Asst Director of Operations
Emergency Services Administrative Officer
Operations Qualification Officer
Mission Administration Officer
Asst Mission Admin Officer (ADY)
Counter Drug/Homeland Security Officer
Counterdrug Officer
Asst Counterdrug Officer/HLS Officer
Emergency Services Officer
Asst Emergency Services Officer
Mission Training Officer
Asst Mission Training Officer
EOC Representative
SAR/DR Officer
Asst SAR/DR Officer
Asst SAR/DR Officer
CISM Clinical Director
 

 

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Lt Col Willard F Garman
Capt. William B Hansen (Ady)
Lt Col Willard F Garman
Capt Peter Leet
Lt Col Willard F Garman
LtCol Judy Hewett
Lt Col George R McCord (Ady)
Lt Col Wesley F Borner
Maj Orlando Ramirez III
Capt Daniel L Woods
Capt. William B Hansen (Ady)
Maj Thomas M Baldwin
Open Position
1st Lt Jack R Payne (Ady)
1st Lt Joseph F St Cyr (Ady)
1st Lt Jack R Payne (Ady)
Lt Col Bruce P Smith
Open Position

COMPLETED STAFF ACTIONS CY JANUARY 2016 – DECEMBER 2016
OPERATIONS
We worked two Hurricanes – Hermine and Matthew
We also worked two Airshows --- MacDill Airfest and Sun N Fun
We had the following additional activities;
Check pilot school
State Hurricane exercise
Constant Watch Communications exercise
Florida ES Academy
Training missions -- 77 Funded and 18 Non Funded
1st Air Force – 18
Corporate -- 41
Homeland Security – 30
Disaster Relief --- 6
ELT --- 91
REDCAP --- 5
Total missions -- 286

Operations Related Qualification Training Completed
Achievement 
Air Crew Emergency Training (ACET) Instructor 
AOBD ‐ Air Operations Branch Director 
AP ‐ Airborne Photographer 
CERT ‐ Community Emergency Response Team 
Check Pilot ‐ Airplane 
CUL ‐ Communications Unit Leader 
FASC ‐ Finance/Admin Section Chief 
FLM ‐ Flight Line Marshaller 
FLS ‐ Flight Line Supervisor 
GBD ‐ Ground Branch Director 
GES ‐ General Emergency Services 
GFSO ‐ Surrogate Unmanned Aerial System Green 
Flag Sensor Operator 
GTL ‐ Ground Team Leader 
GTM1 ‐ Ground Team Member Level 1 
GTM2 ‐ Ground Team Member Level 2 
GTM3 ‐ Ground Team Member Level 3 
IC1 ‐ Incident Commander Level 1 
IC2 ‐ Incident Commander Level 2 
IC3 ‐ Incident Commander Level 3 
 

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Number Completed 

35 
61 

12 
43 
20 
98 
13 
31 
424 

36 
31 
59 
105 


19 

Instructor Pilot ‐ Airplane 
LO ‐ Liaison Officer 
LSC ‐ Logistics Section Chief 
MC ‐ Mission Chaplain 
MFC ‐ Mountain Flying Certification 
Mission Check Pilot 
Mission Check Pilot ‐ G1000 
Mission Check Pilot Examiner 
MO ‐ Mission Observer 
MP ‐ SAR/DR Mission Pilot 
MRO ‐ Mission Radio Operator 
MS ‐ Mission Scanner 
MSA ‐ Mission Staff Assistant 
MSO ‐ Mission Safety Officer 
OSC ‐ Operations Section Chief 
PIO ‐ Public Information Officer 
PSC ‐ Planning Section Chief 
SET ‐ Skills Evaluator Training 
TMP ‐ Transport Mission Pilot 
UAO ‐ Unit Alert Officer 
UDF ‐ Urban Direction Finding Team 
WAO ‐ Wing Alert Officer 

22 
17 
22 



10 

161 
72 
153 
229 
150 
38 
20 
21 
30 
115 
85 
26 
190 


Operations Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
EMERGENCY SERVICES 
EMERGENCY SERVICES 
OPERATIONS 
STANDARDS AND EVALUATIONS 

TrackLevel 
SENIOR 
TECHNICIAN 
TECHNICIAN 
SENIOR 

 

 

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Number 
Completed 

20 



AEROSPACE EDUCATION
Director of Aerospace Education
Asst Director of Aerospace Education
External Aerospace Education Officer
Internal Aerospace Education Officer

Maj Gary A Dahlke (Ady)
Lt Art Stoutenburg (Ady)
Lt Col Richard Ortega
Lt Richard M. Selner

COMPLETED STAFF ACTIONS CY JANUARY 2016 – DECEMBER 2016
Florida Wing continues to be a leader among all wings in CAP. In addition to the many AE
activities conducted on the squadron and group level, the wing organized and either directed or
participated in several important activities in 2016.
The wing-wide Air Force Space and Missile Museum volunteer program continues to involve
Florida Wing members who represent both the U.S. Air Force and CAP on public tours at Cape
Canaveral AFS. CAP members volunteered 61 person-days in 2016, which resulted in over 180
hours of participation.
The wing continues to support the CAP National AEO School by providing classroom instruction,
and conducting workshops and field demonstrations to educate participants in the CAP Model
Rocketry and Advanced Rocketry programs.
The wing has supported the Air Force Space Command Familiarization Course, a premier CAP
National Cadet Special Activity, since its inception in 1996. Wing members have supported the
event in various capacities over the years, and the DAE served as the Deputy Director in 2016.
The activity has garnered the attention and support of the National Staff through in-person visits,
which has resulted in favorable reporting at the national level. Florida Wing also provides critical
logistical and transportation support.
The Spaceflight Orientation Course completed its third consecutive year in 2016. The 3 ½ day
course provides AEOs, AEMs, and commanders with a broad overview of space exploration and
spaceflight operations which then becomes a valuable AE resource at the unit level. The course
has also added the NASA Lunar Certification for all participants whereby they may request (for
temporary loan) actual lunar samples collected during the Apollo missions, for evaluation at their
units. While the course is sponsored and conducted by Florida Wing, it has attracted participants
from other areas within Southeast Region as well as other eastern and central states.
Florida Wing is in the process of partnering with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University to provide
CAP Volunteers to act as ambassadors who will serve as guest speakers for ERAU-sponsored high
schools throughout Florida. Additionally, those CAP volunteers who have aerospace and/or
aviation experience will have an opportunity to network for students to gain internships, or offer a
place of business within the industry to conduct field trips. In addition, the university is hoping to
tap into this important network when they need an adjunct faculty member who may be interested
in teaching opportunities. Florida Wing also provided speakers and breakout sessions at the
university-sponsored Gaetz Aerospace Institute Conference for aerospace educators held in
Daytona Beach.
No doubt, as a result of all these activities, Florida Wing was recognized by receiving the
Southeast Region Aerospace Education Mission Award at the 2016 CAP National Conference.
 

Page 11 of 224

Aerospace Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 

TrackLevel 
MASTER 
SENIOR 
TECHNICIAN 

AEROSPACE 
AEROSPACE 
AEROSPACE 

Number of General Chuck Yeager Award recipients:
2014:
2015:
2016:

120
113
105

A. Scott Crossfield Award recipients:
2014:
2015:
2016:

4
4
1

 

 

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Number 
Completed 

10 
13 

CADET PROGRAMS
Director of Cadet Programs
Cadet Programs Development
Region/Wing Cadet Leadership School Coordinator
Cadet Honor Academy Coordinator
Cadet Advisory Council Chair
Director of Drug Demand Reduction

Maj Iris Molgara
Maj Cory Hewitt
Capt Eduardo Linares
Capt Eduardo Linares
C/Lt Col Alyxandra Swanson
Maj Cory Hewitt

COMPLETED STAFF ACTIONS CY JANUARY 2016 – DECEMBER 2016
Director of Cadet Programs
1. Maj Iris Molgara
2016-2017 SER Cadet Advisory Council representatives:
1. CAC Chair: C/Lt Col Alyxandra Swanson
2. CAC V. Chair: C/Maj Michael Cassell
3. CAC Recorder: C/2Lt Devon Gadarowski
Cadet Conference
1. 97 Cadets
Region Cadet Leadership School (RCLS) 1. 3
Cadet Honor Academy (CHA)
1. 0
SER Cadet Competition or 72 Wing Cadet Competition
1. 72
Director of Drug Demand Reduction
1. Maj Cory Hewitt

Cadet Programs Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
CADET PROGRAMS 
CADET PROGRAMS 
CADET PROGRAMS 

TrackLevel 
MASTER 
SENIOR 
TECHNICIAN 

Number of General Carl A. Spaatz Award recipients:
2014:
2015:
2016:

 

9
7
6

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Number 
Completed 

13 
33 

Number of General Ira C. Eaker Award recipients:
2014:
2015:
2016:

4
11
10

Number of Amelia Earhart Award recipients:
2014:
2015:
2016:

39
27
30

Number of General Billy Mitchell Award recipients:
2014:
2015:
2016:

90
71
79

 

 

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APPENDIX II: Unit Staff - Data and Statistics
Unit Listing

 

Florida Wing (SER-FL-001) •Florida Wing Support Squadron (SER-FL-000)
•State Legislative Squadron (SER-FL-999)
Headquarters Group 1 (SER-FL-434)
•Capt Collins H. Haines Composite Squadron (SER-FL-460)
•Eglin Composite Squadron (SER-FL-423)
•Emerald Coast Senior Squadron (SER-FL-424)
•Marianna Composite Squadron (SER-FL-444)
•Pensacola Composite Squadron (SER-FL-425)
•Tallahassee Composite Squadron (SER-FL-432)
•Tyndall-Panama Composite Squadron (SER-FL-435)
Headquarters Group 2 (SER-FL-025)
•463d Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-463)
•Cecil Field Cadet Squadron (SER-FL169)
•Central Florida Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-259)
•Apopka Composite Squadron (SER-FL143)
•Fernandina Senior Squadron (SER-FL-323)
•Fruit Cove Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-171)
 

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•Gainesville Composite Squadron (SER-FL-142)
•Indian River Composite Squadron (SER-FL-457)
•Jacksonville Composite Squadron (SER-FL-383)
•Lake Composite Squadron (SER-FL-021)
•Marion County Composite Squadron (SER-FL-361)
•Merritt Island Senior Squadron (SER-FL-122)
•North Marion Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-826)
•Olympia Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-465)
•Orlando Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-242)
•Ormond Beach Composite Squadron (SER-FL-049)
•Patrick Composite Squadron (SER-FL-293)
•Saint Augustine Composite Squadron (SER-FL-173)
•Seminole Composite Squadron (SER-FL-116)
•South Brevard Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-123)
•Space Coast Composite Squadron (SER-FL-125)
•Ti-Co Composite Squadron (SER-FL-267)
Headquarters Group 3 (SER-FL-032) •Citrus County Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-315)
•Clearwater Composite Squadron (SER-FL 447)
•Gen Chuck Yeager Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-237)
•Hernando County Composite Squadron (SER-FL-301)
•Hillsborough One Senior Squadron (SER-FL-310)
•Oakhurst Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-084)
•MacDill Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-089)
•North Tampa-Lutz Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-243)
•Pinellas Senior Squadron (SER-FL-182)
•Polk County Composite Squadron (SER-FL-274)
•St Petersburg Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-066)
•South Lakeland Composite Squadron (SER-FL-466)
•Wesley Chapel Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-458)
•Zephyr Airport Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-459)
Headquarters Group 5 (SER-FL-370)
•Charlotte County Composite Squadron (SER-FL-051)
•Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-816)
•Marco Island Senior Squadron (SER-FL-376)
•Naples Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-373)
•Naples Senior Squadron (SER-FL-023)
•SRQ Composite Squadron (SER-FL-044)
•Student Leadership Academy Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-804)
•Venice Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-335)
Headquarters Group 6 (SER-FL-249)
•Boca Raton Composite Squadron (SER-FL-372)
•Cooper City Composite Squadron (SER-FL-011)
•Coral Springs Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-016)
•Crystal Lake MS Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-811)
•Fort Lauderdale Composite Squadron (SER-FL-337)
•Lantana Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-054)
•North Palm Beach County Composite Squadron (SER-FL-152)
 

Page 16 of 224

•Okeechobee County Composite Squadron (SER-FL-453)
•Pines-Miramar Composite Squadron (SER-FL-286)
•Stuart Composite Squadron (SER-FL-024)
•Treasure Coast Composite Squadron (SER-FL-078)
Headquarters Group 7 (SER-FL-010)
•Key West Composite Squadron (SER-FL-462)
•Homestead Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-279)
•Miami Beach Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-101)
•Miami Enterprise Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-090)
•Miami Senior One Squadron (SER-FL-076)
•Miami Springs Optimist Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-319)
•Opa Locka Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-464)
•Tamiami Composite Squadron (SER-FL-355)

Command and Staff Listing
COMMAND SECTION
Command

Col Henry Irizarry

Vice Commander
Chief of Staff
Asst Chief of Staff
Advisor to the Commander
Advisor to the Commander
Advisor to the Commander
Advisor to the Commander
Advisor to the Commander
Advisor to the Commander
Advisor to the Commander
Senior NCO
Chaplain
Asst Chaplain
Director of Finance
Asst Director of Finance
Government Relations Advisor
Asst Government Relations Advisor
Health Services
Health Services Officer
Asst Health Services Officer
Inspector General
Asst Inspector General
Asst Inspector General
Asst Inspector General
Asst Inspector General
 

Lt Col Luis Garcia
Lt Col Christopher J Rousseau
Open Position
Col Michael N. Cook
Col Christian F Moersch
Col Austyn W Granville Jr (Ady)
Col Joseph J Martin
Col Matthew R Sharkey
Lt Col Albert M Ferris
MSgt Scott Jung
MSgt Scott Jung
Maj Eric Cooter
Lt Col Dewert Painter
Lt Col David M Auerbach
Lt Col Mary J Horowitz (Ady)
Lt Col Phil Zedonek
Col Sergio Seoane
Capt Michael Y Wu ++
Maj Jay Williams (Ady)
Lt Col Joanne M Carbana
Lt. Col Vincent Murray
Maj David A Howard
Maj Orlando Ramirez II
Lt Col Charles E. Lynch
Page 17 of 224

Asst Inspector General
Asst Inspector General
Asst Inspector General
Asst Inspector General
Asst Inspector General
Asst Inspector General
Asst Inspector General
Legal Officer
Asst Legal Officer
Director of Safety
Asst Director of Safety
Asst Director of Safety
Asst Director of Safety

Maj Robert Hughes (Ady)
Lt Col Darlene Ferris
Capt Robert Corriveau (Ady)
Maj Samuel L Chiodo (Ady)
Maj Adrian Cuarta (Ady)
Capt Steven J. Makky (Ady)
Maj Cory Hewitt
Lt Col Michael C Godwin
Maj Wayne Henderson (Ady)
Capt Charlene R Garcia
Lt Col Obie S Young
1st Lt Scott D Brown (Ady)
Capt Benjie R Coleman

A-1, DCS - MANPOWER & PERSONNEL
Director of Administration
Asst Director of Administration
Director of Personnel
Asst Personnel Officer
Historian
Asst Historian
Director of Recruiting and Retention
Asst Director of Recruiting and Retention
A-3, DCS - OPERATIONS

Lt Col Collin David
Capt Art L Stoutenburg
Capt Art L Stoutenburg
Maj Melody Clancy
Col Joseph J Martin
Open Position
Maj Michele-Juanita Ricketts
2nd Lt Ayrton Ingle
Lt Col Luis Garcia

Director of Flight Operations (Interim)
Asst. Standardization/Evaluation Officer
Asst. Standardization/Evaluation Officer
Wing Maintenance Officer
Asst Aircraft Maintenance Officer
CAMS Maintenance Officer-N
CAMS Maintenance Officer-C
CAMS Maintenance Officer-S
Asst Wing Maintenance Officer S
Chief Flight Operations Officer
Flight Training Officer
Asst Flight Training Officer
Cadet Flight Orientations Officer
COE Glider Operations Officer
ROTC Operations Officer
Orientation Ride Coordination
Director of Mission Operations
Asst Director of Operations
Emergency Services Administrative Officer
Operations Qualification Officer
Mission Administration Officer
 

Lt Col Ralph Kugel

Page 18 of 224

Lt Col George K. Schaefer
Lt Col Russ Reichmann
Maj David G Randa (Ady)
1st Lt Todd Wean
Capt. Mark Strobridge
1st Lt Charles E Colcord (Ady)
Maj James M Davis (Ady)
Lt Col Larry N Fernald (Ady)
Lt Col Larry N Fernald (Ady)
Capt Ben Moore (Ady)
Maj Enrique Mertins
Maj Richard Davis
1st Lt Lora Lewis
1st Lt Lora Lewis
1st Lt Lora Lewis
1st Lt Lora Lewis
Lt Col Willard F Garman
Capt. William B Hansen (Ady)
Lt Col Willard F Garman
Capt Peter Leet
Lt Col Willard F Garman

Asst Mission Admin Officer (ADY)
Counter Drug/Homeland Security Officer
Counterdrug Officer
Asst Counterdrug Officer/HLS Officer
Emergency Services Officer
Asst Emergency Services Officer
Mission Training Officer
Asst Mission Training Officer
EOC Representative
SAR/DR Officer
Asst SAR/DR Officer
Asst SAR/DR Officer
CISM Clinical Director
A-4, DCS - LOGISTICS

Lt Col James K Spieth

Director of Logistics
Asst Deputy Director of Logistics
Supply Officer
Director of Transportation Officer
Asst Transportation Officer
Logistics Administrator Officer
Maintenance Management Officer

Lt Col James K Spieth
Capt Nancy L Spieth (Ady)
Maj Marie E Berninger
2nd Lt William Leszczynski
Capt Nancy L Spieth (Ady)
Open Position
Open Position

A-5, DCS - PROGRAMS

Lt Col John Clark

Director of Professional Development
Asst Director of Professional Development
Asst Director of Professional Development
Testing Officer
Northwest PDO (Grp 1)
Northeast PDO (Grp 2)
Central PDO (Grp 3, 5)
South PDO (Grp 6, 7)
Director of Cadet Programs
Deputy Director of Cadet Programs
Asst Director of Cadet Programs
Cadet Special Activity Project Officer
Assistant Cadet Special Activity Project Officer
Cadet Special Activity Project Officer
Cadet Programs Activity Officer
Cadet Programs Activity Officer
FLWG Leadership Academy Director
Drug Demand Reduction Officer
Assistant Drug Demand Reduction Officer
Cadet Special Activity Project Officer
Cadet Honor Society Administrator
Cadet Advisory Council Chair
 

LtCol Judy Hewett
Lt Col George R McCord (Ady)
Lt Col Wesley F Borner
Maj Orlando Ramirez III
Capt Daniel L Woods
Capt. William B Hansen (Ady)
Maj Thomas M Baldwin
Open Position
1st Lt Jack R Payne (Ady)
1st Lt Joseph F St Cyr (Ady)
1st Lt Jack R Payne (Ady)
Lt Col Bruce P Smith
Open Position

Page 19 of 224

Lt Col John Clark
Lt Col Stephen Nelson
Lt Col Sonia Soto-Granville
Col Austyn W Granville Jr (Ady)
Maj Robin Estes +++
Maj Charlies Walker
Open Position
Maj Kenneth Bishop +++
Capt Iris Moigora
Lt Col Ricardo Acevedo +++
Lt Col Pedro Santiago
Capt Trung H Tran
1st Lt Sean C Andino
Capt. Eduardo Linares (Ady)
1st Lt Kati Lichi
C/Col Hunter Ward
Maj. Cory Hewitt
Maj. Cory Hewitt
C/Col Iriolexis Encalada
1st Lt Michael Simon
Maj Yvonne Rodriguez (Ady)
C/Lt Col Alexander English

Cadet Advisory Council Vice
Cadet Advisory Recorder
CAC Senior Advisor
Cadet Programs Logistics
FLWG IACE Director
Director of Aerospace Education
Asst Director of Aerospace Education
External Aerospace Education Officer
Internal Aerospace Education Officer

C/Capt Daniel Linares
C/1st Lt Maxwell Frost
1st Lt Sean Andino
Maj Christina English [Ady]
Maj Christina English [Ady]
Maj Gary A Dahlke (Ady)
Lt Art Stoutenburg (Ady)
Lt Col Richard Ortega
Lt Richard M. Selner

A-6, DCS - INFORMATION & COMMUNICATIONS
Director of Communications
Asst Director of Communications
ALE Training Officer
Communications Engineering Officer
Infrastructure Engineering Lead
Infrastructure Programming Lead
Infrastructure Engineering Officer
Communications Training Officer
Communication Net Manager
Communications Licensing Officer
Director of Information Technologies
Asst Director of Information Technologies
Webpage Administrator
Web Security Administrator
Email Administrator
Calendar Administrator
Unit Websites Administrator
e-Learning Site Administrator
Server Administrator
Director of Public Affairs
Deputy Director of Public Affairs
Deputy Director of Public Affairs
Online News Editor
Social Media Administrator
 

 

Page 20 of 224

Col Joseph Martin

Lt Col Jim Clark
Lt Col Robert E Masiker
Maj William D Rice
Open Position
Lt Col Guy M Rasmussen
Lt Col Bruce McConnell (Ady)
Capt Steven J Makky Sr (Ady)
Lt Col Robert E Masiker
Cadet Steven Makky Jr (Ady)
Lt Col Robert E Masiker
Maj.Marian Motyl-Szary
Lt Col Jim Clark
Maj.Marian Motyl-Szary
Col Joseph Martin
Lt Col Jim Clark
Lt Col Jim Clark
Maj.Marian Motyl-Szary
Maj.Marian Motyl-Szary
Col Joseph Martin
Capt Tyler S Lahnen
Maj Jose O Herrera
Capt Ernest F Lee (Ady)
2nd Lt Curtis W Hooks (Ady)
2nd Lt Caitlyn E Reynolds (Ady)

APPENDIX III: Director of Logistics – Data and Statistics LOGISTICS
A-4, DCS - LOGISTICS
Director of Logistics
Asst Deputy Director of Logistics
Supply Officer
Director of Transportation Officer
Asst Transportation Officer
Logistics Adminisrator Officer
Maintenance Management Officer

Lt Col James K Spieth
Lt Col James K Spieth
Capt Nancy L Spieth (Ady)
Maj Marie E Berninger
2nd Lt William Leszczynski
Capt Nancy L Spieth (Ady)
Open Position
Open Position

COMPLETED STAFF ACTIONS CY JANUARY 2016 – DECEMBER 2016
Director of Logistics
1.
Managed acceptance and issue of a bus from Air Force AAFES to units..
2.
Started recovery, retirement and distribution of life saving equipment. (to be
completed in 2017.)
3.
Supported Hurricane Mathew, October 2016.
4.
Presented seminars at FLWG Conference to 35 logistics officers/ commanders.
Supply Officer
1. Completed annual inventory by 31 Oct 2016.
2. Reduced inventory in a 4 storage to 4 laptops and 3 expendable printers.
3. Projection for 2017 is that all accountable property will be issued.
4. Established a new policy for providing printers to staff & unit. New printers
will be ordered on-line and drop shipped to the receiving staff/unit.
Transportation Officer
1. Received 3 new vehicles, processed and issued. Total vehicle inventory 32
vehicles and 6 trailers.
2. One vehicle to be turned in 08487,
3. Expect issue of one additional van in 2017. Fleet inventory will than be 33
vehicles & 6 trailers.
Maintenance Officer
1. Vehicle maintenance availability 98%
2. Aircraft maintenance availability

Logistics Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
LOGISTICS 
LOGISTICS 

TrackLevel 
SENIOR 
TECHNICIAN 

 

 

Page 21 of 224

Number 
Completed 



APPENDIX IV: Director of Communications – Data and Statistics
COMMUNICATIONS
Director of Communications
Asst Director of Communications
ALE Training Officer
Communications Engineering Officer
Infrastructure Engineering Lead
Infrastructure Programming Lead
Infrastructure Engineering Officer
Communications Training Officer
Communication Net Manager
Communications Licensing Officer

Lt Col Jim Clark
Lt Col Robert E Masiker
Maj William D Rice
Open Position
Lt Col Guy M Rasmussen
Lt Col Bruce McConnell (Ady)
Capt Steven J Makky Sr (Ady)
Lt Col Robert E Masiker
Cadet Steven Makky Jr (Ady)
Lt Col Robert E Masiker

COMPLETED STAFF ACTIONS CY MONTH YEAR – MONTH YEAR
Director of Communications
Florida Wing continues to be a leader among all wings in CAP. 2016 was no exception to
this and we accomplished a number of significant tasks during the year. This documents purpose is
to document events for historical purposes.
Florida Wing Communications broke records and completed the annual inventory in less
than 30 days. We and Texas are the largest wings so that is a significant accomplishment.
Florida Wing Communications completed outfitting communications trailer 8925 giving us
two platforms to support missions in austere settings and after disasters. We also continues
advertising the availability of the two trailers, portable radio caches, Icut kits, Portable HF ALE
RSP units, Internet routers, phones, and portable repeaters for training or missions.
Florida Wing Communications continues its trailer operator training program and
implemented an SQTR system to maintain high standards amongst operators. We also
implemented monthly inspections of trailers, portable repeaters (PDR), Transportable HF ALE
radios (RDP), and routers.
Florida Wing Communications added 2 new repeater techs to its staff and created a program
whereby each repeater has a local caretaker who knows the range and can test function without
going on site or touching the equipment. We also implemented pre-hurricane and post storm
repeater testing. This caught a major problem after hurricane Matthew and comms was able to
replace a 600+ foot high antenna at Nasa within weeks of the storm.
Florida Wing Communications maintained distributing trailers and radio caches at multiple
locations around the state so there was something near everyone and no single locations loss would
wipe out our assets. Cache locations included Plantation, Ocala, Tampa, Crestview, and Boca
Raton. Florida Wing Communications also implemented a system using Batchgro that shows the
locations of all major communications assets and caches along with contact info so planners and
IC’s can rapidly identify nearest assets and arrange to collect them.
Finally Florida Wing Communications implemented a form system and asset calendars to
 

Page 22 of 224

people could easily reserve and borrow assets per the recent OI for strategic assets. Demobilization
was stressed in the OI and in the asset loaning process as in the past operations has been slow to
return or refused to return assets. The new system, endorsed by the wing commander and wing
staff, required a firm demobilization plan to be submitted before any asset can be borrowed to
avoid problems recovering loaned equipment in the future.

Communications Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
COMMUNICATIONS 
COMMUNICATIONS 
COMMUNICATIONS 

TrackLevel 
MASTER 
SENIOR 
TECHNICIAN 

 

 

Page 23 of 224

Number 
Completed 


10 

APPENDIX V: Director of Professional Development - Data and Statistics
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Director of Professional Development
Asst Director of Professional Development
Asst Director of Professional Development
Testing Officer
Northwest PDO (Grp 1)
Northeast PDO (Grp 2)
Central PDO (Grp 3, 5)
South PDO (Grp 6, 7)

Lt Col John Clark
Lt Col Stephen Nelson
Lt Col Sonia Soto-Granville
Col Austyn W Granville Jr (Ady)
Maj Robin Estes
Maj Charlies Walker
Open Position
Maj Kenneth Bishop

COMPLETED STAFF ACTIONS CY JANUARY 2016 – DECEMBER 2016

Professional Development Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

TrackLevel 
MASTER 
SENIOR 
TECHNICIAN 

Number of master level specialty tracks achieved:
2014:
2015:
2016:

37
27
13

Number of senior level specialty tracks achieved:
2014:
2015:
2016:

63
74
72

Number of technician level specialty tracks achieved:
2014:
2015:
2016:

199
136
149

Number of Gil Robb Wilson Award recipients:
2014:
2015:
2016:
 

4
4
4

Page 24 of 224

Number 
Completed 

11 
13 

Number of Paul E. Garber Award recipients:
2014:
2015:
2016:

11
12
6

Number of Grover Leoning Award recipients:
2014:
2015:
2016:

31
38
39

Number of Benjamin O. Davis, Jr. Award recipients:
2014:
2015:
2016:

47
69
59

 

 

Page 25 of 224

APPENDIX VI: Staff Officers - Data and Statistics
Director of Administration
Director of Personnel
Director of Recruiting and Retention
Director of Plans and Programs
Director of Public Affairs
Director of Information Technology
Finance - Financial Statement
Chaplain
Historian
Health Services

Lt Col Collin David
Capt Art L Stoutenburg
Maj Michele-Juanita Ricketts
Open Position
Capt Tyler S Lahnen
Maj Marian Motyl-Szary
Lt Col David M Auerbach
Maj Eric Cooter
Col Joseph J Martin
Capt Michael Y Wu

COMPLETED STAFF ACTIONS CY JANUARY 2016 – DECEMBER 2016
Director of Administration
The past year has been an eventful one for CAP administration, and for the Florida Wing
administration directorate. We have seen extensive high-level regulatory changes, and
have also continued to conduct activities to support both the wing staff and lower-echelon
commanders and administrators.
CAPR 5-4, Publications and Forms Management, was revised in November of 2016. The
new CAPR 1-2 set forth several new requirements for administrative activities in CAP,
creating a number of challenges for Florida Wing. The wing publications library is in the
process of being revised and updated to comply with the new regulations, an effort that is
proceeding satisfactorily with the input and cooperation of the various functional areas
who use publications to accomplish their missions.
The administration directorate has also been of assistance to the wing staff by providing
proofreading and review services for various publications, plans, and other documents.
Ensuring that our publications have a polished and professional appearance helps to
convey information and direction more effectively.
To better support commanders and administrators of lower-echelon commands, the
administration directorate developed and presented a two-topic presentation for the Florida
Wing conference. This session covered the basics of CAPR 1-2 for unit-level
administrators, and also presented a step-wise process for formal file planning. A panel
discussion consisting of members from the A1 staff was also conducted. Both of these
activities were well-received by the attendees.
Moving forward, the administration directorate is continuing the push to bring the
publications library of Florida Wing into complete compliance with the provisions of
CAPR 1-2. This is an ongoing effort, and progress continues to be made through the
efforts of many wing staff officers. Continuing training and education for staff officers at
all levels will continue to be a priority, as well as providing subject-matter expert advice
and opinions for those who request guidance. Through teamwork and collaboration, we
can have every expectation that the administrative aspects of the CAP mission will
continue to be successfully executed.
 

Page 26 of 224

Administration Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
ADMINISTRATION 
ADMINISTRATION 
ADMINISTRATION 

TrackLevel 
MASTER 
SENIOR 
TECHNICIAN 

Number 
Completed 




Director of Personnel
Refer to various logs in Appendix VIII.

Personnel Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
PERSONNEL 
PERSONNEL 
PERSONNEL 

TrackLevel 
MASTER 
SENIOR 
TECHNICIAN 

 

 

Page 27 of 224

Number 
Completed 




Director of Recruiting and Retention

Recruiting and Retention Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
RECRUITING AND RETENTION 
OFFICER 
RECRUITING AND RETENTION 
OFFICER 

TrackLevel 

Number 
Completed 

SENIOR 



TECHNICIAN 



Director of Plans & Programs
This was an open position.
There is no specialty track in plans and programs.
Director of Public Affairs
Public Affairs Academy:
Mar 5 - 6, 2016
City of Orlando Emergency Operations Center, Orlando FL
OIC: Capt Ty Lahnen
25 student attendees; 8 staff.
Attachments:
Graduation/Staff List
Academy Agenda
AirFest:
Mar 18 - 20
MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa FL
Event OIC: Capt Joe Mora
PA OIC: Capt Sybrian Castleman
Primary photographers: Maj Steve Lampasona and 1 Lt Gail Arnold
WingSpan Radio Team: Capt Ty Lahnen and C/Maj Antoinette Barnes

Assisted with VIP guests Mar 18 for pre-event practice show
WingSpan Radio interview with Thunderbird Support Team
Meet and Greet with Thunderbird pilots
PA Staff Assisted at CAP recruiting booth
Press releases post event (no copies of articles)
WingSpan Article (attached)
Facebook and twitter coverage of event
 

Page 28 of 224

Sun n Fun:
Apr 1 - 10
Lakeland Linder Airport, Lakeland, FL
Event Commander: Maj Bill Hansen
PA OIC: 1 Lt Gail Arnold
WingSpan Radio Team: Capt Ty Lahnen and C/Maj Antoinette Barnes
Covered CAP 75th Anniversary Events including City of Lakeland Proclamation
WingSpan Radio Interview with CAP National Commander
General Aviation Network interview with CAP National Commander
Facebook, twitter
FLWG Conference 2016:
Pre-Conference Courses - Thurs Apr 14 - Fri Apr 15
Conference and Banquet: Sat Apr 16
Rosen Center Hotel, Orlando, FL
Event OIC: Maj Christina English
PA OIC: Capt Ty Lahnen
WingSpan Radio Team: Capt Ty Lahnen, 1 Lt Elena Lee, C/Maj Antoinette Barnes
Facebook and twitter coverage
Summer Encampment 2016:
25 June - 2 July, 2016
Camp Blanding JTC, Starke, FL
Encampment Commander: Maj Jeremy Marvin, (Alabama Wing)
PA OIC: 1 Lt Gail Arnold
WingSpan Radio Team: Capt Ty Lahnen and C/Maj Antoinette Barnes
Produced Daily Encampment Newsletters
Encampment Video (for banquet)
Encampment Yearbook (sold online for individual purchase; sample page attached; cannot
locate link)
Facebook and twitter updates
WingSpan Radio Interviews with: SER Commander, FLWG Commander
WingSpan Magazine:
One issue published, Summer 2016
File attached
Hurricane Matthew:
Primary PIO - Lt Col Jeffrey Carlson (Group 5)
PIO - Capt Sybrian Castleman (Group 3/Tampa Exec)
Handled media interviews, media flights, and social media
(facebook screenshot attached)
(press release attached)
Ultimate Cadet Challenge:
Oct 14 - 16, 2016
 

Page 29 of 224

Camp Blanding JTC, Starke, FL
Event Commander: Capt Keith Barry
PA OIC: none
Photographer only: Maj Steve Lampasona
facebook and twitter coverage
Winter Encampment 2016:
Dec 27, 2016 - Jan 2, 2017
Tyndall Air Force Base, Panama City, FL
Event Commander: Maj Cory Hewitt
PA OIC: 2 Lt Barbara Rich
Daily newsletters (no copies), encampment video (for banquet).
Facebook and twitter coverage
Florida Emergency Services Academy 2016:
Dec 26 - Dec 31, 2016)
Avon Park, FL
No assigned PAO

Public Affairs Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

TrackLevel 
SENIOR 
TECHNICIAN 

Number 
Completed 

10 

Director of Information Technology
1. Accomplishments in 2016
1.
Finished the build-up phase of the unit website initiative resulting in all of
the unit websites residing on the SER/FLWG server, using and presenting a
common look and feel.
2.
Continued the unit website initiative, resulting in most of the 80 unit
websites showing up-to-date information.
3.
Created event pages for Professional Development course and other wing
and group-level events.
4.
Kept the wing websites operational and up-to-date, working closely with
different wing Directorates.
5.
Responded to many help requests from wing members and wing staff,
solving their IT technical issues in a very timely manner.
6.
Obtained Non-Profit pricing for Microsoft Windows 10 and Microsoft
Office 2016 now available to all wing members.
7.
Secured and customized the Non-Profit G-Suite (Google Apps) for the wing.
2. Planned Accomplishments for 2017
1.
Complete the next version of the wing website based on the new version of
Insite Creation software.
2.
Test and publish new website features like the Helpdesk (trouble tickets)
function.
 

Page 30 of 224

3.
Complete the testing and upgrade of the FormStack online forms and
registrations system.
4.
Complete the testing and migration of the new email system on G-Suite
(Google Apps/GMAIL).
5.
Test @flwg.us and @flwg.gov email in the new G-Suite environment.
6.
Present one or more IT seminars at the wing conference.

IT Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 
OFFICER 
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 
OFFICER 
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 
OFFICER 

TrackLevel 

Number 
Completed 

MASTER 



SENIOR 



TECHNICIAN 



Finance - Financial Statement
Total Income for the entire wing including all units was $995,980.41 for Calendar Year
2016.
Total Expenses for the entire wing including all units was $922,536.50 for Calendar Year
2016.
SER-FL-001 - Headquarters - Only
Income - CY 2016
Revenues from Gov't Contracts

$49,646.05

Revenues from Activities

$69,581.90

Revenue from Dues

$73,936.00

Other Revenue and Gains

$5,637.84

Special Events

$24,765.00

From NHQ Funded Flying

$139,055.67

From NHQ - A/C & Veh Major Mx

$52,213.54

From NHQ - Other

$64,419.56

From NHQ

$255,688.77

From Regions & Wings

$2,614.83

From Units Below

$86,495.87

From Units Below National HQ

 

$89,110.70

Page 31 of 224

Total Income

$568,366.26

Expenses - CY 2016
Awards & Grants to Individuals

$2,476.86

Mission Expenses

$172,728.24

Supplies

$7,652.11

Equipment Purchases

$4,100.46

Telephone & Communication

$8,778.99

IT Expenses

$6,142.35

Postage & Shipping

$1,918.36

Occupancy Expenses

$9,568.69

Corp Aircraft Maintenance

$3,036.21

Corporate Vehicle Maintenance

$22,206.08

Equipment Leases

$1,764.36

Other Equipment Maintenance

$1,298.15

Maintenance Expenses

$28,304.80

Dues & Publications

$70.56

Travel

$35,919.07

Cadet Activities
Encampments

$75,717.48

Glider Flights Expense

$8,430.00

IACE Activity

$3,885.74

Cadet Competition - NCC

$66.49

Florida Leadership Academy

$12,667.15

Ultimate Cadet Challenge

$4,289.83

Special Activity Selection Boar

$1,103.95

Cadet Activities - General

$22.41

Color Guard Academy

$927.20

Cadet Competition - SER

$222.98

Cadet Activities

$107,333.23

Senior Activities
Aerospace Education

$744.98

Wing PAO Academy

$1,388.65

Senior Activities

$788.44

FLWG Check Pilot School

$1,434.15

Senior Activities

Combined SR & Cadet Activities

 

$4,356.22

$9,291.53

Page 32 of 224

Activities & Encampments

$120,980.98

Wing Conference Expense

$21,889.35

Miscellaneous Wing Events

$606.47

Conferences, Convent. & Meeting

$22,495.82

Professional Development

$532.80

Other Expense

$2,772.25

AC MX Draft backs NHQ

$58,812.30

Expenses with NHQ

$58,812.30

Expenses with Wings

$157.50

Expenses with Units Below

$495.00

Total Expense

$483,907.14

Net Income - CY 2016

$84,459.12

Finance Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
FINANCE 
FINANCE 

TrackLevel 
SENIOR 
TECHNICIAN 

 

 

Page 33 of 224

Number 
Completed 



Chaplain
On 1 September 2016, Chaplain Lt. Col. Linda Pugsley, who had served with distinction
as the Florida Wing Chaplain, was assigned to serve as the Southeast Region Chaplain.
Soon after, Chaplain Major Eric Cooter, former Group 5 Chaplain was appointed by Col
Irizarry (Florida Wing Commander) to serve as the new Wing Chaplain. As of 31
December 2016, the Florida Wing had 26 Chaplains and 35 Character Development
instructors serving in the local squadrons.
Total activities attended for Chaplains and Character Development Officers throughout the
wing in 2016 were 1,762; for a6,004 hours of service; 39,217 miles driven; with a total
expense of $19,687.00. Please refer to CAP Form 34 data contained in APPENDIX VIII
for further detail:

Chaplain Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT 

TrackLevel 
TECHNICIAN 

Number 
Completed 


Historian
Prepared annual report for 2015. Continued to conduct research on first wing commander
and began work on historical narrative to document his life work.
There were no specialty track advancements in history during 2016.
Health Services

Health Services Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
HEALTH SERVICES 
HEALTH SERVICES 
HEALTH SERVICES 

TrackLevel 
MASTER 
SENIOR 
TECHNICIAN 

 

 

Page 34 of 224

Number 
Completed 




APPENDIX VII: Special Staff Officers – Data and Statistics
Inspector General
Safety
Government Relations
Legal

Lt Col Joanne Carbana
Capt Charlene R. Garcia
Lt Col Phil Zedonek
Lt Col Michael C Godwin

COMPLETED STAFF ACTIONS CY JANUARY 2016 – DECEMBER 2016
Inspector General
1. We have the largest Wing in CAP and a very qualified inspection team members. We
are constantly inspecting Units throughout the State. None of our Units have been in "red"
or closed for lack of an SUI. Over twenty-five Units were inspected in 2016. Any
discrepancies were uploaded into e-Services and corrected timely. Florida Wing handled
7 investigations/complaints. All were entered into ECIM and closed timely IAW CAPR.
No extensions had to be requested.

Inspector General Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
INSPECTOR GENERAL 
INSPECTOR GENERAL 

TrackLevel 
SENIOR 
TECHNICIAN 

Number 
Completed 



Safety
FLWG maintains active membership with the National Safety Council.
January – March: Annual Safety Day held at all units. 100% compliant
NCPS - February 7, 2016 Charlene Garcia presented Operations & Safety “Why Can’t
We All Get Along” explaining changes to CAP NHQ safety program emphasizing that
Everything we do in Safety will be centered on learning and applying the proper use of the
Risk Management “Loop.”

February FLWG Dir of Safety, Charlene Garcia, Represented FLWG CAP at Legislative
Day in Washington, DC.
March 18-20 The Florida Wing supported the 6th Air Mobility Wing during their biannual Tampa Bay AirFest at MacDill Air Force Base. 149 CAP participants. Keith
 

Page 35 of 224

Barry and Yvonne Rodriguez were Safety Officers. 5 mishaps related to headache or
dehydration were reported.
April 5-10 The Florida Wing supported SUN AND FUN during their annual AirFest at
Lakeland Airport. 5 mishaps reported. 2 related to eye irritation due to debris, 1 cadet had
symptoms of dehydration, 1 blown vehicle tire enroute to SNF and 1 report of skin
irritation.
April 16, FLWG Conference, Guest Speaker Ben Coleman, Mahindra Aerospace.
Presentation subject was Operations and Safety / Aviation Risk Management.
FLWG Summer Encampment June 23- July 2: Record number in attendance. Included 3
High Adventure Activities (obstacle course, rappelling and water survival). 4 minor
mishaps reported.
FLWG Safety reviews Ops orders and Risk Assessments for several High Adventure
Activities conducted throughout the year. Some activities for 2016 included:

Army Airborne Jump School – Fort Benning, GA

NRA Rifle Trainings

NRA Pistol Marksmanship Trainings

IFly – Indoor Skydiving

Obstacle and Ropes Courses

Kayak Races

Safety Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
SAFETY 
SAFETY 

TrackLevel 
SENIOR 
TECHNICIAN 

Number 
Completed 



Government Relations
During the National Legislative Day (26 Feb-28 Feb 2016) the FLWG delegation met with
24 of our 27 Representatives offices. We met with 5 of the representatives personally. We
presented our FY 2015 report on the state of the wing.
There is no specialty track in government relations.
Legal

Legal Related Specialty Tracks Completed
Track 
LEGAL 

TrackLevel 
TECHNICIAN 

 
 

Page 36 of 224

Number 
Completed 


THIS ANNUAL REPORT IS FAITHFULLY EXECUTED AND SUBMITTED BY THE
BELOW SIGNED CIVIL AIR PATROL HISTORIAN REPRESENTING THE
AFOREMENTIONED UNIT. ALL INFORMATION IS RECORDED AS SUBMITTED BY
THE VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS AND ASSIGNED PERSONNEL “AS IS” AND
REPRESENTS STATISTICAL DATA, FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, AND UNIT
ACTIVITIES FOR THE SPECIFIED PERIOD OF ASSESSMENT AND RECORDING. THE
UNIT HISTORIAN IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE VERACITY OR ACCURACY OF
INFORMATION.
Submitted by

Joseph J. Martin, Colonel, CAP
Florida Wing Historian

 

Page 37 of 224

APPENDIX VIII: Other Data

 

Page 38 of 224

Naples Cadets Honor Fallen Veterans
By 1st Lt. Donald Binner, Naples Senior Sq., Florida Wing
12/24/2016
Naples, Fla. -- Naples Cadets honor the fallen soldiers at Veterans Grove, Naples Memorial Gardens on
December 17, 2016. In participation with Wreaths Across America, the Cadets helped unload and place
over 400 wreaths to honor our veterans.
As an act of patriotic service, Naples Cadets, under the command of Deputy Commander 1st Lt. David
Stevens, during a solemn ceremony including Naples Senior Squadron and other patriotic community
members, paid tribute to our fallen heroes. Senior Squadron member Maj. Judy Schiff with Stevens and
Public Affairs Officer 1st Lt. Donald Binner coordinated the organization of the December event. The Civil
Air Patrol, partners with Wreaths Across America, to decorate the graves of American veterans each
December.
Before distributing the wreaths, the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Cadets, parents and Senior members were briefed
on the traditional process. They were instructed to respectfully position each wreath on a veteran’s grave
marker, speak their name and thank them for their service; with this act the fallen are never forgotten.
The 9:00 AM event began with the Cadets opening boxes of wreaths. Six Cadets, with their parents, began
to distribute the patriotic mementos transported earlier by the Naples Senior Squadron. In addition, two
small American flags were attached to each wreath. Stevens and Binner coordinated the work of the
Cadets.
In a public ceremony, the Naples CAP Cadet and Senior Squadrons with other patriotic community
members, paid tribute to our fallen heroes. Stevens told the audience “It is because of these veteran heroes
that we live in this country and can sleep safe at night. This annual event, known as National Wreaths
Across America Day, is one of the most profound, patriotic community events that a CAP cadet can
participate in.” The ceremony concluded with a formal presentation of a wreath to each service branch.
After the ceremony ended, the CAP members continued to Naples Freedom Park to participate in a second
patriotic community event. Both Naples Cadet and Senior Civil Air Patrol Squadrons were present to lend
their respect to our fallen heroes during the Veterans' Day Event. They were publicly complimented on
CAP’s continuing presence at the annual Freedom Park patriotic event.

C/A1C Gonzalez carries wreaths for ceremony

 

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1st Lt Donald Binner, Lt Col Ronald Hemond, C/Gabriel Katz, C/Amn Andrew Michell, 2nd Lt Trudy Lowry,

Florida County Declares Civil Air Patrol Month
By Capt. Dennis Maloney, Fruit Cove Cadet Sq., Florida Wing
12/23/2016
St. Johns County, Fla. -St. Johns County declared December as Civil Air Patrol Month when it presented a proclamation to Fruit
Cove Cadet Squadron Commander Capt. Al Uy in recognition of Civil Air Patrol’s 75th Anniversary.
“It’s an honor to receive this on behalf of our squadron,” said Capt. Uy when he received the proclamation
from Commissioner Jay Morris. “We are so fortunate to have such a great group of cadets and senior
members who continue the CAP tradition.”
The ceremony was organized by St. Johns County Communication Director Michael Ryan and Fruit Cove
Cadet Squadron Public Affairs Officer Dennis Maloney.

Venice Cadet Squadron Supports at Veterans Day
Ceremony
By Lt. Col. Rita Cucchiara, Venice Cadet Squadron
12/22/2017
Venice, Florida -- VENICE, Fla.— Civil Air Patrol’s Venice Cadet Squadron cadets and senior members
proudly supported the Venice Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 8118 Veterans Day ceremony at Patriots
Park, Venice Florida on 11 November 2016. The Squadron set up a coffee and donut station for the
numerous ceremony participants and also distributed flags and water to the many members of the
community who attended the Ceremony.
“I am proud to be part of a ceremony that recognizes our Veterans”, said Cadet Staff Sergeant Anthony
 

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Williams as he enthusiastically handed out water to individuals attending the ceremony. Cadet Master
Sergeant Michael Schultz added, “It was a perfect time to make the community aware of the Venice Cadet
Squadron”.
November 2016 marked the 2nd year of Venice Cadet Squadron’s partnership with the Venice Veterans of
Foreign War organization, thanks to the ongoing communications efforts of Squadron Senior Member Major
Ted Dodds who routinely updates the VFW with Squadron news. “It’s a great partnership”, says Major
Dodds, “Our Squadron looks forward to working with the VFW on community events for many years”.
 

CAP-USAF Region Liaison Visits Florida Squadron
By C/2nd Lt. Jesse Yong, SRQ Composite Sq., Florida Wing
12/20/2016
Sarasota, Fla. -- On 16 December 2016, cadets of the SRQ Composite Squadron of Civil Air Patrol (CAP)
received a surprise visit from the CAP-USAF Southeast Region Liaison, Col. Michael “Tiger” Greiger, at
their regular weekly meeting.
"There are three things you need when going for your goal: hands, head, and heart.” Greiger shared with
cadets and senior members. “Out of all three of those, your heart is the most driving one."
Greiger served as an F-16 pilot throughout the Gulf War to the end of the Iraq War. As a CAP-USAF liaison
officer, Greiger provides oversight, advice, and liaison assistance to members of CAP, the USAF volunteer
auxiliary, in all areas of its mission.
As a teen, Col. Greiger was a CAP cadet. He has completed two national cadet officer schools, and has
traveled to Sweden with CAP’s International Cadet Exchange Program. He ended his CAP cadet career
before enlisting at the rank of Cadet Lt. Colonel.
Based at the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport, the SRQ Composite Squadron is one of more than
1,700 Civil Air Patrol squadrons across the nation. The SRQ Composite Squadron includes 94 members: 61
senior members and 33 cadets. Members put general aviation to its best use, dedicated to saving lives,
flying counter-drug missions, participating in homeland security efforts, providing disaster relief, advancing
young people, and supporting America’s educators. For information about the SRQ Composite Squadron of
CAP, visit www.capsrq044.com.

