File #1517: "Asheville Composite Sqd - 2015 History.pdf"

Asheville Composite Sqd - 2015 History.pdf

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CONFIDENTIAL BUT UNCLASSIFIED
RCS: AVL HO (CAP) 201

HISTORY
OF THE
ASHEVILLE COMPOSITE SQUADRON
1 January – 31 December 2015
Assigned to
North Carolina Wing, Civil Air Patrol

Stationed at
Asheville Regional Airport, North Carolina

JOSEPH E. MYERS
Maj, CAP
Squadron Historian

HARALD P. FIEDLER
Lt Col, CAP
Commander

DATE SIGNED

26 February 2016

LOUIS V. TOMS
TSgt, CAP
Assistant Squadron Historian
OFFICE OF ORIGIN:
DERIVED FROM:

AVL CAP/HO
MULTIPLE SOURCES

If declassified, review document to ensure material is not CONFIDENTIAL and exempt under NCGS §132-1.2
(2002), before making public release.

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SECURITY NOTICE AND ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROLS
(U) The overall classification of this document is CONFIDENTIAL BUT UNCLASSIFIED
and derived from multiple sources to reflect the classifications given the information derived
from source documents.
(U) This document contains information protected under NCGS §15A-16.05, Limitations on
use of membership lists. CONFIDENTIAL BUT UNCLASSIFIED information appears on
pages.
(U) If declassified, review the document to ensure material is not CONFIDENTIAL BUT
UNCLASSIFIED as defined in NCGS §15A-16.1, Corporate Records, and 26 USC 61 §6104,
Publicity of information required from certain exempt organizations and certain trusts, before
making a public release.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Security Notice and Administrative Controls ................................................................................. i
Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................... ii
List of Illustrations ........................................................................................................................ iii
Chronology .................................................................................................................................... iv
Aerospace Education ....................................................................................................................2
Cadet Programs ...........................................................................................................................6
Operations ...................................................................................................................................11
Personnel ......................................................................................................................................19
Community Engagement ............................................................................................................21
Special Events ..............................................................................................................................23
Resource Management ...............................................................................................................25
Facilities ...................................................................................................................................26
Finance .....................................................................................................................................26
Information Technology ..........................................................................................................28
Wrapping Up and Looking Forward ........................................................................................30
Appendices
A. General Squadron Information .................................................................................................33
B. Personnel Statistics ...................................................................................................................35
C. Cadet Achievement Awards .....................................................................................................36
D. Senior Achievement Awards ...................................................................................................38
E. Aircraft Data Sheets .................................................................................................................39
F. Asheville Regional Airport Diagram ........................................................................................41
Glossary of References and Supporting Information ..............................................................42
References ................................................................................................................................42
Abbreviations and Acronyms ..................................................................................................42
Terms .......................................................................................................................................43
Gazetteer ..................................................................................................................................44
Works Cited ..................................................................................................................................46
Distribution List ............................................................................................................................50

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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Tables
Table 1: Cadet Achievements for 2014 ...........................................................................................7
Table 2: Encampment Attendance for 2014 ....................................................................................8
Photos
Photo 1 Mechanics Magazine – Glider from 1852 by George Cayley, British Aviator ..................2
Photo 2 Cadets with UH-60 Black Hawk at Asheville Regional Airport ........................................4
Photo 3 Cadets with T-45 Goshawk at Asheville Regional Airport ................................................5
Photo 4 CAP Quality Cadet Unit Award .........................................................................................9
Photo 5 Lt Col Wallace Courtney Receives 300th Orientation Flight Certificate ..........................15
Photo 6 National Weather Service 2015 Storm Complex .............................................................16
Photo 7 Gastonia Composite Squadron Orientation Flight Weekend ...........................................17
Photo 8 Trinity Baptist Church 9/11 Celebration and Squadron Recruiting Station .....................22
Photo 9 Maj Arnie Andresen Cooking Hamburger and Hot Dogs ................................................24
Photo 10 Army / Navy Football Logo ...........................................................................................25
Photo 11 Asheville Composite Squadron Web Homepage ...........................................................29
Photo 12 Asheville Composite Squadron Facebook Homepage ...................................................29
Photo 13 Approved Emblem ..........................................................................................................33
Photo 14 Functional Emblem ........................................................................................................34
Photo 15 Functional Emblem ........................................................................................................34
Photo 16 Challenge Coin ...............................................................................................................34
Photo 17 Cessna 172 ......................................................................................................................39
Photo 18 Cessna 182 ......................................................................................................................40
Illustrations
Illustration 1: Asheville Regional Airport Schematic ...................................................................41

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CHRONOLOGY
Asheville Composite Squadron
1 January – 31 December 2015
Date
January
8
9-11
15
22
24
29

Event
Squadron Meeting - Cancelled
Special Mountain Fury
Squadron Meeting
Squadron Meeting
Skywarn Training
Squadron Meeting

February
5
12
21

Squadron Meeting
Squadron Meeting
Aerospace Education Day

March
5
10
12
15
19
21
26

Squadron Meeting
Flight Academy Begins
Squadron Meeting
Certificate of Occupancy Received
Squadron Meeting
Training Leaders for Cadets
Squadron Meeting - Cancelled