Leckband Accepts Command of Florida Wing
Squadron
By 1st Lt. Christopher Carroll, SRQ Composite Sq., Florida Wing
12/12/2016
Sarasota, Fla. -- At the SRQ Composite Squadron’s Annual Awards Banquet, 1st Lt. Peter Leckband said,
“I accept command,” as command of the squadron formally transferred from outgoing Commander Maj.
William Hansen. Southeast Region Vice Commander Col. Wes Hannah, Jr. officiated. Capt. Ann Marie
Kozloski will continue as Deputy Commander/Cadets. Hansen had commanded the squadron since 2014.
“We have a great squadron and I look forward to continuing the important work we have been doing,”
Leckband said.
Leckband, a member of Civil Air Patrol (CAP) since September 2012, most recently served as the
squadron’s Deputy Commander/Seniors. He is a private pilot and has served in the squadron as
Administrative Officer, Personnel Officer, and Recruiting and Retention Officer. He joined CAP shortly after
 

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moving to Florida from Minneapolis, Minn. He and wife Patty have been a host family for Southeastern
Guide Dogs.
Based at the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport, the SRQ Composite Squadron is one of more than
1,700 Civil Air Patrol squadrons across the nation. The SRQ Composite Squadron includes 94 members: 61
senior members and 33 cadets. Members put general aviation to its best use, dedicated to saving lives,
conducting search and rescue missions, providing disaster relief, advancing young people, and supporting
America’s educators. For information about the SRQ Composite Squadron of CAP, visit
www.capsrq044.com.

Florida Wing's Marble Promoted to Cadet Master
Sergeant
By Maj. Staten Corbett, Tyndall Panama Sq., Florida Wing
12/3/2016
Panama City, Fla. -Cadet Matthew Eino Marble of the Tyndall Panama Squadron in Florida Wing was promoted to the grade of
cadet master sergeant.
This is the fifth achievement in the Civil Air Patrol cadet program. At this point, a cadet becomes a senior
NCO and may be given the billet of first sergeant, at which time a diamond is placed on the grade insignia.
The grade accompanies the Charles A. Lindbergh Achievement. Charles Lindbergh piloted "The Spirit of St.
Louis" on the first non-stop flight across the Atlantic Ocean from New York to Paris on May 20-21, 1927.
The excitement generated by this accomplishment paved the way for commercial flight.
To become eligible for promotion Marble had to be a current CAP cadet; possess a CAP uniform and wear
it properly and be capable of reciting the Cadet Oath from memory. He passed an online Leadership test on
“Learn to Lead” with a grade of 100%. The test included multiple-choice questions and a section testing his
performance in drill and ceremonies. He also passed an online Aerospace Education test with a grade of
100%.
Marble actively participated in a character development forum; two Cadet Orientation Aircraft Flights; the
Florida Wing “Camp Blanding” July 2015 Summer Encampment; and other squadron activities.
If you are 12 years or older and interested in learning about your opportunities in CAP, contact Maj. Staten
Corbett at 850 867-4414.

Naples Cadets Community Service On Display At Air
Show
By 1st Lt. Donald Binner, Naples Cadet Squadron
11/15/2016
Punda Gorda, Fla. -Eight cadets and three senior members from the Naples Cadet Squadron traveled to participate at the
Florida International Air Show on Saturday, October 22, 2016. Naples Cadet Squadron joined with Lee
County Schools Cadet and Charlotte County Composite squadrons in a display of community service at the
air show.
A pre-dawn Naples departure and a full van arrived at the Charlotte County Civil Air Patrol headquarters
 

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adjacent to the PGD airport. The cadets discussed that their contribution to the air show would be a new
experience available only through CAP.
The requisite sign-in at HQ completed, Naples joined other CAP cadets to a nearly full room for a safety
briefing by Lee County School Squadron senior member Capt. Jonathan Abraham. He described the local
weather and gave an overview of how the day was to be organized with locations and breaks.
Charlotte County Composite Squadron Cadet Commander C/Maj Mikehla Hicks continued with
assignments. She reiterated safety, hydration and breaks. Hicks said “We will be in public so be extra
vigilant on how we are perceived”. She continued with a description of the duty positions: two security and
one aircraft. The two security posts would be fully explained on site. Given that Naples brought eight cadets,
Hicks said “Naples will be split across all three positions”. The aircraft area was highly desired because
staged there were fighters, trainers, vintage and new air craft. Some were even for sale.
Since this is a new assignment for most Naples cadets they will be under the supervision of posted ranking
cadets and senior members from the Charlotte County Composite Squadron. Safety vests were distributed
and the group transported to their respective positions.
Florida Wing Group 5 Commander Lt Col Jim Kaletta, often accompanied by C/Maj Hicks, rotated through
the posts throughout the day making sure all had water and asked about their welfare. He also transported
cadets for scheduled rotation and breaks.
C/SrA Collin Duke returning from the show said “The best part is that no matter where you stand, you can
still see the planes overhead.”
Late afternoon found all Naples attendees returning to HQ to sign-out and depart. The return ride had
everyone discussing their new and different experiences at the Air Show. All agreed the aircraft area was
the best.

 

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1st Lt Donald Binner, 2nd Lt Thomas Ryan, 2nd Lt David Stevens (Photo: 1st Lt Donald Binner) 
 

Missing Senior Found After Several Days with Help
from CAP
By Maj. Staten Corbett, Florida Wing
11/7/2016
Pensacola, Fla. -The Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol conducted aerial searches on October 29, 2016 with 8 aircraft looking for a
missing 83-year-old woman and/or her abandoned vehicle from Highway US 90 in Pensacola to the state
line and east to the Apalachicola River. CAP flew 65.9 total hours (Florida 38.3 and Alabama 27.6) during
this mission. Two Florida ground teams searched two areas while other Florida members stood by at homes
pending emergence of a specific need. Fifty-four members conducted operations for 3 days.
The CAP Incident Commander, Lt. Col. Eric G. Haertel, was the point of contact. The Plans Officer was Lt.
Col. George Schaefer; Operations Officer, Lt. Col. Willard Garman and Air Operation’s Branch Director,
Maj. Ben Poffenberger.
Due to Florida CAP's invaluable assistance in searching approximately 440 square miles, and providing
ground search teams which assisted ECSO in locating the objective, the Air Force Rescue Coordination
Center has awarded FL CAP a "Save”.
 

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Throughout this incident Escambia County Sheriff’s Office investigators and ECSO deputies continued to
develop the situation. Anyone with information about any ongoing incident please contact the ECSO at
(850) 436-9620 or 911. The missing person was confirmed found by Escambia County Sheriff’s
Department.

Wing Commander to Relinquish Command in April of
2017
By Julie DeBardelaben, Deputy Director, Public Affairs, C.A.P. National Headquarters,
11/3/2016
Florida Wing -Florida Wing Change of Command scheduled for 2017
Col. Henry Irizarry announced today that he will relinquish command of Florida Wing in April 2017.
Irizarry, who has held the position of wing commander for three years, was recently promoted to a vice
president’s position with his employer which in turn comes with increased responsibilities.
“It has been an honor and a privilege to serve as the Florida Wing commander for the past three years,”
said Irizarry. “The wing is made up of talented and devoted members who support their state and nation
with outstanding volunteer service each and every day. I look forward to continuing to work by their
side.”
Irizarry became the wing’s commander in March 2014 after serving in leadership positions with Florida
Wing Group 7 and the Tamiami Composite Squadron. He joined Civil Air Patrol as a cadet in April 1988.
Under his leadership, the wing achieved a “highly successful” rating in the compliance inspection and an “outstanding
rating” on its most recent biannual operational evaluation by the U.S. Air Force. In addition, a Florida Emergency
Services Academy was established and a record-sized wing summer encampment was hosted in 2016.

Civil Air Patrol Provides Valuable Community Service
at Air Show
By Lt. Col. Jeff Carlson, Group 5 HQ
10/26/2016
Punta Gorda, Fla., -A longstanding relationship between Civil Air Patrol and the Punta Gorda airport is still strong today
because of the mutual commitment to the growth of aviation and the dedication to serving the southwest
Florida community.
At the end of World War II, a Civil Air Patrol squadron was established at the former Punta Gorda Army
Air Field. When the county took ownership of the airfield, the CAP squadron was the first tenant. The
volunteer members of the ‘Coastal Rangers’ flew patrols over Charlotte Harbor. More than seventy years
later, local volunteer Airmen are still serving their community.
The Florida International Air Show, held October 21-23, 2016, marked the fourteenth year that the local
squadron provided supported to one of the country’s top air shows. CAP cadet and senior members
contributed more than 2,000 person-hours for the event.
 

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Florida Wing Group 5 commander, Lt. Col. Jim Kaletta, oversees the operations of the all-volunteer
organization in Southwest Florida. He said this year’s involvement was “extra special because it marks
CAP’s 75th anniversary”.
We’ve been helping the airshow with logistics all week,” said Kaletta. “We had members come up from
Lee County and Naples to assist with the Charlotte County squadron's effort.”
Cadets from the Charlotte County Composite Squadron provided the color guard for the opening
ceremonies each day. Cadets and senior members helped set up and tear down 100 tables and 3,800
chairs in viewing areas for spectators and the show’s sponsors and performers. CAP members provided
assistance at secondary entry points that helped airport tenants to bypass the show’s primary entrance
and reach hangars and aircraft more quickly.
The squadron’s headquarters served as an incident command post allowing staff to manage activity in the
assigned areas including crew rotation and radio communications. Cadet Major Mikehla Hicks led a team
of over two dozen cadets and was responsible for making certain personnel were properly stationed and
safety requirements for crew rest were met. Hicks is the current cadet commander for the Charlotte
County Composite Squadron.
“Overall, the team performed well. They knew how to do their job.” Hicks explained that the large
airport area involved with the show added challenges. “What impressed me most was the timely manner
we were able to rotate posted personnel.”
One of the specially equipped Cessna airplanes used by CAP for search/rescue and aerial photography was
displayed at the show. Members set up an information table near the airplane and were available to talk
about squadron activities.
In return for the services CAP members provide the airport throughout the year, the local squadron
receives a reduced rental rate for the building and hangar it uses.
“The airport subsidizes a large amount of our rent for the services each year.” Colonel Kaletta
emphasized the “tremendous value” that allows the local squadron to pursue each of CAP’s three primary
missions of aerospace education, emergency services and cadet programs in the community.
For many years, the squadron occupied a hangar on airport property free of charge. Over the years, local
volunteer members made many improvements to the Punta Gorda facility, most at personal expense.
Hurricane Donna damaged the squadron’s facility in 1960. Repairs and upgrades gave another 44 years of
service until Hurricane Charlie destroyed the building and hangar in August of 2004.
Kaletta explained that “the FAA changed the rules and no longer allows free rent for our facilities" at the
airport. He said the local squadron “would be hard pressed to serve the local community without the
support received from the Charlotte County Airport Authority.”
Each year, about 50 local young men women, from 12 years through age 21, are introduced to aviation
through the squadron’s cadet program. The program allows young people to progress at their own pace
through a 16-step program including aerospace education, leadership training, physical fitness and moral
leadership.
The modern day Rangers’ routes of coastal patrols, sundown patrols, and harbor patrols are much the
same today as in the 1940’s. The patrol covers all shoreline of Charlotte Harbor; the Myakka River; the
Peace River; the Intra-coastal Waterway and environs. Along the more than 100-mile route, aircrews
search for boaters in distress, hazards to navigation, and environmental considerations such as oil slicks.
 

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“The local air operations help keep our crews mission ready,” said Kaletta adding that the Punta Gorda
airfield served as a forward operations base during CAP’s recent Hurricane Matthew response mission.
“The first flight for Matthew was launched from Punta Gorda. The plane took off as soon as the weather
allowed. The aircrew flew along Florida’s east coast surveying for damage and looking for collapsed
buildings with trapped victims. They gathered over 8,000 images that were used by emergency
management in Tallahassee. ”

Charlotte County Composite Squadron Color Guard

 

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C/Maj. Mikehla Hicks, FL-051 Cadet Commander

SRQ Composite Squadron Cadets Win Statewide
Ultimate Cadet Challenge
By 1st Lt. Christopher Carroll, SRQ Composite Squadron
10/22/2016
Sarasota, Fla. -- Five cadets from the SRQ Composite Squadron of Civil Air Patrol (CAP) won first-place
honors at the Florida Wing’s Ulitmate Cadet Challenge competition, held 14 through 16 October 2016 at
Camp Blanding in Starke, Florida.
Senior Member David Taylor, who accompanied the cadets as their senior escort, said, “The competition
was important in helping to build confidence and reinforcing the cadets’ ability to work as a team. They were
successful because they were dedicated, united, and physically and mentally prepared.” Taylor added that
the competition gave the cadets an opportunity to put their skills to work in a “real world” situation.
The cadets representing the SRQ Composite Squadron as the “Destroyers” team included C/Amn Jacob
Anthony, C/CMSgt Colt Burch, C/CMSgt Ian Spirduso, C/1st Lt Austin Vore, and C/2d Lt Jesse Yong.
The Ultimate Cadet Challenge (UCC) is an annual event, held by the Florida Wing of CAP, that tests the
abilities of cadets in all areas of the Civil Air Patrol mission. Teams of cadets compete for the title of
“Ultimate Cadet” against others in the wing. This year’s competition included teams from around the state.
Events included Emergency Services activities, obstacle courses, written examination, uniform inspection,
drill evaluation, and leadership reaction courses.
Taylor said the weather during the competition proved to be one of the unscheduled challenges. Cadets
overcame heat, fog and rain and learned how to operate successfully in less-than-ideal conditions.
 

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CAP’s cadet program introduces young people, from ages 12 through 21, to aviation. Cadets progress at
their own pace through a 16-step program including aerospace education, leadership training, physical
fitness and moral leadership. Cadets compete for academic scholarships to further their studies in fields
such as engineering, science, aircraft mechanics, aerospace medicine, meteorology, and many others.
Those cadets who earn cadet officer status may enter the Air Force as an E3 (airman first class) rather than
an E1 (airman basic).
Based at the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport, the SRQ Composite Squadron is one of more than
1,700 Civil Air Patrol squadrons across the nation. The SRQ Composite Squadron includes 102 members:
63 senior members and 39 cadets. Members put general aviation to its best use, dedicated to saving lives,
flying counter-drug missions, participating in homeland security efforts, providing disaster relief, advancing
young people, and supporting America’s educators. For information about the SRQ Composite Squadron of
CAP, visit www.capsrq044.com.

Florida CAP follows DOT Ban of Note7 Smartphone
By Maj. Jeff Carlson, Public Affairs Officer, Florida WIng
10/16/2016
Florida -Effective immediately, Florida Wing commander, Col. Henry Irizarry is advising all individuals who own or possess a
Samsung Galaxy Note 7 device not to transport the device on their person or in carry-on baggage aboard Civil Air
Patrol airplanes.
This advisory follows a U. S. Department of Transportation (DOT) emergency order to ban all Samsung Galaxy Note7
smartphone devices from air transportation in the United States. The DOT ban became effective at 12:00 pm (noon)
Eastern Daylight Time (EDT), October 15, 2016.
Samsung Galaxy Note7 devices may cause an ignition or a dangerous evolution of heat or become a fuel source for
fire, even when powered off. Samsung issued a recall of the devices in September. This past week the company
decided to stop manufacturing and selling “due to the inability to identify the root cause of the incidents”.
According to DOT Order No. FAA-2016-9288, the U.S. Secretary of Transportation has found an unsafe condition and
that an unsafe practice exists and constitutes an imminent hazard to the safety of air transportation.
For more information about DOT ban, visit: https://www.transportation.gov/briefing-room/dot-bans-allsamsung-galaxy-note7-phones-airplanes 
 

SRQ Composite Squadron Helps Train K-9 Search and
Rescue Unit
By Capt. Ann Marie Kozlowski, SRQ Composite Squadron
10/15/2016
Sarasota, Fla. -- On 2 October 2016, cadets and senior members from the SRQ Composite Squadron
assisted in a training seminar for search and rescue K-9 dogs and their handlers.
Deputy Commander Cadets Capt. Ann Marie Kozlowski said, “A relationship began with the Manatee
County Search and Rescue when they gave a presentation at our cadet meeting in August. This led to the
invitation to help with this training event.”
K-9 handlers and their dogs came from Manatee, Sarasota and several surrounding counties to participate
in the four-day event held at Camp Flying Eagle just outside of Bradenton, Florida. The cadets were asked
to help train the dogs for scent searches. Each cadet received a number and a sterile gauze pad to rub on
 

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their face and neck, and then seal in a plastic bag. The bag was numbered with the cadet’s number. The
cadets then formed two lines, 20 feet apart, in an open field. A K-9 and their handler received one of the
scent samples with instructions to find the cadet to whom it belonged.
D. J. Beddow, the head instructor, said having all the cadets wearing the same uniform helped to make the
drill more challenging for both the handlers and the dogs. Several of the dogs were successful in their first
attempt to find “their” cadet, while others required a second pass of the lines and more training. The
handlers even got some training as one of them missed the cue their dog gave when he found his cadet.
Cadet Airman Caeden Moore stated that he thought this exercise really helped the handlers and that
everyone had a good time doing it. C/CMSgt Colt Burch noted that this event helped relations grow between
Civil Air Patrol and the Manatee Search and Rescue and also showed the younger cadets what the K-9
dogs can really do.
Senior member 2nd Lt. Jack Duich, who was instrumental in organizing this activity for the squadron, said,
“This is the first step in what I hope will be a long and productive relationship with Manatee County Search
and Rescue and the SRQ Composite Squadron.”
Based at the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport, the SRQ Composite Squadron is one of more than
1,700 Civil Air Patrol squadrons across the nation. The SRQ Composite Squadron includes 100 members:
61 senior members and 39 cadets. Members put general aviation to its best use, dedicated to saving lives,
flying counter-drug missions, participating in homeland security efforts, providing disaster relief, advancing
young people, and supporting America’s educators. For information about the SRQ Composite Squadron of
CAP, visit www.capsrq044.com.

SRQ cadets provided training opportunities to search and rescue K-9s.
(Photo Credit: Capt. Ann Marie Kozlowski, CAP)

Volunteers Stand Down Response to Hurricane
Matthew
By Maj. Jeff Carlson, Public Information Officer, Florida WIng
10/12/2016
Florida - 

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Following twelve days after being activated by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center, Civil Air Patrol’s Florida
Wing has started the transition from response phase of the Hurricane Matthew mission according to wing commander
Col. Henry Irizarry.
“We are in the demobilization phase where we reposition our aircraft, vehicles and equipment to their home bases.”
Mission staff began the planning process for returning airplanes to their home base after moving 17 aircraft to
Florida’s panhandle for safe harbor during the storm’s trek up the state’s eastern shoreline. Following the storm, many
of the planes were repositioned to mission operation bases along the gulf coast to support state and federal requests for
aerial imagery.
“I'm extremely proud of the professionalism and dedication all our volunteers exhibited during this hurricane response.
It is a true portrayal of the great members we have,” said Irizarry.
Florida squadrons returned to normal operations on Wednesday. A few squadrons remain without power while others
are completing damage repairs from last week’s major hurricane. Florida Wing communication personnel are
coordinating the repair of radio repeating stations and antennas that sustained damage during the storm.
Flight operations for aerial surveys continued while the storm recovery and mission demobilization progressed. Five
recon sorties were completed on Tuesday, bringing the total number of aerial photographic flights to 47. The total
number of images increased to over 17,400 with addition of the 2,500 images captured on Tuesday.
CAP personnel have been working to survey the east coast of Florida from Key Largo north to the Florida-Georgia
border. Flight crews were on standby Wednesday as the collection of images was reviewed to determine if any unmet
needs still exist.
The Civil Air Patrol has been conducting operations as the U.S. Air Force Auxiliary under the direction of First Air
Force. As a part of the Air Force’s “Total Force”, CAP Airmen have been responding to requests from state and
federal agencies for aerial surveys of areas affected by Hurricane Matthew.
The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center serves as the single agency responsible for coordinating on‐land federal 
SAR activities in the 48 contiguous United States, Mexico and Canada. AFRCC is a part of 1AF (AFNORTH) with its 
headquarters at Tyndall Air Force Base, near Panama City, Florida. According the its website, “It has the responsibility 
of ensuring the air sovereignty and air defense of the continental United States (CONUS). As the CONUS geographical 
component of the binational North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), it provides airspace 
surveillance and control and directs all air sovereignty activities for the continental United States.” 
 

Florida Wing Flies Ten Sorties Post Hurricane
Matthew
By Maj Jeff Carlson, Florida Wing
10/10/2016
Sarasota, Fla. -- Civil Air Patrol’s Florida Wing flew 10 sorties Sunday from operational bases in
Tallahassee, Sarasota and Tampa to survey damage caused by Hurricane Matthew. Area Commander Lt.
Col. Luis Garcia said the blue-sky weather over Florida was “allowing our members to effectively support
aerial imaging and damage assessment” on the state’s east coast.
The wing captured more than 8,200 aerial images this weekend. Meanwhile, the wing continued efforts to
relocate aircraft from the Florida panhandle to bases along the gulf coast.
Flights Sunday had photographed the perimeter of Lake Okeechobee in central Florida and the St. Johns
River in the north. CAP aircrews had also completed an initial beach survey from the Miami-Dade area to
the Jacksonville Beach area.
Other flights have been conducted to relocate aircraft and personnel, provide radio communication
coverage and transfer equipment and supplies. Twelve reconnaissance flights are scheduled for Monday.
As of Sunday night, eleven ground sorties had been completed by the Florida Wing. Ground teams have
 

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been activated to relocate vehicles that were secured prior to the storm and to transfer equipment between
bases.
"I feel like this is where all the training has led us,” said 2nd Lt. James Broadwell, a communications officer.
“I feel like, for me, this is our payday. We're volunteers, but we're volunteers with responsibilities.
“The Air Force, the Federal Emergency Management Agency and CAP have entrusted us to do this. And,
through our training, we have the ability to do this."

Florida Wing Launches 1st Flight for Safety Check of
Barrier Islands, Inland Areas
By CAP National Headquarters, National Headquarters
10/8/2016
Lakeland, Fla. -- The Florida Wing responded today to the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s
requests to provide aircraft, vehicles and personnel for aerial and ground imaging to assist in disaster relief
efforts in Hurricane Matthew’s aftermath.The wing’s air operation personnel are operating from the State
Emergency Operation Center in Tallahassee. “I feel the Southeast Region is ready to respond effectively to
any tasking we are assigned,” said Col. Barry Melton, whose command includes Florida, Georgia, Alabama,
Mississippi, Tennessee, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
“Time after time our volunteers answer the call with professionalism and pride. Our members personify the
core value of ‘volunteer service before self’ whenever called upon,” he said. “I am very proud to be
associated with the Southeast Region and Civil Air Patrol.”That sentiment was echoed by Col. John M.
Knowles, commander of CAP’s Middle East Region. “No plan survives first contact, but we have excellent
professionals working on contingencies we have been discussing,” said Knowles, whose region includes
South Carolina, Delaware, Maryland, the National Capital Region, North Carolina, Virginia, and West
Virginia. “I am very confident in our Airmen,” he said.The Florida Wing's first air sortie was launched Friday
afternoon to survey the barrier islands south of Melbourne and inland areas for life and safety issues.
Aircrews in Florida were instructed to look for storm damage that could limit access to certain areas. In
addition to damaged infrastructure, crews were also looking for collapsed buildings that might contain
trapped victims.“Launching the aircraft was hampered by a high-crosswind component,” said Florida Wing
Group 5 Commander Lt. Col. Milton “Jim” Kaletta. “We had to wait on the weather in order to meet the
operation safety standards.”
Response operations are scheduled to expand Saturday. An incident command post under the direction of
Lt. Col. Willard Garman is expected to be activated Saturday morning to oversee air operations launched
from airports along Florida’s Gulf Coast. Garman said he expects the Florida Wing's aircraft will return to
station from the Panhandle, where they evacuated from Hurricane Matthew's path. Melton and Knowles
said they engage their state wing commanders in nightly conference calls to gauge readiness. Of particular
concern, Melton said, "I have ensured the Florida Wing has the support it needs as it stands by for possible
activation." Knowles added, “We are hoping the storm moves east, but are ready to help.”Both commanders
spoke to the unified and coordinated relationships and responses that both regions put forward in support of
each other. Melton said the Southeast Region stands ready to assist in efforts in South Carolina, in the
bordering Middle East Region, as part of the “one-CAP concept” followed by both leaders.
“Our folks know they could easily assist a wing outside our region as well as inside our region,” Melton said.
“It does not matter to us.” Knowles, whose region is getting ready for the brunt of the storm said, “We are
talking with the Southeast Region and have our northern wings standing by as needed."

CAP Preparations Ongoing As Hurricane Matthew
Heads for U.S. Mainland
By CAP National Headquarters, National Headquarters
10/6/2016
Lakeland, FL -- Civil Air Patrol’s Florida Wing continues to prepare for Hurricane Matthew, expected to
slam into the state’s eastern coast as a Category 4 or even a Category 5 storm within hours.
Earlier today, the wing moved to activation level HURCON 1 in anticipation of tropical storm force winds
striking the southern peninsula by this afternoon.
 

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Under the Hurricane Condition alert scale used by the U.S. Air Force, HURCON 1 is the highest level of
alert indicating the state of emergency or preparedness for an approaching hurricane.
“Though based on weather conditions, the HURCON 1 status signals a completion of stormproofing
corporate assets and directs our members to focus on executing their personal emergency plan,” said Maj.
Jeff Carlson, the Florida Wing’s public information officer.
The wing activated its hurricane plan last week and began the planning process for safeguarding its fleet of
airplanes and other resources needed for the response mission after the storm passes. The decision on
where to relocate the aircraft was made once the storm’s track became more defined.
“Our members have accomplished a herculean effort to prepare for this major hurricane,” said Wing
Commander Col. Henry Irizarry. “The highly professional manner in which our people have carried out their
duty is impressive.”
In addition to securing mission assets, the wing’s communication team has taken steps to ensure the radio
network is available for the response mission. The communication network includes more than 400 radios
and is connected to CAP’s nationwide high-frequency network.
Even though Matthew has not hit the state, discussions have already turned to the response phase in
anticipation of aerial photography requests from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and state
emergency management. CAP’s volunteers are recognized as a cost-effective resource and are used by
emergency managers as a primary source for damage assessment imagery.
As rain bands from Matthew started to track across south Florida, Lt. Col. George Schaefer, operations
chief, was already making plans to move planes as soon as possible after the storm.
“We need to have aircraft in a position to launch and quickly be on station once we receive the requests,”
Schaefer said. “It’s a team effort. We’ve received an offer from Georgia Wing to help move the pilots
needed to reposition the airplanes after the storm.”
“A total of 27 sorties were flown to relocate 17 aircraft to Florida’s panhandle area,” said Maj. Sam Chiodo,
incident commander. “This included the flights needed to return the ferry pilots to their home base.”
Meanwhile, the Georgia Wing, at the request of the Georgia State Patrol Aviation Division, has also
repositioned assets in preparation for disaster relief activities after Hurricane Matthew passes. Two Georgia
Wing planes and other assets were moved from coastal areas to inland locations so they will be
immediately available when called upon, said Col. Richard Greenwood, wing commander.
"The volunteer professionals of the Georgia Wing stand ready to assist our communities and state,” he said.
“We are currently working with GEMA (the Georgia Emergency Management Agency), and expect to begin
supporting relief efforts once the storm passes.”
“Our thoughts and prayers are with our neighbors on the coast, as well as those in surrounding states who
are preparing for the arrival of this storm,” Greenwood said.

Florida and Georgia Wings Relocate CAP Assets in
Anticipation of Hurricane
By Volunteer Now Staff Writer, Volunteer Now, National Headquarters
10/6/2016
Maxwell AFB, Ala. -- Members of the Florida Wing, Civil Air Patrol (U.S. Air Force Auxiliary) and their
counterparts in other Civil Air Patrol wings along the Atlantic Coast are busy preparing for the impact and
potential aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, a Category 3 storm expected to make landfall in the Bahamas on
Thursday and skirt the Florida coastline on Friday.
“Florida Wing has done a wonderful job getting out front and ahead of the storm,” said Col. Barry Melton,
Civil Air Patrol - Southeast Region commander. “Seventeen Florida Wing aircraft were successfully
relocated to the Panhandle yesterday, and nightly HURCON teleconferences have been taking place since
last Saturday evening. Georgia Wing, Civil Air Patrol is relocating their two coastal aircraft today.”
As Matthew made landfall in Haiti on Tuesday, the Florida Wing upgraded its military hurricane condition
status to HURCON4. The upgrade from HURCON3 comes with an expectation the eastern coastline of the
state will experience 50-knot or greater winds within the next 72 hours.
“The Florida Wing leadership continues to monitor the situation closely, executing plans detailed in the
wing’s hurricane plan. Aircrews are being identified for potential asset relocation while qualified response
personnel prepare equipment for potential post disaster response,” said Lt. Col. Robert Sims, also of
Southeast Region, in a message on the Florida Wing website.
The Southeast Region staff, along with wing commanders and their staffs in Alabama, Mississippi and
 

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Tennessee are scheduled to begin readiness teleconferences tonight. “These wings stand ready to assist
the Florida and Georgia wings,” said Melton. “Southeast Region is prepared to stand up an Area Command
to coordinate resources if needed.” Several states in CAP’s Middle East Region are also in the storm’s path.
South Carolina and North Carolina wing leaders plan to provide personnel for their states’ emergency
operations centers, beginning this weekend.
Original Publication by Volunteer Now

Florida and Georgia Wings are Prepared for
Hurricane Matthew
By Lt. Col. Robert Sims, Southeast Region
10/5/2016
Florida -In preparation for Hurricane Matthew, all assets and facilities have been secured as part of Florida Wing's
pre planned operations. Local unit emergency services personnel are asked to shelter-in-place, maintain
communications with local command, and monitor communication outlets such as the hurricane net, wing
website, and wing social media for general information. Southeast Region Commander, Col. George Melton
stated, "Seventeen Florida Wing aircraft were successfully relocated to the Panhandle yesterday, and
nightly HURCON teleconferences have been taking place since last Saturday evening. Georgia Wing is
relocating their two coastal aircraft today."
The hurricane has already claimed 11 lives and the Governor of Florida, Rick Scott, stated, "We have to be
prepared to be hit by a catastrophic hurricane." It's been a decade since Florida has experienced a
significant hurricane, leading to concerns by officials that Floridians have become complacent or new
residents don't have the experience to appreciate the danger. The governors of Florida, Georgia, South
Carolina and North Carolina have declared an emergency. Over 7,800 National Guard soldiers have been
activated or placed on alert.
Hurricane Matthew currently remains a major hurricane with maximum sustained wind speeds of 120-MPH
moving northwest at 12-MPH towards the Bahamas and then Florida. The storm will be moving over warmer
waters than can further strengthen the storm prior to affecting the east coast of Florida.

Hurricane Matthew Approaches Florida, HURCON 2
Announced
By Lt. Col. Robert Sims, Southeast Region
10/5/2016
Florida -- Hurricane Matthew sets pace towards the Bahamas and Florida as hurricane warnings and
watches are posted for parts of the east coast of Florida. Per Florida Wing's hurricane plan, the leadership
has set the hurricane condition to HURCON 2 with substantial winds expected in 24-Hours.
Florida Wing emergency services personnel are being asked to remain in contact their local command for
further information as facilities and assets are protected from the impending storm. All personnel are asked
to continue with conducting personal preparations to safeguard their families, with the objective of
completing them by Wednesday evening.
As of Wednesday morning, Hurricane Matthew remains a major hurricane with maximum sustained winds of
115-MPH. The hurricane is is headed NNW at 10-MPH.

With Approach of Mathew, Florida Wing moves to
HURCON 3
By Capt. Curtis Hooks, Capt. Curtis Hooks
10/4/2016
Florida -- The Florida Wing has moved to HURCON 3 with the impending approach of Hurricane Matthew.
Members of the Florida Wing of the Civil Air Patrol are requested to refer to the link below:
 

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http://flwg.us/hurcon.aspx
For information about the Wing HURCON plan and what they should be doing in preparation for the storm.
Further, please remember "Turn Around, Don't Drown," do not drive on any road that is under water. You do
not know how deep the water is or how fast it is moving

CAP Officers Train to Serve Community During
Times of Emergency
By 2nd Lt. Trudy Lowry, Naples Senior Sq., Florida Wing
10/4/2016
Naples, Fla., -Members from Civil Air Patrol’s Naples Senior Squadron attended Collier County’s emergency shelter management
training. Training facilitators included representatives from the Collier County Bureau of Emergency Services, Collier
County Sheriff’s Office and the American Red Cross.
Almost 60 local volunteers attended the annual hurricane shelter orientation training held at Golden Gate High School,
which is a designated storm shelter. The participants were assigned to work groups that rotated through four areas of
shelter operations. The training included information about registering shelter clients as well as feeding and managing
the dormitory.
Civil Air Patrol staff officers receive professional leadership training that makes them a valuable resource to serve the
public’s interest in various capacities. Members from the local CAP squadron have been assigned to shelter staff
positions at the Golden Gate High School in previous declared emergencies.
Maj. Judy Schiff, CAP, previously served as shelter manager at Golden Gate High School shelter and provided insights
from her experience.
Schiff said, “It is my intention to share what I have learned so that in each emergency we can perform better in serving
our community.”
Dan Summers with Collier County emergency management said, “We can always count on the dedication of CAP
members to be of service to the Collier County Community”.
The presenters included: Dan Summers, Collier County Bureau of Emergency Services; Captain Beth Jones, Collier
County Sheriff’s Office; and Justin McElwee, Florida’s Southern Gulf Chapter of the American Red Cross. The
Naples Senior Squadron was represented by Lt. Col. Tom Kuzmar, Major Judy Schiff, 1st Lt. Don Binner and 2nd Lt.
Trudy Lowry.
The shelter training focused on four areas of operation: Registration, Providing Information, Dormitory and Feeding.
Participants reviewed the forms used by shelter management and the policy of admitting service animals into shelters.
Planning the layout of shelter space, shelter rules including issues with contraband were discussed as well. Providing
shelter residents with information was stressed by creating a communication center for the shelter.
The dormitory area can present the most challenges of all of the shelter areas. Creating designated areas can help ease
the sharing of common space diverse groups. Differences between families with children and single residents, late or
early risers, retirees and working people add to the challenge. Most evacuees are under stress from being displaced and
the participants were encouraged to approach each situation with sensitivity.
During an emergency the shelter feeding area is open 24/7 and offers, at minimum, coffee and snacks for shelter
residents and response personnel. Three daily meals are scheduled.
“Food is free at the shelter and brought in by approved vendors to guarantee quality,” said Capt. Jones. “Volunteer
food drop-offs cannot be accepted.”
 

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Summers recognized and welcomed the members of the Naples squadron. He suggested that, in an emergency, CAP
members wear their uniform to alert the managers of each station of their CAP membership.
“CAP members have proven leadership ability and are ready to serve,” said Summers. 
 

Florida Wing Upgrades to HURCON 4
By Lt. Col. Robert Sims, Southeast Region
10/4/2016
Florida -- As Hurricane Matthew makes landfall in Haiti, the Florida Wing upgrades the hurricane condition
status to HURCON 4. This is a pre planned action as there is an expectation that the Florida will
experience 50-knot or greater winds within the next 72-hours.
Florida Wing leadership continues to monitor the situation closely, executing plans detailed in the wing's
hurricane plan. Aircrews are being identified for potential asset relocation while qualified response
personnel prepare equipment for potential post disaster response.
As of Tuesday morning, Hurricane Matthew remains a category 4 major hurricane with sustained winds of
145-MPH. The center is located at the southwest region of Haiti as it moves north at 9-MPH. The forecast
track has shifted slightly west, further inland into Florida as a high pressure ridge blocks it from traveling
further east as previously forecasted.

Florida Wing Upgrades to HURCON 5
By Lt Col Robert Sims, Southeast Region
10/3/2016
Florida -- As Hurricane Matthew strengthens and turns northward, the Florida Wing leadership responds by
upgrading the wing's hurricane condition to HURCON 5, early Monday morning. This well coordinated
action is performed 120-hours prior to forecasted tropical storm winds affecting the Florida area.
With the upgraded condition, the wing's leadership along with mission staff officials, begin the task to plan
any potential movement of assets out of harm's way as well as coordinating with local and state officials.
The wing's communications networks are also activated with task specific traffic, including any necessary
reports to the National Traffic Net.
As of Monday morning, Hurricane Matthew is a category 4 major hurricane with sustained winds of 140MPH southwest of Haiti. The storm is headed north at 6-MPH. The forecast track places the western side
of the forecast cone along the eastern coast of Florida by Thursday evening.

Hicks Solos!
By Maj. Jeff Carlson, Public Affairs Officer, Group 5 HQ
10/3/2016
Punta Gorda, Fla., -Cadet Major Mikehla Hicks, Charlotte County Composite Squadron, reached a milestone in her flight training this past
weekend by successfully completing her first solo flight.
Hicks posted an account of the event on her Facebook page. “My instructor stopped the aircraft in the middle of a
touch n go (not so much go) landing, requested a turn around on the runway to back to the FBO, and then told me it
was time to fly solo.”
Cadet Hicks soloed in with under ten hours of logged instruction in the Civil Air Patrol Cessna. She has also completed
nine cadet orientation flights.
Hicks is no stranger to airplanes. She started flying with a family friend at the age of ten. She was allowed to take
control of the friend’s aircraft and perform basic flight maneuvers racking up an impressive 70 hours of non-logged
pilot time, much of it in a twin-engine aircraft.
 

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Group 5 Commander, Lt. Col. Jim Kaletta, was at the Punta Gorda airfield during the cadet's memorable flight.
“She did ten take-off and landings; all were very good.” said Kaletta.
“I felt so free! I may have even lost count and did an extra landing” exclaimed Hicks. “Thanks to everyone involved.
It's been such a great day!”

C/Maj. Hicks refuels airplane after completing first solo flight. (photo: M. Hicks)

 

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L to R: Lt. Col. 'Jim" Kaletta, C/Maj. Mikehla Hicks, Capt. Ernest Maresca. (photo: M. Hicks) 
 

Florida Wing Big Winners - National Conference
Awards
By Lt. Col. Judy L. Steele, Southeast Region, Public Affairs
9/22/2016
Nashville, Tenn. -- The outstanding wing in each region receiving the highest score on its CAP-USAF
inspection and evaluation of Search and Rescue and Disaster Relief Mission becomes the recipient of the
Search and Rescue and the Disaster Relief Mission Awards.
The Search and Rescue Mission Award winners for 2016, from the Southeast Region was the Florida Wing.

SER Cadets Win Quality Cadet Unit Awards! Way to
Go!
By Lt. Col. Judy L. Steele, Southeast Region, Public Affairs
9/22/2016
Maxwell AFB, Ala. -Any cadet unit that displays strong program fundamentals can earn the Quality Cadet Unit Award. This award
motivates squadrons to pursue goals that will inevitability lead to their having a vibrant Cadet Program. The Quality
Cadet Unit Award is purely objective. Cadet and composite squadrons who meet the challenging
criteria automatically earn the award. The Quality Cadet Unit Award can serve as a helpful management tool. Local
leaders can use the QCUA program to identify squadrons that are flourishing, and perhaps use leaders of those
outstanding units to mentor leaders in nearby units that did not earn the award.

QUALITY CADET UNIT AWARD (45)
 

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AL032 SER-AL-032MAXWELL COMPOSITE SQDN
AL087 SER-AL-087BESSEMER COMPOSITE SQDN
AL113 SER-AL-113AUBURN COMPOSITE SQDN
FL 011 SER-FL-011 NORTH PERRY COMPOSITE SQDN
FL 016 SER-FL-016 CORAL SPRINGS CADET SQDN
FL 021 SER-FL-021 LAKE COMPOSITE SQDN
FL 024 SER-FL-024 STUART COMPOSITE SQDN
FL 044 SER-FL-044 SRQ COMPOSITE SQDN
FL 054 SER-FL-054 LANTANA CADET SQDN
FL 078 SER-FL-078 TREASURE COAST COMPOSITE SQDN
FL 089 SER-FL-089 89TH MACDILL AVIATION CADET SQDN
FL 237 SER-FL-237 GEN CHUCK YEAGER CADET SQDN
FL 259 SER-FL-259 CENTRAL FLORIDA COMPOSITE SQDN
FL 286 SER-FL-286 PINES-MIRAMAR COMPOSITE SQDN
FL 337 SER-FL-337 FORT LAUDERDALE COMPOSITE SQDN
FL 355 SER-FL-355 TAMIAMI COMPOSITE SQDN
FL 372 SER-FL-372 BOCA RATON COMPOSITE SQDN
FL 432 SER-FL-432 TALLAHASSEE COMPOSITE SQDN
FL 444 SER-FL-444 MARIANNA COMP SQDN
FL 458 SER-FL-458 WESLEY CHAPEL CADET SQDN
FL 463 SER-FL-463 463RD CADET SQDN
FL 811 SER-FL-811 CRYSTAL LAKE MS CADET SQDN
GA 002 SER-GA-002 ALBANY COMPOSITE SQDN
GA 065 SER-GA-065 DEKALB COUNTY CADET SQDN
GA 090 SER-GA-090 COBB COUNTY COMPOSITE SQDN
GA 098 SER-GA-098 COLUMBUS COMPOSITE SQDN
GA 112 SER-GA-112 GWINNETT COUNTY COMPOSITE SQDN
GA 153 SER-GA-153 WEST GEORGIA COMPOSITE SQDN
GA 156 SER-GA-156 BARROW-JACKSON COMPOSITE SQDN
GA 160 SER-GA-160 GAINESVILLE CADET SQDN
GA 452 SER-GA-452 CLARKE COUNTY COMP SQDN
GA 454 SER-GA-454 MARIETTA AIR MUSEUM CADET SQDN
GA 507 SER-GA-507 ELLIJAY COMPOSITE SQDN
GA 808 SER-GA-808 CENTRAL FELLOWSHIP CHRISTIAN ACADEMY CADET SQDN
PR 059 SER-PR-059 COL BARTOLO ORTIZ CADET SQDN
PR 094 SER-PR-094 LT COL ELSA M SOTO-TORRES CADET SQDN
PR 110 SER-PR-110 CPT P. F. GUISTI PIAZZA CADET SQDN
PR 123 SER-PR-123 DR. CESAREO ROSA- NIEVES CADET SQDN
PR 126 SER-PR-126 MUNIZ ANG BASE CADET SQDN
TN005SER-TN-005SMYRNA COMPOSITE SQDN
TN008SER-TN-008KNOXVILLE COMPOSITE SQDN 1
TN019SER-TN-019MORRISTOWN COMPOSITE SQDN
TN036SER-TN-036TULLAHOMA COMPOSITE SQDN
TN148SER-TN-148MCGHEE-TYSON COMPOSITE SQDN
TN185SER-TN-185MUSIC CITY COMPOSITE SQDN

Major Kevin Dinger Accepts Command of Naples
Cadet Squadron
By 1st Lt Donald Binner, Naples Cadet Squadron
9/17/2016
 

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Naples, Fla. -With a firm grip on the flagstaff, Major Kevin Dinger said: “I accept command” and formally assumed
command of the Naples Cadet Squadron of the Civil Air Patrol.
The Change of Command ceremony was held at the Naples CAP hanger on Monday, August 22, 2016, and
hosted over 70 attendees. The ceremony follows a long, time-honored military tradition that publicly
acknowledges out-going Commander Major Dirk DeVille transferring command to incoming Major Kevin
Dinger.
The formal ceremony was hosted by Deputy Commander 2nd Lt. David Stevens. Stevens gave a detailed
summation of DeVille’s successful command history. The Naples Cadet Color Guard presented the Colors
and the Pledge of Allegiance followed. The Change of Command was officiated by Group 5 Commander Lt.
Col. 'Jim' Kaletta.
Dinger joined CAP in July, 1998. He graduated from a private high school and attained the rank of Cadet
Senior Master Sargent in the cadet program. In 2004, became a senior member as a Flight Officer. He has
helped over 12 cadets entry into a aviation or military college. He instructs radio control aircraft flying and
has over 500 hours of flight training hours. He has attended Embry Riddle Aeronautical University and
numerous CAP leadership, character development and aerospace classes.
Mr. Christopher Rozansky, President of the Naples Airport Authority and former CAP cadet, was among
those attending. Other notable attendees were former CAP commanders Lt. Col. Charlie Dinsmoor and Lt.
Col. Tom Kusnar.. Marco Island Squadron was well represented with many attending, including Major
Robert Corriveau, Commander.
A reception followed the formal ceremony.

Naples Senior Squadron Updates Squadron Radio
Room With New Hardware
By 1st Lt Donald Binner, Naples Senior Squadron
9/17/2016
Naples, Fla. -A ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Naples Civil Air Patrol squadron headquarters revealed upgraded radio
communications capability. The new communication suite extends the radio range for local missions and training
exercises. The Civil Air Patrol maintains one of the largest nationwide radio communication networks.
The equipment upgrade features new VHF radios and antenna system. It is the culmination of months of planning and
preparation by squadron communications officer, Lt. Col. Ron Hemond; facilities officer, Capt. Dom DaSilva and
information technology officer, Capt. Jhon Arias. The trio were charged by squadron leadership to meet the growing
demands for a fully functioning, long-range operations communications room.
"This was a true team effort" said Naples Senior Squadron commander, 1st Lt. Tom Di Bernardo .
This was the second technology upgrade for the squadron this year. Multi-media equipment was upgraded this past
spring to meet the growing training needs.
DaSilva and Hemond developed a comprehensive plan to modernize the squadron’s radios. The plan required Hemond
to work closely with CAP Florida Wing Logistics to upgrade radios. Arias and DaSilva had the responsibility to get
approvals from the airport authority for the new antenna tower as well as acquire cables and materials for the
installation. Unit members Arias, 1st Lt. Andres Gutierrez and Senior Member Alvin Sotomayor completed the
installation of the antennas.
A flight was then scheduled to test the signal range. On Monday, September 5th, an aircrew flew the squadron’s
Cessna aircraft into the Everglades and Ten Thousand Islands to field-test the new communications system at different
altitudes. Capt. Ray James provided back-up communications at the Marco Island Senior Squadron hangar
communications room. The aircrew included Di Bernardo as pilot in Command, Lt. Col. Tom Kuznar as Mission
Observer and 1st Lt. Don Binner as Mission Scanner.
 

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After a successful flight, Di Bernardo said: "This new antenna system has greatly extended the communication range
and allows Naples squadron to maintain air to ground radio communications when conducting the coastal patrol,
scheduled search and rescue training exercises, cadet orientation and other air operations. We are very proud of our
newly remodeled facility and the accomplishments of the team."

Cadets Join 'Parade of Heroes' to Honor Victims of Sept. 11 Attacks
By 2nd Lt. Ruth Byron, Public Affairs Officer,
9/13/2016
Cape Coral, Fla., - 

Page 61 of 224

The Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron joined the community of Cape Coral in remembrance of
those who gave the ultimate sacrifice during the events of September 11 , 2001. A “Parade of
Heroes” to honor the victims, including first-responders and veterans, was in held in downtown
Cape Coral.
th

Following the parade, the South West Florida Military History Museum held an open house
featuring exhibits from historical military conflicts such as the Revolutionary War, Civil War,
WWI, WWII, Desert Storm and others. The open house also recognized the 7th anniversary of the
museum and library.
Founding member, Ralph Santillo, was quoted in a recent press release saying, “By going outside the walls 
of our museum, we hope to encourage others in the community to join us in saying thank you to those 
who serve us in the military as well as the brave service personnel who serve us on the home front.” 
 

Venice Cadet Squadron Recognizes Cadet Recruiter
By Maj. Ted Dodds, Public Affairs Officer, Venice Cadet Squadron
9/10/2016
Venice, Fla., --

On August 30, 2016, cadets and senior members from the Civil Air Patrol’s Venice Cadet
Squadron recognized Cadet Airman Giovanni Salvador for his efforts in recruiting two new cadet
members, Adam and Elijah Freihaut, to their Squadron.
Cadet Airman Salvador initially met Adam and Elijah Freihaut, who are brothers, during his home
school activities. Cadet Salvador’s enthusiasm about CAP motivated the Freihaut brothers to attend
a Venice Cadet Squadron meeting. As Cadet Salvador predicted, both brothers immediately
enjoyed the variety of activities the Squadron offers Venice area youths. They and their father have
regularly attended Squadron meetings since initially being introduced to CAP.
“I am proud of Giovanni’s initiative in recommending CAP to his friends”, said 1st Lt. Robert
Salvador (also a member of the Venice Cadet Squadron) of his son’s recruiting efforts. “It’s
awesome that he earned the recruitment ribbon, a ribbon that few members of our Squadron have”.
New members add new talents to CAP Squadrons and make the Squadron better for everyone”, added Lt. 
Col. Trammell, Squadron Commander. “We are proud that a junior cadet, like Cadet Salvador, has 
displayed such fine leadership skills by informing his friends about CAP”. 
 

CAP Members Gather at Military Museum for Meeting
By 2nd Lt. Ruth Byron, Public Affairs Officer, Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron
9/10-/2016
Cape Coral, Fla., --

The recent Civil Air Patrol (CAP) Group 5 Commander’s Call was held at the Southwest Florida
Military History Museum in Cape Coral. The event also featured a town hall meeting with the
Florida Wing Commander. The event was hosted by the Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron.

 

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Following the invocation by Chaplain Major Eric S. Cooter, and a safety briefing by Cadet Master
Sargent Bella Viator, the meeting schedule included the staff briefings by Group 5 HQ staff
members, squadron reports from each unit commanders, and a Cadet Advisory Council
presentation by Cadet Major Mikehla Hicks who identified several opportunities to improve the
cadet program on a squadron, group, wing and national level.
A town hall meeting with the Florida Wing Commander followed the commander’s call agenda.
Colonel Henry Irizarry spent several minutes bringing members up to date on key wing-level
initiatives in each of the operation and support function areas. Irizarry then opened the meeting to
questions from the members.
Col. Irizarry presented professional development milestone awards to several Group 5 members
assisted by Group 5 Commander, Lt. Col. Milton ‘Jim’ Kaletta, followed by lunch served by
volunteers from the museum.
Congratulations go to 2nd Lt. William Leszczynski, 1st Lt. Thomas Di Bernardo, and Maj. Robert
Hughes who each received the Grover Loening Award. The Loening Award is the third of five
senior member professional milestone achievements. The award recognizes those members who
have dedicated themselves to leadership and personal development in the CAP.
Maj Robert Corriveau was presented the Paul E. Garber Award. Maj. Corriveau was recognized for
his efforts to inform the local community about CAP and train fellow members in a variety of
courses. Corriveau is the current squadron commander for the Marco Island Senior Squadron and
completed the National Inspector General College this year.
The mission of the Southwest Florida Military History Museum is to honor our soldiers, preserve
military history and to educate today’s and future generations the true meaning of military service
and sacrifice. Through authentic artifacts, displayed in a variety of formats throughout the
museum, viewers can bear witness to the experiences and sacrifices of past members of our Armed
Forces. Museum exhibits cover every aspect of military service from the Revolutionary War to the
conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.
What the museum displays is not a glorification of war, but a tribute to our military heritage and
those who have served in the military, during peacetime and in war.

 

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Florida Wing Commander with Group 5 Unit Commanders at Southwest Florida Military History
Museum.
L to R: Maj. Nancy Spieth, FL816; Maj. William Hansen, FL044; Maj. Robert Corriveau, FL376; Col. Henry 
Irizarry, FL001; Lt. Col. ‘Jim’ Kaletta, FL370; Lt. Col. Thomas Trammell, FL335; 1st Lt. Thomas DeBernardo, 
FL023; Maj. Kevin Dinger, FL373; Maj. Gerald Lewis, FL051. (photo: Maj. J. Carlson, CAP) 
 

Florida Wing Begins Response Mission to Hurricane Hermine
By Maj. Jeff Carlson, Public Information Officer, Florida Wing
9/5/2016
Florida --

Civil Air Patrol’s Florida Wing is taking aerial photos of ground damage for the Federal
Emergency Management Agency after Hurricane Hermine made landfall.
The wing has delivered more than 1,300 aerial images of Florida's Gulf Coast to FEMA Region IV
so far.
Now on its 10th day of active alert, the wing is receiving taskings from FEMA Region IV, the state
of Florida and the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida.
The first photography assessment flight, launched Friday, followed a coastal route from
Tallahassee to Crystal River and produced over 600 images.
A second flight Saturday covered the coast from Punta Gorda to Crystal River after initially being
delayed by adverse weather. That CAP plane, which took off early Saturday afternoon, was in the
air just under four hours.
“The typical summer afternoon weather pattern in Florida tends to create problems for aircrews,”
said Maj. Richard Morrell, CAP aerial photographer. “However, our flight was beautiful.”
 

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CAP photographers are providing both nadir-angle and oblique-angle images. Nadir refers to a
specific vertical direction point below the plane. Nadir images are easier to assemble into a mosaic,
while oblique angle images can provide greater information about structural damage.
“I was impressed by how much technology we were using in the small airplane,” Morrell said. “I
was surrounded with boxes from the two camera systems, and up front the aircrew was using the
GPS system with a preloaded flight plan.
"I’ve been doing this for awhile and even I was impressed.”
The wing-mounted VIRB camera system is the latest addition to CAP’s airborne imaging arsenal.
The camera is remotely operated from inside the airplane using an electronic tablet. The camera
provides the nadir-angle images at customer-requested intervals.
Because the target is directly under the aircraft, each member of the aircrew plays a distinct role.
The CAP volunteers have completed specialized training to ensure a coordinated effort.
Area Command for the wing, established under the direction of Lt. Col. Luis Garcia, is
coordinating activities at incident command posts at Pensacola, Punta Gorda and Ormond Beach.
In addition to the aerial imaging, the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center tasked the Florida
Wing with tracking down two emergency locator transmitter beacon signals.
After the first request Saturday morning, an aircrew operating from the Ormond Beach post
tracked the signal to Cross City Airport. CAP ground team members were deployed to the site to
find the aircraft owner and silence the beacon.
A second ELT search was launched just after midnight this morning in the Fort Lauderdale area. 
 

Florida Wing Demobilizes Hermine Response Mission
By Maj. Jeff Carlson, Public Information Officer, Florida WIng
9/8/2016
Florida --

The Florida Wing is wrapping up its response to Hurricane Hermine and returning to normal
operations after 10 days of being on active alert, during which Civil Air Patrol aircrews captured
over 1,800 digital images of Florida's storm-battered Gulf Coast.
The wing was put on active alert Aug. 25 because of the threat of tropical weather entering the
Florida Strait. After Hermine became a hurricane and made landfall in the Florida Panhandle on
Sept. 1, the wing began taking aerial photos of ground damage for the Federal Emergency
Management Agency, the state of Florida and the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall
Air Force Base, Florida.
Area Command for the wing, established under the direction of Lt. Col. Luis Garcia, coordinated
activities at incident command posts at Pensacola, Punta Gorda and Ormond Beach.

 

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Initial flights covered the Gulf Coast shore from Tallahassee to Punta Gorda. On Sunday, a third
sortie captured images along the shores of Sarasota Bay.
The state’s Emergency Management Team tasked CAP for aerial images in response to a request
by Sarasota County Emergency Management.
“These photos will assist Sarasota County staff to determine impacts to our shoreline, homes
located along the shoreline, dune structures and beaches,” said Scott Montgomery, Sarasota
County Recovery Operations chief. “CAP performed a flyover in July, part of the statewide
hurricane drill — so we now have before and after photos.”
Montgomery said Sarasota County has three engineered beaches that are eligible for federal
reimbursement for damage. The CAP aerial images may assist in the county’s efforts to acquire
funding for repairs by documenting the storm damage.
“A huge thank-you to CAP for their efforts in assisting Sarasota County,” Montgomery said.
Sunday’s photography mission lasted 90 minutes and produced 474 photos of the county's coastal
areas and inland waterways.
Capt. Ann Marie Kozloski, CAP aerial photographer, was instructed to “photograph the coast and
the passes from the intercoastal waterways to the Gulf,” she said. “I used the training I received
from NESA to make some assumptions and also included any bridges, both the entire span and the
entrances and exits. Many times wind and water can damage structures.
“I was looking for any coastal erosion and/or flooding damage. I also made sure to get any and all
piers, especially if they looked like city or county public fishing piers.”
NESA is Civil Air Patrol’s National Emergency Services Academy, held annually to provide
specialized training for CAP members.
Col. Henry Irizarry, Florida Wing commander, said in a statement to members that “thousands of
man-hours have been dedicated to this mission.” That included aerial photography, ground
team/urban direction finding operations, emergency locator transmitter search, interagency
coordination, interwing operations, communications support and activation of the three mission
bases as well as manning the Florida state Emergency Operations Center support staff.
“I greatly appreciate what you all have contributed and accomplished on this mission,” Irizarry said. “It is a 
clear superb reflection of our operational capability, preparedness and teamwork. Again, thank you. We 
could not do what we do without you!” 
 

Group 1 SAREX in Pensacola
By 2nd Lt. Charles M. McCollim, Group 1 Florida Wing
9/3/2016
Pensacola, Fla. -Florida Wing Group 1 Civil Air Patrol conducted a search and rescue exercise to locate a
simulated missing white RV4 aircraft that departed from Chipley, Florida enroute to Mobile,
Alabama for maintenance. The weekend long exercise had 58 members signed into the mission.
 

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Incident Commander Lt. Col. George K. Schaefer reiterated to everyone “First safety, safety,
safety,” and then “have fun.” The mission had a special guest Lt. Col. Kelley Unsicker from the
First Air Force observing Saturday.
On Saturday, three Urban Direction Finding teams and four airplanes practiced electronic
searches to find practice emergency locator transmitters hidden throughout Escambia County
while a host of mission base personnel directed operations and maintained communications. Two
Ground Teams consisting of three senior members and seven cadets bivouacked in tents
Saturday night and concluded the exercise on Sunday using woodland search skills to locate the
simulated plane wreckage and the missing pilot - a dummy made from a stuffed flight suite hidden in the woods.

South Lakeland Composite Squadron August 2016 Change of Command & Promotions
By 2nd Lt James Chamberland Sr., South Lakeland Composite Squadron
8/26/2016
Lakeland, Florida -The South Lakeland Composite Squadron SER FL-466 held its Cadet Change of Command & August
Promotion Ceremony on August 25th at St. Paul Lutheran Church. The Squadrons new Cadet Commander
is C/CMSgt Justin Dal Colletto. Assuming the responsibilities of First Sergeant will be C/MSgt Alex
Vanderwier and C/TSgt Catherine Jilbert will be the squadron’s Flight Sergeant. Florida Wing’s Group 3
Commander, Major Steve Lampasona, and his wife, Major Joyce Lampasona, were in attendance as 2
cadets received promotions as well. Congratulations to all the cadets assuming new squadron leadership
positions and those that passed their requirements and were promoted this evening.

Cadets Promotions:
Catherine Jilbert

C/TSgt (Cadet Technical Sergeant)

James Chamberland, Jr 
 

C/SrA     (Cadet Senior Airmen) 

SRQ Composite Squadron Hosts Group 5 Unit Commanders Course
By 1st Lt Christopher Carroll, SRQ Composite Squadron, Florida Wing
8/22/2016
Sarasota, Fla. -- Twenty-nine senior members of Civil Air Patrol (CAP), including ten instructors,
participated in the Group 5 Unit Commanders Course (UCC) on 20-21 August 2016 in Sarasota,
Fla., hosted by the SRQ Composite Squadron of CAP.
Major Jeff Carlson, Finance Officer, Group 5 HQ, and one of the facilitators of the course said,
“The commitment of the professional volunteers to increase their personal leadership skills was
very evident. Some of the participants traveled over 250 miles each day to attend the professional
training.”
The Unit Commanders Course prepares potential squadron and group commanders to assume
command responsibilities, providing training on leadership, management and ethics in a
standardized format. Squadron and group commanders are responsible for providing local
leadership, administering programs, and managing the volunteer members in the field as they
perform the critical missions of CAP, as well as providing support to the United States Air Force
as the official Air Force Auxiliary.
 

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The Group 5 UCC addressed the traits and skills new squadron commanders need to lead and
manage their units effectively. Topics included command responsibility and accountability,
recruiting and retention, safety, how to work with families, management, leadership,
communication, and elements of successful units and leaders.
“While the two-day course covered a wide range of topics, the participants agreed that the
greatest benefit came from the open-discussions and interaction between members of the cohort,”
Carlson added.
Instructors for the course came from seven different squadrons and included Lt. Col. Luis Garcia
(FL001), Lt. Col. Dave Moruzzi (FL370), Lt. Col. James Spieth (FL001), Maj. Jeff Carlson (FL370),
Maj. Sam Chiodo (FL310), Maj. Robert Corriveau (FL376), Maj. Bill Hansen (FL044), Maj. Ben
Moore (FL044), Maj. Nancy Spieth (FL816), and Capt. Judy Schiff (FL023). All of the UCC
instructors have experience leading a squadron. Some are current Unit Commanders while others
are former Commanders or Deputy Commanders.
Based at the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport, the SRQ Composite Squadron is one of
more than 1,700 Civil Air Patrol squadrons across the nation. The SRQ Composite Squadron
includes 104 members: 65 senior members and 39 cadets. Members put general aviation to its
best use, dedicated to saving lives, flying counter-drug missions, participating in homeland
security efforts, providing disaster relief, advancing young people, and supporting America’s
educators. For information about the SRQ Composite Squadron of CAP, visit www.capsrq044.com.

Lee County Cadets introduce Parents to CAP
By 2nd Lt Ruth Byron, Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron
8/22/2016
Cape Coral, Fla., --

Civil Air Patrol cadets at the Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron presented an introduction to the
Civil Air Patrol for parents and students at Gulf Middle School in Cape Coral, Florida.
Cadet Senior Master Sargent Tristan Palmer led the overview that focused on CAP’s three primary
missions. He explained how thousands of young people are introduced to aviation through CAP’s
cadet program. One example used was the Orientation rides given by experienced pilots in CAP
airplanes where cadets have a hands-on opportunity to learn to pilot an aircraft.
The CAP program allows cadets to progress through sixteen achievement levels at their own speed
and includes modules in aerospace education, leadership, physical fitness and moral leadership.
Palmer emphasized how the training experience helps to prepare the cadets for a career of their
choice.
Cadet Palmer explained how the three missions: Aerospace Education, Emergency Services and
Cadet Programs, influence the volunteer members and benefit the local community. He gave
examples of how the cadet program helped two young adults prepare for a career as officers in the
U.S. Air Force. He told the story of Major Samantha Weeks and Major Ken Campbell who began
their personal journey in aviation as CAP cadets and became pilots with the world famous U.S. Air
Force Thunderbirds. Palmer also explained how the core value of volunteer service leads the cadets
to participate in community activities such as the “Parade of Heroes” and “Wreaths across
America.”
 

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In addition to the Introduction to CAP presentation, the event included a promotion ceremony for
squadron members. Congratulations go out to C/SrA Cooper Bisbe, C/SSgt Joey Gingras, C/Amn
Rachel Thomas and C/SMSgt Tristan Palmer. The cadets were recognized for their achievements
in CAP modules of leadership, cadet programs and aerospace education and balancing the rigors of
the CAP programing while maintaining high scholastic achievement with their regular school
studies.

Drill Demonstration at Gulf Middle School (photo: 2nd Lt Ruth Byron, CAP)

 

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Promotion Ceremony at Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron. (Photo: 2nd Lt Ruth Byron, CAP) 
 

SRQ Composite Squadron Members Explore Pensacola Naval Air Station
By C/SSgt Samantha Michelle Duich, SRQ Composite Squadron
8/17/2016
Sarasota, Fla. -- On 29 August 2016, five senior members and 16 cadets of the SRQ Composite
Squadron of Civil Air Patrol (CAP) traveled to the Pensacola Naval Air Station in Pensacola,
Florida, for a four-day educational event. The trip included exploring the National Naval Aviation
Museum, traveling to Mobile, Alabama, to tour the USS Alabama battleship, cooking out on the
beach, and climbing up a huge 197-step lighthouse, a climb that seemed never ending.
"My favorite part of the trip was running around and getting lost on the battleship," C/2Lt Jesse
Yong said. Senior member 2Lt Jack Duich added, "It was a great experience watching the cadets
get such a kick out of all the activities we did."
While visiting the Naval Aviation Museum, the cadets watched the movie “The Magic of Flight” in
the Giant Screen Theater and tried their hand at flying some simulators. The aircraft in the
museum ranged from WW I biplanes to the F-14 Tomcat. The museum features recreated scenes
from WW II military bases and the home front. One of the more interesting exhibits was the control
car from a WW II airship (blimp). Pulled from a scrap yard and restored by museum personnel, it
flew anti-submarine patrols over shipping convoys and logged many air-sea rescue flights.
At the USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park, the cadets got an exclusive, once-in-a-lifetime
opportunity to sit in the cockpit of the SR12A, the predecessor to the SR71 “Blackbird” after one of
the museum tour guides offered to open the canopy just for the CAP cadets.
 

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CAP’s cadet program introduces young people, from ages 12 through 21, to aviation. Cadets
progress at their own pace through a 16-step program including aerospace education, leadership
training, physical fitness and moral leadership. Cadets compete for academic scholarships to
further their studies in fields such as engineering, science, aircraft mechanics, aerospace
medicine, meteorology, and many others. Those cadets who earn cadet officer status may enter
the Air Force as an E3 (airman first class) rather than an E1 (airman basic).
Based at the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport, the SRQ Composite Squadron is one of
more than 1,700 Civil Air Patrol squadrons across the nation. The SRQ Composite Squadron
includes 104 members: 65 senior members and 39 cadets. Members put general aviation to its
best use, dedicated to saving lives, flying counter-drug missions, participating in homeland
security efforts, providing disaster relief, advancing young people, and supporting America’s
educators. For information about the SRQ Composite Squadron of CAP, visit www.capsrq044.com.

Cadets and senior members from the SRQ Composite Squadron at the Naval Aviation Museum
in Pensacola, Florida.

Aerospace Education and Rocketry Workshop
By Captain Jesse L. Baker, Marco Island Senior Squadron
8/9/2016
Marco Island, Fla. -10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1... Launch, launch, launch! Could be heard at the Frank E. Mackle
Community Park Center on Marco Island, Fla.
Camp Director Heather Lopez invited the Marco Island Civil Air Patrol to conduct an Aerospace
Education and Rocketry workshop on 28 July 2016. The kids are all between the ages of 6 to 12.
There were many great counselors helping the sixty-plus children with the different tasks. The
program, organized by Captain Jesse L. Baker, began with a presentation of the services that
Civil Air Patrol provides to the community and the three main missions that guide us: Aerospace
Education, Cadet Programs, and Emergency Services.
The squadron constantly practices Search & Rescue exercises to be always "mission ready".
Captain Baker explained our weekly air patrols of the Wilderness Water Way of the 10,000 Islands
 

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and parts of the Everglades.
Baker said, "What we are looking for are boaters and campers who may be in distress. We report
the incident location to the Coast Guard and the Sherriff who then guide the rescue operation, if
needed."
He explained that we also perform our Homeland Security efforts as a part of the US Air Force
Total Force working directly with the federal, state, and local agencies to prevent unwanted
coastal incursions, drug trafficking and terrorism.
Additional emphasis was put on the CAP cadet program.
"Our Cadets can learn how to fly airplanes and gliders, and earn various scholarships through the
CAP. "
1st Lt David Dumas, a member of the flight crew and wearing his distinctive, fire-proof USAF flight
suit, gave an overview of the kind of gear, planning and teamwork needed to fly a search and
rescue mission.
Finally, Maj. Marian Motyl-Szary explained the important role aerial photography can have after a
disaster.
Capt. Baker presented the scaled models of the different types of rocket engines and discussed
their differences and applications.
After all the talking, we finally arrived to the fun part and the most important part of the workshop:
building air-powered paper rockets. This exercise teaches the participants the principles of
aerodynamics as well as teamwork and experimentation. The kids were provided with paper, tape
and small rods used to form the rocket fuselage. The group went right into the production and
assembly of their own rockets. Once the fuselage, fins and nose cone were assembled and taped
together, everyone went out to the launch pads or basketball court.
Working in two-person crews each child had a turn pressurizing and launching their rockets. The
"fuel" or air pressure was provided by two launching contraptions where a large bicycle pump was
connected to a pipe assembly. Due to the "unique" nature of each individual final design the
rockets flew like arrows the length of the court, gaining lofty altitudes, or corkscrewed in an erratic
flight path.
It was a fun event and of course we had a few clowns among the children; for instance, several
creative girls used the extra rocket nose cones to tape a unicorn horn to their forehead.
Baker concluded: "Everyone had a great time. Looking ahead, I'd say I can see here: future
engineers, commercial pilots and scientists. The sky's the limit."

 

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New Cameras for CAP Airborne Photography Missions
By 1st Lt Don Binner, Naples Senior Squadron
8/1/2016
Naples, Fla -The new Garmin VIRB Elite camera was just assigned to two southwest Florida CAP squadrons.
The Garmin VIRB Elite (GVE) is a small, removable camera that is attached to a wing-mounted
receiver in order to take down-looking images.
Marco Island Senior Squadron FL376 and Naples Senior Squadron FL023 organized a joint
instructional class at the Naples hangar for Airborne Photographers (AP), Mission Pilots (MP) and
Mission Observers (MO). The class was conducted by Marco Senior Members, Major Marian
Motyl-Szary and Major Bob Corriveau.
The meeting started with a general overview of the GVE. It included an introduction to the camera
followed by the individual operations of the unit. It has four buttons and is easily operated by
scrolling through the options. Picture resolution is high at 16MP. The camera will take about 720
pictures per hour at the 5 second interval setting. There is also a 2 second interval for stills as well
as a video setting. A fully charged battery will last about 3.5 hours of continuous use. It will also
encode the latitude, longitude, direction of shot and altitude.
The accompanying tablet was also inspected by everyone. The GVE requires separate skills from
each member of the aircrew so the group was split into two instructional classes taught separately
by Motyl-Szary and Corriveau.
Major Corriveau instructed the MPs on the piloting requirements in flying a mission using the
GVE. First is collective planning using the search specifications requested by the customer. This
is usually a parallel search but CAP mission pilots are trained in several patterns. A second
unique challenge is the pilot may have to make a ‘positional turn’ instead of a standard rate turn to
correctly position the plane on each leg of the pattern. Corriveau said “Care must be taken to
allow for the required picture overlap”.
Pilots also must know if it is a known or unknown target. A known target would be a bridge or
easily known structure. An unknown target may be something as vague as to fly over the beach
between these two points.
Third is learning to fly slightly to the left of the target or track because of the camera location on
the tip of the right wing. If the aircraft is positioned correctly neither the pilot nor MO can see the
target as it is overflown. The MO or AP will have to give the pilot corrections to position the plane
over the intended track or target.
Major Motyl-Szary demonstrated to his class how to properly mount the GVE. A receiver has been
previously attached to the underside of the right wing near the tip. The GVE is mounted with a 5degree pitch to allow for attitude of the airplane when flying at 90 knots and 10 degrees of flaps.
“The camera is installed backwards because the airflow actually helps it stay in place” said MotylSzary. The pictures and videos are easily flipped 180° later.
He instructed his class by explaining each part of the installation process as he was physically
installing the unit. Motyl-Szary said “Care must be taken to avoid overtightening the hex mounting
screws.” He explained the importance that a separate tether be attached to the unit in the event it
becomes dislodged.
In-flight operation of the camera is by using the included Samsung Galaxy4 communicating over
Wi-Fi. Any tablet such as an iPad or an Android will work with the unit. The AP has the ability to
adjust the time interval for still pictures or initiate a video remotely via Wi-Fi from the tablet while
airborne.
When the mission is completed the aircrew will review the pictures or video. It will then be
uploaded to the customer. FEMA has a special program that allows different organizations to
upload their results to the FEMA image storage facility. The images are geo-tagged and available
for review on a US map.
Training mission are being scheduled for the class participants to gain valuable experience with
the new camera. Florida Wing launched a program to test the Garmin VIRM Elite to take
 

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advantage of the newest camera technology popularized by brands like GoPro. This will be a
valuable tool in any post disaster photography requests made by government, especially FEMA.
The Civil Air Patrol is uniquely qualified to perform this type of mission in a timely and costeffective manner.
CAP California and Colorado Wings have experience with the GVE in real life disaster situations
and have contributed data for educational purposes.

 

 

Cadets recognized with promotions
By Maj Earle Bretz,
7/31/2016
Charlotte County, FL -At a recent meeting of the Cadet Squadron of the Charlotte County Composite Squadron of the
Civil Air Patrol in their headquarters at the Punta Gorda Airport three cadets were promoted to
new ranks.
One of the highlights of a cadet career (ages 12-18) is the night they are recognized as moving up
the career promotion ladder. There are 8 rungs for non-commissioned officers and 6 in the
potential career for commissioned officers. All rungs are available to be earned by all cadets. The
program is designed to allow consistent growth in ranks and responsibilities as a cadet continues
 

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his/her career in CAP at their own pace.
Promotions are the reward for hard work in the classroom, drill field, encampments and their duty
stations. Many hours are spent in learning each new discipline as it is presented to these boys
and girls. They work extremely hard earning their next rank.
Pictured are left to right C/Tech Sgt Michael Griffin, C/ Sen Airman Justin McDonald and C/2nd
Cooper Whitten. For Cadet Whitten the promotion to lst Lt is a two stage process. He was
recognized for completing stage one this night.
Congratulations to these three fine examples of cadets in CAP.
Visit us at FL051/flwg.us  
 

CAP Senior and Cadet Squadrons team up at Raymond James Community Fair
By Lt Col Joyce Nader, Pinellas Senior Squadron
7/31/2016
St Petersburg, FL --

The Pinellas Senior Squadron (FL 182) and the St. Petersburg Cadet Squadron (FL 066) teamed up 
to promote Civil Air Patrol, the US Air Force Volunteer Auxiliary (CAP), at the annual Raymond 
James Community Fair. As in previous years, the community fair was held at Raymond James 
headquarters in St. Petersburg, FL.  The fair is hosted by Raymond James as a way to expose the 
4000 employees that work in their headquarters facility to volunteer organizations around the 
Tampa Bay area. Approximately 50 volunteer groups were represented at this year’s community 
fair.
Representing CAP at the fair was FL 182 Commander, Maj Adrian Cuarta , FL 182 Deputy 
Commander 1ST Lt Ron Klemm, who works at Raymond James, FL 066 Commander, Capt Ronalee 
Klase, and C/Amn Christian DeNapoli.
The CAP team spent the afternoon providing information and discussing the main CAP missions, 
Emergency Services, Cadet Programs, and Aerospace Education, with the Raymond James 
employees that visited the CAP table.
Lt Ron Klemm arranged for the CAP outreach, and stated “this fair is a great opportunity for us to 
spread the word about CAP within the local community; it was a wonderful event which we plan 
to do again next year.”
 
Marco Island Squadron Participates in Aviation Day
By Maj Robert Corriveau, Marco Island Senior Squadron
7/5/2016
Marco Island, Fla. -On Monday June 27th, the STEM Academy summer camp program sponsored by Florida Gulf
Coast University and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People conducted
an Aviation Day field trip to the Marco Island Executive Airport.
The event was organized by Alan Davis, Lee High School Aviation Academy professor. Others in
attendance were: Justin Lobb, Collier County airport manager; Bill Rhodes, Embry Riddle
Aeronautical Academy; Ken Gibson from Project Take-Off and Major Bob Corriveau, Marco Island
 

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Civil Air Patrol squadron commander.
Fifty students were in attendance and participated in a full-day program which consisted of a
comprehensive tour of the airport and maintenance facilities, a drone demonstration by Bill
Rhodes. Commander Corriveau talked about the CAP and guided a tour of the squadron’s
hangar, aircraft and radio room.
Commander Corriveau emphasized the Civil Air Patrol cadet program and what the Marco
Squadron does in service for the county, state and country. During the tour, Maj. Corriveau was
assisted by Deputy Commander Lt. Col. Cindy Dohm who explained the functions and activities of
the radio room and Captain Bob Dohm who showed the CAP airplane and answered questions
regarding the plane components and instruments.
Professor Davis commented: “This program was a very good way of exposing the students to the
opportunities in aviation and we are grateful the squadron was able to participate in the event.”
Commander Corriveau noted that in spite of the large number of students "all were very attentive
and asked many pertinent questions."
The program ended with an inspirational talk given by Ken Gibson in the lounge area of the Marco
Island Executive Airport terminal.

 

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FLWG Graduates 4 at National Inspector General College
By Lt Col Joyce Nader, PAO, PIO, Legal Officer, FL 182, Pinellas Senior Squadron
6/25/2016
Peachtree City, GA --

The recent graduating class of the 2016 National Inspector General College held in Peachtree City,
GA included a record 4 members of the FLWG Inspector General Corp. These FLWG Assistant
Inspector General’s (IGA) included Maj Sam Chiodo, FL 310, Hillsborough One Senior Squadron,
Maj Robert Corriveau, FL 376, Marco Island Senior Squadron, Maj Adrian Cuarta, FL 182
Pinellas Senior Squadron and Maj Steven Makkay, FL 049 Ormond Beach Composite Squadron.
The Inspector General College is the final course in a three-part training program for CAP Inspectors
General. Completion of this course fulfills the academic requirement of the “Master Level” specialty rating
in the CAP Professional Development Program for Inspectors General. This course is required for a
member to serve as an Inspector General at the Wing level or higher. Currently the College is held every 2
years.
The Inspector General College is an intense and challenging weeklong training regimen grounded in
Scenario Based Training (SBT) methods preferred by industry and government. These SBT methods
included mock interviews as well as simulated analysis and investigations.
It was also a valuable networking opportunity for attendees. Some of these attendees included the National
Vice Commander, Brig General Larry Myrick, as well as Region Commanders, Region Vice Commanders
and Wing Commanders.
Maj Cuarta, Commander of FL 182, Pinellas Senior Squadron, and an IGA for FLWG, was very pleased to
be among the attendees, and to have successfully completed the rigorous course, exclaiming, “It was a very
 

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intense and busy week, where days and evenings were filled with lectures, group exercises, homework, and
even an exam…but it was an experience I would not trade, for I learned a lot from the very qualified and
varied instructors…some from CAP USAF…and the networking opportunities and camaraderie was
something truly unique and valuable. I encourage others to attend when the IG College is held again in
2018.”
 

Longtime CAP Member Retires from CAP
By Maj Earle Bretz,
6/23/2016
Charlotte County, FL -Longevity?? THIS is Longevity! !
Civil Air Patrol Captain Fred W. Linde, at the age of 91, was officially retired from CAP with honors
at a recent ceremony. Fred originally joined in 1946 just after he got out of the US Navy serving in
World War II. (Remember that CAP was established on December 1, 1941). A highlight of his
service, other than surviving being shot at, was the fact he was on the first amphibious ship to
arrive in Tokyo Bay for the signing of the surrender papers on the USS Missouri to end the war
with Japan.
Tiring of civilian life, Fred then enlisted in the Air Force just in time to get involved in the Berlin
Airlift of 1947-48. A few years later he was called to serve in Korea during the Korean War. He
left active duty status, but remained in the reserves. His county again needed his services in the
Vietnam War serving in combat operations in Saigon. This proud veteran served his country well
in 3 wars earning 23 decorations and awards, including the Bronze Star, the Purple Heart, Air
Force Commendation, Navy Citation and the Medal for Humane Action (Berlin).
In 1970, he once again left the Air Force for the civilian life as a High School Teacher, travel
agent, lately involved with three travel agencies and a tour company. He also saw employment
with United Airlines, Japan Air Lines, TWA and American Airlines.
With his many calls to serve his country, Fred's CAP career never did settle down until he joined
the Charlotte County Composite Squadron in 2008. His duties included Scanner, Observer and
Pilot. He served his squadron, city, state and nation with extreme diligence. We have been very
proud and fortunate to have had the chance to serve with this very capable officer. His mates
wish all the best in the future. Fred says, "It's been one great ride!" " I think I did it all!" Sure
does look like it, Fred.
CAP is the Congressional Gold Medal winning Auxiliary of the United States Air Force, celebrating
its 75th year of serving America. Tax deductible donations may be sent to Charlotte Squadron,
28000 A-21 Airport Road, Punta Gorda, FL 33982-2452. Visit us at FL051/flwg.us

Color Guard presents at Armed Forces Day Ceremony
By William Bailey,
6/23/2016
Lake County, FL -Cadets and Senior Members from Lake County's joined forces with the daughters of the American 
Revolution to honor Lake County Veterans at the Royal Palms Conference Center. At the event more than 
200 of lake's veterans were in attendance, as well as Congressional Representative Larry Mets who was 
one of the guest speakers for the event. One of the stirring moments of the night was the presentation of 
our Nations Flag by the all female Color Guard of Lake County's Civil Air Patrol (which is a first for this 
squadron) to begin the nights ceremony. The color guard practiced tirelessly for over two months, under 
the direction of Cadet Lt Colonel Alyxandra Swanson to make this a night one to remember for our 
veterans. Also, the Commander of the Squadron, Colonel Larry Rogers, gave a great speech on the 
importance of the Civil Air Patrol for the future leaders of our great country and to the military. During the 
 

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event, veterans of all our wars were called to the stage and presented with a pin and a certificate and 
thanked deeply for their service to secure our American freedoms that we all hold dear. A spotlight shown 
on a table set for the brave men and women who never made it back, but who paid the ultimate price as a 
bag piper played Amazing Grace in the background.  Not a dry eye in the building could be found.  
 

Civil Air Patrol Member Participates in Historic First Honor Flight
By 1st Lt Donald Binner, Naples Senior Squadron
6/21/2016
Naples, Fla., --

An Honor Flight departed from Naples Municipal Airport on 11 June, 2016 for Washington, DC
with 66 women veterans aboard. The Collier County Honor Flight was the first to leave from
Naples Municipal airport and the first to honor only women veterans. The female veterans
represented all branches of the military and major conflicts from WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and
Afghanistan. Honor Flight participants included Jessica Stearns, USAF ret. Major Stearns is the
former commander of Civil Air Patrol’s Naples Senior Squadron.
The busy day started at 6:30am with the veterans assembling at the Naples Commercial Terminal
for registration. The women were treated to a free hot breakfast and coffee. They socialized while
preparing for an 8:05am departure on Elite Airlines.
The flight arrived on time in Washington where the group boarded their daylong, private bus tour
complete with a Capitol City Police escort. From the airport, they proceeded to the National World
War II Memorial where they were greeted by Senator Bob Dole.
Stearns said, “I had previously met the Senator in 1974 and it was a thrill to meet him again.”
The tour continued with a visit to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the Korean War Veterans
Memorial. Lunch was served during the visit to the Women in Military Service for America
Memorial where time was taken to make a group photo.
After lunch, the veterans visited Arlington National Cemetery to observe a Changing of the Guard
and wreath-laying ceremony. The tour continued to the Marine Corps War Memorial and
concluded at the United States Air Force Memorial. The Vets then boarded their bus and the police
escorted the privileged visitors to their awaiting flight back to Naples.
The Elite Airline jet departed for Naples for an 8:30pm arrival. During the return flight, the guests
received an additional surprise: Mail Call! During midflight, the women were given letters from
friends, relatives, Florida U.S. Senators, State Representatives, and local civic organizations. The
letters congratulated them on the historic flight and their military service. Each participant also
received a Challenge Coin to commemorate the event.
One more surprise awaited the group upon arriving in Naples. When the group entered the
terminal, each Vet was presented with a personal copy of the group photo that was made earlier in
the day at the Women's Memorial.
Former CAP Group 5 Commander, Lt. Col. Ray Rosenberg, attended the celebration of the
returning Honor Flight and said, “What an exciting time it was at APF Saturday evening.”
 

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As they walked through the terminal building, over 400 cheering family and friends greeted the
Honor Flight participants. The accolades for the historic flight and honored guests continued
outside where over 600 community friends and neighbors celebrated the local heroes.
“We had a great flight crew, very attentive and gracious,” said Stearns. “I had a fabulous trip, a
very emotional trip. This will be one of the most treasured days in my life.”

Maj Cuarta Racks Up Prestigious Awards
By Lt Col Joyce Nader, PAO, PIO, Legal Officer, FL 182, Pinellas Senior Squadron
6/19/2016
Athens, Ga --

 Maj Cuarta Racks Up Prestigious Awards 
By: Lt Col Joyce Nader, PAO, PIO, Legal Officer, FL 182
Dateline:  June 5, 2016,   Southeast Region Conference, Athens, GA
Maj Adrian Cuarta, Commander for FL 182, Pinellas Senior Squadron, Civil Air Patrol (“CAP”),
based at Albert Whitted Airport, recently earned several prestigious awards and honors.
The Commander of FL 182 was honored by the CAP Florida Wing Commander (“FLWG”), Col
Henry Irizarry, by being named FLWG Senior Member of the Year for 2015 at the FLWG
Conference held in Orlando at the Rosen Center in April of 2016. He was presented this award for
his outstanding service to FLWG during his tenure with CAP, serving in various capacities and
performing numerous functions for CAP in an exceptional manner.
Maj Cuarta also received, at the FLWG Conference, a Commander’s Commendation for Maj
Cuarta’s outstanding service to FLWG as an Assistant Inspector General this past year. He
assisted in numerous Subordinate Unit Inspections (“SUI”) in Group 3 in 2015-16. He also
stepped in to aide Group 1, along with Maj Sam Chiodo, Commander of Hillsborough One Senior
Squadron, and traveled to the Florida Panhandle on multiple separate weekends in 2015, to conduct
SUIs for all the squadrons in Group 1 with a successful outcome.
The Commander’s Commendation recognizes outstanding performance where achievements and
services are clearly exceptional when compared to similar achievements and service of members of
like rank and responsibility.
While there, along with Lt Col Joyce Nader, FL 182, Maj Cuarta also received the Gill Robb
Wilson Award for having successfully completed Level V, the highest professional development
award earned by seniors members of CAP. Maj Cuarta completed the final requirement in May,
2015, when he attended National Staff College at CAP Headquarters, Maxwell AFB, Montgomery,
AL.

 

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Following receipt of these awards and commendations, Maj Cuarta was contacted by the CAP
Southeast Region (SER), and was asked to attend their upcoming SER Conference.
The high honor of being named as the FLWG’s Senior Member of the Year placed Maj Cuarta in
the pool with other Senior Member of the Year award recipients from the entire SER.
Maj Cuarta traveled to Athens, GA, to attend the 2016 SER Conference, on the campus of the
University of Georgia, the oldest chartered university in the United States.
At the SER awards banquet, Maj Cuarta was presented the prestigious honor of being named
Southeast Region Senior Member of the Year for 2015, by Col Barry Melton, Commander for
SER, along with FLWG Commander Col Henry Irizarry. Watching from the head table were
numerous CAP high ranking officers, including CAP National Commander Maj General Joseph
Vazquez.
Maj Cuarta was so honored and pleased to have received these special awards and commendations,
stating “I really appreciate this recognition. I understand that the competition for FLWG Senior
Member and SER Senior Member of the Year was extremely competitive, with so many well
deserving and hard working senior members being in the pool…so I am especially humbled by
that.”
 Well deserved Maj Cuarta!
 
Navy Petty Officer returns to Former Cadet Squadron
By 1st Lt Donald Binner, Naples Cadet Squadron
6/17/2016
Naples, Fla. -Navy Petty Officer Dylan Binner, former CAP Cadet 1Lt Binner, made a surprise visit to his former
CAP squadron, Naples Cadet Squadron 373, while traveling on orders to his next assignment.
Binner was a Naples cadet from 2007 to 2012.
Binner said “ It’s great to see old friends again and see the cadets active and having fun”. He
encouraged the assembled group with some personal stories and for them to enjoy their time at
CAP. “Go to encampment” he said. Binner mentioned his experiences at encampment, but spoke
at length about his three trips to the Experimental Aircraft Association National Fly In, otherwise
known as Blue Beret, in Oshkosh, WI. “Every cadet should apply for Special Activities,” he said.
He continued by telling all to take advantage of the various training available at CAP, especially
Color Guard. Binner took his years of Color Guard experience to boot camp and was immediately
promoted to Section Leader. His CAP training in Customs and Courtesies, and Drill made him the
‘go to guy’ and the only person with CAP experience in his division of 93 sailors.
Cadets who do not contemplate a military career can still benefit from the training gained in Color
Guard. “Color Guard will teach you punctuality, how to maintain a proper bearing and show
respect. These are the visual cues that will make you stand out in today’s competitive market,”
said Binner.

 

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Lee County Cadets Honor Veterans
By 2nd Lt Ruth Byron, Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron
6/1/2016
Cape Coral, Fla., --

With the sounds of cannons booming and rifles firing, cadets from Lee County Schools Squadron
turned out to help the Military History Museum celebrate Memorial Day and honor the country's
fallen heroes.
The cadets assisted with parking and participated in a ceremony for retiring worn flags; a special
memorial to Capt. Daniel Eggers, USA, who was killed in action in Afghanistan in 2004; and the
unveiling of six medal of honor winners.
The event included a reenactment of the Battle of Fort Myers during the War between the States.

 

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Air Force veteran, Jessica Stearns, is greeted by crowd as Veterans Honor Flight returns.  
 

Lee County Squadron holds End of School Year Celebration
By C/SrA Sabrina Reading, Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron
6/12/2016
Cape Coral, Fla., --

The finishing touches on a very successful year at the Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron
included a potluck dinner held at Gulf Middle School in Cape Coral. During the event, five cadets
were recognized with promotions: C/CMSgt Chloe Conlin, C/MSgt Ethan Cummings, C/MSgt.
Katherine Grier, C/2ndLt. Axel Paulsen and C/Amn Marilyn Tacktill.
Honored guests included Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) Shirley A. Nix, Barefoot
Beach Chapter Regent, and Anne McGuire, Lawrence Kearny Chapter Regent . McGuire presented
 

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awards to Cadet Senior Airman Joseph Gingras and Cadet Airmen Fist Class Rachel Thomas for
their successful efforts.
"Today we see a lot of bad news about what the youth of today is doing and I wish the public could
be present at this event tonight to see the direction these youth are headed in and the good things
they are doing." said McGuire.
Lt. Col. Jim Spieth, Florida Wing, represented the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) presented
awards to Cadet Officer of the year C/2nd Lt. Axel Paulsen and the VFW NCO of the Year to
C/Chief Master Sgt. Chloe Conlin.
Lt. Col. Jim Kaletta, Group 5 Commander, represented the Air Force Association (AFA) and
presented the AFA award to C/Senior Master Sgt Bella Viator.
Civil Air Patrol guests also included Cadet Major Mikehla Hicks, Group 5 Cadet Advisory
Chairperson.
Also in attendance were Gulf Middle School Principal, Donnie Hopper, along with other squadron 
supporters, including friends and who provided the delicious dinner. 
 

SRQ Composite Squadron Cadets Receive Promotions and Achievement Awards
By Cadet Staff Sgt. Samantha Michelle Duich, SRQ Composite Squadron
6/6/2016
Sarasota, Fla. -- The SRQ Composite Squadron of Civil Air Patrol (CAP) conferred promotions on
four cadets at their weekly meeting on Monday, 30 May 2016.
SRQ Composite Squadron Commander Maj. William Hansen said, “I want to thank everyone for
coming out tonight to share in the recognition of these cadets and their great achievements.”
Following the posting of the colors, Maj. Hansen promoted the following cadets in grade following
the completion of all requirements:
Oscar Alonso Aguero to Cadet Airman
Natalie Grace Putman to Cadet Airman
Guillermo Jesus Pinon, Jr. to Cadet Airman
Austin J. Vore received recognition for completing the Flight Commander Phase of Cadet Second
Lieutenant
C/2Lt Jesse E. Yong, C/SSgt Samantha Michelle Duich, and C/MSgt Colt A. Burch received a
cord for completing the NCOA course at the Florida Leadership Academy. C/CMSgt Gabrielle
McCoy and C/SMSgt Douglas Lumpkin received a cord for completing the Senior NCOA course at
the Florida Leadership Academy.
In addition, 3 cadets received their awaited achievement certificates:
C/2Lt Austin Vore, Billy Mitchell Achievement Certificate
C/2Lt Jesse Yong, Billy Mitchell Achievement Certificate
C/Capt Gabriel Brink, Amelia Earhart Achievement Certificate
CAP’s cadet program introduces young people, from ages 12 through 21, to aviation. Cadets
 

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progress at their own pace through a 16-step program including aerospace education, leadership
training, physical fitness and moral leadership. Cadets compete for academic scholarships to
further their studies in fields such as engineering, science, aircraft mechanics, aerospace
medicine, meteorology, and many others. Those cadets who earn cadet officer status may enter
the Air Force as an E3 (airman first class) rather than an E1 (airman basic).
Based at the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport, the SRQ Composite Squadron is one of
more than 1,700 Civil Air Patrol squadrons across the nation. The SRQ Composite Squadron
includes 101 members: 61 senior members and 40 cadets. Members put general aviation to its
best use, dedicated to saving lives, flying counter-drug missions, participating in homeland
security efforts, providing disaster relief, advancing young people, and supporting America’s
educators. For information about the SRQ Composite Squadron of CAP, visit www.capsrq044.com.

(Left to Right) Capt. Ann Marie Kozloski (Deputy Commander of Cadets), C/CMSgt Gabrielle
McCoy, C/SMSgt Douglas Lumpkin, Maj. William Hansen (Squadron Commander), C/Capt.
Gabriel Brink. (Photo Credit: 1st Lt. Christopher Carroll, CAP)

More than 80 Attend Change of Command Ceremony for SRQ Composite Squadron Cadets
By 1st Lt. Christopher Carroll, SRQ Composite Squadron, Florida Wing
6/6/2016
Sarasota, Fla. -- More than 80 cadets, parents, guests and senior members attended the SRQ
Composite Squadron of Civil Air Patrol’s (CAP) cadet Change of Command Ceremony on
Monday, 20 May 2016, at The Boys and Girls Club of Sarasota County.
SRQ Composite Squadron Deputy Commander/Cadets said, “Even though the Change of
Command Ceremony is very short, it has a long history and is a very important tradition in the
military.”
Addressing the squadron and guests, outgoing Cadet Commander Capt. Gabriel Brink thanked
his parents for their encouragement and the senior members for giving him the opportunity to be
the commander, and he wished the cadets success in achieving their goals. He added that being
the cadet commander is acknowledged as the hardest challenge of being a cadet.
Incoming Cadet Commander, C/2d Lt. Austin Vore, who is an Eagle Scout, has been in CAP for a
 

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year-and-a-half and will be a senior at Sarasota Military Academy in the fall. He has already
enlisted in the Marines for after high school. C/2d Lt. Jesse Yong will serve as Vore’s Deputy
Commander.
When asked what he thinks will be the most challenging part of his command, Vore said, “The
most challenging thing for me will be keeping myself in my own lane. I like to do everything and,
as commander, I have to step back and let other people do it and help them and teach them.
That’s what being a leader is all about.”
CAP’s cadet program introduces young people, from ages 12 through 21, to aviation. Cadets
progress at their own pace through a 16-step program including aerospace education, leadership
training, physical fitness and moral leadership. Cadets compete for academic scholarships to
further their studies in fields such as engineering, science, aircraft mechanics, aerospace
medicine, meteorology, and many others. Those cadets who earn cadet officer status may enter
the Air Force as an E3 (airman first class) rather than an E1 (airman basic).
Based at the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport, the SRQ Composite Squadron is one of
more than 1,700 Civil Air Patrol squadrons across the nation. The SRQ Composite Squadron
includes 101 members: 61 senior members and 40 cadets. Members put general aviation to its
best use, dedicated to saving lives, flying counterdrug missions, participating in homeland security
efforts, providing disaster relief, advancing young people, and supporting America’s educators.
For information about the SRQ Composite Squadron of CAP, visit www.capsrq044.com.

Charlotte County Cadets Honored by Local VFW Post
By Maj. Earle Bretz, Charlotte County Composite Squadron
5/25/2016
PUNTA GORDA, Fla., -The Port Charlotte Veteran's of Foreign Wars Post 5690 has once again selected two cadets from
the Charlotte County Composite Squadron of the Civil Air Patrol to receive the prestigious VFW
Cadet of the Year Award. Cadet 2nd Lt. Cooper Whitten received the Cadet Officer of the Year
Award and Cadet Chief Master Sgt. Taylor Varner was the recipient of the Cadet NonCommissioned Officer of the Year Award.
The award, presented by VFW Commander Emil Venclik, is given on the basis of the cadet's
progress and status in the CAP program in addition to how well they are doing with their school
curriculum and grades achieved. VFW Post 5690 has supported the efforts of the Charlotte
County CAP squadron to foster leadership and good citizenship in local youth for more than ten
years. Their financial support has been extremely beneficial to our cadet program.
Lt. Whitten joined CAP in March 2013 and has moved up the cadet ranks as rapidly as the
regulations would permit. He is presently the Cadet Deputy Commander. Flying as a career may
be in his future. He has embraced the CAP program and taken advantage of every opportunity to
fly when he can - he has completed nine orientation flights, four credited and five observing. He
has also attended four encampments hosted by Florida Wing.
Sgt. Varner became a CAP member in September 2010 and joined the Charlotte County
squadron two years ago after relocating to Florida from Colorado. His present duty is as First Sgt.
in the squadron. He has seven instructed orientation flights and three observing flights to his
credit. He is working hard to earn the grade of lieutenant before he becomes a member of the
United States Navy in December.
“His experience in CAP will bring many benefits to his Navy career,” said Major Earle Bretz, public
affairs officer.
The Punta Gorda squadron presently has 46 boys and girls between the ages of 12 and 18 year
old.
“Cooper and Taylor are outstanding examples of our cadet group,” offered Bretz.
 

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Patrick Composite Squadron Locate and Silence Emergency Beacon
By Capt Martin Percifield, PAO, FL-293, Patrick Composite Squadron (FL-293)
5/23/2016
Melbourne, Florida -I was just sitting down for my second cup of coffee going through my to-do list when the call came
in early Monday morning. We have a mission!
At 8:38am, notification came in via multiple sources from CAP Incident Commander (IC) Maj Sam
Chiodo. The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) was receiving multiple pilot reports
that an Electronic Locator Transmitter (ELT) signal was being heard on 121.5 MHz in the
Melbourne area.
In other words, CAP needs to mobilize air and ground Urban Direction Finding (UDF) teams and
proceed to the Melbourne area to search, locate, and silence the active ELT – ASAP! Now the
work begins.
The urgency that there could be a downed aircraft and a pilot who needs our help feeds
adrenaline into the body. Putting my coffee down my mind shifts from the plans for my day, to the
tasks required to successfully execute the UDF mission in the most expedient manner.
Remember “The Golden Hour”. Grabbing my UDF Go Bag, I say goodbye to my wife and out the
door I go.
First destination, the squadron to grab the CAP van, radios and additional UDF gear. The other
team members arrive. We conduct a quick equipment check and safety briefing. Now we are on
the hunt and time is of the essence.
Stopping to make an initial check ten miles north and hearing no signal we proceed towards the
airport. A couple miles north of the airport we take another sounding. Capt Denis Sullivan
reports “BINGO”! We pick up a weak ELT signal coming from the general direction of the airport.
We check again as we reach the northwest corner of the airport and now we have a strong
signal. Good, we’re closing in.
We need to break it down and start eliminating possibilities. We make the choice to start on the
North side of the airport and see what indications we get. After eliminating a few obvious
possibilities and making contact with airport security we take another sounding and determine that
the signal is coming from the south tarmac. There is a flight school, the main terminal, and
several General Aviation (GA) hangars there.
Finally after clearing a large flight school and all the GA hangars we find the offending aircraft in a
large hangar used by a local college for a newly established Airframe and Powerplant (A&P)
course.
With the flick of a switch the eerie warbling tone is silenced and the emergency radio wave is clear
once again. We report the details back to mission base and they notify AFRCC that the beacon
has been silenced.
CAP’s mission accomplished. This time, no downed plane and no missing or injured pilot! It was
just an accidental arming of an ELT by a student in a hangar on a busy airport in Melbourne
Florida.
If you would like more information about the Civil Air Patrol please contact us at (321) 494-6395 or
visit www.gocivilairpatrol.com. Patrick Composite Squadron meets every Wednesday at 6:30 pm,
at 3560 Shearwater Pkwy, Satellite Beach, Florida 32937

SRQ Composite Squadron Cadets Host Open House
By 1st Lt. Christopher Carroll, SRQ Composite Squadron
5/17/2016
Sarasota, Fla. -- Cadets from the SRQ Composite Squadron of Civil Air Patrol (CAP) hosted an
open house on Monday, 9 May 2016 at the Boys and Girls Club of Sarasota County. More than 60
attendees, including cadets, senior members, parents and potential cadets, learned about Civil Air
 

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Patrol and the many opportunities available for area youth.
“The cadet program relies on cadets,” said Cadet Capt. Gabriel J. Brink, Cadet Commander. “We
had our open house to bring in more cadets because they are the future of Civil Air Patrol.
Conducting ground teams, having instructors for the programs, and even having leaders to staff
the whole chain of command requires cadets.”
The open house started with the presentation of colors by the cadet color guard, followed by a
presentation by C/Capt. Brink on the history of CAP, CAP’s mission and the programs offered for
cadets. Following the presentation, Squadron Commander Maj. William Hansen and Deputy
Commander/Cadets Capt. Ann Marie Kozolski talked with parents while the cadets and future
cadets went outside for interactive demonstrations of fizzy rockets, stomp rockets and urban
direction finding (UDF) equipment.
CAP’s cadet program introduces young people, from ages 12 through 21, to aviation. Cadets
progress at their own pace through a 16-step program including aerospace education, leadership
training, physical fitness and moral leadership. Cadets compete for academic scholarships to
further their studies in fields such as engineering, science, aircraft mechanics, aerospace
medicine, meteorology, and many others. Those cadets who earn cadet officer status may enter
the Air Force as an E3 (airman first class) rather than an E1 (airman basic).
Based at the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport, the SRQ Composite Squadron is one of
more than 1,700 Civil Air Patrol squadrons across the nation. The SRQ Composite Squadron
includes 93 members: 58 senior members and 35 cadets. Members put general aviation to its
best use, dedicated to saving lives, flying counter-drug missions, participating in homeland
security efforts, providing disaster relief, advancing young people, and supporting America’s
educators. For information about the SRQ Composite Squadron of CAP, visit www.capsrq044.com.