April
2
9
11
16
17-19
23

Squadron Meeting
Squadron Meeting
Squadron Pancake Breakfast
Squadron Meeting
North Carolina Wing SAREx
Squadron Meeting

May
1-2
2
7
9
14
21
28

Rocketry Weekend
Gastonia Composite Squadron Open House
Squadron Meeting
All Things Google Training
Squadron Meeting
Squadron Meeting
Asheville Airport Authority / Buncombe County Exercise
Squadron Meeting
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June
4
11
12-14
18
20
22
25
12

Squadron Training
Squadron Training
Visit Air Force Museum at Wright Patterson Air Force Base
Squadron Training
Landmark Open House
Cub Scout Rocketry Demonstration
Squadron Training
Cub Scout Aerospace Education

July
2
4
9
16
18-19
23
25-30
30

Squadron Meeting
Barnardsville Fourth of July Parade
Squadron Meeting
Squadron Meeting
Aerospace Education Weekend
Squadron Meeting
North Carolina Wing Summer Encampment
Squadron Miniature Golf

August
1-2
6
11
13
14-16
15 & 17
20
27
September
3
10
13
14-16
17
24
25-26
October
1

North Carolina Wing Summer Encampment
Squadron Meeting
Shelby Composite Squadron O-Flights
Squadron Meeting
NC Wing Search and Rescue Exercise
Mountain Fury 9.0
YMCA Aerospace Education
Squadron Meeting
Squadron Meeting

Squadron Meeting
Squadron Meeting
First Responder Appreciation Day, Trinity Baptist Church, Asheville
NC
Mountain Fury
Squadron Meeting
Lt Col. X Moore Retirement
Squadron Meeting
Rocketry Weekend

Squadron Meeting
Senior Change of Command
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1-23
8
15
17
22
24
28
31

South Carolina Severe Storms and Flooding (DR-4241)
Squadron Meeting
Squadron Meeting
Squadron Yard Sale
Aircraft Wash, Asheville NC
Squadron Meeting
Emergency Management Exercise, Haywood County NC
Asheville Regional Airport Tenant Appreciation Day, Asheville NC
Orientation Flights and Aerospace Education Day

November
5
12
19
21

Squadron Meeting
Squadron Meeting
Squadron Meeting
Orientation Flights, Shelby NC

December
3
4-6
10
12
12-13
17

Squadron Meeting
North Carolina Wing Conference, Raleigh NC
Squadron Meeting
Cadet Change of Command
Wreaths Across America
Joint Training Mission with US Forestry Service
Squadron Meeting

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THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY

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(U) What are the ties that bind us to the past? Within a family unit, historians refer to this
connectivity from present to past as a genealogy. Organizations do not have genealogies but do
have pedigrees. Historians refer to organizational pedigrees as a lineage. A lineage serves as an
organizational fabric to link the present to the past. The squadron’s roots provides understanding
into organizational customs, courtesies and hallmarks. Civil Air Patrol heredity begins prior to
the Second World War. Seeing a lack of military aviators for the upcoming engagement in
Europe, influential civil aviators petitioned the United States government to establish a civilian
air force. Their persistence and foresight would lead would lead to the Director of the Office of
Civil Defense, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, to create the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) on 1 December 1941.1
Throughout World War II, CAP aviators crossed the skies to provide conduct “air guard”
missions.2 Born out of a national emergency, “air guard” units worked in harmony with military
and civil defense to serve America. The sacrifices of these founding citizen airmen and
airwomen facilitated congressional recognition of the CAP as a non-profit auxiliary of the United
States Air Force (USAF) in 1948 (10 USC 909 §9441).3 We draw upon their achievements to
inspire and build esprit d ‘corps and altruism within our organization. With over seventy years of
heritage, preservation of historical knowledge is important role of the Squadron historian.
Through these activities, current and future members can follow in the footsteps of the founding
members.
(U) Since the organization’s inception, western North Carolinians have faithfully served with
pride in Coastal Patrol and CAP squadrons. This is evident by looking at today’s North Carolina
Wing Structure. Group 1 represents the five active western North Carolina squadrons (Asheville,
Boone, Gastonia, Hickory and Shelby). Of these valuable resources, the Asheville Composite
Squadron can trace its roots to 1942. Since its wartime beginning, Buncombe County has had an
active CAP squadron for over sixty-nine years. There are very few squadrons within the
organization who can claim such honors. We owe the success of the unit’s longevity and
pedigree from the efforts of prior members. These individuals set a bar that instills a sense of
active community engagement. This principle is very much in keeping with the traditions one
often associates with mountain culture. Though this chronicle, the Historian’s Office hopes to
demonstrate how the Asheville Composite Squadron is dedicated to the principles of the Civil
Air Patrol while preserving a cultural standard. Annual chronicles, like this one, enable future
CAP generations to emulate past leaders while forging their own historical markers. This
document should also enable professional historians gain greater insight into the martial history
of western North Carolina. It is for these few reasons that the squadron historian works diligently
to provide a precise and unbiased account of the unit’s chronology.
(U) This narrative seeks to preserve the historical facts for the Asheville Composite Squadron
spanning the period of 1 January through 31 December 2015. Information within this history
provides an orderly catalog of facts by functional area. The document combines requirements
outlined in CAP Pamphlet 5, Civil Air Patrol Written History Self-Study Guide and AFI 84-101,
Historical Products, Services and Requirements. The Asheville Composite Squadron annual
1