SRQ Composite Squadron Cadets Take Flight
By Cadet Tech. Sgt. Shelby K. Watson, SRQ Composite Sq., Florida Wing
5/17/2016
Sarasota, Fla. -- Emergency services, aerospace education, and cadet programs. Those are the
three primary missions of the Civil Air Patrol. But which aspect of CAP captures the imagination of
adolescents and inspires them to become cadets? Within aerospace education and cadet
programs, it is the opportunity to fly that attracts cadets the most.
The Cadet Orientation Flight Program introduces youth under 18 years of age to general aviation
through hands-on orientation flights in single-engine aircraft and gliders. Every CAP cadet is
eligible for five flights in a powered aircraft. Each phase of the Orientation Flight Program is more
advanced than the one before it. This way, cadets build upon their knowledge of aircraft and
factors that affect flight.
“My first time flying was nerve wracking getting to handle the controls and knowing that there are
three people’s lives in my hands. It is also the first time I have been in such a small plane,” says
Cadet Natalie Putman.
In the first orientation flight, the pilot explains and demonstrates the use of flight controls and
points out the airplane’s attitude in relation to the horizon. During the second powered flight,
cadets learn how the effects of lift, drag, and gravity affect the airplane. Cadets experience the
anticipated stalls during their third flight in a Cessna along with performing climbing turns and
learning about collision avoidance. The fourth flight lesson covers the airspeed indicator and how
attitude and airspeed are related. On the fifth and final orientation flight, the pilot explains the
 

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effects that weather has upon flying as well as discusses wake turbulence avoidance.
Cadets in the SRQ Composite Squadron have the opportunity to fly on Saturdays about once or
twice a month, and do so out of Dolphin Aviation in Sarasota. Providing cadets with the
opportunity to enhance their knowledge in aerospace education and general aviation is done so in
part by making these orientation flights available. Cadets in the Civil Air Patrol receive many
unique opportunities that most adolescents do not, and the Cadet Orientation Flight Program is
just one of them!
CAP’s cadet program introduces young people, from ages 12 through 21, to aviation. Cadets
progress at their own pace through a 16-step program including aerospace education, leadership
training, physical fitness and moral leadership. Cadets compete for academic scholarships to
further their studies in fields such as engineering, science, aircraft mechanics, aerospace
medicine, meteorology, and many others. Those cadets who earn cadet officer status may enter
the Air Force as an E3 (airman first class) rather than an E1 (airman basic).
Based at the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport, the SRQ Composite Squadron is one of
more than 1,700 Civil Air Patrol squadrons across the nation. The SRQ Composite Squadron
includes 93 members: 58 senior members and 35 cadets. Members put general aviation to its
best use, dedicated to saving lives, flying counter-drug missions, participating in homeland
security efforts, providing disaster relief, advancing young people, and supporting America’s
educators. For information about the SRQ Composite Squadron of CAP, visit www.capsrq044.com.

CAP airplane assigned to SRQ squadron takes off from the Sarasota Bradenton International
Airport. (Photo Credit: Capt. Ann Marie Kozloski, CAP)

Former 'Bush Pilot' Shares Stories at Naples Senior Squadron
By 1st Lt Don Binner, PAO, FL023, Naples Senior Squadron
5/10/2016
 

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Naples, FL --

The Naples Senior Squadron guest speaker program recently welcomed Rex Gasteiger to speak
about his eight years' experience as a bush pilot in Papua Guinea. During the presentation,
Gasteiger told stories about the cadre of volunteer bush pilots and the dangerous conditions they
braved flying supplies to remote villages.
The relief flights covered an area of about 1500 square miles and brought fuel, supplies, medicine
and equipment to the villages and were usually the only contact with the outside world. The planes
flown were single or twin-engine aircraft that had only basic avionics to increase the payload. Most
planes carried up to 1300 pounds of freight and had about 15 cubic feet of space. Larger items
were disassembled, stowed and later reassembled on-site.
He described the dangerous jungle runways, known as in/out runways, where pilots have only one
chance to land or take off. The runways are typically designed with a slope. Pilots will land going
uphill, helping to slow down the plane. To depart, the plane is turned around and the downhill
slope accelerates the plane more quickly allowing the wings to develop lift in a shorter distance.
“There is no go-around for a second try.”
Pilots flew ‘dead reckoning’ using the rivers, canyons and ground structures to guide the way.
There were no maps of the remote region and the aircraft did not have GPS. Gasteiger drew his
own maps.
"The area served was mostly jungle covered, and the villages and runways were hidden by the
dense canopy," recalled Rex. “You had to know where the runways were located because there
were no maps of the remote areas.”
Gasteiger is owner of RexAir, a well-known aircraft maintenance facility and flight school, located
at the Naples Air Authority.
He finished by saying: "It was a memorable and valuable experience." 

Cape Coral Cadets recognized for Achievements
By C/SrA Sabrina Reading, Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron
5/4/2016
CAPE CORAL, Fla., --

The month of April was very busy for Civil Air Patrol cadets from the Lee County Schools Cadet
Squadron located in Cape Coral. Friends and family joined cadets to recognize recent
achievements during a promotion ceremony scheduled as part of their weekly meeting at Gulf
Middle School.
Congratulations go out to Cadet Senior Master Sgt. Bella Viator, Cadet Master Sgt. Tristan Palmer,
Cadet Airman 1 Class Cooper Bisbe.
st

CAP cadets are promoted for completion of milestones within the cadet programming that uses
aviation as a cornerstone. In addition to their regular school studies, the cadets must work very
 

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hard to master modules in aerospace education, leadership, character development and physical
fitness.
Prior to the promotion ceremony, Col. Jim Spieth gave a lecture on basic communications used in
Civil Air Patrol’s emergency services mission. The cadets were instructed on the fundamentals of
communicating during mission activity, including: using handheld radios, using the phonetic
alphabet and the importance of using prowords -- wilco, over, out, roger, etc. – to make passing
radio traffic more efficient.
As part of the emergency services training, Lee County cadets recently traveled to Punta Gorda
where they completed Basic First Aid training hosted by the Charlotte County Composite
Squadron and earned certification through the American Safety and Health Institute. Once a cadet
has complete preparatory task training, the cadet is eligible to participate in an Air Force assigned
mission to complete advanced tasks and earn a specialty achievement rating.

 

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Photos by C/SrA Sabrina Reading

Marco Island Squadron holds Gala Open House
By Maj Robert Corriveau, Marco Island Senior Squadron
5/4/2016
Marco Island, FL -On Saturday, April 30th, Marco Island Senior Squadron celebrated CAP’s upcoming 75th
Anniversary with an open house at the squadron hangar located at the Marco Island Executive
Airport. The event was highlighted by the viewing of the 6,000 square foot hangar and state-ofthe-art communications room, as well as both the Marco and the Naples squadrons' CAP aircraft
on display.
"The event was a fantastic success, with over 200 guests of whom seven took applications for
joining CAP," said Maj. Bob Corriveau, squadron commander.
The event was attended by other local emergency service departments that displayed their
response apparatus, including: the Greater Naples Fire and Rescue Department which brought
two fire engines; the Marco Island Police Department which added one cruiser and static table
display; and the Collier County Sheriff’s Department which displayed its search helicopter.
"The open house project team, headed by Major Ken Bardon, did an excellent job in not only
planning and organizing the event, but in also providing advance publicity in the local newspapers
which contributed greatly to the large turn-out," said Corriveau.
Complimentary food and beverages were provided for lunch.
"The success of this event was due to the total cooperation of the membership and their spouses
who all worked hard and participated energetically in this endeavor," offered Corriveau. "A good
time was had by all with much information provided to the attendees."
Maj. Corriveau noted that ”We wanted to be one of the first to celebrate CAP’s 75th and this Open
House with the outstanding attendance was a perfect way to do so”.
More pictures at https://goo.gl/aCRBlt
 

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Marco Island and Naples Senior Squadrons Participate in Group 5 SAR/EX
By Maj Robert Corriveau, Marco Island Senior Squadron
5/10/2016
Marco Island, FL -Local volunteers from the Marco Island and Naples squadrons of Civil Air Patrol recently
participated in a joint training event with members of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. The training
scenario focused on a distressed vessel and allowed teams from the two groups to practice
coordinating response efforts.
“This exercise was very successful with good communications from CAP and USCGA,” said
squadron commander, Maj. Robert Corriveau, CAP. “We look forward to future opportunities to
incorporate the resources of the USCGA into our training events.”
Almost three dozen local volunteers from the Naples Cadet, Marco Island Senior and Naples
Senior squadrons participated in the two-day event. The exercise allowed members to earn,
 

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renew or sharpen technical skill-ratings required for mission duty. In addition to aircrew duty
positions, volunteers trained for ground team and mission base duty. The primary area of focus for
the exercise was communication between aircrews flying overhead and the ground-based or
water-based teams below.
The CAP squadrons perform regularly scheduled patrol flights over area coastal waters with
aircrew members looking for navigation hazards and boaters in distress. The boater-in-distress
scenario was just one of several included in the weekend emergency services training. Other
scenarios include an overdue aircraft and damage assessment photography.
The training is part of the annual schedule of CAP’s Florida Wing Group 5, which oversees an
operations area covering ten counties south of Tampa Bay to the Naples area and east to Lake
Okeechobee. Three incident command posts were established at airports along Florida’s
southwest coast.
“All in all, much training was accomplished. The skills were practiced and sharpened by both
ground teams and aircrews; everyone stayed safe and went home at the end of the day. That’s
success!" said Corriveau.

Florida Wing’s Group 5 Conducts Annual ES Training Exercise
By Maj. Jeff Carlson, Lead PIO, Mission Area Command, Group 5, Florida Wing
5/3/2016
Southwest Florida --

The small red-white-blue airplanes looking for navigation hazards and boaters in distress in coastal
waters are a familiar sight over southwest Florida communities. Local residents may have recently
noticed an increase in sightings. This is due to the volunteer professionals with Civil Air Patrol
conducting an emergency services training exercise as part of the annual training schedule for
Florida Wing’s Group 5. The training ensures CAP personnel are mission ready and prepared to
respond to the call of duty in an expedient and safe manner.
Florida Wing’s Group 5 area of operations includes the ten counties located south of Tampa Bay to
Naples and eastward to Lake Okeechobee. For the exercise, aircrews operated from three bases
along the southwest gulf coast with an area command staff managing the overall mission. This was
the third consecutive year the advanced incident management structure was used for Group-level
training.
“Using the area command structure helps prepare our teams to work large-scale, multi-agency
response efforts,” said Maj. Bill Hansen, Area Commander for the exercise.
The fictitious mission scenario utilized both ground and air resources to search for a missing
aircraft. The aircrews practiced both visual and electronic search techniques while ground teams
practiced coordinating efforts with aircrews flying overhead. CAP performs about 90% of the
inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and is
credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 78 lives annually.
“Our members treat this training as serious business,” said Maj. Earle Bretz, Public Affairs Officer
for the Charlotte County Composite Squadron. “It is important to have the ability to launch a rapid
response in order locate survivors while at the same time ensuring our volunteers return safely
home once the mission is done.”

 

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Aircrews also practiced disaster response tasks by photographing specific targets. Requests for
Civil Air Patrol to provide damage assessment images continue to increase and CAP has
participated in every response to a major U.S. disaster since Hurricane Katrina by taking aerial
photographs of impacted areas.
“The photos are typically used by decision-makers to help plan resource deployment to aid in
disaster response efforts,” said Hansen. “The CAP aircraft fly under clouds that obscure areas from
satellite mounted cameras and the oblique angle gives a better perspective of the damaged
structures.”
Civil Air Patrol maintains the world’s largest fleet of general aviation aircraft. Florida Wing’s
Group 5 includes ten squadrons; four of the squadrons are designated a “flying squadrons” because
the unit is assigned one of the 550 aircraft in the fleet. The Group 5 flying squadrons are based in
Sarasota, Punta Gorda, Naples, and Marco Island. In addition to the variety of missions, the
individual squadrons use the aircraft to maintain aircrew proficiency and serve as a platform to
introduce CAP’s 24,000 cadet members to aviation by offering orientation flights and flight
training.

Members of SRQ Composite Squadron take a pause from mission activity to pose for photo
representing nearly a century of CAP volunteer service.
Pictured L to R:Maj. Roger Nyberg (33 years plus earlier cadet membership); 
Lt Col Richard Grafton (23 years); Chaplain Lt Col Terry Jordan (22 years); 
2nd Lt Victor Della Volpe (16 years). (Photo credit: Maj. J Carlson, FL370) 
 

Community Service Award Presented to Marco Island Squadron Member
By Maj Robert Corriveau, Marco Island Senior Squadron
4/27/2016
Naples, FL -Captain Lyle Odland was recognized at the Marco Island Senior Squadron’s bi-weekly meeting on
April 18th for his long and distinguished community service.
Captain Odland was a volunteer member of the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP). He
was trained as an unpaid volunteer currier of life-saving bone marrow, peripheral red blood cells
 

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or adult stem cells for the advanced treatment of human cancers. Following his training, he
became a currier and made his first volunteer pickup and delivery on April 17, 2008.
The NMDP’s expectation was that each currier would make a minimum of two deliveries per year.
However, during the next 5 ½ years, Lyle made it a personal goal to attempt one delivery per
month. His last assignment was on December 24, 2013 when he completed his sixty-third
delivery. On that December his service ended due to the mandated maximum age restriction for
all curriers.
Within his period of service he picked up and delivered in the following states within the United
States: AZ, CA, CO, FL, GA, MA, MN, MI, NE, NC, NY, NJ, OH, SC, TN, TX, WA; thirteen of his
total deliveries involved the following foreign countries: England, Germany, Italy, Spain, Finland
and Scotland. In each instance, Captain Odland was extremely well received by the medical staff.
At no time did he have contact or even knowledge of the identity of either the donor or the
recipient.
Fulfilling this volunteer position involved him being available for the assigned time, and being
comfortable and effective in dealing with air travel, TSA inspectors, custom officials, and legal
authorities in each location. In addition, he had to be able to problem solve when unexpected
travel arrangements were interrupted and/or changed while still being able to meet the critical
project timeframe.
For his exceptional volunteer service, outstanding performance and community dedication,
Commander Major Robert Corriveau, presented to Captain Lyle Odland, the Community Service
Award and Ribbon with four clasps.

Marco Island Senior Squadron Honored at Wing Conference
By Maj Robert Corriveau, Marco Island Senior Squadron
4/27/2016
Marco Island, FL -The Marco Island Senior Squadron and two of its members were recognized at the annual Florida
Wing Conference held in Orlando on April 16 and 17. The following awards were presented at the
general assembly meeting held on the Saturday morning of the Conference: Major Robert
Corriveau was awarded Florida Wing Professional Development Officer of the Year 2015 and
Major Marian Motylszary was awarded Florida Wing Information Technology Officer of the Year
2015. A Commander’s Commendation was also awarded to Major Corriveau at the Subordinate
Unit Inspection (SUI) seminar later in the day, for his work as Assistant Inspector General (AIG)
for Florida Wing and SUI team member for Group 5.
That evening during the conference banquet the squadron was recognized and awarded the
Florida Wing Senior Squadron of the Year for 2015. Squadron Commander, Major Robert
Corriveau noted that “this award belongs to all the members of the Squadron especially the
frontline officers who performed their duties superbly and contributed greatly to the success of the
Squadron throughout this past year”.

Final Salute: Major Richard Saboda
By 1st Lt Candice Serafin, CAP,
FAYETTEVILLE, Ga. --

Peachtree City Falcon Field Composite Squadron, SER-GA-116 of Peachtree City, Georgia, with
great sadness, announces the passing of Richard Saboda, Major CAP on Wednesday morning,
April 13, in Fayetteville, Georgia at the age of 75. Major Saboda is survived by his three daughters
and four grand children. He is preceded in death by his wife of 52 years, Lois Joan Saboda.

 

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Major Saboda was born on August 9, 1940, in Brooklyn, New York. After being a member of the
Civil Air Patrol during high school, he attended aviation school and worked at LaGuardia Airport.
There, he met and married his wife, Lois Boyer, in 1961 and relocated to Florida for employment
with Northeast Airlines and then finally moved to his present home in Fayetteville where he was
employed by Delta Airlines for another 20 years. After his retirement from Delta, Major Saboda
renewed his relationship with the Civil Air Patrol in 2009 this time with Peachtree City Falcon
Field Composite Squadron SER-GA-116. The squadron recently promoted him to the rank of
Major.
Major Saboda earned the Master Recruiter badge, the highest achievement in that category.
He was a stalwart of the squadron, always there when needed, recruiting adults and teens alike,
with a deep passion for Civil Air Patrol.

Major Saboda as a CAP Cadet at age 17. Photo: Saboda Family Archives 
 

Group 5 HQ Public Affairs Seeking Veterans To Interview
By Maj. Jeff Carlson, Group 5, Florida Wing
4/22/2016
 

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Southwest Florida --

Florida Wing Group 5 Headquarters Public Affairs is collaborating with American Red Cross Services
to Armed Forces to make digital recordings of interviews with U.S. military veterans about their
service for the Library of Congress Veterans History Project.
The Veterans History Project of the American Folklife Center collects, preserves, and makes
accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans so that future generations may hear
directly from veterans and better understand the realities of war. Click here for brochure
http://www.loc.gov/vets/pdf/brochure-august2013.pdf

Many Group 5 CAP members are veterans and eligible to participate. Please make your squadron
members aware of this opportunity.
To schedule an interview, members can contact American Red Cross (813) 868-7636 or
VetHistoryProjectCFL@redcross.org or Group 5 PAO, Maj. Jeff Carlson, jcarlson@flwg.us.
In addition to the VHP interview, I am asking you to identify long-term CAP members, whom we
are at risk of losing contact, so that we can record an interview with them about their CAP service
as part of a Group 5 CAP 75th Anniversary project.
I am also looking for members who are interested in volunteering with this project. Pre‐interview 
preparation; interviewer and/or video recording; post interview document management to package 
content for submission to Library of Congress are the primary areas of need. Contact Group 5 PAO, Maj. 
Jeff Carlson, jcarlson@flwg.us for more information. 
 

Gulf Middle School Cadets Prepare for Flight
By C/SrA Sabrina Reading, Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron
4/9/2016
CAPE CORAL, Fla., -Civil Air Patrol

cadets from the Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron participated in an aerospace education
class on airport operations learning that the airport is more than fun and flying, it requires planning
and a coordinated effort to keep the planes moving and everyone safe.
Lt. Col. John Hunter, Florida Wing Group 5 Aerospace Education Officer, led the presentation and
demonstrated the functions of an airport including hangars, runways, taxiways and ramps and the
role of various airport tenants such as the fixed-base operator.
 

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The Gulf Middle School cadets learned the control tower is responsible for the safe movement of
all vehicles on the airfield, including taking off and landing. As Hunter explained the different
phases of flight, he emphasized the pilot’s responsibility to follow checklists and maintain
communication between the airplane and the control tower.
“A pilot must maintain situational awareness at all times,” said Hunter “if you aren't paying
attention you could easily get lost on the airfield."
Colonel Hunter used a tabletop display of a mock airport called Pegasus Field to walk the cadets
through the pilot’s duties. He also used a script of simulated radio communication between an
aircraft and the control tower. Cadet Technical Sargent Katherine Grier assisted Hunter by playing
the part of the air traffic controller.
The Civil Air Patrol cadet program introduces aviation to thousands of young people each
year. Each CAP cadet has several opportunities to fly with a trained orientation pilot in a Civil Air
Patrol plane and take control of the airplane to perform basic flight maneuvers.
“Having a better understanding of how an airport operates makes the orientation flights more
meaningful” said Hunter.
Colonel Hunter’s approach to teaching captivated the cadets who enthusiastically participated in a
question and answer period.
The CAP cadet program allows young people to progress at their own pace through a 16-step
program including aerospace education, leadership training, physical fitness and moral leadership.
View Colonel Hunter's aerospace education videos on Group 5 YouTube Channel. 
 

Eglin Cadets Tour The 479 Flying Training Group
By Lt. Col. Dale K. Robinson, Eglin Composite Squadron, Florida Wing
4/11/2016
Pensacola, Fla. -A group of Eglin Composite Squadron cadets and senior members toured the 479th Flying
Training Group aboard NAS Pensacola on March 25th. The 479th FTG conducts undergraduate
Combat Systems Officer (CSO) training using T-6A Texan II and T-1A Jayhawk aircraft.
Among the highlights of the tour were static displays of the T-6 and T-1 aircraft and time in the
aircraft simulators. 479th life support personnel presented an orientation on the various gear used
by the CSO trainees. Cadets had a chance to try out some of the gear, including helmets.
479th instructors briefed cadets on the training CSOs receive and the duties they might be
expected to perform. CSOs are trained in navigation, use of the electromagnetic spectrum, and
weapons employment. Combat Systems Officers are often the mission commander aboard multicrew aircraft. The CSO manages the mission and coordinates with the crew and aircraft
commander to maintain situational awareness and mission effectiveness. Their responsibilities
include mission planning, weapons targeting and employment, threat reactions, aircraft
communications, and hazard avoidance.
Cadets enjoyed the tour, which provided insight into an exciting Air Force career field.

Best Buy recognized for support of CAP and CyberPatriot
By Lt. Col. Dale K. Robinson, Eglin Composite Squadron
 

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4/4/2016
Destin, Fla -Eglin Composite Squadron commander Lt. Col. Christopher Rousseau recently presented a Certificate of Appreciation
to Best Buy Destin’s manager, Mr. Sean McGowan. Best Buy Destin donated four laptop computers to the squadron
for cadets to use in the Air Force Association’s Cyber Patriot competition. Eglin’s CAP cadets compete in the All
Services division against teams of other CAP cadets, cadets from the Naval Sea Cadet Corps, and Army, Navy, Marine
and Air Force JROTC cadet team from the country.
CyberPatriot is the AFA’s National Youth Cyber Education Program. At the center of CyberPatriot is the National
Youth Cyber Defense Competition. The competition puts teams of high school and middle school students in the
position of newly hired IT professionals tasked with managing the network of a small company. In the rounds of
competition, teams are given a set of virtual images that represent operating systems and are tasked with finding
cybersecurity vulnerabilities within the images and hardening the system while maintaining critical services in a six
hour period. Teams compete for the top placement within their state and region, and the top teams in the nation
earn all-expenses paid trips to Baltimore, MD for the National Finals Competition where they can earn national
recognition and scholarship money. This year a record breaking 3300+ students are competing.

Eglin’s CyberPatriot team, nicknamed Eglin Team Yeti, consists of C/Amn William Sargent, C/Capt Ethan 
Gunn, C/1st  Lt Brittany Fager and C/SSgt Abi Thomasos. SM Julie Fager serves as team coach, while Kevin 
Dennis (USAF/civ), CAP 2nd Lt Nick Gray, and USAF Capt Mathew Hodde mentor the cadets. Based on their 
combined score in the qualifying rounds, the team will compete in State and Regional competition, with 
the National  Finals in Baltimore as their ultimate goal.   
 

Leadership Training Bivouac Challenges Cadets
By 1st Lt. Craig Ortman, Treasure Coast Composite Sq., Florida Wing
3/26/2016
Fort Pierce, Fla. --

Leadership training for Civil Air Patrol cadets was hosted by the Treasure Coast Composite Squadron in
Florida Wing’s Group 6. The three-day bivouac was held at Camp Hidden Hammock in Fort Pierce, FL.
The event, called F.L.EX. -- Field Leadership Exercise, included leadership and emergency
response training along with the opportunity to learn more about first response teams from the
county sheriff’s office and fire department.
The goal for the leadership weekend was to promote a foundation of self-confidence within the
cadets. The training focused on challenges for the basic Airman through First Lieutenant, giving
tasks that met the level of knowledge and ability of the cadet.
The leadership training began with Team Leadership Problems, other topics included; customs and
courtesies, marching drill and guidon training. Cadet members also practiced using a command
voice inflection and giving commands as they commanded their flight.
A highlight to the F.L.E.X. weekend was a visit by retired Army Colonel Danny McKnight. The
Colonel made a special trip to speak to the cadets about the importance leadership and having to
make the hard right decisions over the easy wrong ones. McKnight inspired the cadets with his
own life experiences to teach the values and commitment needed to be a successful leader.
 

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The cadets learned how to properly prepare and present themselves, and their peers, to a promotion
board. They learned the importance of maintaining military bearing, a show of confidence, being
neat in appearance and prepared for duty. Over the weekend, the cadets refined acceptable
behaviors and learned more about what is not acceptable.
Cadet 2nd Lt. Lauren Duer, reviewed the importance of wearing the CAP uniform properly. She
also demonstrated how to iron and properly prepare it.
The bivouac training encouraged CAP members to become certified in Emergency Services and
included Ground Team Member training, Urban Direction Finding radio tracking, and other first
response training including First Aid/CPR/AED certifications.
There were several special guests who contributed their knowledge, skill, and time to the FLEX.
One of the many guests that attended is Mr. Adkins, an Embry Riddle Professor. Adkins taught an
aerospace class about Unmanned Aircraft Systems. After the demonstration, he gave the cadets a
chance to gain some hands on experience flying an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.
The St. Lucie County Sheriff’s office provided a K-9 demonstration and an aviation display. Cadets
watched as two trained K-9 work dogs displayed their unique skills in action. After the
demonstration, the cadets were able to interact with the dogs and their handlers. The SLCSO pilot
spoke about his career as a pilot both military and civilian. He also gave the cadets a tour of the
department’s 206 Jet Ranger helicopter, similar to the military OH58 Kiowa, and allowed the
cadets sit inside.
Members of the St. Lucie County Fire Department brought a rescue truck and equipment. They allowed
cadets to try on the turnout gear and demonstrated the different tools they use daily.
The weekend event was planned and executed by a cadet staff. The project staff did an outstanding
job of promoting and carrying out all of the events. The staff learned to work under pressure and
gained important experience that will benefit them in the future.
“Lessons were learned at all levels over this weekend. Some about strengths and weaknesses, but
perhaps just as important, friendships, bonds, and memories were made,” offered 1st Lt. Craig
Ortman. “This will last throughout their lives and careers within Civil Air Patrol. You know you
have done your job and the event was successful when parents tell you their cadets don’t want to
leave.”

 

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Treasure Coast cadets checkout the Bell Jet Ranger helicopter used by the St. Lucie County sheriff.

 

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Cadets watch as a SLCSO K-9 officer demonstrates valuable canine skills.
For more pictures of the weekend, please visit our Facebook page.
https://www.facebook.com/Treasure-Coast-Composite-Squadron-FL078-167833090034077/

Charlotte County Cadet Earns First Diamond
By Major Earle Bretz, Charlotte County Composite Squadron
3/24/2016
PUNTA GORDA, Fla., --

The members of the Charlotte County Composite Squadron enjoyed a special promotion at their recent
meeting when Cadet Captain Mikehla L. Hicks was promoted to the grade of Cadet Major.
The Civil Air Patrol cadet program fosters leadership, good citizenship and transforms youth, ages
12-18, into dynamic Americans. Almost 24,000 American youth, boys and girls, are challenging
themselves with CAP activity nationwide; 1,600 in the Florida Wing. Only a small percentage of
the cadet progress far enough to obtain the grade of Major during this time-window of
membership.
Major Hicks was so enthusiastic about the prospect of becoming a cadet, she attended meetings
three months before her 12th birthday so she could officially join on her birthday. She has
consistently pushed herself to be ready for each new challenge, ribbon, job assignment and
promotion as they came along. To achieve the grade of Major requires the cadet to successfully
complete 37 individual tests and receive 17 different promotions.
She rapidly completed the requirements for a General Emergency Services rating which included
courses in Incident Command System, National Incident Management System and National
Response Framework. She has completed the exhaustive Emergency Services Specialty training as
a Mission Staff Assistant, Urban Direction Finding, Flight Line Marshaller and Mission Radio
Operator. She is now a skills evaluator in these categories for other members of the squadron.
She attended the Group 5 Aviation Ground School -- she wants to solo an aircraft on her 16th
birthday; attended three Florida Wing Summer Encampments -- serving on staff at two of them.
Also she has participated in two Florida Wing Conferences and one CAP National Conference.
The CAP cadet program is self-paced covering 16 achievements. Cadets complete one task in each
element of cadet life - leadership, aerospace, fitness and character during each achievement. As
they progress, they earn ribbons, awards and increased grade rewarding their commitment and
achievement in the program.
Each phase of the four required become more challenging and builds on what the cadet has already
learned. As a part of the fourth and final "Executive" phase, the cadet serves in a sequence of
leadership positions that serve to prepare the officer for the role of Colonel.
During the past three years, Major Hicks has held cadet duty positions as Administrative Officer,
Communications Officer, Public Affairs Officer, Deputy Squadron Commander and now Squadron
Commander.
 

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The current Group 5 Commander, Lt. Col. ‘Jim’ Kaletta, is a former unit commander of the Punta
Gorda-based squadron.
“Her dedication to the Civil Air Patrol and the cadet program is noteworthy. What she wants in
life will be achieved with her level of determination,” said Kaletta.
“Mikehla is truly an exceptional young lady,” offered Major Earle Bretz. “We at the Charlotte County 
Composite Squadron are proud to be associated with such a wonderful example of the youth of America. 
Her horizons are limitless and endless. Good for her!” 
 

Leadership School Held in Naples
By Maj Robert Corriveau, Marco Island Senior Squadron
3/21/2016
Naples, FL --

The capstone portion of the 2016 Group 5 Squadron Leadership School (SLS) was held at the Naples
Senior Squadron headquarters on Saturday, March 19th. Thirteen members attended, 12 from Group 5
and one from Group 2.
The training provides Civil Air Patrol adult members with a basic understanding of CAP
operations at the squadron level and how those operations affect CAP's national missions.
Additionally, members learn more about CAP customs, core values, and communications.
The leadership training is included in the second of CAP's five professional development levels.
Typical SLS candidates are junior officers in the early stages of their Civil Air Patrol career.
The course uses a blended format where candidates first complete coursework online followed by a
seminar where the cohorts meet and openly discuss challenges facing CAP leadership. Case studies
and group assignments are integral facets of the SLS coursework.
"The forum of the course allows for a good exchange of ideas and ensures participation and
interaction from each of the attendees," said Lt. Col. Dave Moruzzi, SLS Course Director.
The Naples squadron has been working to position itself for the future. The squadron recently
completed technology upgrades to its audio/visual equipment to serve CAP training needs in the
area.
"The upgraded equipment proved to be outstanding for the purpose of the course," said Moruzzi.
Group 5 professional development schedules these seminars once or twice each year. The next
Group 5 SLS capstone is tentatively slated for fall 2016.
“The professional development course series is essential for maintaining CAP's team of
professional volunteers,” said Lt. Col. ‘Jim’ Kaletta, Group 5 Commander. “We are grooming
CAP’s future leaders. The course materials set a good foundation for the open discussions.
Fostering an environment of open-communication is essential to the success of the CAP
organization.”
 

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Moruzzi was assisted by an experienced team of facilitators, including; Major Bob Corriveau, Major Judy 
Schiff, Major Dirk Deville, Captain Lyle Odland, 1st Lt. Tom DiBernardo and 1st Lt. Lou Corda. 
 

Major Advancements at the Marco Island Senior Squadron
By Public Affairs, Marco Island Senior Squadron
3/14/2016
MARCO ISLAND, Fla., --

Two Marco Island Senior Squadron members have distinguished themselves through advancement to the
grade of Major. Captain Robert Corriveau, Unit Commander and Professional Development
Officer, and Captain Steve Riley, Assistant Finance Officer and Fundraising Chairman, publicly
received the promotion to field officer grade at a recent squadron meeting on March 7. The
promotion ceremony was officiated by Lt. Col. Lee Henderson, Group 5 Director of Operations, and
Lt. Col. Cindy Dohm, Deputy Commander, Marco Island Senior Squadron.
If not specially appointed, a CAP member must demonstrate exemplary performance of duty, serve
on command staff and complete training through Level III of the CAP professional development
program to be eligible for promotion to Major. A member must complete the technical and
management levels of professional development and achieve a master rating in the chosen
specialty track.
Member who elect to continue CAP professional development then begin Level IV training which
includes command and staff education and is designed to identify potential leadership for region
level and above. After achieving the grade of Major, many CAP officers attend Region Staff
College as part of this phase of their CAP career.
The guest speaker for the meeting was Commodore Walter Jaskiewicz, Commander, 7th District US
Coast Guard Auxiliary (USCGA). The Commodore spoke about the value of volunteer services in both
CAP and USCGA. He provided a detailed review of how the Coast Guard auxiliary works and the
type of services and support it provides to Collier County.
Another notable award was presented at the meeting to Captain Richard Farmer, CAP, who
received his 9th ribbon clasp, representing a cumulative total of 90 Homeland Security missions.

 

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CAP Pilot, Capt. Richard Farmer, is credited with 90 Homeland Security Missions.

Commodore Walter Jaskiewicz, Commander, 7th District US Coast Guard Auxiliary, talks about
the value of volunteer service.

Members Prepare to Support Upcoming Airshows
By 2016 Public Affairs Academy, Florida Wing
3/8/2016
Florida -Spring is in the air! And so are the aircraft of every shape and size. This spring, local Civil Air Patrol members will
support several popular airshows across the state. Some CAP members will provide logistical support for the event
while other members will focus on bringing the CAP message to the airshow.

These events serve as projects to help strengthen CAP's bonds with community partners and
reinforces the core value of volunteer service. CAP plans include recruiting efforts, generating
greater interest in CAP’s aerospace and aviation education and networking with stakeholders.
Some of the advertised highlights include performances by the USAF Thunderbird's, Breitling Jet
Team, the Canadian Air Force Snow-Birds, and the F35 in a Heritage Flight.
Florida Wing Commander, Colonel Henry Irizarry, recommends that all qualified members
participate in this type of CAP activity to gain the fullest experience from membership. Contact
your home squadron chain of command for further information about how to register to participate
as CAP member for any of the events listed below.
TICO Warbird Airshow
Date: March 11-13, 2016
Location: Titusville, FL
Information:http://www.nbbd.com/festivals/warbird/index.html
MacDill AFB Tampa Bay Airfest
Date: March 19-20, 2016
Location: MacDill AFB
Information:https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1gO00GceSfp7-iZJufaWmDFJcCO0rW-JgGlk63_ws8kg/viewform
 

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Sun N Fun
Date: April 4-10, 2016
Location: Lakeland, FL
Information:http://flwg.us/news/sun-n-fun.aspx
Fort Lauderdale Airshow
Date: May 6-8, 2016
Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
Information: http://www.fortlauderdaleairshow.com

Lt. Matt Brown- State of Florida Search & Rescue Responder of the Year
By SM James Chamberland, South Lakeland Composite Sq., Florida Wing
3/7/2016
Lakeland, Fla. -The South Lakeland Composite Squadron and Polk County Composite Squadron held a joint meeting and hosted a
special guest this past Thursday, Lt. Matt Brown, Coordinator of Lakeland Fire Department’s Urban Search & Rescue
Team. Lt. Brown was recently honored with “The State of Florida Search & Rescue Responder of the Year Award “,
presented at the Florida Fire Chiefs' Association Conference in Daytona Beach held in January.
His USAR team is recognized as a light technical rescue team, comprised of 44 highly trained members split among
three shifts. The Urban Search & Rescue Unit specializes in five main types of rescues: (1) confined space rescue, (2)
rope rescue, (3) trench rescue, (4) vehicle machinery rescue and (5) structure collapse rescue. Team members have
to complete 16 hours of continuing education each year for rope rescue and 8 hours for the four other types of
rescues. Lt. Brown said, “Each month, one of the rescue types is chosen for training to make sure team members
keep their skills fresh.” His team has also been trained on Swift Water Rescue and Wilderness Search, including Wide
Area Searches.
Lt. Brown shared pictures and commentary on a recent mock exercise held in Lakeland attended by other USAR
teams from across Central Florida. The scenario was mass destruction & mass causalities due to a tornado touching
down. The teams were evaluated at several locations requiring a number of search & rescue techniques.
Moving forward, The Lakeland Fire Department’s Urban Search & Rescue unit wants to incorporate the services
offered by Civil Air Patrol into a number of S&R scenarios. Lt. Brown hopes to utilize our cadets while assisting them
in gaining vital training and hands-on experience.

Congressional Gold Medals Awarded to
Families of World War II Heroes
By Lt. Col. Dale K. Robinson, Eglin Composite Squadron, Florida Wing
3/7/2016
Shalimar, FL -On Dec. 10, 2014, Congress awarded the Congressional Gold Medal to the Civil Air Patrol in honor of its founding members’ roles
in protecting the homeland against deadly German U-boat attacks during World War II and carrying out other vital wartime
domestic missions. Civil Air Patrol recently presented replica Congressional Gold Medals to the families of two World War II CAP
members who were not able to attend the December 2014 ceremony. The awards were presented recently during CAP’s Eglin
Composite Squadron’s 49th Anniversary Awards Dinner.

 

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Ms. Kristie Fagan of Pensacola accepted the Congressional Gold Medal on behalf of her late father, Ronald E, Lunstrum, who
served as a Cadet Technical Sergeant from 1942-1945. Cadet Lunstrum was the Cadet Commander in his squadron during the war.
Civil Air Patrol Capt. Roy Trusty of Mary Ester accepted the Congressional Gold Medal on behalf of his late mother, Lt Lavern
Jackson, who served as a CAP pilot in Indiana and Kentucky from 1942-1944.
Some 200,000 men, women and teenagers from all walks of life – including stars of the silver screen and successful businessmen,
future Tuskegee Airmen and aspiring pilots – participated in CAP during the war years, largely without recognition or reward. The
organization was founded Dec. 1, 1941, six days before Pearl Harbor.
During the war, members of CAP’s coastal patrols, flying their own or borrowed planes, flew 24 million miles from March 1942August 1943 over the Atlantic and Gulf coasts in order to ward off German U-boat attacks against U.S. shipping – especially
domestic oil tankers bound for Europe to help fuel allied forces. They did so at the request of the U.S. Petroleum Industry War
Council, because the U.S. Navy lacked the resources to guard against the submarine attacks and provide escorts for commercial
convoys.
The CAP coastal patrols, flying out of 21 bases located along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts from Maine to the southern tip of Texas,
spotted 173 U-boats and attacked 57. They also escorted more than 5,600 convoys and reported 17 floating mines, 36 bodies, 91
ships in distress and 363 survivors in the water.
Other pioneering Civil Air Patrol members patrolled the country’s borders by air, vigilant for potential saboteurs. In addition, they
towed targets for military trainees, watched for forest fires, conducted search and rescue missions, provided disaster relief and
emergency transport of people and parts and conducted orientation flights for future pilots.
In all, 65 CAP members lost their lives in the line of duty by the end of the war.
The Senate passed legislation authorizing the Congressional Gold Medal in May 2013, with the House following suit a year later.
President Barack Obama signed the bill into law May 30, 2014.

FLWG Selection Boards 2016
By Florida Wing, Florida Wing
3/7/2016
Patrick AFB, FL -CADETS FORWARD MARCH! Discover the best that CAP has to offer YOU!
Want to wear the Blue Beret? Want to travel the world? Want to engage in cyber patriot? How about attending a
flight academy? Almost 100 cadets attended this year’s Florida Wing Selection Boards at Patrick AFB. The top 10% of
cadets in attendance were green lighted for the activity of their choice.

Below are the results of this year’s boards. Will you see YOUR name next year?

_______________________________
 

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Female Fleet foot award, C/Capt Kiasama Gonzalez, 7:44
Male Fleet foot award, C/SMSgt Andrew Weiker, 5:53
Phase I - Highest Written Exam, C/SrA Anthony Vicary (44 out of 50)
Phase II – C/SSgt Highest Written Exam, C/TSgt Snow Kang (46 out of 50)
Phase III - Highest Written Exam, C/1st Lt Darius Calvert (42 out of 50)
Phase IV - Highest Written Exam, C/Col Iriolexis Encalada (37 out of 50)
Phase I - Top Board Score, C/SrA Justin Friedlander
Phase II - Top Board Score, C/CMSgt Allen Miller
Phase III - Top Board Score, C/1st Lt Jackson Ribler
Phase IV - Top Board Score, C/Capt Austen King
Phase I – Inspection, C/A1C Ignacio Ocando and C/A1C Andrew Alayon
Phase II - Inspection, C/TSgt Snow Kang
Phase III - Inspection, C/2d Lt Santiago Ledesma
Phase IV - Inspection, C/Capt Jonathan Levin
Phase I - Top Score Overall, C/SrA Anthony Vicary
Phase II - Top Score Overall, C/SSgt Michael Lambert
Phase III - Top Score Overall, C/2d Lt Santiago Ledesma
Phase IV - Top Score Overall, C/Col Iriolexis Encalada
OVERALL – Top Score - EAGLE AWARD, C/2d Lt Santiago Ledesma
Phase I – Cadet of the Year, C/SrA Anthony Vicary
Phase II - Cadet of the Year, C/TSgt Snow Kang
Phase III - Cadet of the Year, C/2d Lt Santiago Ledesma
Phase IV - Cadet of the Year, C/Col Iriolexis Encalada
_______________________________
All Cadet of the Year winners will go on to compete for the region Cadet of the Year award. I wish
all of the awardees congratulations!

Lewis Takes Command at FL051
By Maj. Earle Bretz, Charlotte County Composite Squadron
3/7/2016
PUNTA GORDA, Fla., -Charlotte County Composite Squadron saw new leadership take command of the nearly 70-year old Civil Air Patrol
squadron. Outgoing commander, Major Richard Morrell, (USMC Ret), relinquished his second tour as Commander of
the Punta Gorda squadron to incoming commander, Major Gerald C. Lewis, CAP .
Major Lewis is another distinguished Marine, 1959-1963, serving overseas during his tour as an Air Traffic Controller.
Prior to his military career, he graduated from Northern Illinois University with a BS in accounting. His marine

 

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training served him well as he retired with 32 years’ service as an FAA Air Traffic Controller at the Chicago Center in
Aurora, Illinois. He has been a flight instructor for over 20 years and serves as the squadron’s chief pilot. Lewis
joined FL-051 in 2000, after retiring to Florida with “time to give back to the community”.
“Our squadron grew and prospered under the direction of Dick Morrell,” said Major Lewis. “We have a strong
membership base and look forward to expanding our senior and cadet membership. “
“Volunteer service is one of CAP’s core values. Gerry’s commitment to serving our community and nation is the type
of leadership that the local squadron will thrive under,” said Major Morrell.
Morrell’s first command of FL-051 was a two-year stint during 2012-2013. After a brief hiatus, he was called back for
duty due to family health problems of the then commander, Major Paul Reeves.

The Punta Gorda squadron was established in the late 1940's at an abandoned military training
airfield now PGD.

Florida Wing Dignitaries’ Attend Legislative
Day
By Public Affairs Academy 2016, Florida Wing
3/6/2016
Washington DC -One of the most important dates for Civil Air Patrol comes in the month of February. This is when members from the
Florida Wing (FLWG) travel to Washington D.C. to say thank you to their representatives for the support they have
shown for CAP programming and to remind them of the important work these volunteers are doing in their
communities.
National Legislative Day allows organizations like Civil Air Patrol the opportunity to help Members of Congress
understand the importance of the services our volunteers provide and to help them justify their decision for
continued funding of the missions.
The trip comes after delegates from Florida Wing visited the state capitol in Tallahassee for the state legislative day.
After speaking with state representatives, the Florida Wing delegates took to the nation’s capital and talked to
representatives from each state about the impact of Civil Air Patrol.
This year’s Wing delegates included FLWG Commander, Colonel Henry Irizarry and former FLWG Commander, Colonel
Michael Cook. During the time on Capitol Hill, the Florida Wing delegates spoke with multiple representatives
including Congresswoman Gwen Graham, Representative for Florida's 2nd congressional district.
Last fall, Secretary of Air Force, Deborah Lee James, emphasized that as part of the U.S. Air Force’s “Total Force”,
CAP volunteers are a valued resource that return more than 8 times the value of the investment made by the Air
Force each year.
In the past year, Florida’s members have provided $9.5 million in volunteer services to local communities. Florida
CAP aircrews flew 5,577 hours. Nationally, Civil Air Patrol members provide $165 million in volunteer services
including 98,529 flying hours.

Nationally, the Civil Air Patrol has 33,568 adult members and 24,093 cadets. Florida Wing
membership totals 3,558, making it the largest of 52 wings in Civil Air Patrol.
 

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Florida Wing Public Affairs Academy
By SM James Chamberland, Florida Wing
3/6/2016
Orlando, FL --

The 2016 Florida Wing Public Affairs Academy was held March 5-6 in Orlando, Florida. Once again,
the professional development training was well attended by over 30 senior and cadet members at
the Police Training Facility located at Orlando Executive Airport.
The Civil Air Patrol has increased its focus on developing professional public affairs personnel.
The Florida academy has been a popular choice in recent years. Topics for this year’s curriculum
included Social Media& Media Relations, Press Release Formats, Web content optimization,
Project management and more.
“Attendees increased their knowledge and developed skills necessary to perform job related
duties,” said Captain Tyler Lahnen, Academy Director.
CAP is working hard to leverage changes in the media landscape and where people get
information. Squadron newsletters and city newspapers are only a portion of today’s media mix
available to the unit public affairs program. At the academy, the attendees can share experiences
and learn from one another beyond the planned material.
“In addition to the 14-hours of classroom training, informal social gatherings are a great way for
members to exchange ideas and develop relationships that serve as an important resource,” said
Lahnen.
The CAP mission is continually evolving. It is important to record what is happening while it is
happening to create a record of the service of citizens serving their communities.
"Civil Air Patrol has launched a yearlong celebration of its 75th anniversary. From a marketing standpoint,
the goal is to gain advantage from the milestone and build visibility,” said Major Jeff Carlson,
former academy director. "While the big story arching over the national organization is impressive,
it is the stories generated within the local units that can have the greatest impact.”
“Having a cadre of skilled communicators is a great advantage to an organization. CAP’s 1500 public affairs 
officer presents a tremendous resource,” continued Carlson. “ Most public affairs officers are new and 
need proper mentoring to help gain traction. Florida Wing is doing a good job of providing important 
training at both a Wing and Group level to develop professionalism in its public affairs team. The training is 
not only to develop public relation professionals, but leadership as well with the skill needed to shape the 
future of Civil Air Patrol public affairs at all levels of the organization.” 
 

SAR/EX at Marco Squadron – 3 Days, 28
Sorties, 34 Participants
By Major Robert Corriveau, Marco Island Senior Squadron
 

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Marco Island, FL -A joint training exercise with the Marco Island Senior and Naples Senior squadrons was held the weekend of February
26 – 28th, 2016. The squadron headquarters at the Marco Island Executive Airport served as mission base.
The training event allowed CAP volunteers to work on advanced skills needed for assignment to aircrew and ground
team duty as well as mission staff positions including leadership roles like incident commander and branch director.
The mission sorties included a combination of air and ground tasking in the Marco Island, Port of the Isles and
Everglade City areas. Several aerial photo reconnaissance sorties provided an opportunity for training with the CAP
Image Uploader and the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s geo-mapping programs and visualization.
Guests at the SAR/EX included Florida Wing Deputy Director of Mission Operations, Major Bill Hansen and Group 5
Commander Lt Col Jim Kaletta. The Incident Commander for the mission was Lt Col Lee Henderson.

 

 

DiBernardo Accepts Command of Naples
Senior Squadron
By 1st Lt Donald Binner, Naples Senior Squadron
3/2/2016
Naples, Fla. -- Taking a firm grip on the flagstaff, 2nd Lt. Tomas Di Bernardo, CAP said” I
accept command”. In doing so, he accepted responsibility for leading the Naples Senior
Squadron of the Civil Air Patrol.
The Change of Command ceremony was held at the Naples Senior Squadron hangar on
Tuesday, January 12, 2016, and hosted over 80 attendees. The ceremony follows a long,
time-honored tradition that publicly acknowledges out-going Commander Major Jessica
Stearns transferring command to incoming 2nd Lt Tomas Di Bernardo.
Di Bernardo was joined by his wife, Cathy, for the formal ceremony hosted by past unit
commander, Lt Col Charlie Dinsmoor. The Naples Cadet Color Guard presented the
Colors then followed by the Pledge of Allegiance. The transfer was officiated by Group 5
Commander Lt Col Ray Rosenberg.
Di Bernardo joined CAP in March 2014. He graduated from DePaul University, Chicago,
 

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Illinois in 1984 with a Bachelor in Business Administration, Management major. He is also
a CAP Mission pilot, has flown Cadet “O” flights and the Wilderness Waterways Coastal
Patrol over the Ten Thousand Island National Park.
Mr. Tom Soliday, President of the Naples Airport Authority, was among those attending.
Other notable attendees were Lt Col Jim Kaletta, Lt Col Tom Kusnar. Representatives
from Marco Island Senior Squadron included Maj Robert Corriveau; Lt Col Cindy and
Capt Robert Dohm.