Wikipedia, s.v. “Civil Air Patrol,” last modified February 10, 2015: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Air_Patrol,
(accessed on February 26, 2015).
2
Kit Benson and Organ Benson, “Lieut Gill Robb Wilson,” Find a Grave, May 15, 2006,
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=14291740, (accessed on February 10, 2010).
3
Ibid.
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history is a two volume enterprise. First, the document contains three distinctive components.
These sections include the narrative, supporting information, and references. The narrative
explores aerospace education, cadet programs, and operations. Within this element, historians
will also recognize the achievements of Squadron personnel, community outreach and resource
management. As the researcher delves deeper into the material, they will notice the supporting
materials section. These one to two sheet appendices provide support to the content contained
within the narrative. Finally, the document concludes with a listing of references and distribution
record. The second volume features a collection of emails, photographs and supporting materials
in electronic form. These multi-media materials provide further historical value to understand
Squadron operation over the calendar year. Squadron historians believe that the chosen format
provides a logical exploration of unit accomplishments while allowing ease of understanding.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION
(U) In the history of humankind, aerospace is a
relatively new concept in the fields of science. This is not
to say that earlier scientists did not study the principles of
aeronautics and human flight. Ismail ibn Hammad alJawhari, Bladud, Leonardo da Vinci and others
hypothesized various principles needed to lift one beyond
the “surly bonds of Earth, and danced the skies on
laughter-silver wings.”4 Our modern founding concepts
of aerospace and aeronautics are less than 211 years old.
In 1804, George Cayley successfully flew a glider at
Brompton-by-Sawdon in the United Kingdom. This was
made possible with Cayley’s identification of the four
vector forces influencing manned air flight: thrust, lift,
drag and gravity.5 George Cayley would go on to build
various gliders to aid in his understanding of flight
mechanics. Prior to 1848, he would design and
successfully launch a biplane glider. This aircraft was
said to be flown by a ten year old boy.6 Understanding
these basic principles and successful demonstration them
in flight, George Cayley would become the inspiration for future aerospace explorers and
scientist.
(U) Until the mid-twentieth century, aeronautics and scientific discovery was primarily an
academic pursuit. Limited government intervention in society meant leaders overlooked
scientific breakthroughs unless they could gain an economic or military edge over their rivals.
This philosophical mindset would change with the onset of World War II and its aftermath. Axis
scientific advancement lead to rocket development, smart bombs, synthetic fuel, and theoretical
4

Wikipedia, “John Gillespie Magee, Jr.,” last modified February 7, 2016,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Gillespie_Magee,_Jr., (accessed on February 7, 2016).
5
Wikipedia, “George Cayley,” last modified January 27, 2016, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Cayley,
(accessed on February 7, 2016).
6
Ibid.
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and mathematical aerodynamics.7 These scientific and technological achievements took the
allied forces by surprise at the onset of the Second World War. Upon the war’s conclusion,
distrust between the once allied nations would further the need for leaders to advance science,
technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. As with any initiative, STEM required
increased funding at all levels of education to incentivize students to become future scientists.
Between 1950 and the present, governmental leaders allocated millions of dollars to facilitate
science enrichment within the high schools and colleges. Through these funding opportunities,
the expectations are to have children enter into college with the eventuality that they will become
the scientists of tomorrow.
(U) Under Public Law 80-557, President Harry S. Truman established aerospace education as
one of Civil Air Patrol’s three mission areas.8 The CAP aerospace program provides instruction
to seniors and cadets while reaching out to community educators to advance understanding the
importance of STEM fields. These activities are accomplished by a highly qualified Squadron
Aerospace Education (AE) staff. Unit AE teams visit schools, community organizations, and
other interested groups to provide instruction on STEM subjects. These lectures may include the
evolution of aviation or more detailed subjects regarding aerodynamics of civilian aircraft.
Through these activities, the CAP provides highly qualified instructors at little to no cost to the
general public. Unlike most professional educators, CAP instructors often have both the practical
experience balanced with a formal education experienced through their military and/or civilian
aviation careers. Over the next couple of pages, this document’s chronicler hopes to demonstrate
the Squadron’s commitment to its aerospace education charter.
(U) CAP aerospace education seeks to inspire today’s youth to seek out opportunities in the
science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) professions. The problem is that in a
child’s eye science just doesn’t have the same public relations as singer or professional
quarterback. In order to change this perspective, the Civil Air Patrol has several programs
designed to inspire tomorrow’s leaders into giving math and science a chance. Model rocketry
provides one avenue for gaining an appreciation of things outside the humanities and social
sciences. Incorporating several aspects of STEM is the CAP rocketry program. Cadets learn the
principles of aerodynamics and propulsion with this block of study. The program begins with
cadets building hand launched balsa wood gliders. Acquiring the basic understanding of flight,
cadets move to building model rockets. During 2015, the Asheville Composite Squadron
conducted two rocketry weekends. These activities were held on the property owned by Lt Col
Richard Auger and Capt. Rhonda Auger. During the first weekend of May, the Asheville
Composite Squadron had seven cadets receive the model rocketry badge honor.9 Five months
later, ten more cadets would receive their rocketry achievement devices.10 The September 25th
weekend event would be the largest rocketry weekend held for quite some time. A total of
twenty-three cadets attended the weekend activity.11 Through these two events, the Asheville

7

Wikipedia, “Technology during World War II,” last modified February 5, 2016,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technology_during_World_War_II, (accessed on February 9, 2016).
8
Civil Air Patrol, “History of Civil Air Patrol,” last modified unknown, http://www.gocivilairpatrol.com/about/,
(access on 9 February 2016).
9
William Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes--7 May 2015,” message to Squadron, May 8 2015, email.
10
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--1 October 2015,” message to Squadron, October 2, 2015, email.
11
Ibid.
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Composite Squadron cadets are able to build upon their understanding of scientific principles in
order to become tomorrow’s leaders in science and technology.
(U) Asheville Regional Airport
(KAVL) is a vital hub in western
North Carolina. Commercial,
military and private aircraft all
share the airport’s facilities. The
various aircrews and aircraft flying
into Asheville provide unique
opportunities to expand the
Squadron’s aerospace education
experiences. Over the past twelve
months, unit personnel had two
unique occasions to learn from two
armed forces aircrews while also
touring their aircraft. The first of
these teachable moments occurred
on the evening of June 25.12 A
United States Army UH-60 Black Hawk touched down. Cadets and seniors were given a tour of
the aircraft while the Black Hawk’s aircrew entertained questions.13 The second occasion
occurred on Friday July 10th but almost did not happen.14 Capt. James Matthews was conducting
emergency services training when a U.S. Navy T-45 Goshawk stopped in Asheville after
mountain range training. Participating cadets and seniors were given an impromptu lesson on
naval aviation by the flight crew.15 These two events were successful and enjoyed by all those in
attendance. As in years past, the Asheville Composite Squadron will continue to exploit the
available local resources to augment lessons learned in the classroom.
(U) Military aviation heritage is an important aspect of aerospace education. Contrary to the
opinions of conspiracists, military aviation’s importance is largely due to technological
advancements rather than fire power. We can see this more clearly by understanding the
foundation of instrumentation flying. On 24 September 1924, Army Air Corps Lt James
Doolittle became the first to pilot an aircraft using only the aircraft’s instrumentation.16 In
today’s world, commercial and private pilots along with the military aviators use instrument
navigation to fly aircraft. Therefore, understanding the role of the military in aviation heritage is
vital to advance aerospace education. During the second weekend in June, Lt Col Robert Bauer
and Maj James McNab escorted a party of 20 Squadron personnel to the U.S. Air Force Museum
at Wright Patterson Air Force Base.17 Individuals had the unique opportunity to talk to a World
12

Asheville Composite Squadron’s Facebook page, accessed on January 29, 2016,
http://www.facebook.com/AshevilleCAP.
13
Ibid.
14
Ibid.
15
Ibid.
16
Perry Turner, “10 Milestone Flights,” Air & Space Smithsonian, March 2003,
http://www.airspacemag.com/history-of-flight/10-milestone-flights-4056259/?no-ist=&page=2, (accessed on
February 3, 2015).
17
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting—11 June j2015 [sic],” message to Squadron, June 12, 2015, email.
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War II 82nd Airborne Division glider pilot. The 93 year old veteran talked about the “very
harrowing experience of landing troops in the middle of battle.”18 Maj McNab served as the tour
educator as the Squadron toured the museum’s many exhibits. Lt Donald Briola and C/2 Lt
Caleb Freeman provided logistical and command support to further the trip’s success.19 The
weekend event concluded successfully with all participants returning back home to Asheville. Lt
Everyone seemed to enjoy themselves while US Air Force Museum staff complimented
everyone on their professionalism. In the future, the expectation is that the unit will take a trip
out to the US Air Force Academy.20

(U) Aerospace education is not strictly a cadet program. The reality is that Civil Air Patrol
desires for all members to appreciate America’s rich aviation heritage. With the traditional focus
on cadet programs, it is easy to understand how one may overlook senior aerospace education.
To facilitate senior aerospace education, CAP National Headquarters established the Brigadier
General Charles E. Yeager Aerospace Education Achievement Award. Seniors earn this
distinction by studying various topic related to aerospace heritage, basic principles of avionics,
and meteorology. When the senior member feels knowledgeable of the subject matter, they can
complete an online examination available through CAP eServices. Upon successful completion
of the exam, senior member receives a ribbon signifying the member’s commitment of CAP’s
aerospace mission. Over the past twelve months, the Squadron had six seniors achieve the
Brigadier Charles E. Yeager Aerospace Education Achievement Award.21 Their commitment

18

William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--18 June 2015,” message to Squadron, June 19, 2015, email.
Ibid.
20
Ibid.
21
Data compiled from CAP e-Services.
19