 

 

Four Lee County Cadets Receive Promotion
By 2nd Lt Ruth Byron, Public Affairs Officer, Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron
2/28/2016
CAPE CORAL, Fla., -Civil Air Patrol cadets at the Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron along with family and
friends recognized the achievements of their own members during an awards ceremony
scheduled as part of the weekly meeting at Gulf Middle School.
Congratulations go out to Cadet Master Sargent Bella R Viator; Cadet Senior Airmen
Joseph A Gingras; Cadet Technical Sargent Tristan K Palmer and Cadet Airmen 1st
Class Rachel N. Thomas.
The cadets were promoted for their accomplishments in CAP's cadet program that uses
aviation as a cornerstone. In addition to their regular school studies, the cadets must work
hard to master the leadership modules in aerospace education and cadet programs.
Thousands of young people from 12 years through age 21 are introduced to aviation
through CAP's cadet program. The program allows young people to progress at their own
 

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pace through a 16-step program including aerospace education, leadership training,
physical fitness and moral leadership. The Lee County squadron is one of only a few
special units attached to a school as part of the extra-curricular programming.
Cadet Thomas also received the Civil Air Patrol Achievement Award for Outstanding Duty
Performance at the Florida Wing Winter Encampment held December 27, 2015 to
January 01, 2016.
"We are very proud! This is the first ever such award in our squadron," said Lt Col Jim
Spieth, former Lee County Schools Cadet Squadron unit commander.

 

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(Photos by Lt Col Jim Spieth, USAR/CAP) 
 

CAP Byword - Safety, Safety, Safety
By Maj. Earle Bretz, Charlotte County Composite Squadron
2/27/2016
PUNTA GORDA, Fla., -The Civil Air Patrol Florida Wing held a 3-day flight operation stand down. For the thirty
senior members that attended, this meant no flying and a lot of listening and learning.
Charlotte County Composite Squadron was one of three squadrons in Group 5 to hold
 

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their safety session with their aircrews, the other two were SRQ Composite and Marco
Island Senior squadrons.
The four-hour session covered safety from all angles - safety on the ground, at meetings,
traveling and flying, etc. Florida Wing Commander credited Group Commanders, Check
Pilot Examiners and Check Pilots for the part played in the audio and visual
presentations.
Addressed in the talks were the Aircraft Informational Folder that is carried in the plane;
entering data properly into our mission reporting site called WMIRS, which stands for
WEB Mission Information Reporting Service; Timing Aircraft Inspections; following Aircraft
Check Lists; maintaining Aircraft Airworthiness; CAP Regulations and FL Wing
Supplements covering all aspects of flight; Federal Air Regulations; and Weight and
Balance Calculation requirements. The thrust of all the presentations and the items
continually stressed was safety.
Charlotte County squadron has not had a safety related issue or incident reported for over
7 years. Local members take the CAP safety program very seriously and include a safety
briefing at every event for all senior members and cadets.
The time spent reviewing CAP guidelines helped to reinforcing the Air Force and CAP
message regarding safety. We will continue to conduct all activities safely as we perform
our Missions for America. 
 

CAP Launches 75th Anniversary Celebration
By CAP National Headquarters Public Affairs, National Headquarters
2/25/2016
Maxwell AFB, AL -WASHINGTON, D.C. – Civil Air Patrol members convened this evening after the organization’s annual Legislative Day to
launch CAP’s 75th anniversary celebration.
While CAP will officially turn 75 on Dec. 1, having been founded six days before Pearl Harbor, a yearlong observation
of the milestone is underway. It began when officials, members and VIPs gathered at the Crystal City Marriott at
Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport for a reception kicking off the celebration.
In conjunction with the reception, National Headquarters unveiled its 75th Anniversary website and a special
video marking the milestone.
Anniversary activities and displays are planned throughout the year – in April at the Sun ‘n Fun International Fly-In&
Expo in Lakeland, Florida; in June at the Mid-Atlantic Air Museum’s World War II Weekend in Reading, Pennsylvania;
in July at EAA’s AirVenture in Oshkosh, Wisconsin; and in September at the Air Force Association’s Air & Space
Conference in National Harbor, Maryland. The observances will culminate with a 75th Anniversary Gala back in the
nation’s capital at the Smithsonian’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center on Dec. 1.
The 75th Anniversary reception closed out Civil Air Patrol’s 2016 Legislative Day. Every year, representatives from
each of CAP’s 52 wings go to Capitol Hill to brief members of Congress on the U.S. Air Force auxiliary’s primary
missions.
Speaking to those gathered for the reception, the chairman of CAP’s Board of Governors, U.S. Army Col. Jayson
Altieri, forecast a year of “posts, banners, PSAs, anniversary logos, videos, proclamations and news reports about the

 

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impact our members’ service has had on the communities we serve.”
Referring to the missions highlighted on the new website, Altieri told his audience that “the weight of these
achievements, the myriad ways in which CAP members have stepped up to serve their communities over the past 75
years during national disasters and national emergencies, as well as many, many local events, is mind-boggling.”
“The list of hurricanes alone could just about be used to establish a baby name book!” he quipped.
“I encourage CAP members to take advantage of our 75th anniversary to tell CAP’s stories of service and love of
country nationwide,” said the organization’s national commander, Maj. Gen. Joe Vazquez. The website and the other
resources Altieri cited “can be extremely effective in increasing awareness of who CAP is, the amazing things our
members do in cadet programs, aerospace education and emergency services to serve their communities and the
nation and what CAP’s brand represents,” Vazquez said.
Keynote speaker for the event was Maj. Jill Paulsen, chaplain for the Illinois Wing’s Lake County Composite Squadron
and granddaughter of CAP founder Gill Robb Wilson. Paulsen told the gathering that at the end of the busy day,
“despite all the tasks before us, this is the time when the meaning of what we do, and what those who came before
us have done, intervenes. When significance overtakes our busy schedules and we … see the bigger picture.”
Col. Frank Blazich, Civil Air Patrol’s chief national historian, was among the CAP dignitaries in attendance. “Since its
earliest days, when more than 200,000 Americans responded to the call for service by volunteering during World War
II, Civil Air Patrol has kept a vigilant watch on the homeland,” he said. “Today that vigilance continues in a myriad of
emergency services, disaster relief and homeland security missions, each focused on the well-being and protection of
our citizens.”
Since 2010, CAP has responded to both natural and manmade disasters, including the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on
the Gulf Coast, Hurricane Sandy on the Eastern Seaboard, flooding in the Midwest, tornadoes in the South and
Southwest, wildfires in California, a mudslide in Washington State and a blizzard in South Dakota. Aircrews have also
provided tsunami warnings in Hawaii.
CAP’s search and rescue efforts, aided by advances in technology, have resulted in nearly 400 lives saved nationwide
in the last six years.
Homeland security missions include aerial reconnaissance conducted near America’s shipyards and on the nation’s
waterways. CAP also provides air defense exercises for Air Force fighters protecting U.S. airspace and helps train U.S.
troops before they deploy overseas.
“The 75th anniversary celebration is our time to raise our flag, to show our colors,” said Vazquez, who will also
oversee the annual winter meeting of CAP’s Command Council on Friday and Saturday at the Crystal City Marriott.
The Command Council consists of CAP’s national commander, national vice commander and executive officer, as well
as eight region commanders and 52 wing commanders.

Safety Stand Down Saturday at Marco
By Capt Robert Corriveau, Marco Island Senior Squadron
2/22/2016
Marco Island, FL -- On Saturday, February 20th a Safety Stand Down seminar was held
at the Marco Island Senior Squadron hangar. This was a joint venture with the Naples
Senior Squadron. Guests in attendance were Florida Wing Commander, Col Henry
 

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Irizarry and Group 5 Commander, Lt Col Jim Kaletta.
The agenda consisted of five presentations which served as an overview and review of
CAPR 60-1, 60-3, 66-1, FRO procedures & responsibility, mission paperwork and working
with WMIRS. Instructors for the seminars were Captains Richard Farmer, Bob MacNeill,
Bob Corriveau, 2nd Lt Tom Di Bernardo and Lt Col Lee Henderson. Go to this
link FL023+FL376 2016 Standdown to see all of the interaction.
This event yielded much discussion on many points of safety, process, and procedure as
well as very good exchange of information and experiences. The presence of our Wing
Commander made the sessions that much more meaningful by his participation and
sharing of information. Overall everyone felt it was a well run program and time well
spent. The total attendance was 32 (21 from Marco, 7 from Naples, 3 from Group 5 and
Col, Irizarry).
"The Marco Island Senior Squadron was very thankful to have the opportunity to host this
successful joint venture." Capt. Corriveau said at the end of the meeting.

Group 5 Pilots Keep Feet on the Ground to Hit the Books
By Maj. Jeff Carlson, Group 5 Headquarters
2/20/2016
SARASOTA, Fla. -The familiar red- white-blue airplanes sat motionless on the tarmac as the clear blue skies
beckoned. There were no Civil Air Patrol flights to be seen in the sun-filled skies over Florida
creating an unusual snapshot. Pilots from across Florida Wing were on the ground to participate in
the Flight Operations Stand Down held February 19-21, 2016 at the direction of the Florida Wing
Commander.
“A great deal of work and hundreds of man-hours by the Florida Wing Operations staff have been
dedicated to the organization and coordination of this event,” said Florida Wing Commander,
Colonel Henry Irizarry. “Our Group Commanders, Check Pilots and Check Pilot Examiners have
 

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taken the lead on the execution.”
Seminars were held at seventeen locations across the state to help ensure CAP pilots have the
information needed to operate within current requirements and to prepare aircrews for future
changes. More than twenty pilots attended the event hosted by the SRQ Composite Squadron in
Sarasota. Other seminar sites in Group 5 included Marco Island Senior Squadron and Charlotte County
Composite Squadron in Punta Gorda.
The six-hour seminar offered a valuable review of the multiple layers of requirements the
‘professional’ CAP pilot must navigate. Seminar topics included: Keeping Aircraft Information File
Up-To-Date; Mastering the Web Mission Information Reporting System (WMIRS); balancing
aircraft use with maintenance and inspections; a review of CAP aircraft operations guidance,
including 60-1, 60-3, 66-1 and the Florida Wing supplements. The discussion also included
restrictions for use of member-owned aircraft on Air Force assigned missions.
A significant amount of the discussion focused on reviewing proficiency training and check ride
policies.
“We’re looking to see greater diversity in the proficiency flight profiles that pilots are using to keep
skills sharp,” said Major William Hansen, CAP Deputy Director of Florida Wing Mission
Operations. “In addition, we need to meet the Air Force’s standard for documenting our asset
usage. The additional details of data will make the WMIRS information more valuable and
demonstrate that CAP aircrews can meet the challenge.”
Pilots were directed to the national web site for up-to-date forms and information.
Capt. Michael Christmann, FL044 Standardization/Evaluation Officer, was the project officer for
the SRQ event and served eloquently as emcee, presenter, and commentator to help weave the
segments together. Other Civil Air Patrol officers presenting at the Sarasota clinic included Maj.
Benjamin Moore, FL044 Operations Officer; Maj. William Hansen, FLWG Deputy Director of
Mission Operations; Lt Col Nicholas Modders, CAP, MNWG; 2nd Lt Victor Della Volpe, FL044
Maintenance Officer.

Civil Air Patrol

operates the world's largest fleet of general aviation aircraft. (file photo: Maj. Jeff
Carlson, CAP)

Civil Air Patrol Conducts Search and Rescue
 

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Training Exercise at Albert Whitted
By Lt Col Joyce Nader, Pinellas Senior Squadron
2/20/2016
Albert Whitted Airport -Against the backdrop of the City of St. Petersburg’s preparation for the upcoming Grand Prix races, 33 Civil
Air Patrol senior members and 4 cadets participated in the Emergency Services exercise hosted by the
Pinellas Senior Squadron (FL 182) at Albert Whitted Airport on February 13, 2016.
The weather was perfect—clear, no fog and few clouds with moderate winds. Two (2) aircraft were utilized
during the exercise. There were 9 air sorties and 2 ground sorties completed during the exercise.
CAP senior members and cadets trained for positions at mission base including communications, as aircrew
teams, and as ground teams. The various team’s simulated search and rescue tasks utilizing the aircraft as
well as ground based communications systems and resources. Cadet and senior members also conducted
ground team exercises, including a missing aircraft ramp search and locating an emergency locator
transmitter (ELT).
2d Lt Keith Lukat was the project officer for the exercise, and Maj Sam Chiodo from Hillsborough One
Senior Squadron was the Incident Commander for this Search and Rescue Exercise (SAREX).
”The exercise was a great success due to the skilled work of many members as well as the spirit and
dedication of all the participants,” exclaimed Maj Adrian Cuarta, FL 182 squadron commander.
Another exercise will be planned for sometime in the second quarter, 2016.

 

Inclement Weather Grounds Flights at Check
Pilot Course
By Lt Col Joyce Nader, Pinellas Senior Squadron
2/20/2016
Lakeland, FL -Civil Air Patrol’s (CAP) Florida Wing (FLWG) held its annual National Check Pilot Standardization Course (NCPSC),
commonly called “Check Pilot School”, in Lakeland, Florida, at the main terminal building, Lakeland Linder Airport,
February 6-7, 2016. FLWG is one of the few wings in CAP that mandates both online training and in person face-toface training and evaluation of its check pilots.
Over fifty (50) CAP members from around FLWG came to participate in the annual NCPSC, including more than 37
check pilots, check pilot trainees, and check pilot examiners. The check pilot examiners train future check pilots and
future check pilot examiners, as well as evaluate Form5/Form 91 check pilots.
Over 20 sorties were planned to fly throughout the 2- day training. Eleven (11) CAP aircraft were flown in from
around the state to participate in this important mission, which was funded by the United States Air Force (USAF).
However, inclement weather on both days grounded the training and examination flights. A steady rain on Saturday
Feb. 6th prevented the sorties from taking off, while gusty cross-winds prohibited the sorties from flying on Sunday
Feb. 7th. The training and examination flights will be rescheduled over the course of the next few weeks by FLWG.

 

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The NCPSC consists of extensive classroom instruction, roundtable discussions with the pilots in attendance, and in
flight training and evaluation.
CAP members from the CAP Southeast Region and FLWG served in numerous staff-related roles throughout the 2-day
course including: Lt Col Luis Garcia, Incident Commander (“IC”); Lt Col George Schaefer, Deputy IC; Capt Charlene
Garcia, Safety Officer, Aircraft Inspections; Lt Col Bruce McConnell, Communications; Maj Adrian Cuarta, LSC,
Logistics, and other staff support; and Lt Col Joyce Nader, LSC Trainee, PIO, and other staff support. CAP USAF
representatives were also present.
The overarching message of this mission is SAFETY first and foremost: safety of the check pilots who then evaluate
the Form 5/Form 91 and Cadet Orientation pilots. As the FLWG Commander Col Henry Irizarry stated, “For CAP
pilots, safety reigns supreme. We must earn and maintain the trust, most especially of the parents and grandparents
who entrust their children’s lives with each one of us.”

SRQ Composite Squadron Cadet Receives Appointment to United States Air Force
Academy
By 1st Lt. Christopher Carroll, SRQ Composite Squadron
2/8/2016
SARASOTA, Fla. -- Cadet/Staff Sergeant Shelby Kate Watson, a member of the SRQ Composite
Squadron of Civil Air Patrol (CAP) in Sarasota and a senior at Palmetto High School, has received
an appointment to the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) in Colorado Springs, Colorado.
She will report at the end of June.
Capt. Ann Marie Kozloski, Deputy Commander (Cadets), said, "Cadet Watson will make an
excellent appointee to the Air Force Academy. During her involvement with CAP, she has
volunteered for every opportunity to learn and serve in her squadron, and has advanced in grade
at every occasion. She stands out as an example to other cadets."
Watson recently received the Air Force Association Award for leadership and academic standing,
became a member of the Florida Wing Cadet Honor Society, and received recognition as Cadet of
the Quarter at the squadron. She also actively participates in the color guard team.
Watson's advice to other cadets or any students who are interested in attending the Air Force
Academy is, "You have to work extremely hard both inside and outside of school. Make everything
count. And try not to care about what other people think about you because, in a few short years,
the only thing that will matter is how you managed your time and resources."
Watson followed her own advice over the past several years, serving as an officer in the Student
Government Association for three years; earning college credits as a dual enrollment student at
the State College of Florida where she graduated this past December with an Associate of Arts
Degree; and beginning the Emergency Medical Technician program at Manatee Technical
College, with the intention of completing the program before leaving for the Academy in June.
During high school, Watson earned the Bausch and Lomb Honorary Science Award, became a
member of the National Honor Society, and received the Daughters of the American Revolution
Good Citizen Award.
"I think the best part of attending USAFA," Watson said, "will be the fact that my classmates are
also individuals with integrity who strive for excellence. Being around like-minded people is very
encouraging and will lead to personal development."
At the Air Force Academy, Watson plans to major in biology as a foundation for medical school,
but admits those plans might change because, she said, the Academy has so many opportunities
for cadets.
 

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"I am looking forward to serving as an officer in the world's greatest Air Force," Watson said.
Watson is the second cadet from the SRQ Composite Squadron to receive an appointment to the
Air Force Academy in the last twelve months. A year ago, Cadet/2nd Lt. Jonathan Banks received
an appointment.
Cadet Watson is the daughter of Whitney and Matthew Watson, Sr., and was nominated to the
United States Air Force Academy by Congressman Vern Buchanan.
CAP’s cadet program introduces young people, from ages 12 through 21, to aviation. Cadets
progress at their own pace through a 16-step program including aerospace education, leadership
training, physical fitness and moral leadership. Cadets compete for academic scholarships to
further their studies in fields such as engineering, science, aircraft mechanics, aerospace
medicine, meteorology, and many others. Those cadets who earn cadet officer status may enter
the Air Force as an E3 (airman first class) rather than an E1 (airman basic).
Based at the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport, the SRQ Composite Squadron is one of
more than 1,700 Civil Air Patrol squadrons across the nation. The SRQ Composite Squadron
includes 103 members: 64 senior members and 39 cadets. Members put general aviation to its
best use, dedicated to saving lives, flying counter-drug missions, participating in homeland
security efforts, providing disaster relief, advancing young people, and supporting America’s
educators. For information about the SRQ Composite Squadron of CAP, visit www.capsrq044.com.

Group 5 Holds CLC Capstone Course in Cape Coral
By Capt Robert Corriveau, Group 5 Headquarters
2/2/2016
Cape Coral, FL -On Saturday, January 30th, ten Civil Air Patrol members from squadrons across Group 5 attended the Corporate
Learning Course capstone session. Members were from Sarasota, Charlotte County, Naples and Marco Island
squadrons.
The CLC training is designed to prepare members to serve in duty positions above squadron level. The course format
includes both online training and classroom time. The capstone is the second portion of the course held in a
classroom. The first being an on-line portion conducted on computer.
"Florida Wing is a beta-test site for this new course format," said Capt Robert Corriveau, Course Director. "We've
successfully run two SLS and CLC courses over the past year and a half with very good results and good evaluation
responses from the participants. We continue to tweak the courses as we move forward to keep them fresh and
current."
The next course on the schedule is the SLS which will be held on Saturday, March 19th at the Naples Squadron. Check
the FLWG calendar.

 

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Marco Senior Squadron Conducts MSA class.
By Capt Robert Corriveau, Marco Island Senior Squadron
1/27/2016
Marco Island, FL -- Fourteen participants attended the Mission Staff Assistant (MSA)
class held at the Marco Senior Squadron hangar on Saturday January 23rd. This was a
joint effort with the Naples Senior and Cadets squadrons and two members from each
were in attendance at the class.
The class included a PowerPoint presentation that covered a great majority of the tasks
related to the MSA role during a mission. Both paper and electronic forms were presented
and reviewed. Additional time was spent familiarizing the group with WMIRS. Participants
went through the actual assignments of running a mission through WMIRS from sign-in of
personnel, aircraft and vehicles, maintaining a unit log, signing-out the resources and
properly downloading and filing out the personnel spreadsheet, which acts as the ICS211, and finally uploading the information to the mission files. Time was dedicated to
familiarize the group with key WMIRS displays such as the Com Log and the Status
Board.
The training was successful with many SQTRs for completed tasks were signed off.
 

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Everyone left with a much better understanding of how to utilize WMIRS for the proper
execution of a mission.

 

 

Charlotte County Volunteers Fly Into 2016
With A Rush
By Maj.Earle Bretz, Charlotte County Composite Squadron
1/25/2016
PUNTA GORDA, Fla., -The Charlotte County Composite Squadron is off to a great start for the New Year. Eight cadets welcomed in the New
Year at Tyndall Air Force Base near Panama City, FL with old and new friends at the Annual Florida Wing Winter
Encampment. The Charlotte County cadets were part of a group of 196 basic cadets and 79 staff cadets who
participated in the a week of extensive training.
Lt. Gen. William H. Etter, Commander, Continental North American Aerospace Defense Command Region and Colonel
Michael D. Tyynismaa, Commander, Civil Air Patrol - U.S. Air Force, Maxwell Air Force Base gave inspiring educational
presentations to the encampment attendees. This year’s program included a tour of: the Area Operations Center; the
Combat Control Training Center; and a Career Day demonstration by the USAF Red Horse Squadron.
“The structure of an encampment is ideal for exposing cadets to drill, leadership, aerospace, emergency services,
career exploration and other varied topics”, said Maj. Dick Morrell, Commander, Charlotte County Composite
Squadron. “We are exceptionally proud of Cadet T/Sgt Douglas Short as Flight Sargent of Mike Flight leading his Flight
to the award of Honor Flight of the encampment”
On the following weekend of January 9, the squadron held a Search and Rescue Exercise directed by the Air Force.
These training events are routinely held to maintain a mission-ready resource and mitigate risks associated with
emergency response efforts.

 

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A mission base was established with staff assistants, radio operators for ground to air communications, a safety
officer, public affairs officer and the incident commander. These duties occupied the 23 volunteers assigned for the
day. Four aircrews were established to prosecute the mission sorties. The first sortie was not flown due to morning
fog, but was re-scheduled for the next day with another volunteer crew. This exercise focused on electronic search.
The goal was to locate an Emergency Locator Transmitter placed strategically to mimic a downed aircraft. All four
aircrews were successful in locating the ELT signal.

On January 30, 2016, in conjunction with the Peace River Sail and Power Squadron, CAP will
participate in a safety demonstration exercise at Gilchrist Park from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM.This is
a land-based pyrotechnic devices information event. This exercise is a follow up to the very
successful night pyrotechnic exercise run by PRSPS/CAP on November 21, 2015.

Kaletta Selected to Relieve Rosenberg as
Group 5 Commander
By Maj. Jeff Carlson, Group 5 Headquarters
1/22/2016
SOUTHWEST FLORIDA -Florida Wing Commander, Colonel Henry Irizarry, has announced that Lieutenant Colonel Milton “Jim” Kaletta will
follow Lieutenant Colonel Ray H. Rosenberg in line as Commander of Group 5. The change of command ceremony will
take place on Saturday, January 30, 2016 at the Group 5 Commander’s Call held in Cape Coral, FL.
Kaletta is currently the deputy commander of the Group 5 headquarters unit and the former commander of the hightempo Charlotte County Composite Squadron. Colonel Kaletta’s first experience with CAP was as a cadet in Buffalo,
NY. The most recent 19 years of service has been as a senior member. In 2010, he received the Florida Wing Senior
Member of the Year award. Kaletta has been assigned a command duty position for the majority of the past two
decades of membership.
“Everyone one benefits when Group 5 is successful. We have talented members that consistently set trends. Group 5
is an incubator for developing key personnel for CAP operations in Florida,” said Kaletta. “Our challenge is to manage
the member’s need for a meaningful volunteer experience while delivering a pertinent organization into the hands of
the next generation of members. This is a priority for CAPNHQ and Florida Wing.”
Colonel Kaletta’s military service was with the New York National Guard from 1954 to 1969 where he rose from
Aircraft and Power Plant mechanic to Chief Aircraft and Power Plant mechanic and ultimately to Chief of Operations.
He enjoyed a successful professional career rising through the ranks over a 30-year career to become a captain of
industry and lead a $135 million aviation company.
His lifelong love for flying is evident by the long list of pilot type ratings and 10,000+ flying hours logged. In 1991,
Kaletta was inducted into the Niagara Frontier Aviation Hall of Fame. He received the Air Force Association Medal of
Merit in 2000 and the Wright Brothers FAA Master Pilot award in 2003.
Lt. Col. Kaletta will formally relieve Lt. Col. Ray Rosenberg who served his full tenure as the Group 5 Commander on
Saturday, 30 January 2016. Rosenberg replaced Lt. Col. Fran Gleockler in 2012 as commander responsible for the
Civil Air Patrol’s Southwest Florida operations area of Florida Wing. The command duties included the oversight of
two composite squadrons, three senior squadrons and five cadet squadrons including three school squadrons.
“We thank Lt Col Rosenberg for a job well done as a Group Commander and look forward to his continued service and

 

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contribution to Civil Air Patrol and the Florida Wing,” said Colonel Irizarry.

“My only regret is that I am sorry to have seen how many CAP members have slipped away these
past few years, both nationally and locally. I am very proud of the progress that Group 5 units have
made with consolidating the planning process,” said Rosenberg. “We now have units working
together effectively to make the best use of limited resources. There is room for improvement and
a stronger recruiting effort. I have confidence that Colonel Kaletta can keep the momentum going.”

Squadrons Conduct 3-Day Search and Rescue
Exercise
By Capt Robert Corriveau, Marco Island Senior Squadron
1/19/2016
Marco Island, FL -From January 8th through 10th the Marco Island Squadron along with Members from both
the Naples Senior and Cadet Squadrons conducted a 3-day SAR/EX for the purpose of
providing practice and training for their members.
The exercise was comprised of multi-task sorties involving both air crew and ground
team activities. All were coordinated through mission base located at the Marco Island
Squadron’s hangar at the Marco Island Executive Airport on Mainsail Drive. Tasks
ranged from locating ELT (Electronic Locator Transmitter) beacons, searching and
locating a downed aircraft and also a crashed helicopter, all simulated of course.
A total of 40 members attended, of which 22 were certified in various mission positions.
They are as follows: mission scanner, mission observer, mission pilot, mission staff
assistant, mission radio operator, airborne photographer, ground team leader, ground
team member, and air operations branch director.
These exercises are planned and performed monthly to increase mission readiness for
any and all circumstances and provides the membership with a solid training platform.
The Marco Island and Naples Senior Squadrons also jointly perform weekly Wilderness
Waterway Coastal Patrols in conjunction with a Memorandum of Understanding with
Collier County. These patrols are flown in late afternoons for the purpose of observing
all watercraft and campsite activities along the Wilderness Waterway and up the
coastline over the many keys and finally along the shore of Marco Island. Our
objectives for these patrols are to identify and report any potential vessels or campers
in distress or in need of assistance.
Your Civil Air Patrol Squadrons are constantly at work for you and watching out on your
behalf by patrolling the skies and following our motto: Semper Vigilans.
 

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Venice Cadets Join Nationwide Recognition of
Veterans
By Major Ted Dodds and C/SMSgt Michelle Theriault, Venice Cadet Squadron
1/16/2016
SARASOTA, Fla. - 

Page 129 of 224

VENICE, Fla.— On December 12, 2015, cadets and senior members from the Civil Air Patrol’s Venice Cadet Squadron
participated in the Wreaths Across America ceremony conducted at the Sarasota National Cemetery. The Sarasota
ceremony coincided with similar events at Arlington National Cemetery and hundreds of other locations across the
country.
The Venice squadron’s participation in laying holiday wreaths on the grave sites of departed veterans marked the
culmination of their community service and fund raising efforts for 2015. In previous weeks, the squadron cadets
collected funds for sponsorship and donations for wreaths at their schools and at Publix Super Market located at
Toledo Blade Blvd in North Port, Florida. In total, the cadets collected almost $1200 with which they were able to
purchase 77 wreaths.
“Venice Cadet Squadron is very proud of this year’s fund raising effort,” said Lt Col Thomas Trammell, Squadron
Commander. “We’re considering it a good start to our association with the annual Wreaths Across America program.
The mission of Remember, Honor, Teach is a good fit with CAP core values.”
“In addition, the Squadron was privileged to have one of its own cadets, Cadet Staff Sergeant Samson Del Torto,
serve as the United States Air Force representative for this year’s ceremony” said Trammell.

Florida Wing Winter Encampment 2015-2016
By Capt Staten Corbett and 1Lt Gail Arnolds, Marianna Composite Sq., Florida Wing
1/7/2016
Tyndall AFB, Fla. -Those attending the December 26, 2015 to January 2, 2016 Florida Wing Winter
Encampment are in the presence of the best of the best. This year U.S. Air Force
Academy students Jared Brown, Kevin Tierney and Hunter Ward are here to offer their
experience. These three students share a commonality with this year’s Cadet
Commander of Encampment, C/Col Iriolexis Encalada; C/Col’s Tierney and Ward each
are recipients of the Civil Air Patrol Gen. Carl A. Spaatz Award. C/Col Encalada is the
newest to receive this distinguished award, an achievement accomplished by less than
one percent of cadets in the program. Cadets meet many challenges along the way, as
they progress through the 16 achievements and four milestones while at all times
demonstrating a commitment to CAP's Core Values of Integrity, Volunteer Service,
Excellence and Respect.
This award is named for, Gen Tooey Spaatz, a man of many firsts. The first to conduct
America’s grand experiment in aerial refueling as a crew member of the famous flight of
The Question Mark in 1928. The first to lead US Strategic Air Forces in Europe to Allied
aerial victory over Nazi Germany in 1945. The first to serve as Chief of Staff of the postWorld War II United States Air Force. After retirement from active service in 1948, he
continued his long career of public service as the first Chairman of the National Board of
the Civil Air Patrol. For all time, Airmen everywhere will remember Gen Spaatz as a man
of courage, vision, and dedication.
C/Col Encalada has been in CAP five years, she has enjoyed nine encampments, taught
at the Florida Leadership Academy, been in several Color Guard competitions and
attended cadet officer school at Maxwell AFB, Ala. C/Col Tierney has been in CAP five
years, attended six encampments, has attended flight academy and is making his college
 

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major Military History. C/Col Ward has been in CAP 5 years. He has attended four
encampments, attended cadet officer school, taught at the Florida Leadership Academy
and enjoyed a term on the National Cadet Advisory Council. C/Lt Col Brown is from
Kansas, been to two encampments, attended the cadet officers school, attended the
glider and power flight academies and completed the International Air Cadet Exchange
program to Canada.

Fruit Cove Cadet Squadron first annual
bivouac
By Capt Dennis Maloney, Fruit Cove Cadet Squadron
1/3/2016
Keystone Heights, FL --

Fruit Cove Cadet Squadron (SER-FL-171) went on its first annual bivouac
early in December. The squadron spent the weekend at Mike Roess Gold
Head Branch State Park, a 2000 acre area of rolling sand hills, marshes,
ravines, lakes, and scrub located midway between Gainesville and
Jacksonville in the community of Keystone Heights.
The evenings were a bit on the chilly side but all of the daytime activities
were conducted under bright blue skies and warm temperatures. Some of
the activities completed by the squadron included map reading,
orienteering, first aid, team building, line searches, customs and
courtesies, and physical fitness. “I was so pleased that things went so
smoothly during the course of the weekend,” said Squadron Commander
Capt Al Uy. “Bivouacs are a great way for the cadets to learn new skills and
work together as a team with the rest of the squadron.”

Southeast Region Cadet Team Wins National
Cadet Competition
By Volunteer Now Staff Writer, National Headquarters
1/2/2016
Maxwell AFB, Ala. -The Florida Wing’s Spartans started the New Year in grand style tonight, winning the
2015 National Cadet Competition and the Air Force Chief of Staff Sweepstakes Award
Trophy that goes to the top Civil Air Patrol cadet team.
The 2015 competition was held Wednesday through today in front of special guests that
included senior U.S. Air Force and CAP personnel.
 

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"It was a good competition,” Lt. Col. Grace Edinboro, the activity’s director, told members
of the 16 competing teams. “You are all winners!”
Cadets participating in the competition reached the national stage by winning group, wing
and regional competitions. Each of CAP’s eight regions were represented, as well as 14
wings -- Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Michigan, Minnesota, New York,
North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah and Virginia.
Members of the championship team, from the Coral Springs Cadet Squadron, are Cadet
2nd Lts. Michael Cassell and Santiago Ledesma, Cadet Master Sgt. Andres Fonseca,
Cadet Staff Sgts. Kenneth Lasseter and Pedro Turmero and Cadet Senior Airman
Anthony Vicary. The team was escorted by Capt. Luz Levin and 1st Lt. Sean Owens.
Cadets competed on six-member teams, demonstrating skills in events that involve
precision and teamwork. These skills included indoor and outdoor color guard challenges,
a written test of leadership and aerospace knowledge and a Jeopardy!-style game, a
physical fitness test, an obstacle course-like fitness challenge, public speaking, model
rocketry, team leadership problems (group problem solving challenges) and a uniform
inspection.
In addition to the Air Force Chief of Staff Sweepstakes Award Trophy, second- and thirdplace team trophies were also presented.
The second-place trophy went to the Florida Wing's Sabre team, consisting of cadets from
the Ormond Beach Compsiite Squadron, while the California Wing’s CA-324 team -cadets from Skyhawk Composite Squadron 47 --finished in third place.
Individual awards were also presented to cadets competing in several categories,
including top written exam score.

#2015CadetComp
View more images from National Headquarters's Instagram

Members of the team, from the Coral Springs Cadet Squadron, are (from left) Cadet
Senior Airman Anthony Vicary, Cadet Staff Sgt. Kenneth Lasseter, Cadet 2nd Lt. Michael
Cassell, Cadet Master Sgt. Andres Fonseca and Cadet 2nd Lt. Santiago Ledesma
 

 

 

Page 132 of 224

Wing Span Magazine

 

Page 133 of 224

SUMMER 2016
www.f l w g .us

Page 134 of 224

Commander’s
Comments
WingSpan is an authorized publication serving
the interests of the Florida Wing of the United
States Air Force Auxiliary Civil Air Patrol. It is
published by a private firm in no way connected
with the Department of the Air Force or with the
Civil Air Patrol Corporation. The appearance
of advertisements in this publication, including
supplements and inserts, does not constitute an
endorsement by the U.S. Air Force or CAP of the
products and services advertised herein.
WingSpan encourages contributions from all
CAP members, military personnel, and related
agencies. Material must be original, free of
copyright constraint, and submitted to WingSpan
magazine, which reserves the right to approve,
reject, edit, abridge, or expand any submission.
Ideas for feature articles should be discussed in
advance with the Editor.
Submission guidelines: As a twice a year
publication, the magazine is not suitable for dated
material on routine Squadron or Wing activities.
PAOs and other correspondents should generally
avoid subjects and styles typical of newsletters.
Never imbed photographs within documents.
Send photographs as separate email attachments
with complete captions. Always include contact
information at the top of copy. Email articles,
along with .jpg-extension photographs of a
minimum one MB resolution or higher, to:
wingspan@flwg.us.
For more information on Florida Wing CAP,
contact info@flwg.us.
For information on advertising rates and space
availability, please call 1-800-635-6036.
Col. Henry Irizarry
Florida Wing Commander
Capt. Tyler Lahnen
Director of Public Affairs
Editor, WingSpan



A Year of
Celebration
In December
1941, one week
before the Japanese
attack on Pearl
Harbor, Civil Air
Patrol (CAP) was
founded by citizens
committed to using
civilian aviation
resources to help
bolster the nation’s
defense. On July
1, 1946, President
Harry Truman
Colonel Henry Irizarry
established CAP as
Commander, Florida Wing
a federally chartered
nonprofit corporation, and Congress passed a law
on May 26, 1948, designating CAP as the Air Force
Auxiliary and giving CAP three primary missions – emergency
services, cadet programs and aerospace
education.
This December,
the Civil Air Patrol
will be celebrating
its seventy-fifth
anniversary. We celebrate 75 years of
serving our nation,
contributing to our
local communities and in the development of
America’s future leaders through our youth.
Continued on page 9 . . .

COVER DESIGN By TFO Toni Barnes
Page 135 of 224



Civil Air Patrol at Tampa Bay
AirFest 2016
By Capt. Sybrian Castleman, CAP
Civil Air Patrol joined the 6th Air Mobility
Wing for Tampa Bay AirFest 2016 at MacDill Air
Force Base this past weekend as part of the US
Air Force “Total Force”. Civil Air Patrol (CAP)
provided 150 members from around the state of
Florida to assist with guest relations and visitor
safety during the event.
Friday, during the Media Day Event, the CAP
AirFest Public Affairs Team arrived ahead of the
rest of Civil Air Patrol members to greet and escort
VIP guests to their seating areas for the practice
run of the airshow.
On Saturday and Sunday, CAP Cadets helped
visitors through the static aircraft displays and

talked with kids about the various types of aircraft.
They also helped the 6th Air Mobility Wing
Security Squadron with retrieving forgotten items
to take to the Lost and Found booth and with keeping small children who were lost safe until they
could be reunited with their parents.
Inside Hangar 3, Civil Air Patrol had a booth
with two flight simulators where visitors could
“fly” a Cessna 182, which is the primary aircraft
that makes up the CAP fleet of 550 aircraft. Kids
enjoyed taking pictures with CAP’s mascot “Cadet
Ken” and learning about CAP’s “Drug Demand
Reduction Program”, which focuses on drug abuse
awareness, education, and prevention. Visitors also
had an opportunity to interact with Civil Air Patrol
members to find out more about Cadet Programs,
CAP’s Search and Rescue missions, and membership opportunities.
While Civil Air Patrol was at AirFest serving with the 6th Air Mobility Wing, the 927th
Reserve Refueling Wing was serving Civil Air
Patrol – literally. Members of the 927th cheerfully
cooked and served the 150 CAP members their
meals throughout the event. During the sudden
thunderstorm on Saturday, the 927th delivered
and served lunch to CAP members where they had
taken shelter in Hangar 3 without any delays.
The support of the 6th Air Mobility Wing and
the 927th Reserve Refueling Wing of Civil Air
Patrol extends beyond AirFest 2016. In August of
2015, they arranged a tour of MacDill Air Force
Base for CAP Cadets. The 927th will again be
cooking and serving CAP members’ meals next
month at Sun-N-Fun in Lakeland. Civil Air Patrol
has offered assistance with other events hosted by
both Wings to further solidify the working partnership between the US Air Force and Civil Air Patrol
as members of the USAF Total Force.

Page 136 of 224



Lee County Cadets Take To the Road to
Learn About Aviation
By SM Ruth Byron, CAP
Photos by Capt. J. Arbraham, CAP
Civil Air Patrol cadets from Lee County
Schools Cadet Squadron attended the National
Tour of Historic WWII Aircraft organized by
the Commemorative Air Force at the Punta
Gorda Airport. The cadets were hosted by the
Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) chapter
565 to assist with safety and security around the
static aircraft displays from the largest flying
museum in the world.
“Unfortunately the majority of the planes were
“weathered in” at a Texas airport and could not
make the flight in time,” said Lt. Col. Jim Kaletta,
Group 5 Commander. “With only a few aircraft on
the tarmac the cadets had time on their hands. EAA
members treated the cadets to an all you can eat



pancake breakfast.”
After breakfast, the cadets received a private
tour of the airport control tower. The tower operators explained how they were controlling both air
and ground traffic operations in the area around
the tower.
“This takes the learning experience beyond
the books,” said Kaletta. “The cadets could see
firsthand what a flight control operation does and
the people involved. They saw PGD’s new radar. It
helps them learn about career opportunities.”
The cadets then visited the airport fire department and watched the firemen complete daily tests
with the equipment. A popular piece of equipment
Continued on page 7 . . .

Page 137 of 224



Lee County Cadets
Cont- from page 5

is the 78,000-pound fire rescue
truck with its impressive size,
speed, and the ability to shoot
tons of water a great distance.
After the demonstration, then
the cadets were able to closely
inspect the vehicle from inside,
on top, and anywhere on the
vehicle followed by a tour of
the firehouse.
The cadets returned to the
air show and toured the flight
line to check out the planes.
Each plane’s pilot spoke with
cadets about their plane, its
performance capabilities and
its history.
By this time, the cadets were
ready for a lunch hosted by the
EAA chapter.
Cadet Master Sgt. Bella R.
Viator said, “Best day ever!”
Lee County Schools Cadet
Squadron would like to thank
EAA Chapter 565 for their
endless hospitality and food.
We would also like to thank
Group 5 Commander. Lt. Col.
Jim Kaletta, and Cadet Capt.
Mikehla Hicks, Charlotte
County Composite Squadron’s
cadet commander, for making
this a special activity.
Other FL-816 cadets attending the Punta Gorda event
were Cadet Airman Cooper J.
Bisbe; Cadet Airman Kyle C.
Brady; Cadet Tech. Sgt. Ethan
Paul Cummings; Cadet Senior
Airman Joseph A. Gingras;
Cadet Staff Sgt. Katherine J.
Grier; Cadet Senior Airman
Sabrina M. Reading; and Cadet
Master Sgt. Bella R. Viator.



The 2016 Public Affairs Academy
By TFO Antoinette Barnes
On the weekend of March 4th Florida Wing
held its annual Public Affairs Academy (PAA).
The PAA is the one event that should never be
missed as it is always a fun academy and this
year was no exception. The PAA was hosted
by the Florida Wing Director of Public Affairs,
Capt. Ty Lahnen, accompanied by Deputy
Director Capt. Wayne Hooks, 1st Lt. Elena Lee
and Cadet Maj. Antoinette Barnes.
The PAA took place in Orlando at the
Police Training Facility. Over 40 Civil Air Patrol members attended the
two-day Academy full of useful PA classes. CAP PA members learned
more about public affairs and how to branch out and help the general public
learn about Civil Air Patrol. Students who attended this activity had loads
of fun and made new friends in the wide world of Civil Air Patrol.
On Friday night the Senior CAP members got together for a light social
at a local restaurant before getting down to business the next day.
Day 1 started off with the usual introductions and safety briefing and
then it was heads down for the nitty-gritty. Capt. Lahnen spoke about
upcoming events such as Sun-N-Fun, Macdill Airfest, Encampments and
the new professional development requirements for PAO’s. The PA team
also gave a fun filled class on how to put out great press releases and the
best way to work with social media.
Day 2 we had a surprise visit from Col. Henry Irizarry the Florida Wing
Commander, who answered questions from participants and spoke about
the importance of public affairs at the wing-level.
The day continued with a class on promoting the cadet program and
how to make the best of your PA cadets, followed by some camera tips and
a unique class on how to get your story out. The infamous camera wiz Maj.
Steve Lampasona was seen with welding his camera and took some great
photos of the group.
The weekend wrapped up with the award ceremony where CAP members received their well earned certificates and well wishes for happy PA
work before all headed back to their home squadrons armed with all sorts of
great ideas to help get CAP in the media.

Page 138 of 224



Commander’s
Comments
Cont- from page 1

I am proud to be part of
this great organization that has
contributed so much to our
great nation and has provided
so many opportunities to our
youth to include myself. CAP
was a crucial part in my teenage
years through the teachings of
leadership, aerospace, fitness
and character development. It
helped me reach who I am today
in both, my professional and
CAP careers.
2016 is a year of celebration. Let’s honor those who preceded us, those who serve today
but most importantly, all who
throughout time have supported
our endeavors that include our
spouses, parents, local community government, industry
leaders, and many, many others. We could absolutely not
accomplish our mission without
their help.
Let’s take every opportunity during 2016 to honor our
past and prepare for the next
75 years.

CAP Byword -

Safety,
Safety, Safety
By Maj. Earle Bretz, CAP

Periodically, the Florida Wing (FLWG) holds a 3 day
Flight Operation Stand Down (NO flying and a lot of sitting,
listening and learning). Recently, FL - 051 Charlotte County
Composite Squadron held their “Sitting Session” with their
aircrews. Thirty senior members, approximately 30% of their
senior members attended.
Group Commanders, Check Pilot Examiners and Check
Pilots played a big part in the audio and visual presentations.
The four hour session covered safety from all angles - safety on
the ground, at meetings, traveling and flying, etc. Addressed in
the talks were the Aircraft Informational Folder (carried in the
plane), our mission reporting site - WEB Mission Information
Reporting Service (WMIRS), Aircraft Inspections, Aircraft
Check Lists, Aircraft Airworthiness, CAP Regulations and
FLWG Supplements covering all aspects of flight, Federal Air
Regulations and Weight and Balance Calculations were only
some of topics covered.
The thrust of all the presentations and the items continually
stressed was safety - Safety to and from meetings, at the meetings, during flight - basically, ALL the time one is “upright and
awake” performing for Civil Air Patrol (CAP).
We are pleased to report that CAP FL - 051 has not had a
safety related issue or incident reported for well over 7 years.
We have taken the safety program of CAP very seriously. There
is never a gathering where it is not stressed to all senior members and cadets.
The time spent at the recent session was very educational
and informative, reinforcing the Air Force and CAP message
regarding safety.We will continue to conduct all activities safely
as we perform our “Missions for America.”



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10

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10

Former Florida Wing Commander
Col. Henri Casenove Passes Away at 98
In mid-January, Col.
Henri Casenove, a former
Florida Wing Commander
(1974 – 1977) passed away
at age 98. Henri joined
CAP in 1961 and was heavily involved in all three
CAP missions, to include
Operations, Logistics and
Communications. CAP
Communications was very
near to his heart having
been involved with radio
nets for many years on
the air as Florida CAP
90. I don’t know what
his callsign was back in
the Sparrow/Crane days, Casenove and Reed in 1984, Col. Henri Casenove and Lt. Col. Dick Reed, Lt. Col.
which were our old callsign USAF, Florida Wing Liaison Officer are being interviewed by an Orlando based radio
station.
names. In 2008, he was
named the Florida Wing
Col. Casenove was named the Florida Wing
and Southeast Region Communicator of the Year
Senior Member of the Year in 1966 and 1985, was
and finished second in the National Communicator
named Southeast Region Wing Commander of the
of the Year process.
Year in 1974 and earned
the Distinguished Service
Award along with numerous
Exceptional and Meritorious
awards. He also earned the
Gill Robb Wilson award,
number 220 in 1984.
In attendance at his
service were eight former
Wing Commanders, along
with other CAP members
that served at high levels
within the Wing. Friends
and family in attendance
spoke highly of Henri’s love
for CAP.
(r to l) Col. Sharkey (01-04), Col. Levitch (05-06), Col. Bedgood (07-08), Col. Lewis
(92-94), Col.Gwynn (66-67), Col. O’Key (06-07), Col. Moersch (08-11) and Col.Cook
(11-15). Col. Bass (68-70) could not attend but passed along his condolences.

11

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11

OOPS…….My Mistake!
By Lt. Col. Phil Zedonek, CAP
Former Florida Wing Vice Commander and Current Government Relations Officer
Are you kidding me? Didn’t you use spell check
or have someone proof this article before it went to
print---Mastake is spelled wrong. Obviously you
don’t know how to write or probably can’t do anything RIGHT. How often have we been criticized,
ridiculed or embarrassed by someone for making a
mistake? How did it make you feel? Probably you
would rather forget about it and just move on, but
often others just won’t let it go, even after years.
Mistakes will happen and are part of our lives.
Everything we have ever learned, all of the world’s
inventions, and who we are as individuals is the
result of trial and error (mistakes). Mistakes are an
integral part of the learning process and must be
internalized if we are to grow and prosper in this
complex world. From learning to walk, feeding
ourselves, riding a bike, playing a musical instrument to operating complex equipment would not
be possible if we didn’t try and fail a few times
along the way. Remember nothing we have ever
accomplished or attempted was done perfectly the
first time. So why do individuals continue to make
mistakes when asked do something?
In the context of the Civil Air Patrol we must
examine several root causes for why some tasks or
situations lead to someone making mistakes ranging from minor to potentially life threatening. As
a leader you must ensure when delegating a task
or mission the guidance you provide is correct and
current. It is your responsibility to check if regulations have changed, new procedures updated, or
polices have changed which would impact on
how something is to be accomplished. Also the
guidance you provide must be clear/concise and
specific as to the desired outcomes. Don’t be
vague and leave it up to someone’s interpretation
as to the final product or otherwise you have
abdicated your right to be upset if the results are
different from your own vision. Additionally, do
the individuals you are asking to do something
possess the requisite skills and training necessary
13

to even attempt your request? You must know your
people and their skill level before assigning them a
“mission impossible.”
Okay, so someone makes a mistake even after
you have done everything possible to minimize the
potential for such an outcome. What next? First
take a hard look at the affect the mistake has had
on the overall mission or task assigned. Was the
mistake just a minor blip on the radar that others
may not even notice or was it something which
could cause serious damage to property or be life
threatening? Put the mistake into context from
“who will care” to “call 911” and temper your
response to the individual(s) accordingly. Too
often in the Civil Air Patrol we tend to over react to
someone’s mistake and make the situation worse
than it really is in the “big picture.” Remember
perfection in everything we do and say is impossible. To achieve perfection is about as likely as it
is to change the temperature of the ocean.
Shifting gears (something many of us made
mistakes doing while learning to drive) to the
individual who actually made the OOPS we must
get a sense for their reaction to the situation. Does
the person immediately become defensive and
starts blaming someone, something or everyone
else for the mistake, or are they remorseful and
accept responsibility for their actions? We must
listen to the person and understand why they are
reacting in such a manner so everyone can learn
from the situation. Did the person feel they did
not receive proper guidance, the instructions were
vague, they lacked the necessary training or did
they just didn’t care to take time to do the task
properly and in the manner it was conveyed? This
analysis is critical if we are to make the best of a
mistake and truly learn from it so as to minimize
the possibility of a repeat performance.
The organization can also have a direct impact on
minimizing the possibility of mistakes, remembering
Continued on page 15 . . .