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brought the unit to a 58.02% of the senior membership holding this distinction.22 This is an
inspirational benchmark but Squadron aerospace educators hope to increase the senior
participation levels to around 60% or greater for the upcoming year. With a higher percentage
rate of award, senior members will be setting an example to cadets that speaks to the unit’s
commitment to aerospace education.
(U) There are many aspects required to have a successful aerospace education program.
Rocketry weekends, Yeager Awards, weekly briefings and a host of other activities are actions
that could not happen without an enthusiastic and engaging aerospace education staff. The
Asheville Composite Squadron’s AE Officers provide a health balance of instruction and fun to
inspire cadets and seniors to want to learn more. There hard work is often overlooked. On a
weekly basis, these officers research and present the Squadron with an understanding of
aerospace achievements. They post news articles and hunt down speakers to provide a more
informative instructional program. Within this corps, one educator announced their move out of
the area. Squadron Aerospace Education Officer, Maj James R. McNab gave notice transferred
to Georgia in October 2015.23 Over the past many years, he worked closely with the cadet
programs officer to provide meaningful instruction and activities. His efforts did not go
unappreciated. Cadets and seniors enjoyed having classes where PowerPoint presentations were
the exception rather than the rule. Maj McNab’s enthusiasm and knowledge will be missed by
the Squadron and more importantly the aerospace program as we begin a new year.

CADET PROGRAMS
(U) Too often, people in my generation and older feel today’s youth have lost their way.
Since the dawn of humankind, this emotional impulse has been shared by elder generations
examining their younger contemporaries. Imagine the first conversation held by a teen and their
parents about wanting to circumnavigate the globe or becoming the first to go to the moon. There
are millions of these examples from which one can draw as examples of insanity when viewed
through the prism of historical context. As community elders, we must have trust that our
guidance has placed tomorrow’s leaders on the right path success. One of the ways a community
can mentor youth is through youth activities. According to the latest research, organized youth
activities provide an avenue for children to become responsible adults by mitigating external
pressures for youth to become detriment to the society.24 The Asheville Composite Squadron
cadet activities program is dedicated to shaping individuals into becoming tomorrow’s leaders.
These young adults acquire the personal skills needed to manage many of life’s challenges. With
these tools, cadets can excel as an individual and as a team. The Asheville Component
Squadron’s cadet education team understands the many external challenges faced by today’s
youth and provides them with a healthy alternative. This section of the unit’s historiography will
demonstrate that perceptions of today’s youth is not a universal truth.
(U) One cornerstone to the senior and cadet program is one’s ability to demonstrate their
competency through advancement. Civil Air Patrol recognition takes to the form of military-style
22

Ibid.
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting—1 October 2015,” message to Squadron, October 2, 2015, email.
24
Frank F. Furstenberg, Jr. and Mary Elizabeth Hughes. “Social Capital and Successful Development among AtRisk Youth,” Journal of Marriage and the Family 57, no. 3 (August, 1995): 581.
23

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rank. These insignia provide a physical sign that the wearer has a mastery of core program
objectives and is committed to the values of the organization. Within the cadet programs, teen
members have the ability to progress from Cadet to Colonel. To achieve each rank, cadets must
complete a level named for an American pioneer in aviation. At the very beginning of the CAP
career, a cadet receives the Airman rank. This signifies that the cadet has a basic understanding
of core principles of the program. At the opposite end, the awarding of Cadet Colonel signifies
the wearer is highly proficient as a leader of cadets. Very few cadets are able to achieve the
General Carl A. Spaatz achievement before aging out of the program. During 2015, Squadron
Cadet Programs Commander advanced 100 individuals (see appendix C).25 This figure represents
a 44.93% increase in promotions from 2014 and 63.93% in 2013.26 Through these promotions,
the cadet corps demonstrate their ability and desire to become active and effective leaders in
their communities.
Achievement
General J. F. Curry
General H. H. “Hap” Arnold
Mary Feik
Wright Brothers
Captain Eddie Rickenbacker
Charles A. Lindbergh
General Jimmy Doolittle
Dr. Robert H. Goddard
Neil Armstrong
General Billy Mitchell
Amelia Earhart
General Ira C. Eaker
General Carl A. Spaatz

2013
7
4
9
7
6
5
6
6
5
5
1
0
0

2014
19
11
9
9
5
3
1
6
3
2
0
1
0

2015
20
16
14
11
9
7
7
6
5
4
1
0
0

(U) Table 1: Cadet Achievements 3-Year Review27

(CBU/DECL 20211231) One of the most accessible summer programs available to the cadets
are encampments. Cadets from across the state and nation attend one-week programs. Depending
on the scope of program, these encampments enable members to hone emergency services,
leadership and career development skills. Cadets attending these activities may participate as a
trainee or staff member. Senior personnel may also attend but their roles are limited to staff
positions. Regardless of age, staff members have the responsibility for facilitating a safe
environment for participants to learn and enjoy fellowship. During last summer, 11 cadets
25