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13

Oops...My Mistake
Cont- from page 13

Zero Defects is impossible. Regulations, polices and
procedure changes need to be kept to an absolute
minimum. Our volunteers have many other duties,
responsibilities and roles to fulfill other than just
Civil Air Patrol. Constant changes/revisions often
lead to confusion, misunderstanding and increase the
likelihood of mistakes. We cannot just keep piling on
requirements as a response to some incident thinking
it will be a panacea for our ills. Additionally, we tend
to over react to a given mistake and this often leads to
the individual(s) leaving the organization since they
feel (despite their best efforts) inadequate, unappreciated or with a sense they can never recover from their
errors since they will constantly be reminded of it for
years. We must, in many instances, “just let it go.”
We cannot keep eating our young for every mistake
they make if we are to survive from the Squadron to
the National Level.
Mistakes are a part of life…from the apple in
the Garden of Eden to present day. They will occur
and we must use them to grow and develop as
individuals and as an organization. Our reaction to
mistakes must be tempered and appropriate to the
seriousness and implications of each situation. One
response does not fit all. Individuals must accept
responsibility for their actions (when appropriate)
and not play the blame game. Finally, we can
be a true Mentor to others and assist in guiding
them through the Civil Air Patrol maze and thus
minimize self-inflicted mistakes.
Finally, a first for this author… a quote to end
this article by Mahatma Gandhi “Freedom is not
worth having if it does not include the Freedom to
make mistakes.”
Lt. Col. Zedonek is a regular contributor to
WingSpan Magazine. His columns focus on effective communication and leadership. Lt. Col.
Zedonek holds a BS in Public Relations from the
University of Florida, a MA in Psychological
Counseling from Ball State and a MS (ABD)
in Communications Research and Theory from
Florida State University.

15

Safety is
Overarching Theme
of Civil Air Patrol
By Lt. Col. Joyce Nader, CAP
Safety, the paramount issue that governs every
activity within Civil Air Patrol (CAP): IMSAFE standards for the pilots and aircrew; ORM (Operational
Risk Management) training for senior and cadet members; monthly safety briefings; periodic safety stand
downs; mandatory annual safety day training; annual
training for the check pilots; and most recently, an
entire weekend throughout the Florida Wing (FLWG)
of CAP devoted to mandatory safety training of the
pilots and aircrew, a Flight Operation Stand-down,
where no flying activity could take place.
The Flight Operation Stand-down mandatory
sessions were provided all over the State for the entire
weekend of February 19-20, 2016. One such session
was conducted at Pinellas Senior Squadron, FL 182.
The main presenter was Lt. Col. Larry Fernald.
Lt. Col. Fernald is a check pilot and check pilot
examiner for FLWG, is a retired commercial airline
pilot, and former fighter pilot for the US Air Force.
Lt. Col. Fernald was assisted by Lt. Col. Bill Rake,
a member of FL 182. Lt. Col. Rake is also a retired
commercial airline pilot, former fighter pilot for the
US Air Force, and an Air Force Academy graduate.
Over 18 senior members attended, most of them
were pilots, while some were aircrew (Mission
Scanners/Mission Observers), and some came just
to observe and learn.
Lt. Col. Fernald’s PowerPoint presentation
was dynamic, interactive, succinct, cohesive,
plain spoken for the non-pilots, and packed full of
helpful information. He asked lots of questions to
the participants, and promoted lively discussion
among the members. Lt. Col. Fernald covered a
myriad of topics, with the overarching message
being safety now, safety always.
“There is no short-cut to being a CAP pilot. It
takes hard work, diligence, and constant vigilance…
to the equipment, to the weather, to the regulations, to
one’s own condition,” stated Lt. Col. Fernald.
The mandatory session was a very worthwhile 4
hours spent on a bright but cold Saturday morning.

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21

2016 Check Pilot School
Another Florida Wing Success
By Lt. Col. Joyce Nader, CAP
Civil Air Patrol’s (CAP) Florida Wing (FLWG) held
its annual National Check Pilot Standardization Course
(NCPSC), commonly called “Check Pilot School”, in
Lakeland, Florida, at the main terminal building, Lakeland
Linder Airport, February 6-7, 2016. FLWG is one of the few
wings in CAP that mandates both online training and in person face-to-face training and evaluation of its check pilots.
Over 50 CAP members from around FLWG came to
participate in the annual NCPSC, including more than 37
check pilots, check pilot trainees, and check pilot examiners.
The check pilot examiners train future check pilots and future
check pilot examiners, as well as evaluate Form5/Form 91
check pilots.
Over 20 sorties were planned to fly throughout the 2- day
training. 11 CAP aircraft were flown in from around the state
to participate in this important mission, which was funded
by the United States Air Force (USAF). However, inclement
weather on both days grounded the training and examination
flights. A steady rain on Saturday Feb. 6th prevented the
sorties from taking off, while gusty cross-winds prohibited
the sorties from flying on Sunday Feb. 7th. The training and
examination flights were rescheduled over the course of the
next few weeks following the Check Pilot School.
The NCPSC consists of extensive classroom instruction,
roundtable discussions with the pilots in attendance, and in
flight training and evaluation.
CAP members from the CAP Southeast Region and
FLWG served in numerous staff-related roles throughout
the 2-day course including: Lt. Col. Luis Garcia, Incident
Commander (“IC”); Lt. Col. George Schaefer, Deputy IC;
Capt. Charlene Garcia, Safety Officer, Aircraft Inspections;
Lt. Col. Bruce McConnell, Communications; Maj. Adrian
Cuarta, LSC, Logistics, and other staff support; and Lt. Col.
Joyce Nader, LSC Trainee, PIO, and other staff support. CAP
USAF representatives were also present.
The overarching message of this mission is SAFETY first
and foremost: safety of the check pilots who then evaluate the
Form 5/Form 91 and Cadet Orientation pilots. As the FLWG
Commander Col. Henry Irizarry stated, “For CAP pilots,
safety reigns supreme. We must earn and maintain the trust,
most especially of the parents and grandparents who entrust
their children’s lives with each one of us.”
23

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Marion County
Composite Squadron
Finishes in First Place
in State CyberPatriot
Competition
By Capt. Don Lefebvre, CAP
The Civil Air Patrol (CAP), Marion
County Composite Squadron’s cadet team
finished in first place out of 27 registered
CAP teams in the state of Florida and 10th
place out of 448 in the nation in the national
CyberPatriot competition. The Marion
County CAP team was formed in August,
2015, giving the cadets only seven months
to form a cohesive team and win the Florida
competition. 2nd Lt. Dale Katz, the team
leader and coach said, “The team worked
very well together under extreme pressure
and I am proud of their accomplishment.”
E-ONE Inc., the fire engine/emergency
vehicle manufacturer in Ocala, generously
offered the team their facility to practice and
computer access to the on-line competition.
During the competition the cadets are
tasked with finding cyber security vulnerabilities within computer operating systems
while maintaining critical computer services.
The competition is conducted on-line and the
teams are given a six-hour window in which
to perform the assigned tasks. The clock starts
when the team logs-in. CyberPatriot is the
National Youth Program created to motivate
students towards careers in cybersecurity and
other science, technology, engineering and
mathematics disciplines.
In addition to 2nd Lt. Dale Katz, the
team was comprised of Cadet Master Sgt.
Jonathan Allison, Cadet 2nd Lt. Hannah
Guertler, Cadet 2nd Lt. Christopher Katz,
Cadet Airman First Class Chase Lucas,
Cadet Master Sgt. Joseph Reynolds and
Cadet Staff Sgt. Brandi Yager.

23

Southwest Florida Civil Air Patrol
Squadrons To Mark 75 Years of Vigilant
Watch Over Florida’s Coast
By Group 5 Public Affairs
The Civil Air Patrol has
safeguarded life and property by
keeping a vigilant watch over
Florida coastal waters for nearly
75 years. CAP’s initial air operations focused on the German Uboat “war on trade” in the Atlantic
seaboard shipping routes. Bases
along Gulf of Mexico shores were
established to guard against the
growing threat from German submarine activity in gulf waters.
CAP members from what is now
Florida Wing Group 5 operations
area have played a continuous
and expanding role since the very
beginning of this important civilian defense effort.
The Ports of Tampa Bay
When creating the Florida
Wing in 1942, the peninsula
was divided into geographical
regions of responsibility. The current assigned area for Group 5
extends south from Tampa Bay
to the Naples area and eastward
to the western shores of Lake
Okeechobee. By the spring of
1942, CAP aircrews were flying
patrols over the shipping lanes
serving ports in Tampa Bay.
That year, Civil Air Patrol’s 13th
Coastal Base moved to Sarasota
from the Tampa area.
The wide continental shelf
along Florida’s west coast forced
the aircrews to fly more than 70
miles from shore to reach water
deep enough for the submarines
to operate. Aircrews often flew
just a few hundred feet above the
24

water’s surface to spot their prey.
The aircrews also helped to locate
wreckage of military training accidents from sorties launched from
airfields built along the peninsula’s
west coast.
For more than seven decades,
volunteers have continued the
reconnaissance flights as the
Airforce’s auxiliary. Over this
broad span of time, local citizenry
has remained a relevant and important link in emergency response
and America’s homeland security.
The local squadron continued to
help alert authorities to suspicious activities in nearby coastal
waters. In the early 1990’s, the
U.S. Customs Agency increased
focus on the Florida peninsula
and surrounding waters. CAP aircrews were once again tasked to
fly reconnaissance sorties over the
Gulf of Mexico waters.
“The operation parameters had
changed since the 1940’s”, offered
1st Lt. Christopher Carroll, unit
public affairs officer assigned to
the Sarasota squadron. “Aircrews
now flew only half the distance
offshore than their WWII-era
brethren at an altitude with a
greater margin of safety.”
Sarasota pilot, Maj. Roger
Nyberg, a 33-year CAP member
and Vietnam veteran, was the
Group 5 operation officer for many
years’ states, “In addition to transporting military personnel, pilots
conducted aerial missions searching for emergency locator transmitter beacons and overdue aircraft.”
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In 2016, the SRQ Composite
Squadron is thriving. The squadron’s
pilots are based from the Sarasota
Bradenton International Airport
and conduct coastal patrols twice
a week. The aircrews fly a course
of more than one hundred miles
over the navigation lanes along the
coastline of Sarasota and Manatee
counties using strict parameters
of flight. During the safety patrol,
aircrews exercise communication
channels while searching for navigation hazards and boaters showing
signs of distress.
Charlotte Harbor
“At the end of World War II, a
CAP squadron was established at
the former Punta Gorda Army Air
Field,” said Maj. Earle Bretz, unit
public affairs officer. “During the
early years, the ‘Coastal Rangers’
flew a Piper J-3 Cub on patrol over
Charlotte Harbor while operating out
of the abandoned Air Force facility.”
“Over the years, local volunteer members made many
improvements to the Punta Gorda
facility, most at personal expense.
Hurricane Donna damaged the
squadron’s facility in 1960. Repairs
and upgrades gave another 44 years
of service until Hurricane Charlie
destroyed the building and hangar
in August of 2004,” told Bretz.
“It comes down to relationships,” said Lt. Col. Jim Kaletta,
Group 5 Commander. “A mission
statement only goes so far, it takes
partnerships to keep the wheels
turning. In this case, to keep the
24

props turning.” Kaletta, a former
Punta Gorda unit commander said,
“The Charlotte County squadron
has made it a priority to maintain
good community partnerships.
Through the support of the airport authority, county commission
and other community partners,
the Charlotte County Composite
Squadron preserves the legacy of
the early Coastal Rangers.”
The modern day Rangers’
routes of coastal patrols, sundown
patrols, and harbor patrols are
much the same today as in the
1940’s. The patrol covers all
shoreline of Charlotte Harbor; the
Myakka River; the Peace River;
the Intra-coastal Waterway and
environs. Along the more than
100-mile route, aircrews search
for boaters in distress, hazards to
navigation, and environmental
considerations such as oil slicks.
Crews report any sightings
to the U.S. Coast Guard. Local
units from both organizations find
it valuable to schedule regular
multi-agency training events to
exercise lines of communication.
The events use real-to-life scenarios to help become accustomed
to working in a response environment with multiple agencies.
The CAP flight crews include
a mission pilot, a mission observer,
and a mission scanner or aerial
photographer. Crew members train
regularly for specialty qualifications and to maintain proficiency.
The cross-unit training creates an
opportunity for working in mixed
teams. This ensures CAP resources
are ready to respond in a safe and
efficient manner. In recent years,
Group 5 aircrews have provided
a proving ground for beta testing
the CAP National Technology
Group’s digital imaging systems
from the Punta Gorda base.
Funding for the patrol flights
25

comes from the volunteers themselves and through a memorandum
of understanding (MOU) with
the state or local counties. Both
the State of Florida and many of
Florida’s shoreline counties use
the MOU agreement for tasking
CAP aircrews to fly the safety
patrols and aerial photo sorties.
The acquired images and data
assist planners with decision-making for tropical storm mitigation
and responding to land development trends.
The Everglades and Ten
Thousand Islands
Civil Air Patrol established
a squadron in 1951 at the Naples
airport to provide additional services for the southern region of
the peninsula. Like the Charlotte
County Squadron, The Naples
Senior Squadron enjoys a good
relationship with the local airport
and community neighbors forming
the cornerstones for the longevity
of the unit.
In 1981, a second flyingsquadron operating from a base
at Marco Island added additional
CAP resources for the area.
Drawing deeply from local support, the Marco Island Squadron
constructed a modern training
center at the airport to support
CAP mission efforts. Today, the
Marco Island Senior Squadron
and Naples Senior Squadron serve
their communities as partners in
maintaining the vigilant watch
over the area’s coastline.
“Over the decades, CAP teams
have assisted in helping numerous
boaters who have gone aground,
required mechanical assistance
or simply got lost in the backwaters of the mangrove islands,”
said Capt. Robert Corriveau,
Commander of the Marco Island
Senior Squadron. “In one case, our

Page 150 of 224

team assisted the Coast Guard in
finding a vessel that was taking on
water somewhere between Marco
Island and Key West. In each case,
the individuals involved were
assisted and/or rescued.”
Coverage of these weekly
safety patrols in southern Group 5
includes the Ten Thousand Islands
and Wilderness Waterway Trail.
Aircrews perform reconnaissance
of the campsites along the route
to check for needed assistance.
The Coast Guard is notified at the
beginning and end of each patrol.
Aircrews monitor marine channel
16 and can be redeployed in-flight
to assist as a High-Bird communication relay. The squadrons’
patrol route completes CAP coverage of navigated waters along the
Intercoastal Waterway through
the Group 5 operations area to the
mouth of Tampa Bay.
The attacks on 11 September
2001 have renewed the importance
of identifying aircraft flying over
prohibited airspace or entering the
country without proper flight plans.
In addition, the unique geography of southern Florida makes the
shoreline vulnerable to contraband
floated or flown into the United
States. To combat the threat, fighter
aircraft remain poised to be airborne within minutes to intercept
unidentified and unknown airplanes
entering U.S. airspace.
Just as in 1942, qualified CAP
aircrews participate in Department
of Defense exercises to help keep
the military pilots skills sharp.
Eye To The Future
In 2014, Civil Air Patrol and
its earliest members were honored with the Congressional Gold
Medal for their contributions during World War II. Three-quarters
of a century after CAP’s inception,
Continued on page 29 . . .

25

Blasting Into a New Frontier!
By 1st Lt. Richard Haughton, CAP
The Fort Lauderdale
Composite Squadron was honored to host a 7 week model
rocketry program for Group 6
cadets representing North Perry
Composite Squadron, Boca
Raton Composite Squadron,
Crystal Lakes MS Cadet
Squadron and Coral Springs
Cadet Squadron. Our Cadets
embarked on a new appreciation for rocketry with the help
of new age programs such as
Orion, Space X and the Space
Launch System. While completing the program requirements,
cadets will become eligible
for the official Civil Air Patrol
Model Rocketry Badge. Cadets
and senior members started this
program on January 7 th, 2016
and will continue to meet each
Saturday until its conclusion
on February 27 th . The time
was spent meeting the requirements of the program which
involved rocket history, rocket
science, rocket building and
the safe launch and recovery
of a model rocket.
The Civil Air Patrol Model
Rocketry is an achievement program for cadets interested in the
science technology and flight
of model rockets. The program
subunits, Redstone, Titan and
Saturn are stages in the program
which honor NASA’s history of
rocket missions. Upon the completion of each stage it becomes
more challenging. Cadets who
complete this program will be
recognized by their peers for
27

their leadership skills in the field
of model rocketry. This program
requires the support of cadets,
parents, senior members and
generous partners like the Fort
Lauderdale Police Department,
Banyan Air Service and the
Florida Army National Guard.
In our first stage which is
called Redstone we introduced
our cadets to a rich history of
rocketry starting progress by the
Chinese almost 800 years ago.
Cadets were given a rocketry
presentation which was followed
by written exam administered
by senior members Stephanie
Franca, Lori Pierre-Louis, and
Capt. Rosario Palau. All cadets
successfully completed their
test with high marks. Though
the program is educational we
still had a blast! After our first
examination cadets began their
building phase under the supervision of Capt. James Sullivan
from the North Perry Composite
Squadron and myself. The
cadets were putting theory into
practice while they built bottle
rockets during the hands on portion of the program. Following
this was launch time where we
had some fun allowing cadets
to choose the propellant of their
choice which includes skittles,
confectioner sugar, flour and
wet noodles. We all like to have
fun but safety was a top priority
at all times. We routinely followed the 11 set Model Rocket
Safety code before all launches.
The cadets all competed to see
Page 151 of 224

who could launch their rocket
the highest or the farthest using
both the Pop Bottle Rockets and
Junk Rockets. Cadet Berg from
the Crystal Lakes MS Cadet
Squadron achieved the highest altitude with her Pop Bottle
Rocket powered by skittles.
Even our Commander Capt.
John Franco got in on the fun
launching a Pop Bottle Rocket.
The Second Stage Titan
followed the procedures of
Redstone, but now the cadets
would put Sir Isaac Newton’s
Theories into practice. Second
Lieutenant Edson Franca who
we consider as our own in house
NASA scientist had all rocketry
stations ready for the build. This
time our rockets would use solid
rocket fuel requiring our cadets
to use the information gained
from the lectures in order to
complete a successful launch and
recovery. The Cadets would meet
at Snake Creek in the Florida
National Guard training center
to launch their single stage and
two stage rockets. We were very
thankful to the National Guard
for allowing us to follow the
rocketry safety code while keeping with airspace requirements
from the FAA. Cadet Read of
Fort Lauderdale achieved the
highest altitude and recovery of
his two stage rocket!
The third stage Saturn
followed the procedures of
Redstone, Titan and also introduced altitude tracking using a
Continued on page 29 . . .
27

New Frontier

75 Years of Service Cont- from page 25

Cont- from page 27

device called the Altitrak. The
cadets were able to compute
the altitude from the angles tangent and baselined distance.
Although all launches never
go as planned cadets learned
a valuable lesson in problemsolving and team work. They
were tasked with what went
wrong and getting themselves
ready for a relaunch or helping
fellow cadets with relaunch.
The program was successful in
allowing all cadets to achieve
their rocketry badge. Awards
were presented by our Group
Commander Maj. Jaime Lichi.
We also encouraged Maj. Lichi
to have some fun by arranging
a competition against our own
Capt. Palau to see whose rocket
could achieve the highest apogee (highest point in the flight
of a model rocket). I will leave it
up to the reader to view our face
book page to see who really won
the contest. This program was
designed to bring cadets, qualified senior members and squadron commanders all together and
after witnessing the end result
I believe we have successfully
achieved that mission.

We Thank You
C.A.P., for
all your
efforts...

29

local citizens are still providing
voluntary service to help manage the nation’s borders along
Florida’s coast.
“The local squadron is the
face of Civil Air Patrol to the
community; it is also the face of
the local community to a nationwide membership body of close
to 60,000 volunteers,” said Maj.
Jeff Carlson, CAP Public Affairs
Officer. “The diversity in the
CAP membership is the primary
strength of the organization.”
“On one hand, local units have
been working at the same mission
for 75 years. On the other hand, the
mission environment has changed
significantly,” said Carlson.
“Political and legal influences,
economic pressures, technology
changes and other influences continue to shape the CAP culture
and mission. At the local level, the
organizational change is both exciting and frustrating. It is challenging
to create a simple definition of what
CAP is because of the continually
evolving mission and the broad
impact of the aerospace, cadet, and
emergency services programs.”
Civil Air Patrol’s professional volunteers are a valued
part of the United States Air Force
“Total Force” and viewed by
the Department of Defense and
Department of Homeland Security
as a cost-effective resource for noncombat, domestic missions. The
Federal Emergency Management
Agency relies on CAP’s trained
mission professionals to provide
data from both air and groundbased resources to aid in response
efforts. State and local officials
look to the Air Force auxiliary as
a valuable resource to help quickly
identify need throughout the incident response cycle.
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Almost 40% of Group 5 membership is comprised of cadets,
representing ten percent of Florida
Wing’s 1500 cadets. Young people
from 12 years old through age
21 are introduced to aviation
through CAP’s cadet program.
The program allows young people
to progress at their own pace
through a 16-step program including aerospace education, leadership training, physical fitness
and moral leadership. Cadets can
also complete specialty qualification training and be assigned duty
on Air Force-assigned missions.
Cadets enjoy success through the
Group 5 program and many have
receive appointments to the Air
Force Academy in Colorado.
“The Civil Air Patrol is wellpoised to serve Florida communities for the next 75 years,”
continued Carlson. “There is
tremendous untapped potential to
impact local communities with the
STEM education programming
funded by the Air Force and available through CAP. The surface has
only been scratched.”
Carlson reassured “residents
of southwest Florida communities
can feel safer to see their neighbor
patrol the area’s coastline from
above in the familiar red, white
and blue airplanes, helping to keep
recreational and commercial traffic safe while serving their communities and nation with constant
vigilance both on the ground and
from above...and beyond.”

29

A Day To Call Our Own
By 1st Lt. Gail Arnold, CAP
Sun-N-Fun is the second largest air show,
fly-in, tradeshow and aviation event in the nation.
More than 160,000 people enjoyed the event
this year with over 5,000 aircraft flying in to the
Lakeland airport. Aviation enthusiasts of all ages
enjoyed watching 80 teams fly above to thrill them
with the sights and sound of aviation.
April 6, 2016 was proclaimed to be Civil Air
Patrol Day, by Lakeland’s Mayor, Howard Wiggs
during the opening ceremony of Sun-N-Fun in
Lakeland, Florida. Receiving the proclamation was
Civil Air Patrol National Commander, Maj. Gen.
Joseph Vasquez and Florida Wing Commander
Col. Henry Irizarry.
In return the Mayor graciously accepted Civil
Air Patrol’s prized 75th Anniversary Coins.
In celebrating the 75th anniversary during
Sun-N-Fun Gen Vasquez and Col Irizarry enjoyed
the show. The General began his morning on the
War-Bird ramp and in the afternoon he joined Col.
Irizarry on the radio. They became celebrities on
the airwaves of Sun-N-Fun Radio. It was a great
interview that lasted more 30 minutes discussing
all things CAP.
Civil Air Patrol serves at this event as support
for the vendors prior to the opening date, followed
by crowd control, safety for attendees and aircraft
and conducting emergency locator searches on the
field. More than 150 members were in attendance
to assist in making Sun-N-Fun a safe and enjoyable experience for everyone.
Civil Air Patrol had a booth to highlight the
celebration of its 75-year history. The story of
CAP was told beginning with its founding on
Dec. 1, 1941, just six days before Pearl Harbor.
Members spread the word of the Civil Air Patrol
being awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in
December 2014 for the fearless efforts of those
early CAP members who protected the eastern
seaboard during WWII.
The missions carried out during the early days
lead to the core mission of today, with core values
of integrity, volunteer service, excellence, and
30

respect, and a mission of promoting aerospace education, cadet programs and emergency services.
Cadets promoted their program and spoke to
the core values at the recruiting booth. They also
educated parents and children on the Drug Demand
Reduction Program. They answered questions on
many issues related to being a cadet. Questions are
asked about the uniform as well, the uniform they
wear with such pride.
Pride, a deep satisfaction derived from
one’s own achievements or the achievements
of one whom you are closely associated with,
so says Mr. Webster. Civil Air Patrol members
can relate, we have much to be proud of, those
who have gone before us are not the least of that
pride. Therefore the announcement, which came
during CAP’s 2015 National Conference, that
the all-volunteer Air Force auxiliary had joined
the active-duty Air Force, Air National Guard
and Air Force Reserve Command, along with Air
Force retired military and civilian employees, in
the Total Force, was received with such great
pride by Civil Air Patrol members.
To all of the proud members of CAP, Happy
Anniversary Civil Air Patrol as you celebrate 75
years of service.

Civil Air Patrol
Always Vigilant For America
1941 - 2016

Page 153 of 224

30

Young Squadron Makes Big Strides in
First Year of Operation
By Maj. Dennis Maloney, CAP
One of Group Two’s newest members, Fruit Cove Cadet
Squadron (SER-FL-171), has
been growing under the leadership
of Capt. Al Uy since receiving
its charter from Civil Air Patrol
(CAP) National Headquarter
(NHQ) in April, 2015.
Before that time, the squadron
performed as Foxtrot Flight of
nearby St. Augustine Composite
Squadron (SER-FL-173).
However, Capt. Uy saw the need
for a standalone squadron in the fast-growing area
of northwest St. Johns County.
The Fruit Cove Cadet Squadron meets every
Tuesday evening in the annex building of the Fruit
Cove Baptist Church. The current roster includes
30 cadets and 12 senior members.
Since its inception, the squadron members
have been very active in many Civil Air Patrol
activities, including Texas Wing (TXWG) and
Florida Wing (FLWG) summer and winter
encampments, Hawk Mountain Ranger School,
and National Blue Beret.
The squadron has also held two very popular
open houses which resulted in over ten youngsters
signing up as CAP members.
“I am also very proud that we have a very
active and supportive group of parents,” said Capt.

31

U y. “ W h e n t h e
word went out that
we needed money
for a color guard,
they generously
came up with the
funds.”
The squadron
has also gotten extensive media coverage through
the efforts of Public Affairs Officer Maj. Dennis
Maloney. A front page article appeared in the St.
Johns Sun and other articles have been published
in Creek Lines newspaper.
“We are also very pleased to participate at
Westminster Retirement Community,” explained
Capt. Uy. “We post over 100 American flags on the
grounds for Memorial and Veteran’s Day. It’s such
an honor for our squadron to be doing this.”
2nd Lt. Mark Carley has also gotten the cadets
excited about participating in CyberPatriot competition. He was very pleased that the two teams
were able to do well at the state level.
Recently the squadron was selected by CAP
NHQ to participate in the development of the
BETA physical training testing component.
“It is truly amazing to watch the enthusiasm
of our cadets and senior members,” said Capt. Uy.
“We are so happy to be part of Civil Air Patrol.”

Page 154 of 224

31

Key West Composite Squadron Gears Up
to Celebrate 5th Anniversary
Since its birth in December
2 0 11 , K e y We s t C o m p o s i t e
Squadron (known as SER FL-462)
is the southernmost squadron of
the continental United States. The
current Squadron Commander
is ex Army veteran, and Marine
Major John Di Renzo Jr. He is also
the squadron’s first Commander
and is responsible for its creation. The squadron has grown
immensely since. Giving cadets
3 to 4 orientation flights a year,
teaching AEX courses (Aviation classes) twice a month, volunteering close to 200 community service
hours a year, creating two certified pilots, and has a history of two cadets who have received a congressional nomination to the Air Force Academy and one currently attending the Naval Academy.
Cadet 2nd Lt. Caleb Hiller was the first cadet to receive a congressional nomination to not only the Air
Force Academy, but the Naval Academy as well, where he is currently attending. Cadet 2nd Lt. Hector Gomez
was the second in the Key West squadron to receive a congressional nomination to the Air Force Academy.
Key West Composite Squadron also has a history of advancing the success of many cadets who seek
an education in aviation and strive to become future pilots, and service men and women. Cadet Senior
Master Sgt. Aaron Portal is the first cadet from Key West to receive the Air Force Association (AFA)
Award for his exemplary leadership, education, conduct, and tact.
Key West has also had a history of members who strive to make their mark. Two cadets have
had leadership positions in their state cadet advisory council (CAC) as Vice Chairman and Squadron
Representatives. Those same two cadets also took the initiative to attend the Florida Wing special
activities selection boards to go off and attend academies for emergency services and aviation training. One such cadet (Cadet 2nd Lt. Hector Gomez) has already attended a special activity in Camp
Atterbury Indiana for Emergency Services to gain knowledge in basic search and rescue to further
the growth of his squadron and all its cadets.
Since its birth 5 years ago, one thing is certain about the momentum growing in the Florida Keys. It
is a service worth recognizing to the community of Key West, the state of Florida, the South-East region,
and above all the United States of America.

33

Page 155 of 224

33

Four Squadrons Join Together for
Community Event
By Capt. Sybrian Castleman, CAP
On the morning of Saturday, March 12th,
four squadrons joined together under cloudy
skies to march in one of Zephyrhills most
anticipated events of the year: the Zephyrhills
Founders Day Parade.
Cadets and Senior Members from the Zephyr
Airport Cadet Squadron, the MacDill Aviation
Cadet Squadron, the South Lakeland Composite
Squadron, and the Polk County Composite
Squadron met a couple of hours before the parade
to practice marching together as one unit.
Practice complete, the cadets marched a few
blocks through the residential streets of Zephyrhills
to the parade line up. This year Civil Air Patrol had
been placed near the end of the parade line up
which gave the cadets time to visit with each other
and other Zephyr squadron members who were
participating in the parade with other groups.
Once the parade line began to move, the cadets
took their places. With the MacDill Squadron’s
Color Guard leading the way, the combined unit
turned the corner onto the Main Street parade
route. Civil Air Patrol is one of Zephyrhills’ most
recognized organizations due to the great amount

35

of service provided by the local squadron in the
community. The cadets stepped out to people
standing and saluting them, yelling out thanks for
their service, and cheering when the cadets came
into view.
At the Parade Judge’s Stand, the cadets were
greeted by the parade announcer, Greg First, with
a glowing review well past the normal blurb about
Civil Air Patrol. He also welcomed the other three
squadrons to Zephyrhills and extended a thank you
to them for participating in the parade.
After the parade, the
squadrons had a pizza
social where the cadets
were able to relax and
get to know each other a
little better. The squadron
commanders and senior
members discussed plans
for additional combined
activities, emergency
services training for the
cadets, a Curry Camp for
new cadets, and a rocketry launch day over the
summer months.

Page 156 of 224

35

Cadet Program Thrives At Venice Charter
Middle School
By Maj. Jeff Carlson, CAP
VENICE, Fla. - The Venice Leadership Academy
Cadet Squadron is one of Florida Wing’s 800 squadrons. These units are attached to a school as part
of its extracurricular program. Currently, there are
several active school squadrons in Florida Wing.
The Leadership Academy of Venice is a charter
middle school celebrating a decade in the community and the Civil Air Patrol has been a partner
from the beginning. Young people are introduced to
aviation through CAP’s cadet program. The aerospace education lesson plans blend effortlessly into
the school’s STEM programming and the leadership
lesson plans helps youth develop team-building
skills. It also has the fitness requirements as part
of the self-paced milestone program. The academy
squadron currently has fourteen cadet members.
“Being able to get the young person in an
airplane seat with her hands on the yoke, flying the
airplane, is CAP’s competitive advantage,” said Lt.
Col. Jim Kaletta, Group 5 Commander and former
CAP cadet. “The Orientation Flights, or O-Rides,
let us hook into the imagination and explore what
is possible. Once the youth get a hold and run with
it, they challenge themselves. I see it over and
over, I’ve lived it.”
“It is a tremendous undertaking to operate a
school squadron. The Commander must meet the
conditions set forth by both the school and CAP.
Group 5 at one time had four active, award-win-

36

ning, school squadrons. Today there are two,” said
Kaletta. “Running an ordinary CAP squadron is
not kid’s stuff; the school squadron leadership is a
double-tough breed.”
The current Venice Leadership Academy Cadet
Squadron unit commander, Capt. Madeline Kirsten,
CAP, is typical by being both a CAP commander and
a teacher at the host school. Commander Kirsten is
the unit’s fifth commander. These units must meet
the same requirement, with few variances, as other
squadrons. The unit leadership must look to the
school for space and funding.
“It’s challenging to keep up with everything
CAP expects,” said Kirsten. “The Air Force STEM
material and CAP learning modules are too good
of a learning experience to pass up, what are you
going to do?”

Page 157 of 224

36

Page 158 of 224

Commander’s
Comments
WingSpan is an authorized publication serving the
interests of the Florida Wing of the United States
Air Force Auxiliary Civil Air Patrol. It is published
by a private firm in no way connected with the
Department of the Air Force or with the Civil Air
Patrol Corporation. The appearance of advertisements
in this publication, including supplements and inserts,
does not constitute an endorsement by the U.S. Air
Force or CAP of the products and services advertised
herein.
WingSpan encourages contributions from all CAP
members, military personnel, and related agencies.
Material must be original, free of copyright constraint,
and submitted to WingSpan magazine, which reserves
the right to approve, reject, edit, abridge, or expand
any submission. Ideas for feature articles should be
discussed in advance with the Editor.
Submission guidelines: As a twice a year publication,
the magazine is not suitable for dated material on
routine Squadron or Wing activities. PAOs and other
correspondents should generally avoid subjects and
styles typical of newsletters. Never imbed photographs
within documents. Send photographs as separate email
attachments with complete captions. Always include
contact information at the top of copy. Email articles,
along with .jpg-extension photographs of a minimum
one MB resolution or higher, to: wingspan@flwg.us.
For more information on Florida Wing CAP, contact
info@flwg.us.
For information on advertising rates and space
availability, please call 1-800-635-6036.
Col. Henry Irizarry
Florida Wing Commander
Capt. Sybrian Castleman
Editor, WingSpan
Capt. Ernest Lee
Historical Research

COVER DESIGN: Cover concept by 1st Lt.
Elena Lee. Final design by Lt. Col. Jeff Carlson


Reflecting on the past and
shaping the future
On December 1st,
2016, we celebrated
the 75th anniversary of the Civil Air
Patrol. Seventy-five
years of serving
America through a
variety of missions
that started in 1941
as coastal patrols and
today include similar
missions supporting
the U.S. Air Force as
Colonel Henry Irizarry
air intercept targets. Commander, Florida Wing
Over time, Civil Air
Patrol has adapted to new mission requirements
and smoothly transitioned to incorporate technological advances in the same. Our missions
have expanded to Cadet Programs, Aerospace
Education, and Emergency Services.
In this edition of WingSpan, we highlight
some Florida historical facts and with the same,
recognize that we have been a crucial part of our
great organization’s past. Florida Wing continues
to prepare and train our members for the missions
of the future and to serve our nation for at least
another 75 years.
In a few months, I will hand over command
of the Florida Wing after three years as the Wing
Commander and likewise form part of the history
of our great wing. Therefore, I take this opportunity to thank every one of you for the opportunity
you have offered me to lead and enhance our
amazing wing. There is no doubt that we are the
best wing in the nation and will continue to set the
higher standards for others to follow. I wish you all
the best and look forward to continue working by
your side.

Page 159 of 224



Cadet Activities:

Getting Out What We Put into Them
By Maj. Keith Barry, CAP
Gen. Chuck Yeager Cadet Squadron Commander
Much of the Civil Air Patrol cadet experience
revolves around its activities. Local events such as
parades, model rocketry, and field trips allow cadets
to stay engaged while doing something fun. Wing
activities include the SUN ‘n FUN International
Fly-In and other regional airshows, the Ultimate
Cadet Challenge, and annual Cadet Competition.
The Florida Wing is fortunate to be able to offer
both a summer and winter encampment each year,
attracting cadets and senior members from wings
across the United States, Europe, Puerto Rico, and
the U.S. Virgin Islands.
Through the cooperation and support of our
Total Force partners, we are able to offer more
than 40 National Cadet Special Activities. These
events are designed to explore aerospace careers in
both the military and private sectors, hone leadership skills, provide flight training opportunities,
and build upon the emergency services training
received at the squadron and group level.
For over 60 years, the International Air Cadet

Team “Phoenix” from the Orlando Cadet Squadron use
their compasses to navigate to a simulated aircraft crash
location. Photo credit Maj. Steve Lampasona, CAP, Group 3
Commander



Cadets tackle an obstacle on the Air Assault Course,
one of the more challenging events in the Ultimate Cadet
Challenge. Photo credit Maj. Steve Lampasona, CAP, Group
3 Commander

Exchange (IACE) has afforded cadets an opportunity to travel to 19 foreign countries for what
many participants attest to be the experience of a
lifetime. As CAP’s premier cadet activity, those
chosen to participate in IACE are outstanding
leaders who have demonstrated excellence in the

With the assistance of a cadet safety officer, Team “Trigger
Warning” from the Pines-Miramar Cadet Squadron proceed
to another obstacle on the Air Assault Course. Photo credit
Maj. Steve Lampasona, CAP, Group 3 Commander

Page 160 of 224



180 cadets from 18 wings line up to march to the next phase
of training. Photo Credit Winter Encampment Public Affairs
Staff

Every morning starts out with warm-ups, stretches and
invigorating exercise. Photo Credit Winter Encampment
Public Affairs Staff

CAP Cadet Program.

ing from this encampment are now eligible to test
for the second cadet milestone achievement, the
Gen. Billy Mitchell Award, and are also able to
apply for National Cadet Special Activities.

The Florida Wing Winter Encampment was
held in the Silver Flag exercise area at Tyndall Air
Force Base from 26 December 2016 to 3 January
2017. As the final cadet activity for 2016, this
year’s encampment was attended by 162 students,
85 cadet cadre, and 35 senior members.
Hosted by Detachment 1, 823rd RED HORSE
Squadron, cadets were exposed to a several areas
within the Civil Engineering career field. RED
HORSE stands for Rapid Engineer Deployable
- Heavy Operational Repair Squadron Engineer,
which essentially equates to heavy construction
in the civilian world. RED HORSE is designed
to deploy to areas where there are little or no
resources available and construct a functioning
base for Air Force personnel and assets to conduct
contingency operations.
In addition, participants were taken to the Air
Operations Center on Tyndall Air Force Base, where
they received briefings on the North American
Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), and the
Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC).
They were also given a tour of the 9/11 Memorial
constructed there, and provided with insight on the
missions executed by the First Air Force.
Guest speakers from the Navy and Air Force
Reserve spoke about career opportunities in the
military, and each day included various activities
designed to promote teamwork. Students graduat

The 2016 Ultimate Cadet Challenge was held
from 14-16 October 2016. Nearly 100 members from the Florida Wing converged on Camp
Blanding for events centered on the CAP mission:
uniform inspection and close order drill, a physical
fitness challenge using the Air Assault Course, a
mock ELT mission, general knowledge test, and a
leadership exercise.
The team representing the SRQ Composite
Squadron in Sarasota walked away with the title
of “Ultimate Cadet” for 2016 and marked the third
year of this competition since being brought back
from hiatus. The Florida Wing Cadet Advisory
Council oversees this activity and is directly
responsible for the events and rule sets.
These are only two examples of how the Florida
Wing leads the way in providing top-notch cadet
activities. The quality of our activities is dependent
on the amount of support placed on them. When
the CAP Cadet Program was introduced in 1942, it
was seen as a way to train future pilots. Today, it is
much more, being ever mindful that each member
gets out of CAP what they put into it. As we follow
the Air Force’s lead into cyberspace and unmanned
aerial vehicles, cadet activities are limited only by
our imagination – and the possibilities are endless.

Page 161 of 224



Remembering Coastal Patrol 3,
Civil Air Patrol
Courtesy of Palm Beach County Historical Society
Special exhibit Teachers Guide “War in Florida Waters”, Feb-Sept 2010
Excerpt of text reprinted with permission. All rights reserved.
During the opening months of World War II a
little known story of the war took place at Lantana
Airport in Palm Beach County. For seventeen
months, a group of volunteers serving in the Civil
Air Patrol helped fight one of the biggest threats
to our country’s safety: German submarines called
U‐Boats. They hunted their prey along the East
Coast of the United States and in the Gulf of
Mexico. Men and women of the Civil Air Patrol
volunteered their time and resources to help protect our shores from the U‐boat menace.
Birth of the Civil Air Patrol
After Fiorello La Guardia, former mayor of
New York City, was appointed to head the new
federal Office of Defense, established by presidential order in May 1941, he worked with Gill
Robb Wilson; Guy P. Gannett, owner of a chain
of Maine newspapers; Thomas Beck, Chairman
of Crowell‐Collier Publishing Company; and later
Reed Landis, to develop a plan for a national civil
air patrol. The plan was to form a “minute man
force” to gain valuable time for the military to
prepare for the defense of the nation. Wilson used
New Jersey’s Civil Air Defense Services as the
model for the national plan.
In late 1941 the team presented the plan to La
Guardia, who reviewed and sent it to General Henry
H. “Hap” Arnold, commander of the Army Air
Corps. Arnold liked the idea and appointed a board
of army air corps officers to review the plan. After a
thorough examination, the board endorsed the plan.
Perhaps from the beginning, Arnold foresaw the
valuable contributions the CAP could make towards
the defense of the country and the assistance it could
offer to the military.
Just six short days before the Japanese attack
on Pearl Harbor, under presidential executive
order, La Guardia signed Administrative Order No.


Vermilya and Staff, 1st Air Squadron, Base 3. Civil Air Patrol
Archives

9 establishing the Civil Air Patrol. The CAP would
bolster the nation’s coastal defenses and perform a
wide range of duties including searching for enemy
submarines, border patrols, and rescue missions.
With the establishment of the CAP, civilian
pilots and aviation enthusiasts could put their
aviation skills and private, light planes to use for
civil defense efforts. The opportunity to use the
approximately 100,000 civilian aviators and their
23,000 private aircraft for national defense was
an advantage for both the civilian pilots and the
military. Essentially, the use of civilian planes would
allow military aircraft to perform more immediate
military missions. For many civilian pilots, this was
the only way they could fly because the government
grounded all civilian flights except commercial
airlines after the attack on Pearl Harbor.
After the U.S. declared war on Japan, the German
government in turn declared war on the United
States. Hitler then ordered U‐boats to attack shipping on the U.S. east coast. As the New Year began,
the Germans launched Operation Paukenschlag
(drumbeat) in January 1942 against the vulnerable
U.S. east coast, and then later carried the campaign

Page 162 of 224



into the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. In the early
months of Operation Paukenschlag, U‐boat commanders found virtually no effective anti‐submarine
measures along the east coast during the first months
of the U‐boat campaign. German U‐boat men, who
crossed the Atlantic to attack allied shipping along
the U.S. east coast, referred to this period as the
“happy times.”
In January 1942, a dozen tankers and freighters
were sunk or damaged by U‐boats operating along
the east coast; within two months, the number
increased to forty‐two sunk or damaged ships. By
June 1942, ninety‐seven ships and approximately
5,000 people had been lost to U‐boat attacks. After
April, the U.S. military was finally able to launch
effective counter measures to combat U‐boat attacks
which eventually stopped by 1943. Part of the
counter‐measures was the use of the Civil Air Patrol
which flew anti‐submarine patrols from the last day
of February 1942 to August 1943. A U.S. Naval
report later stated “The Axis submarine campaign
was well planned. Nowhere else in the world could
(Germany) find such a concentration of ships in
such a small area.” Northbound ships cruised the
Gulf Stream while southbound ships were funneled
between the Gulf Stream and the east coast of
Florida. The United States shipping lanes off Florida
were the second busiest in the U.S. and rated sixth
in the world. One out of every twelve ships sunk by
U-boats occurred in Florida waters.
Admiral Ernest King, Commander in Chief,
U.S. Fleet, did not particularly like the idea of
using civil aviators to carry out anti‐submarine patrols. On the other hand, the Army Air
Corps had no objections. A few days after the
CAP began its patrol duties, Admiral Adolphus

Base 3 Hangar. Civil Air Patrol Archives

Andrews, Commander, North Atlantic Naval
Coastal Frontier, tried to persuade the Navy to use
the CAP. Andrews thought this “scarecrow force”
would be able to restrict German naval operations
along the U.S. east coast. King’s reply was simple
“the scarecrow patrol was rejected on grounds
of operational difficulties.” However, after a few
months in operation, the Navy grudgingly recognized the success of CAP coastal patrols.
With Army Air Corps approval, three bases
were authorized to operate for a three‐month trial
period to evaluate CAP performance. The experimental bases were organized at Atlantic City, New
Jersey; Rehoboth, Delaware (both established on
28 February 1942); and West Palm Beach, Florida,
on 30 March 1942. A factor in the selection of West
Palm Beach as one of the experimental bases may
be because Palm Beach County is closer to the Gulf
Stream than anywhere else on the east coast. This
shipping lane became a prime target for enemy
naval attacks. The first three bases proved such
a success that eighteen additional bases quickly
organized along the eastern seaboard and Gulf
coast stretching from Maine to Texas. Altogether,
five bases were located in Florida: Lantana (CP 3),
Flagler Beach (CP 5), Miami (CP 7), Sarasota (CP
13), and Panama City (CP 14).
Coastal Patrol Base No. 3
On 30 March 1942, CAP’s Coastal Patrol 3
was officially established absorbing the members
of the 1st Air Squadron. From April 1942 to May
1943, the unit would fly fourteen missions a day.
The first patrols consisted of only one plane per
patrol. However, in mid‐May 1942, this practice

Base 3 Hangar Aerial View. Civil Air Patrol Archives



Page 163 of 224



changed to two aircraft per patrol after CAP
Coastal Patrol aircraft were armed with bombs.
The two patrol planes flew at different altitudes, one at five hundred feet and the other at
one thousand feet. Two pairs of planes would
take off for patrol, one heading north from the
Lantana area and the other heading south from
Banana River NAS.
The month of May proved to be an extremely
deadly month for merchant ships off the coast
of Florida. Over ten ships were sunk or severly
damaged by German U-Boats between 3 May and
14 May, with a significant loss of life.
Wiley Reynolds, Jr. remembered that every
time he went out on patrol in May 1942, he saw
a ship burning from U‐boat attacks. He said the
U‐boats “were just knocking off these ships.”
Reynolds stated many of the ships he saw in flames
were carrying fuel. The sailors on those ships
“didn’t have a chance.” On one patrol the only
remains of a ship he saw was just a raft floating
with only a sailor’s hat, nothing else.
Because of increased Army Air Corps at
Morrison Field, CP 3 moved its operations to
Lantana Airport in May 1942. Another reason for
the re‐location may have been military officials
did not want small civilian aircraft carrying bombs
to use the same airport the air corps was using.
Bombing practice was staged on 17 May two days
before they changed airfields. The service facilities at Lantana were Spartan at first. There were
three landing strips of 3,500 feet long at the new
airport and eight portable canvas hangars and six
individual workshops. The large wooden hangar
was used for CAP operations was built after the
unit had moved to their new location. There was a
smaller concrete building just west of the hangar
where CP 3’s headquarters were established.
Often, work on the planes was done outside or with
the nose just inside a portable hangar.
Civilian Planes Armed
One of the most notable incidents occurred on
5 May 1942 that finally led to the arming of CAP
planes with bombs and depth charges. During
a patrol late in the day off the coast of Cape
Canaveral, Marshall E. Rinker and Tom Manning
of CP 3, spotted a U‐boat cruising near the coast.
When help finally arrived on the scene the
U‐boat was gone. Greatly disturbed by the lost


1st Air Squadron looking at maps, Base 3. Civil Air Patrol
Archives

opportunity to bag a U‐boat, Vermilya notified
CAP headquarters, “That’s one that we could have
chalked up for a sure kill if we’d had bombs.”
Since Vermilya knew General Henry H. “Hap”
Arnold, Commanding General of the U.S. Army
Air Corps, Vermilya called him at the Pentagon
about the “one that got away.” After hearing about
the incident, Arnold ordered all coastal patrol
aircraft armed with bombs.
Once the order to arm coastal patrol planes was
given, CP 3 flew their planes to Morrison Field to
be fitted with bomb racks. These were attached to
the underside of the fuselage on the right side under
the observer’s seat; the observer would now act as
the bombardier. A crude homemade bombsight was
made from pieces of handy metal. The bombsight
was mounted to the left side of the plane for the pilot
to sight in on his target. Surprisingly, the bombsight
was very accurate at an altitude of a thousand feet.
The air crew would begin their bombing run
at about a thousand feet. The pilot would stick his
head out the window which was protected by the air
deflector and look through the bombsight adjusting
it with the handle in the plane and/or by pushing the
rudder pedals until the target was found. The pilot
kept doing this as the plane closed in. The sight
was mounted in such a way that as you adjusted
it, the sight would come into contact with a switch
when the aircraft was at the bomb release point. The
switch then activated a red light inside the cabin
signaling the observer to release the bomb.
Another way the pilot communicated to the
observer to drop the bomb was by patting the
observer’s left knee. In less than a week, most
of CP 3’s aircraft had been fitted with sights and