Data compiled from CAP e-Services.
Joseph A. Myers and Louis Toms, History of the Asheville Composite Squadron, 1 January-31 December 2013,
Tech, North Carolina Wing (2015): 4, web, last modified unknown,
http://history.cap.gov/files/original/19d60a99d5d98fbfead94cd52f3ef042.pdf (accessed on February 3, 2016).
Joseph A. Myers and Louis V. Toms, History of the Ashville Composite Squadron, 1 January-31 December 2014,
Tech, North Carolina Wing (2015): 6, print.
27
Joseph A. Myers and Louis Toms, History of the Asheville Composite Squadron, 1 January-31 December 2013,
Tech, North Carolina Wing (2015): 4, web, last modified unknown,
http://history.cap.gov/files/original/19d60a99d5d98fbfead94cd52f3ef042.pdf (accessed on February 3, 2016).
Joseph A. Myers and Louis V. Toms, History of the Ashville Composite Squadron, 1 January-31 December 2014,
Tech, North Carolina Wing (2015): 6, print.
26

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participated in four different summer encampments (see Table 2). These activities took place in
North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico and South Carolina. The variety of cadet
programming attended insures that cadets unable to attend these activities are able to receive
quality peer education. Through these direct and indirect exchanges, the Asheville Composite
Squadron is able to have greater effectiveness in meeting the mission of the Civil Air Patrol.
Leadership School
Residential Center of Education Opportunities of Mayaguez
11 June 2015 – 20 June 2015
C/SMSgt Jan Dave R. Contreras
Ranger Academy
Hawk Mountain State Park
6 July 2013 – 14 July 2013
C/1 Lt Caleb A. Freeman
C/2 Lt Rob G. Reeves
National Blue Beret Academy
Residential Center of Education Opportunities of Mayaguez
14 July 2015 – 27 July 2015
C/Capt Jacob B. Davis
North Carolina Wing Encampment
Camp Butler National Guard Training Center
25 July 2015 – 2 August 2015
C/1 Lt Caleb A. Freeman
C/2 Lt Josiah D. Bilbrey
C/2 Lt Robert B. Lewis
C/MSgt Ryan T. Santiago
C/Amn Jacob N. Jahant
South Carolina Wing Encampment
McCrady National Guard Training Facility
25 July 2015 – 2 August 2015
C/CMSgt Joshua M. McGlinsky
C/CMSgt Matthew R. McGlinsky
C/CMSgt Caleb A. Mcintosh
(CBU/DECL 20211231) Table 2: Encampment Attendance for 201528

(U) Within the Civil Air Patrol encampment model, there programs that reach beyond the state
and region. These national activities seek to promote individual and team responsibilities while
preserving physical and psychological safety of the participant. Unlike traditional squadron
activities, national summer camps use professional mentors to enhance the educational
experience. One such opportunity is the Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training
Familiarization Course (SUPTFC). Held at Air Force bases, cadets attend so they may become
more knowledgeable about aviation and aeronautics. SUPTFC sites were Columbus AFB (MS)
and Laughlin AFB (TX) during the summer. Air Force student pilots provide mentoring and
28

Data compiled from CAP e-Services.
8

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instruction during the course while CAP instructors coach the cadets through the lessons.29
Within this year, the Asheville Composite Squadron had the honor of having C/ Capt Jacob B.
Davis serve as a cadet staff member at the school.30 This was a major recognition of Cadet
Davis’ professionalism and leadership. Echo Loud!
(U) The dedication of the Squadron’s cadets
and program leaders would not go unnoticed. In
early September, Civil Air Patrol’s National
Headquarters announced the units receiving the
2014-2015 Quality Cadet Unit Awards. This
announcement included the Asheville
Composite Squadron among the other 202 cadet
and composite squadrons within the United
States and its territories. Focusing in on North
Carolina, Asheville was one of ten within the
Wing to receive this honor.31 Squadrons seeking
this achievement must complete six of ten
benchmarks. These requirements include but not
limited to cadet membership, participation in
encampments, Aerospace Excellence Award and
CyberPatriot.32 Except for the 2013-2014 season, the Asheville Composite Squadron received
this distinction since 2011.33 Unlike other Civil Air Patrol programs, this award runs on a school
year cycle rather than the traditional fiscal year.34 A certificate recognizing the Squadron’s 20142015 achievement was presented to the unit by the North Carolina Wing Commander.
(CBU/DECL 20201231) There are times when it seems a bit cliché when discussing youth
morale and leadership development. This is especially true with talking about youth programs.
Every youth program charter highlights their commitment to morale and leadership building
efforts. The problem with many of these postures is that there are no means by which one can
measure the outcome. Within organizations like the Civil Air Patrol, recognition of ownership in
responsibility to self and others is rewarded. These often come in the form of progression
through the ranks and appointment to positions of authority. At the apex of dependability,
leadership determines the individual has the characteristics that makes them a leader among
29

Civil Air Patrol, “SUPTFC,” last modified unknown, http://suptfc.com, (accessed on December 12, 2015).
Data compiled from CAP e-Services.
31
Civil Air Patrol, “202 Units Tapped for Quality Cadet Unit Awards,” last modified September 18, 2015,
http://www.capvolunteernow.com/news/%3F202_units_tapped_for_quality_cadet_unit_awards%26show%3Dnews
%26newsID%3D20733 (accessed on January 27, 2016).
32
Ibid.
33
Civil Air Patrol, “List of 2014-2015 Winners,” last modified unknown,
http://www.capmembers.com/media/cms/2015_QCUA4_85E67A91C8BA6.pdf (accessed on January 27, 2016). &
Civil Air Patrol, “List of 2013-2014 Winners,” last modified unknown,
http://www.capmembers.com/media/cms/2014_Quality_Winners_C4D10DCB05EE8.pdf (accessed on January 27,
2016). & Civil Air Patrol, “List of 2011-2012 Winners,” last modified unknown,
http://www.capmembers.com/media/cms/20112012_Winners_3D85A16CE3BB3.pdf (accessed on January 27,
2016).
34
Civil Air Patrol, “Quality Cadet Unit Award,” last modified unknown,
http://www.capmembers.com/cadet_programs/library/quality-cadet-unit-award/ (accessed on January 27, 2016).
30

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leaders. These seniors and cadets receive an appointment to command. During 2015, the
Asheville Composite Squadron experienced a twofer. Change of commands occurred on both the
cadet and senior side of the house. Within the cadet ranks, C/Capt. Jacob Davis had served as an
effective and respected Cadet Commander for almost a year. On 10 December 2015, Cadet Davis
handed over the reins of leadership to C/1Lt Molly Boothe.35 The ceremony was held at the
Auger Center. Cadets and senior members stood to recognize the significance of the ceremony.
Along with the command changing, the duties and responsibilities of first sergeant transferred
from C/2Lt Josiah Bilbrey to C/CMSgt Caleb Mcintosh.36 These individuals along with their
command staff will be responsible for providing guidance to the cadets. Senior leadership
charged the new cadet leadership to become a model for younger cadets in the Squadron.
(CBU/DECL 20211231) Aviation activities form a cornerstone of Civil Air Patrol programs.
Concepts of flying to actual flight span lessons learned under aerospace education, emergency
services and cadet activities. Fortunately, the Asheville Composite Squadron maintains a deep
bench of licensed pilots for two assigned aircraft. This equation enables the Squadron to conduct
orientation flights with some regularity. Over the past year, thirty-five percent of the cadets
assigned to the Squadron had their first orientation flight.37 Following the cadet’s initial flight,
Squadron operations leaders present a certificate to each young aviator. During 2015, the unit
awarded nineteen orientation flight certificates to cadets.38 Those receiving recognition were
C/MSgt Joshua N. Garcia-Billings, C/MSgt Grant C. McDaris, C/TSgt Ashlie L. Mason, C/TSgt
Daniel A. Owen, C/TSgt Alyssa M. Paull, C/SSgt Cherie Cheyenne Carson, C/SSgt Brian N.
McCall, C/SSgt Jasen A. Sanchez, C/SSgt Dylan R. Sasser, C/SrA Haleigh N. King, C/A1C
Aaron A. King, C/Amn Joseph I. Diaz, C/Amn Xavier Hernandez-Pera, C/Amn Jacob N. Jahant,
C/Amn Adam P. Lytle, C/Amn Dylan R. Myers, C/Amn Soto Omar Santiago, Cadet Eric A.
Bright and Cadet James A. Bright.39 With this milestone achieved, Squadron mentors hope
cadets will advance their appreciation of aviation by becoming a licensed pilot.
(U) With interest established in the orientation flight program, cadets can pursue the coveted
solo flight badge. This is no simple achievement and requires hours of study. With few
exceptions, the education component is held at a flight academy. Asheville Composite Squadron
has successfully conducted an annual flight academy since 2008.40 The activity invites cadets
from around western North Carolina to partake in classroom and hands on flight instruction. The
rigorous course and external commitments often collide to impede a cadet’s successfully
completion of all instructional phases. Cadets spend a couple of years working towards the day
when they can take over the controls. There are times when the commitment becomes too much
and the cadet must drop out of the program. For the few who are able to balance these often
competing obligations, successful course completion means receiving the Civil Air Patrol solo
flight badge. Over the past twelve months, the Asheville Composite Squadron had five cadets to
35