Page 164 of 224



Inspection Formation, Base 3. Civil Air Patrol Archives

bomb racks. To release the bomb during an attack,
the observer had two wires to pull both leading to
the bomb or depth charge through the floor. One
wire with the red handle armed the bomb. The
wire with the yellow handle released the bomb.
The type of armament depended on the type of
aircraft flown. Smaller planes like the Stinson,
Voyagers and Rearwins were fitted with one 100
pound bomb. The larger Fairchilds carried two 100
pound bombs and Stinson Reliants were armed
with one 325 pound depth charge. The bottom fin
of the depth charge had to be sawed off in order to
clear the ground during take off. There was a scant
seven inches of clearance between the bottom of
the modified depth charge and the ground.
Following the arming of the CAP planes, on
19 May 1942, pilot Wiley Reynolds and observer
Earl Adams made the first attack on what they
thought was a U‐boat dropping the 100 pound
bomb they were carrying. Reynolds knew he
was taking a chance because it was large and
was either a submerged U‐boat or a whale. He
hoped it was not a whale but he wanted to be safe.
Wallace R. King got his opportunity to bomb a
U‐boat when he thought he saw the bubbles from
a diving submarine.
King dropped his bomb on the spot where the
U‐boat had submerged and then continued with
his patrol. A nearby Coast Guard boat came to
investigate the bombing. Shortly after the attack,
the Lantana base received a message stating pilots
should stop bombing sunken ships. According to the
Coast Guard, King apparently attacked a shipwreck.
The bubbles were from a wreck which had moved
because of the underwater currents of the ocean.
One day on patrol, Charles Weeks and his
11

observer decided to practice sighting on a target.
Weeks chose the Fort Pierce buoy to practice
sighting for a bombing run. During the practice
run, Week’s observer accidentally released the
bomb. They knew they would likely get into some
trouble for dropping their bomb so they conjured
up a story to cover themselves. When they returned
to base, they told the intelligence officer that the
bomb rack was loose causing the bomb to drop
while on patrol.
Trouble in the Air
The aviators flying anti‐submarine patrols knew
the risks that came from flying such missions and
that a malfunction could happen at anytime whether
it was over land or the ocean far from land. They ran
the risk of crashing into the water if they could not
make it to an airstrip or some deserted beach. Some
members of Coastal Patrol 3 would experience such
circumstances and land safely but a couple of air
crews would have to land on the water.
On 9 July 1942, just before noon, Ted Keys
and Tom Manning had to crash land because of a
mechanical malfunction four to five hundred feet
offshore of Palm Beach near Bethesda‐By‐TheSea Episcopal Church. The malfunction caused a
fire in the engine. It was put out when Keys put the
plane into a dive. The men were not hurt and when
the plane was later recovered the bomb was found
to be still in its rack. Keys and Manning forgot to
drop the bomb before ditching the plane. Keys and
Manning received the Duck Club award for their
landing in the ocean.
Lieutenant Wiley R. Reynolds was described as
a good, cautious pilot and was ready for anything
that might happen. The safety equipment he carried
in his airplane on patrol included shark repellent,
flare pistols, knives, and floats. On 11 July 1943,
Reynolds and his observer Ralph Cohn took off on
what should have been an uneventful patrol. But
at 2 pm when they were at about 1,500 feet, they
encountered engine problems off Jensen Beach
which caused them to crash land in the Atlantic
Ocean. Both escaped unharmed and were rescued
from the water a short time later by a nearby boat
and taken to Fort Pierce.
Cohn was lucky because he did not know how
to swim. Once down, he inflated his one‐man life
raft and got in. Reynolds’s cousin Harry Bassett
and Alex Thomson observed the incident and

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11

circled overhead until help arrived. The guys in
the small boat made it to the two downed fliers in
about five minutes. Once the men were safely on
board, the rescuers took them to Fort Pierce.
Those pilots and observers who had to ditch
their aircraft at sea had the honor of receiving
membership in the “Duck Club.” Only those who
were forced to land in water earned membership
into this exclusive club. Reynolds and Cohn were
awarded membership into the “Duck Club.” The
idea of the Duck Club came from Lieutenant
Colonel K.A. Vilas, CAP executive officer and
pioneer aviator. The originator got the idea from
the Army Air Corps’ Caterpillar Club (those forced
to parachute from a plane).
The Duck Club patch was designed using the
blue background from the CAP insignia with a
red duck floating on water and was worn on the
left shirt pocket. Only those CAP members who
survived ditching at sea received membership into
the club. By coincidence, one of the first CAP
members to receive the award was Vilas’ nephew,
Lieutenant Ward Vilas, who had to land on water
while out hunting German submarines.
Defeat of the U‐boats
In May 1943, the Army Air Corps assumed
responsibility of directing the CAP. Two months
later, CAP National Headquarters issued orders
that coastal patrol operations were going to stand
down at sunset Tuesday, 31 August 1943. The
Navy was ready to take over this duty. Writing in
August, Admiral Ernest J. King, Commander in
Chief of U.S. Fleet and Chief of Naval Operations,
to General George C. Marshall, Chief of Staff of
the Army, stated the CAP was released from coastal
patrol duties effective 31 August 1943. He asked
Marshall to pass on to the CAP a “well done for
their enthusiastic, loyal and constant cooperation
in combating the submarine menace, patrolling our
coastline and assisting in the locating of survivors
and ships in distress.”
When CAP anti‐submarine operations stood
down, U.S. Senator Claude Pepper (D‐FL) attended
a sundown ceremony held at the Lantana base on
31 August 1943, marking the end of antisubmarine
patrols. As the sun set, Pepper addressed the
formation and the crowd stating, “I am proud of
the fact that Florida has had five of the twenty‐one
coastal patrol units in the U.S. and that this one
13

[CP 3] was the first in Florida.” He continued to
praise the men and women of Coastal Patrol 3 and
how they helped save the nation from invading
German U‐boats and for the sacrifices they made
during a time of war.
The final victory over the German U‐boats
was the result of the combined efforts of the Army,
Navy, Coast Guard, and the Civil Air Patrol.
Coastal Patrol 3 flew 18,712 hours plus 45 hours
of special missions for the Army’s Signal School
at Camp Murphy in Martin County. They flew an
estimated 1,546,500 miles in seventeen months of
operation. Air crews made fourteen attacks dropping twenty‐one live bombs on suspected U‐boats.
Cadets
In 1943, a cadet program was established
at Lantana airport. The program was part of the
pre‐induction for enlistment of qualified personnel
into the Army Air Force. On 23 August 1943, CP
3 held the first cadet meeting with 28 cadets. By
September, the cadet squadron had enrolled fifty
cadets. A year later, the squadron, known as the
Palm Beach Squadron, had an enrollment of 100
boys and 60 girls. To join, cadets had to be seventeen years old or older and were able for enlistment
in the Army Air Corps.
In October 1943, the cadet squadron began
accepting girls into the program. Over fifty girls
attended a meeting of the squadron the first week
of the October. At the end of October 1943, to help
promote the program and attract new cadets, Coastal
Patrol 3 “bombed” towns along the east coast
between Melbourne and West Palm Beach with
leaflets. Captain Marshall Rinker told the Palm
Beach Post the leaflets had been an effective tool to
attract new cadets.
Praise for a Job Well Done
The government was slow in recognizing the
immense contributions made during the war by
the Civil Air Patrol. Finally, in 1948, President
Harry Truman authorized the presentation of the
Air Medal to those who flew coastal patrol. CAP
personnel with more than 200 hours flight time on
coastal patrol during the period of 1942‐1943 were
awarded the Air Medal.
On 2 May 1948, 200 Florida CAP members
from Lantana, Miami, Daytona Beach, Sarasota,
and Panama City received the award at a ceremony

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Continued on page 29 . . .
13

CAP Receives
Commendation
By Maj. Keith Barry, CAP
Gen. Chuck Yeager Cadet Squadron
Commander
On Pearl Harbor Day, the Civil Air Patrol was
recognized for their service during the monthly
meeting of the Hillsborough County Board of
County Commissioners in Tampa. The meeting
opened with the presentation of Colors by the
General Chuck Yeager Cadet Squadron, followed
by the playing of the National Anthem by Capt. Art
Stoutenburg, Florida Wing Personnel Officer.
The Commendation, read by the Vice Chair,
District 1 Commissioner Sandy Murman (R),
honored all CAP members for their courage and
service on its 75th Anniversary. Details about
CAP’s service during World War II as well as
its present day mission were included in the
Commendation. Commissioner Murman praised
the Civil Air Patrol, stating “They are such an
important part of our community.”
Following the presentation of the
Commendation, Capt. Keith Barry, Commander
of the General Chuck Yeager Cadet Squadron,
addressed the commissioners, thanking them
for recognizing CAP on this “bittersweet day, as
America’s destiny was forever changed with the
attack on Pearl Harbor. Today, we remember and
honor those who lost their lives in service to our
Great Nation 75 years ago, and celebrate 75 years
of Civil Air Patrol “bittersweet day, as America’s
destiny was forever changed with the attack on
Pearl Harbor. Today, we remember and honor those
who lost their lives in service to our Great Nation
75 years ago, and celebrate 75 years of Civil Air
Patrol saving lives and serving America.”
Capt. Barry thanked the citizens of Hillsborough County for their continued support of
the four squadrons located in the county and
presented a commemorative painting of Civil Air
Patrol airplanes, past and present, flying over a
lighthouse on the coast of Maine. The painting will
be placed on permanent display at County Center
in downtown Tampa.
15

Capitol City
Recognizes Civil
Air Patrol’s
Contributions
By Capt. Wayne Hooks, CAP
Florida Wing Deputy Director of Public Affairs
The Tallahassee City Commission meeting on
Wednesday, December 14, 2016 was a landmark
event for Civil Air Patrol’s Tallahassee Composite
Squadron. With several other community groups
and approximately 200 citizen in attendance,
the meeting was called to order at 4:00 p.m. at
Tallahassee City Hall.
After a few housekeeping items on the agenda
had been dealt with, Mayor Andrew Gillum and
Mayor Pro Tem Gil Ziffer moved to the public
podium. The Tallahassee Composite Squadron
members present were asked to come forward.
After the many contributions the squadron has
made to the community in carrying out its missions over the years were acknowledged, they
moved on to the main event.
Mayor Pro Tem Gil Ziffer read into the record a
proclamation recognizing the scope and purpose of
the Civil Air Patrol and its primary missions. The
proclamation was ratified by a unanimous vote of
the city commission. The mayor then proclaimed
December as Civil Air Patrol month in the City of
Tallahassee and received a standing ovation from
the citizens present.
It was a proud day for Civil Air Patrol. The
day was especially meaningful to the members
of the Tallahassee Composite Squadron in being
recognized for their service and as a vital part of
their local community.

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15

Cadet 2nd Lt. Christopher Bernhardt and 2nd Lt. William
Bernhardt explain to some visitors the importance of Civil
Air Patrol Emergency Services. Photo by 2nd Lt. Giovanni
Martinez, CAP

2nd Lt. Ed Cox gives the visitors an opportunity to get an
inside look at the Civil Air Patrol aircraft. Photo by 2nd Lt.
Giovanni Martinez, CAP

Seminole Composite Squadron Celebrates
Civil Air Patrol’s 75th Anniversary
By 2nd Lt. Keith Evans, CAP
Seminole Composite Squadron Public Affairs Officer

On Tuesday, 30 August 2016, the
lobby of the StarPort FBO at the
Sanford Orlando International Airport
filled with members of the community
who turned out to learn about Civil Air Patrol.
For weeks leading up to the big event, Seminole
Composite Squadron seniors and cadets peppered
the community with a combination of flyers, press
releases, and interviews inviting anyone interested
to attend the Civil Air Patrol’s Open House and
75th Anniversary celebration. The invitations
promised presentations, refreshments and a look
into how CAP serves the community.
Community members arriving at the event were
welcomed by senior members and cadets sporting
every type of Civil Air Patrol uniform, including
blues, aviator shirts, corporate polos, and BDUs.
A POW/MIA table stood as the lobby centerpiece
and a wealth of Civil Air Patrol pamphlets, handouts, and other materials were available to guests
in the meeting rooms.
Members of the community took the opportunity to talk with members, learning how Civil Air
Patrol serves the community through emergency
services, aerospace education, and cadet programs.
Some lucky guests were given the opportunity to
get up close and personal with the squadron’s aircraft. Seminole Composite Squadron pilots gave
ground-based familiarization tours of the cockpit
as well as a little history on the plane’s service.
16

S e m i n o l e C o m p o s i t e S q u a d r o n ’s 7 5 t h
Anniversary Open House was special for another
reason. Just a week prior, squadron Commander
Maj. Jeany Kistner received the prestigious Gill
Robb Wilson award which was presented by
Southeast Region Commander Col. Barry Melton.
The Wilson award is the highest recognition a CAP
member can receive for professional development.
The community joined the squadron in congratulating Maj. Kistner on her achievement.
Maj. Kistner and Group 2 Commander Maj.
Gary Stalnaker delivered presentations at the Open
House, and the community partook in a solemn
observation of the POW/MIA ceremony. Afterward,
community and squadron members enjoyed an
assortment of cookies, popcorn, snacks, coffee, and
two custom cakes created specifically for the event.
The Civil Air Patrol 75th Anniversary
Celebration hosted at the Orlando/Sanford
International Airport was a resounding success,
leaving an impact on the community, and laying
the groundwork for new relationships with other
emergency services organizations. Community
awareness of Civil Air Patrol was increased, and
the event served as a springboard for several cadets
and new members into their own Civil Air Patrol
involvement. Thanks to the efforts of all, Seminole
Composite Squadron continues to set an example
of Civil Air Patrol service and involvement in the
Central Florida area.

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16

Two 75th Anniversaries: Attack on Pearl
Harbor and Civil Air Patrol’s Birthday
By Cadet Chief Master Sgt. Michael Rowe, CAP
Zephyr Airport Cadet Squadron, Cadet Commander
On Saturday, December 3rd, the Zephyrhills Museum of Military
History, known locally as the “Barracks Museum” hosted an event
to remember the attack on Pearl Harbor 75 years ago. The Barracks
Museum is located on the grounds of the Zephyrhills Municipal
Airport which was used as an Army Air Corps training facility.
The event opened with the Zephyrhills High School Army
JROTC conducted Color Guard duty and a Flag jump was done by
a parachutist to the National Anthem. After the jump, there was a
prayer for those who lost their lives in the attack on Pearl Harbor.
Two Pearl Harbor survivors, Charles McClelland and Wig
Wigmore, attended the event and stayed after opening ceremonies
to share their experiences of that tragic day. Also in attendance
were World War II Pacific Theater survivors, Tom Cummings and
Harold McDonald.
Cliff Moffett, who was dressed in a World War II style Navy
uniform, gave a short speech about the losses suffered on December
7, 1941. The attack happened at 7:48 a.m. at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii
where Japanese bombers sunk four battleships, three cruisers, three
Capt. Castleman talks about Civil Air
destroyers. Five other ships were damaged. The only ship that was
Patrol’s 75th Anniversary at Pearl
Harbor Remembrance event. Photo
not raised and repaired was the battleship Arizona. It is still on the
bottom of the harbor with a memorial built on top of it to honor the credit Cadet Chief Master Sgt. Michael
Rowe
fallen. Another 159 aircraft were also destroyed in the attack, and
2,403 people on the ground were killed.
Another 75th Anniversary was also recognized at the event. Civil Air Patrol had been formed on
December 1, 1941, just a week before the Japanese attack. Capt. Castleman, Commander of the Zephyr
Airport Cadet Squadron, gave a brief
history of Civil Air Patrol and talked
about the Zephyrhills squadron.
She also talked about the three
missions of CAP today: Emergency
Services, Aerospace Education,
and Cadet Programs.
The squadron was also recognized a month later on January 9th by
the Zephyrhills City Council with a
Proclamation declaring January 13th
as Civil Air Patrol Day, commemorating Civil Air Patrol’s 75th Anniversary
and recognizing the local squadron for
Pearl Harbor and WWII Survivors at Barracks Museum event in Zephyrhills.
Cliff Moffett is in the background, giving history of Pearl Harbor attack.
their service in the community.
Photo credit Cadet Chief Master Sgt. Michael Rowe

17

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17

Anti- Submarine Patrol During
World War II in Florida
By Capt. Ernest Lee, CAP
Florida Wing Public Affairs Staff
In 1941, the situation in Europe was grim. The public
thought that the United States could somehow soon
become directly involved. From 1938 to 1941, private
aviation enthusiasts were also concerned with the tensions, the war that was occurring overseas, and worried
for the security U.S. home front. By then, many U.S.
states were creating their own civil air defense units.
When National Guard troops were federalized and
entered active duty, Florida Governor Spessard Holland
ordered the creation of a state guard. In May 1941, a unit
designated the 1st Air Squadron, Florida Defense Force
was formed at Morrison Field in West Palm Beach. It was
created for the express purpose of equipment transport
from the state arsenal in St. Augustine to any needed
location for infantry support within the state. At the time, Coastal Patrol Base 3, Formation, aerial view. Civil Air Patrol
a dozen aircraft and over 65 volunteer personnel made up Archives
the unit. By November the same year, an additional 55
pilots and aircraft were part of the unit.
Parallel to what individual states were doing, President Roosevelt saw a need for defense within the United
States. With the creation of the Office of Civilian Defense in May 1941, President Roosevelt appointed Mayor
Fiorella La Guardia the Director of Civil Defense. Patterned after the various state civil air defense services, the
Civil Air Patrol became official on December 1, 1941, when La Guardia signed the formal order for its creation. A
total of 48 wings, one for each state, were in place at the time Pearl Harbor was attacked.
Within the United States, CAP was organized into regions, coinciding with the War Department’s nine Army
Air Force areas within the United States. In January 1942, the Florida Wing of CAP had been organized into seven
operational groups. The first wing commander for CAP in the state of Florida was Col. Wright Vermilya, who was
already the commanding officer of Florida’s Civil Air Defense unit.
For most missions of CAP during the war, operations and directions were under the command of each state
wing where the mission occurred. In the case of the Coastal Patrol, those missions came under the command of
National Headquarters, based in New York at that time.
Although coastal patrol duties were under jurisdiction
of Army Air Forces Anti-Submarine Command, patrol
orders were generally issued by the U.S. Navy.
Although CAP was formed under the direction of
President Roosevelt, Civil Air Patrol owned no property
and had limited funding. The funds that were available for
operation came from the Office of Civil Defense and were
for covering expenses at the National Headquarters level,
with some limited assistance at wing level. Facilities and
equipment, including personally owned aircraft, were
provided by the CAP volunteers. Expenses were initially
absorbed by the volunteers themselves. Sometimes, local
agencies or organizations that CAP supported would
Aircraft used for Coastal Patrol. Civil Air Patrol Archives
19

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19

supply assistance towards operational costs and supplies. Later in the war CAP members were eventually reimbursed
up to eight dollars per day, and given some funds towards fuel if assigned to a war department ordered mission.
At the onset of the war, oil tankers being sunk by submarines were a frequent occurrence along the eastern
seaboard early in 1942. The Navy was lacking in manpower and aircraft to handle the submarine menace, and
owners of the oil tankers asked the War Department for help. This was not a traditional Army function, and they
were not prepared for such defense.
Civil Air Patrol volunteers, who were already performing important functions for the Office of Civil Defense,
eagerly stepped up and offered their services. At first, the army was skeptical of the ability of CAP to perform this
mission, but there was no alternative and the Coastal Patrol unit was organized.
The first three bases set up for CAP Coastal Patrol were in Atlantic City, NJ; Rehoboth, DE; and West Palm
Beach, FL. The bases were set up at first as a 30-day experiment, were then extended to a 90-day trial. At the end
of three months, the operation was extended indefinitely. The base staff was made up of CAP pilots, maintenance
crew, and clerical staff, typically from the surrounding areas.
Out of 21 bases created specifically for coastal patrol, five were in Florida: Base 3 in Lantana; Base 5 in Flagler
Beach; Base 7 in Miami; Base 13 in Sarasota; and Base 14 in Panama City. These five bases were not the only CAP
operations in Florida during WW2. Other units were organized to perform a multitude of supporting roles for AAF
and other federal and state governmental agencies.
Base 3 at Morrison Field, West Palm Beach, became operational on March 30, 1942. At the
beginning of declared war, the U.S. Army started moving aircraft operations into Morrison Field.
Army activity became so intense at Morrison Field, it was decided to move CAP operations to
Lantana. Base 3 was in active service for 17 months and flew over 18,700 hours in the coastal
patrol mission. Its first commanding officer was Col. Wright Vermilya.
Base 5 became active in Daytona Beach on May 18, 1942. Operations
Coastal Patrol
were moved to Flagler Beach in October 1942. As one of the higher areas of
Base 3
submarine activity around the coast of Florida, pilots from Base 5 accumulated
up to 65 hours a day flying patrols, with up to 35 aircraft at the height of operations. One hundred
twenty-seven men and women served at the base. Three aircraft were lost at sea. Over 17,000
Coastal Patrol
hours were flown with no loss of life in the 16 months the base was operational. The first com- Base 5
manding officer was Lt. Col. Julius Gresham.
Base 7 operated out of Chapman Field, Miami. This was also the location of
an aero gunner’s school for the U.S. Army and pilot training provided by Embry-Riddle. The first
CAP commander of Base 7 was Lt. Col. Lloyd Fales.
Base 13 was activated at Peter O. Knight airport in Tampa on July 9, 1942.
Its primary mission was search and rescue, and civil defense air raid exercises
to judge civil defense response time in surrounding cities. When anti-submarine
Coastal Patrol
coastal defense became a priority, operations were moved to Sarasota, with its
Base 7
first patrol in August 1942. Approximately 11,000 flight hours were amassed
with no fatalities during operations out of either of the base’s two locations. The first command- Coastal Patrol
Base 13, Cadet
ing officer of Base 13 was Maj. Pete Somes.
Base 14 in Panama City was formed in June 1942. Much of the original Squadron
staff that formed the base was from out of state, mainly from Ohio. The out-of-state staffing was
due to the lack of qualified civilian pilots and observers in the Panama City area. However, much
of the support staff was made up of local residents. The location was near Fannin Field, which is
the current day Panama City Airport. The first commanding officer was Maj. Robert Dodge.
At first, CAP aircraft assigned to Coastal Patrol bases were expected to be utilized as observaCoastal Patrol
tion platforms only. Early in 1942 a CAP aircraft circled a grounded U-boat for an hour, helpless
Base 14
to take any action. By the time military aircraft could respond, the U-boat escaped. After that
time, CAP aircraft were authorized to carry bombs in order to take immediate action if necessary. By May of that
year, CAP aircraft were being fitted with bomb racks in order to take a more defensive role against submarines.
Allowing ordnance on civilian-owned aircraft initially presented a point of concern for the War Department.
Civil Air Patrol, as a civilian organization, was now taking an active defensive/offensive role. This was one of the
driving forces to initiate transfer of CAP from the Office of Civil Defense to the Army Air Force.
By the spring of 1943, the U.S. Navy was gearing up to take over duties and responsibilities of the coastal patrol.
21

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21

In May 1943, CAP was transferred from the Office of Civilian Defense to the war department, under the supervision
of the Commanding General, Army Air Forces. The transfer to the war department did not change the mission of CAP
but allowed it to be integrated with the mission of the Army Air Forces.
Much is written about CAP coastal patrol units searching for German submarines. During WWII, Civil Air Patrol
performed many other functions, especially in Florida. Aircraft based in the panhandle were used to locate isolated
items such as steel bridges in abandoned logging areas as part of the nationwide war effort to collect scrap metal.
During a cold snap in February of 1943, CAP aircraft flew over eight thousand acres of north Florida fields, keeping
the air moving, to prevent frost formation and crop loss. CAP also acted as curriers to transport military documents in
order to free up military aircraft for other missions.
In addition, one of the most hazardous missions CAP performed was tow target duty in support of aerial gunnery
training for pilots and aircrew stationed at the various army air bases. Between 1942 and 1945 seven lives were lost
during this hazardous duty.
Southern Liaison Patrol was also a duty of Civil Air Patrol. CAP patrolled the southern border between
Brownsville, TX and Douglas, AZ looking for saboteurs and infiltrators entering the country, both by land and air.
Aircraft with engine ratings in excess of 90 horsepower were reserved for offshore coastal patrols. With the
condition of many of the aircraft used in CAP and with patrol distances of up to 50 miles offshore, crashes were
inevitable. Unofficially, the aircrews that crashed at sea and survived the crash became members of the ‘duck club’.
A total of 112 persons, from all CAP coastal patrol units, are part of the club, with a majority from Florida bases.
While CAP had many other missions assisting in Civil Defense, the title of Coastal Patrol was well publicized,
and often interchanged with the name Civil Air Patrol. It was erroneously reported in newspapers that CAP was to
be disbanded. In actuality, only the anti-submarine mission was deactivated August 31, 1943. CAPs other missions
were dovetailed into the operations of the Army Air Force’s to the end of WWII, providing needed support for the
war effort.

Coastal Patrol Base Statistics, combined units
from Maine to Texas:
• 86,865 missions flown
• 244,600 flying hours
• 24 million miles covered
• 83 pieces of ordnance delivered on targets
• 17 sea mines spotted at sea and reported
• 173 submarines spotted and reported to Army
and Navy resources
• 2 German subs directly sunk by CAP, with 57
additional possible hits
• 5,684 special transport missions flown by CAP
for US Navy
• 363 U-boat attack survivors found in search
and rescue operations
• 91 ships-in-distress reported to navy rescue
vessels
• 26 airmen lost, seven critically wounded, 90
aircraft lost
Sources:
Army Air Forces Historical Studies #19 Civilian Volunteer Activities in
the AAF. October 1944
History of CAP Coastal patrol Base #5: May 19, 1942 to August 31, 1943
Civil Air Patrol Historical Monograph: Duck Club 1984
The History of Coastal Patrol Base #14, CAP, WW2 by Barbara Green
AAF regulation #20-18 and AGO Memo W95-12-43: Organization-Civil
Air Patrol. War Dept. May 23, 1943

23

Letter from the
Editor
Capt. Sybrian Castleman, CAP
Wingspan Winter 2016 Editor
The source materials Civil Air Patrol members found in their research for the historical articles were fairly consistent in the data given, but
there were some minor discrepancies discovered.
Rather than edit out these small discrepancies, it
was decided by the Public Affairs team that we
would leave each article true to its own sources
and leave the variations in data in place.
WingSpan magazine received reprint permissions for images and text used in this edition
from historical collections and individuals from
around the state.
For their time and assistance in obtaining
these permissions and providing WingSpan with
digital files for us to share in this issue, a special
thank you goes to:
Rose Golterry, Palm Beach Historical Society
Connie Lester, Florida Historical Society
Jill Mosley, daughter of Zack Mosley (Former
Florida Wing Commander)

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23

Florida Wing’s First
Commander
By Capt. Wayne Hooks, CAP
Florida Wing Deputy Director of Public Affairs
The formation of Civil Air Patrol was the result of the efforts of Gill
Robb Wilson, the President of the National Aeronautic Association in
1941. He devised a plan for a Civil Air Patrol and presented it to Fiorello
La Guardia, the mayor of New York City and the Director of the United
States Civil Defense. La Guardia signed the organization into existence
and Civil Air Patrol became monitors of the United States coastline on
December 1, 1941, just a week before the attack on Pearl Harbor.
Florida Wing has a prestigious history of service throughout World Col. Wright “Ike” Vermilya. Photo credit
War II. Colonel Wright “Ike” Vermilya, Jr., the first Wing Commander Civil Air Patrol Archives
for Civil Air Patrol in Florida, adds to this rich history.
He started down his path in aviation as a boy flying a Wright Brothers style glider he built himself
from a plan he ordered from a boys magazine of the day. Overall, he covered a distance of roughly 400
feet over six flights before he finally damaged the glider beyond repair.
Vermilya went on to become a licensed pilot, holding pilot’s license number 35, and flew over a million and a half air miles during his lifetime. He saw service as an aviator in World War I and World War II
and flew a great variety of aircraft, including a new form of aircraft, the helicopter.
Vermilya’s path to becoming the first Wing Commander began on May 28, 1941 with the formation of
the 1st Air Squadron, Florida Defense in West Palm Beach, Florida where he was assigned as the squadron
commander. He had long been working on the organizational side of the 1st Air Squadron before it had
been made official by an act of the Florida Legislature. By November, the unit had amassed 12 aircraft, 26
officers, and 41 enlisted men. Vermilya went on to recruit 54 more pilots with 53 additional airplanes.
Upon the attack at Pearl Harbor, just one week after the formation of Civil Air Patrol, Fiorello La
Guardia who was the Mayor of New York City and the Director of the United States Civil Defense,
decreed that each state would have a Civil Air Patrol Wing. On December 10, 1941, La Guardia appointed
Capt. Vermilya as Florida’s first Wing Commander. By early January 1942, Vermilya had organized the
Wing into a seven group structure, very similar to how the Wing is organized today.
During his aviation career, Vermilya did test work on the Sopwith Camel; flew with the Arkansas
National Guard; served as the State of Florida Director of Aviation under Governor Spessard Holland;
became the Director of Flight training at EmbryRiddle University; and was a partner in the Palm
Beach Aero Corporation. His achievements continue well beyond this short list. Most pilots would
consider any one of Col. Vermilya’s accomplishments a lifetime achievement, let alone take his
career in its entirety.
Florida Wing has a proud history reaching back
to the very beginnings of Civil Air Patrol, not the
least of which is its first Commander.

Vermilya and Gresham, 1942. Photo credit Civil Air Patrol
Archives

25

Sources: Civil Air Patrol, Southeast Region website
http://archives.sercap.
us/research-center/biographies/col-wright-vermilya--jr.aspx

Page 173 of 224

25

Zack Mosley: Civil Air Patrol’s
Cartoonist Aviator
By Capt. Sybrian Castleman, CAP
Zephyr Airport Cadet Squadron, Commander
The Adventures of Smilin’ Jack
comic strip was the creation of
cartoonist Zack Mosley. Originally,
the comic strip was debuted in
1933 as On the Wing, but after a
few months, the Chicago Tribune
changed the name. His comic strip
was published in over 300 newspapers for 40 years.
Mosley was an avid aviator.
During World War II, Mosley
moved his art studio to a corner of
the hangar at Coastal Patrol Base
3 so he could continue his work
on the syndicated comic strip and
volunteer with Civil Air Patrol as
a pilot.
He used prominent Civil Air
Patrol members to base some of his
cartoon characters upon, including
Florida Wing’s first commander
Wright “Ike” Vermilya who was
Mosley’s inspiration for the character Long Distance Ike. Mosley
created several of the Smilin’ Jack
comic strips with Civil Air Patrol
as the subject matter, helping promote CAP.
His Civil Air Patrol career
included serving with the Coastal
Patrol anti-submarine mission
where he flew 300 hours, and was
awarded the U.S. military Air Medal. He also
served as a Florida Wing Commander, a Public
Affairs Officer, and was a member of the executive
board for Civil Air Patrol.
Mosley ended his Civil Air Patrol career with
the grade of Colonel and was inducted into the
U.S. Air Force’s Hall of Fame three years after he
retired the Smilin’ Jack comic strip in 1973.
27

Sources:
Palm Beach Historical Society. Special Exhibit Teachers
Guide “War in Florida Waters”, Feb-Sept 2010
visit their website at: www.historicalsocietypbc.com for the
full Teacher’s Guide.
Wikipedia article, Zack Mosley, https://en.wikipedia.
org/wiki/Zack_Mosley
Official Zack Mosley website, www.smilinjackart.com
visit their site to see additional Smilin’ Zack comic strips
Jill Mosley, daughter of Zack Mosley

Page 174 of 224

27

Wreaths Across America
•Remember • Honor • Teach

On the third Saturday of December, Civil Air
Patrol squadrons from across the state of Florida
participated in Wreaths Across America (WAA)
by laying wreaths at grave markers in National
Cemeteries. The motto of WAA is “Remember.
Honor. Teach.”
Photo by Maj. Steve Lampasona, CAP
At Florida National Cemetery, Bushnell FL

927th Honored

Coastal Patrol 3 Cont- from page 13 . . .

Story and Photo by Capt. Sybrian Castleman
On Saturday, December 3rd, the 927th
Refueling Wing from
MacDill Air Force
Base was honored
by Civil Air Patrol’s
Group 3 for their
invaluable assistance
at MacDill’s AirFest
and at Sun n Fun in
Lakeland in 2016.
The 927th set up their
field kitchen and
cooked to feed the
hundreds of Civil Air
Patrol volunteers at both events.

Chief James Candler, Col. Frank Amodeo, Cadet Chief
Master Sgt. Austin Naraez (CAP), Maj. Joe Mora (CAP), Lt.
Col. Kelli Molter, Command Chief Mike Klausutis

29

held at Lantana Airport. Major General Lucas
V. Beau, USAF, presented the medal to them.
This group represented almost one quarter of the
total 824 medals awarded to the CAP, of which
fifty‐three were awarded to members of CP 3.
A year after the war ended, General Tooey
Spaatz, first chief of staff, USAF, admitted at a congressional dinner that the U.S. air forces “were not
prepared to meet that danger [German Uboats], not
equipped for adequate defense of the country, with
less for offense overseas.” Of the CAP he continued
to say, “it was then, in 1941, that the Civil Air Patrol
was formed somewhat as a fire bucket project,” to
supplement the military until the army and navy had
the resources to defend the U.S.
A fitting tribute to the CAP of World War II
was a statement made by another former German
U‐boat commander. Sometime after the war,
an American military officer interviewed the
ex‐Uboat commander and asked him why U‐boat
attacks stopped along the east coast of the United
States. His answer was “because of those damned
little red and yellow planes.”
Thank you to the Palm Beach Historical Society for use of
this article.
To read the full article from the Special Exhibit Teachers
Guide “War in Florida Waters”, Feb-Sept 2010 visit their
website at: www.historicalsocietypbc.com
Credit for compiling excerpts for WingSpan magazine:
Capt. Ernest Lee, CAP, Florida Wing Public Affairs Staff

Page 175 of 224

29

FLESA 2016 Graduation. Photo credit 1st Lt. Joe St. Cyr, CAP

Florida Emergency Services Academy
By Maj. Judy Schiff, CAP
Florida Emergency Services Academy, Public Information Officer
The MacDill Air Force Base Auxiliary Field,
also known as the Avon Park Air Force Range,
was the location for the 2016 Florida Emergency
Services Academy (FLESA) held during the last
week in December. This location was a World War
II airfield and is presently used as a training facility for many emergency services teams, including
Civil Air Patrol, and military training.
The 70 Civil Air Patrol members from around
the state of Florida who attended were introduced
to some of the Central Florida Search and Rescue
K-9 teams. They demonstrated to CAP members
how K-9 searches are conducted and the diverse

abilities of the trained dogs.
Many cadets enjoyed their first bivouac camping experience and others enjoyed getting qualifications for air crew search and rescue. The training
was intense and very effective because of highly
trained and motivated instructors.
For the very first time, aircrew training
sorties were added to the Florida Emergency
Services Academy. Four aircraft - one from
Group 5, one from Group 2, and two from Group
3 - were on hand to offer the platforms necessary
for Civil Air Patrol members to achieve their air
crew qualifications.
Classroom training was conducted by the pilots. The training
included sessions for Mission
Scanner, Arial Photographer,
and Mission Observer. Flights
began on Wednesday morning
and were completed by late
Friday afternoon. Thirty-three
air sorties were flown, nine of
which were in the GA8. The
GA8 saved FLESA about 13 air
sorties by smaller aircraft as it

1st Lt. Frank Kilgore, CAP. Photo credit Capt. John Robinson, CAP

31

Page 176 of 224

31

was able to accommodate 5 trainees at a time.
Mission Observer sorties were in the bombing
range restricted area where air crews located the
source of the training ELT signal, then proceeded
to give directions to ground teams to find and
silence it. This was valuable training for both
air and ground personnel as the opportunity for
combined training doesn’t present itself often in
training scenarios.
The air crews were training at the large training
center near the airfield, while the ground teams
and mission base teams were at headquarters near
the barracks and mess hall. Favorable weather for
the week allowed air crews to fly on schedule and
ground teams to camp comfortably in the bivouac
areas. Mission staff training was also part of the
achievements during the week long training.
Aerial photography is in high demand and aircrews are often needed after natural or man-made
disasters. This need has prompted many Civil Air
Patrol members to seek this qualification. Seven
members newly rated as mission air photographers
during the Academy.
Coordination, communication, and motivation
were instrumental to members having a successful
week of emergency services training at Avon Park
Air Force Range. The addition of aircrew training
to the curricula was highly successful with the

Capt. John Robinson, CAP and 2nd Lt. Jose Concepcion,
CAP preparing for aircrew search and rescue training. Photo
credit 1st Lt. Frank Kilgore, CAP

number of qualified air team members graduating
from the Academy. Next year, the plan is to add
mission pilot training and accommodate more
trainees in all the other mission qualifications.

Aerial view of the MacDill Air Force Base Auxiliary Field, at Avon Park. Photo
credit 1st Lt. Frank Kilgore, CAP

32

Page 177 of 224

Civil Air Patrol members with Search
and Rescue of Central Florida’s
(SARCF) track and trailing bloodhound
“Duke”. Photo credit 1st Lt. Joe St.
Cyr, CAP

32

Fwd: Change of commands for 2016 for FLWG

Page 1 of 1

Fwd: Change of commands for 2016 for FLWG
Thu 6/15/2017 1:48 PM
From: Joseph Martin
To: jjmartin802@list.flwg.us

Regards,
Joe Martin
Begin forwarded message:
From: "Stoutenburg, Art" <astoutenburg@flwg.us>
Date: June 8, 2017 at 9:18:40 PM EDT
To: Joe Martin <jjmartin@flwg.us>
Subject: Fwd: Change of commands for 2016 for FLWG

­­­­­­­­­­ Forwarded message ­­­­­­­­­­
From: Ralph Kugel <kugel70@centurylink.net>
Date: Thu, Jun 8, 2017 at 7:32 PM
Subject: Re: Change of commands for 2016 for FLWG
To: Art Stoutenburg <astoutenburg@flwg.us>

Art,
18 Change of Command
5 Unit Name Change
1 Unit Address Change
Ralph

Page 189 of 224

http://smtp.flwg.gov/Main/frmMessagePrint.aspx?popup=true&messageid=9&folder=Inbo... 6/15/2017

Fwd: 2016 FLWG Membership Jan 2016 to Dec 2016

Page 1 of 1

Fwd: 2016 FLWG Membership Jan 2016 to Dec 2016
Thu 6/15/2017 1:49 PM
From: Joseph Martin
To: jjmartin802@list.flwg.us

Regards,
Joe Martin
Begin forwarded message:
From: "Stoutenburg, Art" <astoutenburg@flwg.us>
Date: June 8, 2017 at 3:41:54 PM EDT
To: Joe Martin <jjmartin@flwg.us>
Cc: Ralph Kugel <kugel70@centurylink.net>
Subject: 2016 FLWG Membership Jan 2016 to Dec 2016
Cadets = 1,513
Seniors = 1,887

Page 190 of 224

http://smtp.flwg.gov/Main/frmMessagePrint.aspx?popup=true&messageid=10&folder=Inb... 6/15/2017

SRQ Composite Squadron History

Page 191 of 224

SRQ Composite Squadron ‐ Civil Air Patrol ‐ 2016 Highlights 
 
During 2016, the SRQ Composite Squadron engaged with local airport authority, Experimental Aircraft 
Association, Manatee County government and U.S. Coast Guard. We conducted coastal patrols throughout 
the year and provided exceptional training opportunities for our members.  
 
The squadron provided orientation rides for cadets once or twice a month during the year. 
 
[Caption Image O Rides: C/TSgt Shelby K. Watson before her final orientation flight. (Photo Credit: Capt. 
Ann Marie Kozloski, CAP)] 
 
April 2016 
 
In April, the SRQ Composite Squadron cadet and senior members assisted with the Sun 'N Fun Fly‐in which 
took place in Lakeland. Members provided hangar duty and served on the flight line marshaling aircraft. 
 
Also during the month, senior members and cadets participated in a SAREX. Three air crews and a groups 
crew were dispatched to locate a simulated downed aircraft. In addition to the squadron,  
 
[Caption Image SAREX: Members of the Parrish Fire Department helped with the April SAREX.] 
 
May 2016 
 
Cadets from the SRQ Composite Squadron of Civil Air Patrol (CAP) hosted an open house on 9 May 2016 at 
the Boys and Girls Club of Sarasota County. More than 60 attendees, including cadets, senior members, 
parents and potential cadets, learned about Civil Air Patrol and the many opportunities available for area 
youth. 
 
“The cadet program relies on cadets,” said Cadet Capt. Gabriel J. Brink, Cadet Commander. “We had our 
open house to bring in more cadets because they are the future of Civil Air Patrol. Conducting ground 
teams, having instructors for the programs, and even having leaders to staff the whole chain of command 
requires cadets.” 
 
The open house started with the presentation of colors by the cadet color guard, followed by a 
presentation by C/Capt. Brink on the history of CAP, CAP’s mission and the programs offered for cadets. 
Following the presentation, Squadron Commander Maj. William Hansen and Deputy Commander/Cadets 
Capt. Ann Marie Kozloski talked with parents while the cadets and future cadets went outside for 
interactive demonstrations of fizzy rockets, stomp rockets and urban direction finding (UDF) equipment. 
 
[Caption Image 005: Future cadets enjoyed presentations from SRQ Composite Squadron cadets during 
the May 9 open house. (Photo credit: 1st Lt. Christopher Carroll, CAP) 
 
August 2016 
 
On 29 August 2016, five senior members and 16 cadets of the SRQ Composite Squadron of Civil Air Patrol 
(CAP) traveled to the Pensacola Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Florida, for a four‐day educational event. 
The trip included exploring the National Naval Aviation Museum, traveling to Mobile, Alabama, to tour the 
USS Alabama battleship, cooking out on the beach, and climbing up a huge 197‐step lighthouse, a climb 
that seemed never ending. 
 

Page 192 of 224

 
While visiting the Naval Aviation Museum, the cadets watched the movie “The Magic of Flight” in the 
Giant Screen Theater and tried their hand at flying some simulators. The aircraft in the museum ranged 
from WW I biplanes to the F‐14 Tomcat. The museum features recreated scenes from WW II military bases 
and the home front. One of the more interesting exhibits was the control car from a WW II airship (blimp). 
Pulled from a scrap yard and restored by museum personnel, it flew anti‐submarine patrols over shipping 
convoys and logged many air‐sea rescue flights. 
 
At the USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park, the cadets got an exclusive, once‐in‐a‐lifetime opportunity 
to sit in the cockpit of the SR12A, the predecessor to the SR71 “Blackbird” after one of the museum tour 
guides offered to open the canopy just for the CAP cadets. 
 
[Caption Image 007: Members of the SRQ Composite Squadron had the opportunity to explore the USS 
Alabama battleship.] 
 
October 2016 
 
On 2 October 2016, cadets and senior members from the SRQ Composite Squadron assisted in a training 
seminar for search and rescue K‐9 dogs and their handlers. 
 
Deputy Commander Cadets Capt. Ann Marie Kozlowski said, “A relationship began with the Manatee 
County Search and Rescue when they gave a presentation at our cadet meeting in August. This led to the 
invitation to help with this training event.” 
 
K‐9 handlers and their dogs came from Manatee, Sarasota and several surrounding counties to participate 
in the four‐day event held at Camp Flying Eagle just outside of Bradenton, Florida. The cadets were asked 
to help train the dogs for scent searches. Each cadet received a number and a sterile gauze pad to rub on 
their face and neck, and then seal in a plastic bag. The bag was numbered with the cadet’s number. The 
cadets then formed two lines, 20 feet apart, in an open field. A K‐9 and their handler received one of the 
scent samples with instructions to find the cadet to whom it belonged. 
 
[Caption Image 072: Cadets provided training opportunities to search and rescue K‐9s. (Photo Credit: Capt. 
Ann Marie Kozlowski, CAP)] 
 
A highlight of the year was the SRQ Composite Squadron's support of Hurricane Matthew recovery in 
October 2016. Sarasota‐Bradenton International Airport served as a mission based and both senior and 
cadet squadron members spent the week flying and photographing areas of the state which had been 
damaged. The SRQ Composite hosted media from Tampa, Sarasota and Bradenton during disaster relief 
mission following Hurricane Matthew. Resulted in online and television news stories and commitments 
from media for continued relationships. 
 
[Caption Image Matthew: One of several planes based at Sarasota for the Hurricane Matthew disaster 
relief mission. (Photo Credit: 1st Lt. Christopher Carroll, CAP)] 
 
Also in October, five cadets from the SRQ Composite Squadron of Civil Air Patrol (CAP) won first‐place 
honors at the Florida Wing’s Ultimate Cadet Challenge competition, held 14 through 16 October 2016 at 
Camp Blanding in Starke, Florida. 
 
Senior Member David Taylor, who accompanied the cadets as their senior escort, said, “The competition 
was important in helping to build confidence and reinforcing the cadets’ ability to work as a team. They 
 

Page 193 of 224

were successful because they were dedicated, united, and physically and mentally prepared.” Taylor 
added that the competition gave the cadets an opportunity to put their skills to work in a “real world” 
situation. 
 
The cadets representing the SRQ Composite Squadron as the “Destroyers” team included C/Amn Jacob 
Anthony, C/CMSgt Colt Burch, C/CMSgt Ian Spirduso, C/1st Lt Austin Vore, and C/2d Lt Jesse Yong. 
 
The Ultimate Cadet Challenge (UCC) is an annual event, held by the Florida Wing of CAP, that tests the 
abilities of cadets in all areas of the Civil Air Patrol mission. Teams of cadets compete for the title of 
“Ultimate Cadet” against others in the wing. This year’s competition included nine or ten teams from 
around the state. Events include Emergency Services activities, obstacle courses, written examination, 
uniform inspection, drill evaluation, and leadership reaction courses. 
 
[Caption Image UCC: The Destroyers Team included (left to right) Senior Member David Taylor, C/Amn 
Jacob Anthony, C/2d Lt Jesse Yong, C/CMSgt Ian Spirduso, C/CMSgt Colt Burch, and C/1st Lt Austin Vore. 
(Photo Credit: Civil Air Patrol)] 
 
August 2016 
 
Twenty‐nine senior members of Civil Air Patrol (CAP), including ten instructors, participated in the Group 5 
Unit Commanders Course (UCC) on 20‐21 August 2016 in Sarasota, Fla., hosted by the SRQ Composite 
Squadron of CAP. 
 
[Caption Image UDF: Squadron cadets practiced UDF skills at the Fall 2016 Bivouac.] 
 
December 2016 
 
In December, the squadron participated in the Sarasota Holiday Parade. During the year, the Color Guard 
posted the colors at several high school sporting events, Bradenton’s Elks Lodge and for Veterans’ Day 
celebration. 
 
[Caption Image 012: Cadets and senior members strut their stuff at the Sarasota Holiday Parade. (Photo 
Credit: 1st Lt. Christopher Carroll, CAP)] 
 
The squadron also participated in Wreaths Across America with multiple events and the wreath‐laying at 
the Sarasota National Cemetery.  

 

Page 194 of 224

Annual Report

Page 195 of 224

Florida-Wing-2017.qxp_Layout 1 2/11/17 11:54 AM Page 1

FLORIDA

CIVIL AIR

PATROL

2016 REPORT TO CONGRESS
CELEBRATING CADET PROGRAMS’
75TH ANNIVERSARY

Page 196 of 224

Florida-Wing-2017.qxp_Layout 1 2/11/17 11:54 AM Page 2

2016

FLORIDA StAtIStICS

nAtIOnAL StAtIStICS
Volunteer Members
32,656 adult members
24,091 cadets
34,320 voting-age members
6,928 aircrew personnel
30,742 emergency responders

Marking its 75th anniversary this year, Cadet Programs
can track its beginnings to Oct. 1, 1942 — 10 months after
the formation of CAP itself. More than 1 million cadets
have benefited from Cadet Programs’ leadership,
character development and aerospace training curriculum.

Squadrons
1,437 locations nationwide
Aircraft
560 single engine
54 gliders
3 balloons
Vehicles
1,042 vehicles

Volunteer Members
1,917 adult members
1,626 cadets
1,981 voting-age members
493 aircrew personnel
1,975 emergency responders

Total Hours Flown
5,556

Squadrons
79 locations statewide

National Commander
Maj. Gen. Joseph R. Vazquez
jvazquez@cap.gov

Aircraft
22 single engine
1 glider
Vehicles
33 vehicles
Interoperable Communications
23 VHF/FM repeaters
371 VHF/FM stations
49 HF stations
Missions
95 search and rescue missions
1 life saved
72 finds
36 other state support missions

Financial
$49,500 in state funding
$9.6 million value of wing’s volunteer hours

Region Commander
Col. George B. Melton
tncap204@bellsouth.net
Wing Commander
Col. Henry Irizarry
hirizarry@flwg.us
Gov. Relations Advisor
Lt. Col. Phillip Zedonek
zzedonekp@gmail.com
Wing Info
4040 Crossfield Way
Lakeland, FL 33811-1258
863-644-0172
www.flwg.us

Cadet Flying
1,672 cadet orientation flights
A related national CAP Financial Report will be available in June 2017 andPage 197 of 224
forwarded to all congressional
offices. Contact John Swain at jswain@capnhq.gov for more information.

Interoperable Communications
749 VHF/FM repeaters
9,926 VHF/FM stations
1,850 HF stations
Missions
1,265 search and rescue missions
92 lives saved
577 finds
139 other state support missions
Cadet Flying
27,316 cadet orientation flights
Total Hours Flown
104,525
Appropriations
$27.4 million operations & maintenance
$10.4 million aircraft procurement
$1.7 million vehicle procurement

$167 million value of wings’ volunteer hours

About the Cover

President John F. Kennedy visited with a group of
CAP cadets in the White House Rose Garden on May
7, 1962. Kennedy is seen here speaking to Cadet
Maj. Julianne G. Glowacki, from the president’s
home state of Massachusetts. Glowacki is now a
professor of orthopedic surgery at Harvard Medical
School and a senior scientist at its teaching affiliate,
Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Florida-Wing-2017.qxp_Layout 1 2/11/17 11:54 AM Page 3

FLORIDA WIng
MEETING THE MISSION AND SHAPING THE FUTURE
The Florida Wing continues to meet all challenges, both real-world
missions and training exercises, in a professional and safe manner by
providing qualified, well-trained members who are dedicated
professionals committed to excellence.
Whether involved in communication exercises, flight clinics, search
and rescue missions or leadership academies, the wing ensures its
members possess the requisite skills to be successful at the regional, state
and local levels.
The wing excels in all three of Civil Air Patrol’s congressionally
mandated missions — emergency services, cadet programs and aerospace
education. Performance is reflected in these highlights:
Emergency Services
• 91 Air Force Rescue Coordination Center-authorized searches,
including five actual downed aircraft.
• 29 homeland security missions, including American Shield and
Fertile Keynote.
• 19 1st Air Force training missions.
• 95 Air Force support and six disaster relief missions.
• Total of all funded and unfunded missions — 286.
Cadet Programs
• Two wing-wide encampments with over 600 cadets attending.
• Cadet Col. Viviana L. Angelini of Clearwater Composite Squadron

received the Gen. Carl A. Spaatz Award, CAP’s top cadet honor, achieved by
less than one-half of 1 percent of all cadets.
• 39 cadet teams participated in the Air Force Association’s CyberPatriot
national cyber security competition.
• 183 cadets attended the Florida Leadership Academy.
• 257 cadets participated in other wing academies or competitions.
• Several cadets received military service academy appointments.
• Hosted overseas participants of the International Air Cadet Exchange.
Aerospace Education
• Hosted the National CAP Aerospace Education Officers School held in
Pensacola.
• Provided Teacher Orientation Flights and hands-on STEM activities
throughout the state.
• Continues to maintain partnerships with 76 high schools.
• Conducted model rocketry and remote controlled aircraft workshops.
• Provided support for CAP’s National Space Familiarization Course at
Patrick Air Force Base.
• Developed a Spaceflight Orientation Course.
• Provided displays and workshops at numerous air shows throughout
the state.
With 79 units from Key West to Pensacola, along with 22 planes, one
glider and 33 vehicles, the Florida Wing continues to excel.

Florida Wing aircraft stand ready to meet any assigned mission.
Page 198 of 224

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nAtIOnAL
MISSIOnS &
teChnOLOgy
CAP has one of the largest single-engine piston aircraft fleets in the world, operating 560 powered aircraft that support
missions for communities nationwide every day. Fifty-four gliders and three hot-air balloons are used to provide cadet
orientation flights. Cadets will play vital roles in the future of American civilian and military aviation, and dedicated
CAP pilots work to give them opportunities to explore aviation and learn how to fly. CAP also maintains a fleet of over
1,000 ground vehicles consisting of vans, trucks, sedans and other special purpose vehicles used to support our
missions. CAP’s multimillion-dollar interoperable VHF-FM and HF radio communications network consists of over
11,700 fixed, mobile and portable radio stations used for command and control of resources and to communicate
with counterpart agencies at the federal, state and local levels.

hIgh-PROFILe MISSIOnS
l

Damage assessment flights throughout CAP’s Middle East
Region after Hurricane Joaquin and subsequent flooding.

l

Severe weather and flooding support operations in
Texas from the end of April into early June.

l

Storm assessment support to Texas after multiple storms in
October and November.

l

Damage assessment support to West Virginia for flooding
operations from late June through July.

l

Storm and flooding support in Ohio, Missouri and Louisiana
from the end of the calendar year through January.

l

Tornado support in Illinois in late July.

l

Indiana severe weather support in late August.

l

Hurricane Hermine support to Florida, North Carolina
and Maryland in September.

l

California wildfire support to FEMA in October 2016.

l

Aircrews from CAP’s Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky,
Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia
wings flew impact assessment and aerial imagery sorties
before and after Hurricane Matthew.

l

l

Remote piloted aircraft escort missions in support of MQ-9
Reaper training in Syracuse, New York, were demonstrated
in December and began full operations in June once
Federal Aviation Administration approval was received; 251
hours were flown to prepare for and support this operation
in fiscal year 2016.
Support to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Arkansas for
flooding in January.

Page 199 of 224

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By the

nuMBeRS
Civil Air Patrol annually conducts 90 percent of
all inland search and rescue missions in the
continental U.S. as tasked by the Air Force
Rescue Coordination Center and other agencies.
CAP was involved in 1,265 SAR missions in fiscal
year 2016 and was credited with saving 92 lives.

l

6,928 aircrew personnel and 4,245 ground team
members are available for CAP missions.

l

l

l

l

l

30,742 qualified personnel trained to federal
standards supported 164 disaster relief and other federal,
state and local agency support missions.

CAP aircrews flew 1,390 hours on 215 air defense
exercise missions helping prepare fighter units across
the country for homeland security missions.

l

CAP aircrews flew 104,525 hours conducting search and
rescue, disaster relief, air defense, counterdrug and
numerous other critical missions.

CAP aircrews flew 1,168 hours on 30 Surrogate
Unmanned Aerial Systems missions to train U.S. and
coalition forces from around the world.

l

CAP pilots flying as mentors to America’s future aviation
leaders flew 9,693 hours to conduct 27,316 cadet
orientation flights in both powered aircraft and gliders.

l

In all, CAP members provided $167 million in
volunteer services to the 1,437 communities they
support nationwide.

l

The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center credited CAP’s
national cell phone forensics and radar analysis teams
with 70 lives saved.

CAP services, performed in the air and on the ground by
CAP’s volunteers, cost only $120 to $165 per flying
hour, saving millions of dollars over other aviation
options.
Aircrews conducting counterdrug and drug interdiction
operations flew 9,682 hours helping law enforcement
agencies seize $1.5 billion in illegal drugs and currency,
leading to 1,909 arrests.

Page 200 of 224

Florida-Wing-2017.qxp_Layout 1 2/11/17 11:55 AM Page 6

nAtIOnAL CADet PROgRAMS
tRAnSFORMIng yOuth IntO
DynAMIC AMeRICAnS AnD
AeROSPACe LeADeRS
Core Values
CAP instills the organization’s core values in its cadets —
integrity, volunteer service, excellence and respect. Cadets are
drug-free role models in their communities and schools.
Wreaths Across America
Every December, in all 52 wings and even overseas, cadets
participate in Wreaths Across America observances,
presenting the colors and placing wreaths on veterans’ graves
in national cemeteries and at war memorials.
Career Exploration
Through more than 50 National Cadet Special Activities cadets
annually explore careers in a wide variety of fields. Cadets can
choose to investigate flying, aircraft maintenance and
manufacturing, cyberspace operations, engineering, robotics
and emergency services, among others.
Flying High
The opportunity to fly is a major attraction CAP offers youth.
During 2016, CAP’s pilots flew cadets on 27,316 orientation
flights.
Leadership
Our program offers cadets in-depth training in leadership and
enables them to apply classroom principles to real-world
needs. With adult supervision, cadets are encouraged to plan
events, make decisions and teach and mentor junior-ranking
cadets.
Community Service
CAP cadets serve their communities in myriad ways, including
collecting and distributing food and clothing to the needy,
carrying out cleanup campaigns and meeting logistical needs
for aviation-related events like air shows.

Page 201 of 224

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nAtIOnAL AeROSPACe eDuCAtIOn

CAP’s Aerospace Education and STEM
programs, consisting of over 40 no-cost
aerospace education products and
programs, generate interest in Science,
Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
careers in over 24,000 cadets and about
200,000 K-12 students nationwide.

STEM Kits
Over 185,000 K-12 youth across the country were exposed to
career exploration programs associated with astronomy, flight
simulation, model and remote-control aircraft, robotics, rocketry,
weather, hydraulic engineering and computer programming.
Teacher Members
CAP’s AE programs extend to adults as well as youth. CAP offers
a special membership for teachers promoting AE and STEM in
their classrooms. This includes Teacher Orientation Program
flights that provide educators with the opportunity to experience
firsthand the excitement of flying and to expand their
aeronautical knowledge, which also enriches learning for
30,000 students annually.

Young Learners
Over 22,000 youth in 37 states are K-6 Aerospace Connections
in Education program participants. The no-cost program offered
by more than 360 teachers enriches aerospace/STEM academics,
character education and physical fitness with an engaging
grade-specific curriculum.
Cyber Security
The Air Force Association’s CyberPatriot Program, complemented
by CAP’s cyber security educational materials, is grooming
participants for future cyber security careers. Civil Air Patrol is a
leader in the All Service Division national high school
CyberPatriot program, with past championships in the
competition. In 2016 the Colorado Springs Cadet Squadron
team placed third nationally.

Page 202 of 224

Florida-Wing-2017.qxp_Layout 1 2/11/17 11:55 AM Page 8

CeLeBRAtIng
CADet PROgRAMS’
75th AnnIveRSARy

MISSIOn StAteMent
Supporting America’s communities with
emergency response, diverse aviation and
ground services, youth development and
promotion of air, space and cyber power.

www.gocivilairpatrol.com
Front/Back Cover Photos Courtesy of
Cecil Stoughton. White House Photographs.
John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and
Museum, Boston. Inside Front Cover Photos
Courtesy of Robert Knudsen. White House
Photographs. John F. Kennedy Presidential
Page 203 of 224
Library and Museum, Boston.

Financial Statements

Page 204 of 224

10:22 AM

Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol

07/20/17

Profit & Loss
January through December 2016

Accrual Basis

Jan - Dec 16
Income
5010000 · Revenues from Gov't Contracts
5050000 · Federal State and Local Mission
5050200 · A/C Fuel

146.05

Total 5050000 · Federal State and Local Mission
5060000 · State Appropriations
5080000 · Gov't Contr - Unrest
5080100 · Unrest Govt Contr - Other

146.05
49,500.00
7,961.75

Total 5080000 · Gov't Contr - Unrest

7,961.75

5082000 · Govt Contr Fac & Utilities

201,331.36

Total 5010000 · Revenues from Gov't Contracts
5100000 · Revenues from Activities
5223200 · Senior Activities Income
5223201 · Aerospace Education
5223202 · Wing PAO Academy
5223204 · Check Pilot School
5223205 · Unit Senior Activities

258,939.16

920.00
465.00
1,035.00
4,023.50

Total 5223200 · Senior Activities Income
5224200 · Cadet Activities Income
5224201 · Encampments
5224202 · Summer Encampment
5224203 · Winter Encampment

6,443.50

19,168.52
28,128.90

Total 5224201 · Encampments

47,297.42

5224204 ·
5224211 ·
5224213 ·
5224216 ·
5224217 ·
5224218 ·

680.00
12,025.00
2,320.00
1,060.00
515.00
14,827.96

Color Guard Academy
Florida Leadership Academy
Ultimate Cadet Challenge
Special Activities
Cadet Activities General
Unit Cadet Activities

Total 5224200 · Cadet Activities Income
5224300 · Combined SR & Cadet Activities
5224301 · FLESA
5224302 · Sun N Fun
5224300 · Combined SR & Cadet Activities - Other
Total 5224300 · Combined SR & Cadet Activities
5225200 · Flight Activities/Member Flying
5225201 · A/C Minor Maintenance
5225202 · A/C Fuel
Total 5225200 · Flight Activities/Member Flying

78,725.38
5,678.00
2,345.00
775.00
8,798.00
37,375.61
95.38
37,470.99

Total 5100000 · Revenues from Activities
5240000 · Fundraising Income
5240100 · Wreaths Across America
5240300 · Other Fundraising Income

131,437.87
16,283.56
31,564.33

Total 5240000 · Fundraising Income

47,847.89

5310000 · Revenue from Dues
5310010 · Membership Dues
5310011 · From NHQ
5310012 · From Members

73,225.00
13,199.30

Total 5310010 · Membership Dues

86,424.30

Page 205 of 224

Page 1

10:22 AM

Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol

07/20/17

Profit & Loss

Accrual Basis

January through December 2016
Jan - Dec 16
5342000 · Contributions - From NHQ

756.00

Total 5310000 · Revenue from Dues

87,180.30

5400000 · Other Revenue and Gains
5410000 · Interest Income
5410010 · General Interest
5410020 · Wing Banker Interest

2,386.06
0.30

Total 5410000 · Interest Income

2,386.36

5412000 · Contributions
5412010 · Contributions Unrestricted
5412011 · Cont - Unrest - Cash
Total 5412010 · Contributions Unrestricted
5412020 · Contributions - Restricted
5412021 · Cont - Rest - Cash

64,133.34
64,133.34
500.00

Total 5412020 · Contributions - Restricted

500.00

Total 5412000 · Contributions

64,633.34

5413000 · Non-Govt Contrib Fac & Util
5415000 · Miscellaneous Income
5415010 · Miscellaneous Income
5415020 · Unclaimed Deposits
5415030 · Bad Check Charge
5415040 · Member Assessments

57,082.74
1,856.77
2,924.50
90.00
22.42

Total 5415000 · Miscellaneous Income

4,893.69

5416000 · Rental Income
5424100 · Mat. & Sup. Sales
5424300 · Unrelated Business Income
5424310 · Advertising Sales (Dennison)

500.00
3,054.70
1,505.75

Total 5424300 · Unrelated Business Income

1,505.75

Total 5400000 · Other Revenue and Gains

134,056.58

6210000 · Special Events
6212000 · Wing Conf Registration
6214000 · Unit Events/Banquets

25,605.00
12,328.95

Total 6210000 · Special Events

37,933.95

6300000 · From NHQ
6310000 · From NHQ Funded Flying
6310200 · Aircraft Fuel
6310220 · SAR Actual Missions - A/C Fuel
6310230 · SAR Training Missions-A/C Fuel
6310270 · ROTC Flying - A/C Fuel
6310280 · Cadet O-Rides - A/C Fuel
Total 6310200 · Aircraft Fuel

52,347.26
45,529.13
1,617.17
29,047.10
128,540.66

6310300 · Miscellaneous
6310320 · SAR Actual Missions - Other
6310330 · SAR Training Missions - Other
6310380 · Glider Tows
Total 6310300 · Miscellaneous

2,127.16
830.75
7,557.10
10,515.01

Total 6310000 · From NHQ Funded Flying
6313000 · From NHQ - A/C & Veh Major Mx
6313010 · A/C Reimb Major Mx
6313015 · Consolidated Mx Ferry Costs

Page 206 of 224

139,055.67
3,445.46
33,964.78

Page 2

10:22 AM

Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol

07/20/17

Profit & Loss
January through December 2016

Accrual Basis

Jan - Dec 16
6313030 · Vehicle Reimbursable Maint.
6313038 · 08487
6313045 · 08501
6313046 · 08502
6313047 · 08503
6313048 · 08504
6313052 · 08508
6313054 · 08510
6313056 · 08512
6313057 · 08513
6313060 · 08516
6313061 · 08517
6313062 · 08518
6313064 · 08520
6313065 · 08521
6313067 · 08523
6313070 · 08526
6313072 · 08528
Total 6313030 · Vehicle Reimbursable Maint.

198.55
410.36
546.01
2,326.34
2,715.33
34.71
549.66
1,418.15
199.73
649.48
991.88
1,159.52
41.99
1,246.66
856.45
1,725.59
1,151.04
16,221.45

Total 6313000 · From NHQ - A/C & Veh Major Mx
6320000 · From NHQ - Other
6320010 · IACE
6320030 · Teacher Flights
6320050 · Travel
6320060 · Scholarships

53,631.69
4,000.00
253.56
60,166.00
1,000.00

Total 6320000 · From NHQ - Other

65,419.56

Total 6300000 · From NHQ

258,106.92

6500000 · From Units Below National HQ
6510000 · From Regions & Wings
6510100 · From Regions
6510110 · From Regions Through NHQ
Total 6510100 · From Regions

2,316.60
2,316.60

6510200 · From Wings
6510215 · Aircraft Fuel
6510250 · Activities

173.23
-225.00

Total 6510200 · From Wings

-51.77

Total 6510000 · From Regions & Wings
6513000 · From Units Below
6513010 · Proficiency Flying
6513015 · Aircraft Fuel
6513030 · Tolls & Parking
6513040 · Membership Dues
6513060 · Encampment
6513070 · Cadet Activities from Units
6513080 · Cadet Competition
6513085 · Wing Bankers Transfer
6513090 · From Units Miscellaneous
Total 6513000 · From Units Below

2,264.83
28,690.70
0.00
-95.94
107.00
-150.00
3,471.00
200.00
0.00
5,990.15
38,212.91

Total 6500000 · From Units Below National HQ
Total Income

40,477.74
995,980.41

Gross Profit

995,980.41

Expense
7100000 · Awards & Grants to Individuals
7120000 · Awards

Page 207 of 224

8,291.75
Page 3

10:22 AM

Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol

07/20/17

Profit & Loss
January through December 2016

Accrual Basis

Jan - Dec 16
7135000 · Scholarships
7135020 · General Scholarships
7135000 · Scholarships - Other

4,199.64
150.00

Total 7135000 · Scholarships

4,349.64

Total 7100000 · Awards & Grants to Individuals
7600000 · Mission Expenses
7695000 · Other Mission Expenses
7695350 · Sun-N-Fun
7695450 · Mission Exp SAR/DR Actual
7695500 · Mission Exp SAR/DR Trng
7695600 · Homeland Security Missions/EAS
7695900 · Misc Mission Expenses

12,641.39

2,316.99
2,890.61
245.18
669.30
352.43

Total 7695000 · Other Mission Expenses

6,474.51

7696000 · Corporate Vehicle Fuel
7696300 · Below Wing Level
7696350 · Sun-N-Fun

141.80
207.16

Total 7696000 · Corporate Vehicle Fuel
7697000 · A/C Fuel
7697300 · Below Wing Level
7697450 · SAR/DR Actual
7697500 · SAR/DR Training
7697700 · O'Flights
7697950 · A/C Fuel Credit Card

348.96
905.73
370.46
341.12
110.80
165,354.65

Total 7697000 · A/C Fuel

167,082.76

Total 7600000 · Mission Expenses

173,906.23

7700000 · Supplies
7700100 · Supplies
7700110 · Office Supplies
7700111 · FLWG HQ
7700112 · Headquarters Staff

2,236.94
2,626.94

Total 7700110 · Office Supplies
7700120 ·
7700130 ·
7700140 ·
7700150 ·

4,863.88

Materials & Supplies
Uniforms/Supplies
Software Purchase
Below Wing Level

4,244.90
11,054.15
57.65
8,734.12

Total 7700100 · Supplies

28,954.70

7701000 · Cost of Sales

1,557.92

Total 7700000 · Supplies

30,512.62

7730000 · Equipment Purchases
7735000 · Equipment
7735010 · FLWG/HQ
7735020 · Headquarters Staff
7735030 · Below Wing Level

525.14
1,170.42
6,524.56

Total 7735000 · Equipment

8,220.12

7745000 · Communications Equipment
7745010 · Wing Level
7745030 · Below Wing Level
Total 7745000 · Communications Equipment
Total 7730000 · Equipment Purchases

2,404.90
4,184.18
6,589.08
14,809.20

Page 208 of 224

Page 4

10:22 AM

Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol

07/20/17

Profit & Loss
January through December 2016

Accrual Basis

Jan - Dec 16
7800000 · Telephone & Communication
7810000 · Telephone & Comm Expenses
7810100 · FLWG/HQ
7810110 · FLWG/HQ
7810130 · Cellular
7810140 · Conference Calling/Webinars

3,208.35
2,116.33
837.00

Total 7810100 · FLWG/HQ

6,161.68

7810200 · Below Wing Level

2,673.66

Total 7810000 · Telephone & Comm Expenses
7813000 · Internet Expense
7813100 · FLWG/HQ
7813110 · FLWG/HQ
7813120 · Headquarters Staff - IT
7813130 · Headquarters Staff-Other

8,835.34

292.50
125.00
2,199.81

Total 7813100 · FLWG/HQ

2,617.31

7813200 · Below Wing Level

4,399.93

Total 7813000 · Internet Expense

7,017.24

Total 7800000 · Telephone & Communication
7820000 · IT Expenses
7900000 · Postage & Shipping
7900100 · FLWG/HQ
7900200 · Headquarters Staff
7900210 · Operations
7900100 · FLWG/HQ - Other

15,852.58
6,142.35

1,477.97
85.66
354.73

Total 7900100 · FLWG/HQ

1,918.36

7900300 · Below Wing Level

776.65

Total 7900000 · Postage & Shipping

2,695.01

8000000 · Occupancy Expenses
8010000 · Rent
8015000 · Utilities
8016000 · Property Taxes
8020000 · Contributed Facilities
8085000 · Facility Expenses-Other

21,365.74
16,954.42
17.74
258,414.10
13,233.17

Total 8000000 · Occupancy Expenses

309,985.17

8100000 · Maintenance Expenses
8110000 · Corp Aircraft Maintenance
8110020 · Corp Aircraft O & M-General
Total 8110000 · Corp Aircraft Maintenance
8120000 · Corporate Vehicle Maintenance
8120003 · 08487
8120004 · 08488
8120008 · 08502
8120009 · 08503
8120010 · 08504
8120013 · 08507
8120014 · 08510
8120015 · 08511
8120016 · 08512
8120017 · 08513
8120020 · 08516
8120021 · 08517
8120022 · 08518
8120024 · 08520
8120025 · 08521

Page 209 of 224

3,785.03
3,785.03
198.55
261.52
546.01
878.61
2,725.33
487.73
549.66
59.95
1,418.15
179.46
382.91
991.88
1,159.52
41.99
1,299.14
Page 5

10:22 AM

Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol

07/20/17

Profit & Loss
January through December 2016

Accrual Basis

Jan - Dec 16
8120027 ·
8120028 ·
8120029 ·
8120032 ·
8120034 ·
8120063 ·
8120071 ·
8120073 ·
8120100 ·

08523
08508
08509
08526
08528
08915
08923
08925
General Vehicle MX

803.58
34.71
79.00
1,301.57
41.96
409.08
295.88
3,357.74
4,722.24

Total 8120000 · Corporate Vehicle Maintenance
8121000 · Equipment Leases
8121015 · Toshiba Service Contract

22,226.17
1,764.36

Total 8121000 · Equipment Leases

1,764.36

8123000 · Other Equipment Maintenance
8123010 · Equipment Maintenance
8123020 · Communications Equip Maint
8123000 · Other Equipment Maintenance - Other

305.49
1,255.25
18.05

Total 8123000 · Other Equipment Maintenance

1,578.79

Total 8100000 · Maintenance Expenses

29,354.35

8230000 · Dues & Publications
8230200 · Headquarters Staff
8230300 · Below Wing Level

70.56
406.49

Total 8230000 · Dues & Publications

477.05

8310000 · Travel
8310100 · Travel
8310101 · Commander
8310102 · Command Directed
8310103 · Vice Commander
8310104 · Chief of Staff
8310107 · Dep Chief of Staff - Programs
8310108 · Group Commanders
8310109 · Aerospace Education
8310111 · Cadet Programs
8310112 · Chaplain
8310113 · Communications
8310117 · Government Relations
8310118 · Information Technology
8310119 · Inspector General
8310120 · Command Chief
8310121 · Logistics/Supply
8310122 · Marketing/Public Affairs
8310124 · Operations
8310127 · Professional Development
8310130 · Safety
8310133 · Dep Chief of Staff - Info/Comm.
8310190 · Below Wing Level

7,189.55
1,839.49
4,468.33
687.26
547.69
2,666.59
308.17
1,885.85
2,036.61
3,400.63
1,202.97
180.64
1,253.40
610.01
3,422.41
383.34
1,549.39
627.68
1,362.54
296.52
7,855.82

Total 8310100 · Travel

43,774.89

Total 8310000 · Travel

43,774.89

8400000 · Activities & Encampments
8475000 · Cadet Activities
8475010 · Encampments
8475015 · Summer Encampment
8475020 · Winter Encampment
Total 8475010 · Encampments

47,019.09
30,155.22
77,174.31

Page 210 of 224

Page 6

10:22 AM

Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol

07/20/17

Profit & Loss
January through December 2016

Accrual Basis

Jan - Dec 16
8475040 ·
8475060 ·
8475070 ·
8475110 ·
8475130 ·
8475150 ·
8475170 ·
8475180 ·
8475190 ·
8475230 ·

Glider Flights Expense
IACE Activity
Cadet Competition - NCC
Florida Leadership Academy
Ultimate Cadet Challenge
Special Activity Selection Boar
Cadet Activities - General
Unit Cadet Activities
Color Guard Academy
Cadet Competition - SER

Total 8475000 · Cadet Activities

8,464.00
3,885.74
66.49
12,737.15
4,289.83
1,103.95
649.41
24,935.09
1,860.50
222.98
135,389.45

8476000 · Senior Activities
8476010 · Aerospace Education
8476020 · Wing PAO Academy
8476030 · Senior Activities
8476040 · FLWG Check Pilot School
8476050 · Unit Senior Activities
Total 8476000 · Senior Activities

744.98
1,388.65
788.44
1,434.15
2,508.17
6,864.39

8480000 · Combined SR & Cadet Activities
8480020 · FLESA
8480030 · Unit Combined Activities
Total 8480000 · Combined SR & Cadet Activities

9,391.53
120.00
9,511.53

Total 8400000 · Activities & Encampments
8505000 · Conferences, Convent. & Meeting
8510000 · Wing Conference Expense
8510010 · Banquet & Catering Expenses
8510020 · Hotel & Meeting Costs
8510030 · Conference Transportation Exp.
8510040 · Conference Supplies
8510000 · Wing Conference Expense - Other
Total 8510000 · Wing Conference Expense
8530000 · Miscellaneous Wing Events
8530400 · Other Wing Events

151,765.37

14,407.84
5,017.12
1,225.00
454.39
1,480.00
22,584.35
606.47

Total 8530000 · Miscellaneous Wing Events
8540000 · Unit Meetings/Banquets

606.47
18,989.97

Total 8505000 · Conferences, Convent. & Meeting
8650000 · Depreciation Expense
8652000 · Deprec Bld & Imp
8657000 · Deprec Other Eq

42,180.79
2,722.61
2,392.65

Total 8650000 · Depreciation Expense

5,115.26

8820000 · Professional Development
8820030 · Unit Commanders Course

532.80

Total 8820000 · Professional Development
9240000 · Advertising & Promotion
9300000 · Other Expense
9302000 · Miscellaneous Expenses
9302010 · Miscellaneous

532.80
38.14

166.70

Total 9302000 · Miscellaneous Expenses

Page 211 of 224

166.70

Page 7

10:22 AM

Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol

07/20/17

Profit & Loss
January through December 2016

Accrual Basis

Jan - Dec 16
9303000 · Bank Expense
9303100 · General Bank Expense
9303200 · Wing Banker Bank Expense
9303300 · PayPal Fees
Total 9303000 · Bank Expense

30.00
68.50
2,649.65
2,748.15

Total 9300000 · Other Expense

2,914.85

9306100 · Fundraising
9401000 · Expenses with NHQ
9401010 · Membership Dues
9401020 · AC MX Draft backs NHQ

5,981.54
1,721.00
58,812.30

Total 9401000 · Expenses with NHQ

60,533.30

9520000 · Expenses with Wings
9520010 · Proficiency Flying
9520015 · Aircraft Fuel
9520040 · Tolls and Parking
9520060 · Encampment
9520070 · Other Cadet Activities
9520090 · Miscellaneous

2,930.10
0.00
-95.94
-150.00
2,891.00
0.00

Total 9520000 · Expenses with Wings

5,575.16

9530000 · Expenses with Units Below
9530010 · Proficiency Flying
9530015 · A/C Fuel
9530040 · Membership Dues
9530070 · Unit Activities
9530090 · Misc Expenses with Units

633.30
605.00
0.00
862.00
5,648.15

Total 9530000 · Expenses with Units Below
Total Expense

7,748.45
922,536.50

Net Income

73,443.91

Page 212 of 224

Page 8

10:21 AM

Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol

07/20/17

Profit & Loss - HQ Only

Accrual Basis

January through December 2016
Jan - Dec 16
Income
5010000 · Revenues from Gov't Contracts
5050000 · Federal State and Local Mission
5050200 · A/C Fuel

146.05

Total 5050000 · Federal State and Local Mission

146.05

5060000 · State Appropriations

49,500.00

Total 5010000 · Revenues from Gov't Contracts
5100000 · Revenues from Activities
5223200 · Senior Activities Income
5223201 · Aerospace Education
5223202 · Wing PAO Academy
5223204 · Check Pilot School

49,646.05

920.00
465.00
1,035.00

Total 5223200 · Senior Activities Income
5224200 · Cadet Activities Income
5224201 · Encampments
5224202 · Summer Encampment
5224203 · Winter Encampment

2,420.00

17,925.00
28,128.90

Total 5224201 · Encampments

46,053.90

5224211 · Florida Leadership Academy
5224216 · Special Activities

12,025.00
1,060.00

Total 5224200 · Cadet Activities Income
5224300 · Combined SR & Cadet Activities
5224301 · FLESA
5224302 · Sun N Fun

59,138.90
5,678.00
2,345.00

Total 5224300 · Combined SR & Cadet Activities

8,023.00

Total 5100000 · Revenues from Activities
5310000 · Revenue from Dues
5310010 · Membership Dues
5310011 · From NHQ

69,581.90

73,180.00

Total 5310010 · Membership Dues

73,180.00

5342000 · Contributions - From NHQ

756.00

Total 5310000 · Revenue from Dues

73,936.00

5400000 · Other Revenue and Gains
5410000 · Interest Income
5410010 · General Interest

2,386.06

Total 5410000 · Interest Income

2,386.06

5412000 · Contributions
5412010 · Contributions Unrestricted
5412011 · Cont - Unrest - Cash
Total 5412010 · Contributions Unrestricted

36.23
36.23

Total 5412000 · Contributions

36.23

5415000 · Miscellaneous Income
5415010 · Miscellaneous Income
5415040 · Member Assessments
Total 5415000 · Miscellaneous Income
5424100 · Mat. & Sup. Sales

1,637.38
22.42
1,659.80
50.00

Page 213 of 224

Page 1

10:21 AM

Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol

07/20/17

Profit & Loss - HQ Only

Accrual Basis

January through December 2016
Jan - Dec 16
5424300 · Unrelated Business Income
5424310 · Advertising Sales (Dennison)

1,505.75

Total 5424300 · Unrelated Business Income

1,505.75

Total 5400000 · Other Revenue and Gains

5,637.84

6210000 · Special Events
6212000 · Wing Conf Registration

24,765.00

Total 6210000 · Special Events

24,765.00

6300000 · From NHQ
6310000 · From NHQ Funded Flying
6310200 · Aircraft Fuel
6310220 · SAR Actual Missions - A/C Fuel
6310230 · SAR Training Missions-A/C Fuel
6310270 · ROTC Flying - A/C Fuel
6310280 · Cadet O-Rides - A/C Fuel
Total 6310200 · Aircraft Fuel

52,347.26
45,529.13
1,617.17
29,047.10
128,540.66

6310300 · Miscellaneous
6310320 · SAR Actual Missions - Other
6310330 · SAR Training Missions - Other
6310380 · Glider Tows
Total 6310300 · Miscellaneous

2,127.16
830.75
7,557.10
10,515.01

Total 6310000 · From NHQ Funded Flying
6313000 · From NHQ - A/C & Veh Major Mx
6313010 · A/C Reimb Major Mx
6313015 · Consolidated Mx Ferry Costs
6313030 · Vehicle Reimbursable Maint.
6313038 · 08487
6313045 · 08501
6313046 · 08502
6313047 · 08503
6313048 · 08504
6313052 · 08508
6313054 · 08510
6313057 · 08513
6313060 · 08516
6313061 · 08517
6313062 · 08518
6313064 · 08520
6313065 · 08521
6313067 · 08523
6313070 · 08526
6313072 · 08528
Total 6313030 · Vehicle Reimbursable Maint.
Total 6313000 · From NHQ - A/C & Veh Major Mx
6320000 · From NHQ - Other
6320010 · IACE
6320030 · Teacher Flights
6320050 · Travel

139,055.67
3,445.46
33,964.78
198.55
410.36
546.01
2,326.34
2,715.33
34.71
549.66
199.73
649.48
991.88
1,159.52
41.99
1,246.66
856.45
1,725.59
1,151.04
14,803.30
52,213.54
4,000.00
253.56
60,166.00

Total 6320000 · From NHQ - Other

64,419.56

Total 6300000 · From NHQ

255,688.77

Page 214 of 224

Page 2

10:21 AM

Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol

07/20/17

Profit & Loss - HQ Only

Accrual Basis

January through December 2016
Jan - Dec 16
6500000 · From Units Below National HQ
6510000 · From Regions & Wings
6510100 · From Regions
6510110 · From Regions Through NHQ
Total 6510100 · From Regions

2,316.60
2,316.60

6510200 · From Wings
6510215 · Aircraft Fuel
6510250 · Activities

173.23
125.00

Total 6510200 · From Wings

298.23

Total 6510000 · From Regions & Wings
6513000 · From Units Below
6513010 · Proficiency Flying
6513015 · Aircraft Fuel
6513030 · Tolls & Parking
6513060 · Encampment
6513070 · Cadet Activities from Units
6513080 · Cadet Competition
6513085 · Wing Bankers Transfer
6513090 · From Units Miscellaneous
Total 6513000 · From Units Below

2,614.83
79,811.70
250.59
165.89
550.00
5,320.00
200.00
120.00
77.69
86,495.87

Total 6500000 · From Units Below National HQ

89,110.70

Total Income

568,366.26

Gross Profit

568,366.26

Expense
7100000 · Awards & Grants to Individuals
7120000 · Awards
7135000 · Scholarships
7135020 · General Scholarships
7135000 · Scholarships - Other
Total 7135000 · Scholarships

801.86
1,525.00
150.00
1,675.00

Total 7100000 · Awards & Grants to Individuals
7600000 · Mission Expenses
7695000 · Other Mission Expenses
7695350 · Sun-N-Fun
7695450 · Mission Exp SAR/DR Actual
7695500 · Mission Exp SAR/DR Trng
7695600 · Homeland Security Missions/EAS
7695900 · Misc Mission Expenses
Total 7695000 · Other Mission Expenses
7696000 · Corporate Vehicle Fuel
7696350 · Sun-N-Fun

2,476.86

2,316.99
2,890.61
245.18
669.30
221.97
6,344.05
207.16

Total 7696000 · Corporate Vehicle Fuel
7697000 · A/C Fuel
7697450 · SAR/DR Actual
7697500 · SAR/DR Training
7697700 · O'Flights
7697950 · A/C Fuel Credit Card

207.16
370.46
341.12
110.80
165,354.65

Total 7697000 · A/C Fuel

166,177.03

Total 7600000 · Mission Expenses

172,728.24

Page 215 of 224

Page 3

10:21 AM

Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol

07/20/17

Profit & Loss - HQ Only

Accrual Basis

January through December 2016
Jan - Dec 16
7700000 · Supplies
7700100 · Supplies
7700110 · Office Supplies
7700111 · FLWG HQ
7700112 · Headquarters Staff

2,236.94
2,626.94

Total 7700110 · Office Supplies

4,863.88

7700120 · Materials & Supplies
7700130 · Uniforms/Supplies
7700140 · Software Purchase

2,079.10
655.14
53.99

Total 7700100 · Supplies

7,652.11

Total 7700000 · Supplies

7,652.11

7730000 · Equipment Purchases
7735000 · Equipment
7735010 · FLWG/HQ
7735020 · Headquarters Staff

525.14
1,170.42

Total 7735000 · Equipment

1,695.56

7745000 · Communications Equipment
7745010 · Wing Level

2,404.90

Total 7745000 · Communications Equipment

2,404.90

Total 7730000 · Equipment Purchases
7800000 · Telephone & Communication
7810000 · Telephone & Comm Expenses
7810100 · FLWG/HQ
7810110 · FLWG/HQ
7810130 · Cellular
7810140 · Conference Calling/Webinars
Total 7810100 · FLWG/HQ

4,100.46

3,208.35
2,116.33
837.00
6,161.68

Total 7810000 · Telephone & Comm Expenses
7813000 · Internet Expense
7813100 · FLWG/HQ
7813110 · FLWG/HQ
7813120 · Headquarters Staff - IT
7813130 · Headquarters Staff-Other
Total 7813100 · FLWG/HQ

6,161.68

292.50
125.00
2,199.81
2,617.31

Total 7813000 · Internet Expense

2,617.31

Total 7800000 · Telephone & Communication

8,778.99

7820000 · IT Expenses
7900000 · Postage & Shipping
7900100 · FLWG/HQ
7900200 · Headquarters Staff
7900210 · Operations
7900100 · FLWG/HQ - Other

6,142.35

1,477.97
85.66
354.73

Total 7900100 · FLWG/HQ

1,918.36

Total 7900000 · Postage & Shipping

1,918.36

8000000 · Occupancy Expenses
8010000 · Rent
8016000 · Property Taxes
8085000 · Facility Expenses-Other

8,986.05
17.74
564.90

Total 8000000 · Occupancy Expenses

Page 216 of 224

9,568.69

Page 4

10:21 AM

Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol

07/20/17

Profit & Loss - HQ Only

Accrual Basis

January through December 2016
Jan - Dec 16
8100000 · Maintenance Expenses
8110000 · Corp Aircraft Maintenance
8110020 · Corp Aircraft O & M-General
Total 8110000 · Corp Aircraft Maintenance
8120000 · Corporate Vehicle Maintenance
8120003 · 08487
8120004 · 08488
8120008 · 08502
8120009 · 08503
8120010 · 08504
8120013 · 08507
8120014 · 08510
8120015 · 08511
8120016 · 08512
8120017 · 08513
8120020 · 08516
8120021 · 08517
8120022 · 08518
8120024 · 08520
8120025 · 08521
8120027 · 08523
8120028 · 08508
8120029 · 08509
8120032 · 08526
8120034 · 08528
8120063 · 08915
8120071 · 08923
8120073 · 08925
8120100 · General Vehicle MX
Total 8120000 · Corporate Vehicle Maintenance
8121000 · Equipment Leases
8121015 · Toshiba Service Contract
Total 8121000 · Equipment Leases

3,036.21
3,036.21
198.55
261.52
546.01
878.61
2,725.33
487.73
549.66
59.95
1,418.15
179.46
382.91
991.88
1,159.52
41.99
1,299.14
803.58
34.71
79.00
1,301.57
41.96
409.08
295.88
3,357.74
4,702.15
22,206.08
1,764.36
1,764.36

8123000 · Other Equipment Maintenance
8123010 · Equipment Maintenance
8123020 · Communications Equip Maint
Total 8123000 · Other Equipment Maintenance

237.90
1,060.25
1,298.15

Total 8100000 · Maintenance Expenses

28,304.80

8230000 · Dues & Publications
8230200 · Headquarters Staff

70.56

Total 8230000 · Dues & Publications

70.56

8310000 · Travel
8310100 · Travel
8310101 · Commander
8310102 · Command Directed
8310103 · Vice Commander
8310104 · Chief of Staff
8310107 · Dep Chief of Staff - Programs
8310108 · Group Commanders
8310109 · Aerospace Education
8310111 · Cadet Programs
8310112 · Chaplain
8310113 · Communications
8310117 · Government Relations
8310118 · Information Technology
8310119 · Inspector General
8310120 · Command Chief
8310121 · Logistics/Supply
8310122 · Marketing/Public Affairs

Page 217 of 224

7,189.55
1,839.49
4,468.33
687.26
547.69
2,666.59
308.17
1,885.85
2,036.61
3,400.63
1,202.97
180.64
1,253.40
610.01
3,422.41
383.34
Page 5

10:21 AM

Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol

07/20/17

Profit & Loss - HQ Only

Accrual Basis

January through December 2016
Jan - Dec 16
8310124 ·
8310127 ·
8310130 ·
8310133 ·

Operations
Professional Development
Safety
Dep Chief of Staff - Info/Comm.

1,549.39
627.68
1,362.54
296.52

Total 8310100 · Travel

35,919.07

Total 8310000 · Travel

35,919.07

8400000 · Activities & Encampments
8475000 · Cadet Activities
8475010 · Encampments
8475015 · Summer Encampment
8475020 · Winter Encampment

46,237.32
29,480.16

Total 8475010 · Encampments

75,717.48

8475040 ·
8475060 ·
8475070 ·
8475110 ·
8475130 ·
8475150 ·
8475170 ·
8475190 ·
8475230 ·

8,430.00
3,885.74
66.49
12,667.15
4,289.83
1,103.95
22.41
927.20
222.98

Glider Flights Expense
IACE Activity
Cadet Competition - NCC
Florida Leadership Academy
Ultimate Cadet Challenge
Special Activity Selection Boar
Cadet Activities - General
Color Guard Academy
Cadet Competition - SER

Total 8475000 · Cadet Activities

107,333.23

8476000 · Senior Activities
8476010 · Aerospace Education
8476020 · Wing PAO Academy
8476030 · Senior Activities
8476040 · FLWG Check Pilot School
Total 8476000 · Senior Activities

744.98
1,388.65
788.44
1,434.15
4,356.22

8480000 · Combined SR & Cadet Activities
8480020 · FLESA
Total 8480000 · Combined SR & Cadet Activities

9,291.53
9,291.53

Total 8400000 · Activities & Encampments
8505000 · Conferences, Convent. & Meeting
8510000 · Wing Conference Expense
8510010 · Banquet & Catering Expenses
8510020 · Hotel & Meeting Costs
8510030 · Conference Transportation Exp.
8510040 · Conference Supplies
8510000 · Wing Conference Expense - Other
Total 8510000 · Wing Conference Expense
8530000 · Miscellaneous Wing Events
8530400 · Other Wing Events

120,980.98

14,407.84
5,017.12
530.00
454.39
1,480.00
21,889.35
606.47

Total 8530000 · Miscellaneous Wing Events

606.47

Total 8505000 · Conferences, Convent. & Meeting

22,495.82

8820000 · Professional Development
8820030 · Unit Commanders Course

532.80

Total 8820000 · Professional Development
9300000 · Other Expense
9302000 · Miscellaneous Expenses
9302010 · Miscellaneous
Total 9302000 · Miscellaneous Expenses

Page 218 of 224

532.80

29.10
29.10
Page 6

10:21 AM

Florida Wing Civil Air Patrol

07/20/17

Profit & Loss - HQ Only

Accrual Basis

January through December 2016
Jan - Dec 16
9303000 · Bank Expense
9303100 · General Bank Expense
9303200 · Wing Banker Bank Expense
9303300 · PayPal Fees
Total 9303000 · Bank Expense

25.00
68.50
2,649.65
2,743.15

Total 9300000 · Other Expense

2,772.25

9306100 · Fundraising
9401000 · Expenses with NHQ
9401020 · AC MX Draft backs NHQ

0.00
58,812.30

Total 9401000 · Expenses with NHQ

58,812.30

9520000 · Expenses with Wings
9520010 · Proficiency Flying

157.50

Total 9520000 · Expenses with Wings

157.50

9530000 · Expenses with Units Below
9530010 · Proficiency Flying
9530070 · Unit Activities
9530090 · Misc Expenses with Units
Total 9530000 · Expenses with Units Below
Total Expense

45.00
400.00
50.00
495.00
483,907.14

Net Income

84,459.12

Page 219 of 224

Page 7

Chaplain/Character Development CAPF 34 Data

 

Page 220 of 224

CAP Form 34
Reporting Unit: SER-FL-001 | Reporting Period: 31 Dec 2015 - 30 Jun 2016 | Form: Character Development Instructor
Summary for SER-FL: Total Units Reported: 18 | Total Reports Submitted: 22
Activities

Activity Date Activities

Hours

Mileage

Expenses Summary

Administrative

18

90

100

$135.00

Entries: 22 | Recent activity on 25 Jun 2016

Air Force Association

1

1

0

$0.00

Entries: 20 | Recent activity on 20 Jun 2016

CAP Related Meetings

59

137

1,343

$224.00

Entries: 32 | Recent activity on 27 Jun 2016

Character Development Facilitation

50

82

608

$66.00

Entries: 43 | Recent activity on 29 Jun 2016

Emergency Services

21

428

940

$270.00

Entries: 26 | Recent activity on 27 Jun 2016

Military Chaplains Association

0

0

0

$0.00

Non-Activity Expenses

0

0

0

$180.00

Entries: 20 | Recent activity on 25 Jun 2016

Other Activities

17

36

500

$163.00

Entries: 24 | Recent activity on 27 Jun 2016

Other Cadet Activities

11

312

117

$600.00

Entries: 21 | Recent activity on 27 Jun 2016

Promotional Activities

15

15

0

$0.00

Entries: 20 | Recent activity on 29 Jun 2016

Training/Education

13

77

745

$529.00

Entries: 20 | Recent activity on 29 Jun 2016

205.00

1,178.00

4,353.00

$2,167.00

Activity Totals

Warning: The information you are receiving is protected from interception or disclosure. Any person who intentionally distributes, reproduces or discloses its contents is subject to the
penalties set forth in 18 United States Code Section 2511 and/or related state and federal laws of the United States.

Results as of: 27 Jul 2017

Page 221 of 224

Page 1 of 2

CAP Form 34
Reporting Unit: SER-FL-001 | Reporting Period: 31 Dec 2015 - 30 Jun 2016 | Form: Chaplain
Summary for SER-FL: Total Units Reported: 13 | Total Reports Submitted: 18
Activities

Activity Date Activities

Hours

Mileage

Expenses Summary

Administrative

228

235

1,048

Aerospace Ed Support

29

82

795

$353.00

Entries: 17 | Recent activity on 07 Apr 2016

Air Force Association

7

14

0

$205.00

Entries: 15 | Recent activity on 15 Jan 2016

Air Force Support

25

76

860

$192.00

Entries: 38 | Recent activity on 22 Jun 2016

CAP Related Meetings

119

445

5,301

Character Development Facilitation

69

170

1,135

Emergency Services

25

80

1,266

Military Chaplains Association

1

1

0

$150.00

Entries: 15 | Recent activity on 15 Jan 2016

Non-Activity Expenses

0

0

0

$446.00

Entries: 17 | Recent activity on 16 Jun 2016

Other Activities

12

83

353

$525.00

Entries: 18 | Recent activity on 28 Jun 2016

Other Cadet Activities

23

108

1,744

$45.00

Entries: 15 | Recent activity on 14 Jun 2016

Other Military Support

43

104

949

$707.00

Entries: 21 | Recent activity on 05 Jun 2016

Pastoral Ministries

114

292

1,411

$69.00

Entries: 19 | Recent activity on 18 Jun 2016

Promotional Activities

22

33

157

$0.00

Entries: 15 | Recent activity on 26 May 2016

Training/Education

28

438

4,657

745.00

2,161.00

Activity Totals

$1,015.00 Entries: 32 | Recent activity on 26 Jun 2016

$1,502.00 Entries: 49 | Recent activity on 28 Jun 2016
$385.00

Entries: 33 | Recent activity on 28 Jun 2016

$1,245.00 Entries: 20 | Recent activity on 14 Jun 2016

$2,933.00 Entries: 18 | Recent activity on 28 Jun 2016

19,676.00 $9,772.00

Warning: The information you are receiving is protected from interception or disclosure. Any person who intentionally distributes, reproduces or discloses its contents is subject to the
penalties set forth in 18 United States Code Section 2511 and/or related state and federal laws of the United States.

Results as of: 27 Jul 2017

Page 222 of 224

Page 2 of 2

CAP Form 34
Reporting Unit: SER-FL-001 | Reporting Period: 01 Jul 2016 - 31 Dec 2016 | Form: Character Development Instructor
Summary for SER-FL: Total Units Reported: 21 | Total Reports Submitted: 32
Activities

Activity Date Activities

Hours

Mileage

Expenses Summary

Administrative

55

104

36

$20.00

Air Force Association

0

0

0

$0.00

CAP Related Meetings

122

262

1,176

$5.00

Entries: 53 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

Character Development Facilitation

134

189

1,283

$78.00

Entries: 63 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

Emergency Services

11

155

91

$220.00

Entries: 30 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

Military Chaplains Association

0

0

0

$0.00

Non-Activity Expenses

0

0

0

$497.00

Entries: 26 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

Other Activities

20

83

922

$238.00

Entries: 26 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

Other Cadet Activities

57

394

892

$350.00

Entries: 26 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

Promotional Activities

9

9

150

$50.00

Entries: 24 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

Training/Education

8

24

12

$0.00

Entries: 29 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

416.00

1,220.00

4,562.00

$1,458.00

Activity Totals

Entries: 32 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

Warning: The information you are receiving is protected from interception or disclosure. Any person who intentionally distributes, reproduces or discloses its contents is subject to the
penalties set forth in 18 United States Code Section 2511 and/or related state and federal laws of the United States.

Results as of: 27 Jul 2017

Page 223 of 224

Page 1 of 2

CAP Form 34
Reporting Unit: SER-FL-001 | Reporting Period: 01 Jul 2016 - 31 Dec 2016 | Form: Chaplain
Summary for SER-FL: Total Units Reported: 12 | Total Reports Submitted: 16
Activities

Hours

Mileage

163

212

957

Aerospace Ed Support

2

8

276

$90.00

Entries: 14 | Recent activity on 29 Oct 2016

Air Force Association

1

0

0

$50.00

Entries: 13 | Recent activity on 21 Jul 2016

Air Force Support

1

3

28

$8.00

Entries: 13 | Recent activity on 06 Jul 2016

CAP Related Meetings

71

471

4,508

Character Development Facilitation

33

84

598

$156.00

Entries: 26 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

Emergency Services

41

66

2,142

$388.00

Entries: 25 | Recent activity on 20 Dec 2016

Military Chaplains Association

6

15

82

$56.00

Entries: 14 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

Non-Activity Expenses

0

0

0

$680.00

Entries: 17 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

Other Activities

27

349

1,068

Other Cadet Activities

0

0

0

$0.00

Other Military Support

9

53

159

$1.00

Entries: 14 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

Pastoral Ministries

33

108

534

$300.00

Entries: 20 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

Promotional Activities

4

6

36

$3.00

Entries: 14 | Recent activity on 20 Dec 2016

Training/Education

5

70

238

$250.00

Entries: 16 | Recent activity on 06 Dec 2016

396.00

1,445.00

Administrative

Activity Totals

Activity Date Activities

Expenses Summary
$1,102.00 Entries: 22 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

$1,844.00 Entries: 29 | Recent activity on 31 Dec 2016

$1,362.00 Entries: 14 | Recent activity on 20 Dec 2016

10,626.00 $6,290.00

Warning: The information you are receiving is protected from interception or disclosure. Any person who intentionally distributes, reproduces or discloses its contents is subject to the
penalties set forth in 18 United States Code Section 2511 and/or related state and federal laws of the United States.

Results as of: 27 Jul 2017

Page 224 of 224

Page 2 of 2