William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--10 December 2015,” message to Squadron, December 11, 2015,
email.
36
Ibid.
37
Data compiled from CAP e-services.
38
Ibid.
39
Ibid.
40
“Asheville area students and staffers earn awards and honors,” Asheville Citizen Times, November 10, 2014,
http://www.citizen-times.com/story/life/2014/11/09/asheville-area-students-staffers-earn-awards-honors/18778169/,
(accessed on November 15, 2014).
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achieve this distinction. These cadets include C/Capt Molly Boothe, C/1 Lt Rob Reeves, C/2 Lt
Morgan MacDonald, C/CMSgt Nolan Middlemas and C/SSgt Jacob McIntosh.41 With this
recognition, cadets can continue their instruction and go on to receive their civil aviation license
from the Federal Aviation Administration.
(U) Over the past couple of pages, readers should acknowledge that this chronicle paints a
picture of an active cadet cadre within the Asheville Composite Squadron. As the year came to a
close, one of the Squadron’s junior leaders had one final accomplishment to receive. In late
summer, Civil Air Patrol cadets are eligible to apply for the Spaatz Association’s cadets from
around the United States are eligible to apply for the Aerospace Leadership Scholarship. This
award “is intended to be used primarily to bring a cadet from solo to his/her private pilot’s
license.”42 The organization recognized that flight lessons are expensive for most family
incomes. Through this program, the Spaatz Association can help cadets achieve their “dream of
flight.”43 During the 2015 Spaatz Association Mid-Winter Dinner, C/2nd Lt Eli Boothe became
the second within the unit to receive this honor since its inception in 1997.44 No other North
Carolina squadron holds claim to this distinction. The Spaatz Association committee selected
Cadet’s Boothe’s based on CAP career, academic standing and personal statements.45 This
achievement reflects great credit upon the cadet, family and cadet leadership. Echo Loud!
(U) Just as in years past, the cadet cadre began the year with a laundry list of expectations for
growth. As the year wore on, priorities shifted and new adventures took the lead for attention.
Those earlier aspirations sometimes fall by the wayside. Through these shifts and expectations,
the cadet corps demonstrated a professional dedication to the missions of the Squadron and CAP.
Their achievements captured within this document not only inspire but demonstrate the quality
of America’s youth. Civil Air Patrol does not pay people to participate, young adults must want
to be involved. Over the past year, the Squadron’s cadet cadre actively engaged in all aspects of
the CAP mission. This was demonstrated by promotions, awards and special designations
presented to them. These accomplishments reflect great credit upon the leadership and dedication
of the cadets to strive to be the best. I mention this as it is important to view cadet achievements
as the sum of all its parts. Regardless of status, these young people worked together to meet and
overcome challenges. Without this collaborative teamwork, there is little doubt that the Asheville
Composite Squadron could survive. Their dedication disproves the perspective that all of today’s
youth are more self than selflessness. As the year concludes, the Squadron’s cadet program will
continue to inspire today’s and tomorrow’s leaders.

OPERATIONS
41

William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--14 May 2015,” message to Squadron, May 15, 2015, email. &
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--18 June 2015,” message to Squadron, June 19, 2015, email. & William
Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--13 August 2015,” message to Squadron, August 14, 2015, email. & William
Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--19 November 2015,” message to Squadron, November 20, 2015, email.
42
The Spaatz Association, “Aerospace Leadership Scholarships,” last modified unknown,
https://spaatzassociation.wordpress.com/programs/aviation-scholarships/ (accessed on January 27, 2016).
43
Ibid.
44
The Spaatz Association, “Scholarship Recipients,” last modified unknown,
https://spaatzassociation.wordpress.com/scholarship-recipients/ (accessed on January 27, 2016).
45
The Spaatz Association, “Aerospace Leadership Scholarships,” last modified unknown,
https://spaatzassociation.wordpress.com/programs/aviation-scholarships/ (accessed on January 27, 2016).
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“We are not preparing for the world we live in - we
are preparing for the world we find ourselves in.”
Michael Mabee
Preparing for a Suburban or Rural
Community: Building a Civil Defense Plan for
a Long-Term Catastrophe46
(U) Civil Air Patrol squadrons prepare their members to respond professionally to a variety of
man-made and natural incidents. These activities fall within the organization’s operational
mission. When discussing operations, we really are examining two distinctive functions. The
first being flight and the second covering emergency services. These features comprise the bulk
of the Civil Air Patrol’s mission. To understand the importance of operations, one must
understand its foundation. After the First World War, American aviators return to the States with
an idea that civil aviation could protect against foreign invaders. This concept was necessary
given the U.S. Army’s hesitation to invest in a non-traditional weapon of war. CAPs founding
members solicited state and federal officials in order to establish a civilian air force. On the eve
of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Congress approved CAP as a component of civil defense.
Civilian pilots took to the skies towing targets for the Army Air Forces, located fires for the
Forestry Service, and protected Merchant Marine shipping. The early organization also
augmented civil and military flight instruction to grow America’s need for qualified aviators
during the Second World War. By the end of the conflict, Civil Air Patrol leaders had earned the
respect and admiration of national leaders along with military brass. Gill Robb Wilson’s dream
of a fleet of minute men of the skies had become a reality.
(U) Over the decades, Civil Air patrol has undergone various changes but the core values
remain intact. The organization continues to prepare tomorrow’s aviators while responding to
major incidents. Since World War II, the men and women of the Asheville Composite Squadron
has actively promoted their commitment to CAP’s core values. This is especially true when
evaluating the Squadron’s commitment to operational readiness and response. Over the past year,
unit personnel undertook an aggressive training schedule. Using both CAP and civilian response
standards, operations and emergency service officers established a program designed to increase
the Squadron’s response capabilities. Collaboratively, they implemented the program in an effort
to increase the unit’s effectiveness and integration capabilities during times of great need. This
section combines the two primary components of operations under one heading to present the
Squadron’s achievements over the past year. Information will cover only those items specific to
aviation and emergency services. Information explored within this section will collectively
strengthen understanding of how the organization met or exceeded local, state and national
response objectives during 2015.
(U) Living in the mountains, one becomes familiar with the shifts in weather. This sentiment
is never truer than during the winter months. Snow, hail, sunshine, rain, and sleet are all just as
likely to occur as not. Given CAP’s charter, these variables mean that regardless of the weather
the show must go on. In the first month of the year, the Asheville Composite Squadron held three
important operational events. Excluding 2011, aircrews from around the Middle East Region
46

Good Reads, “Quotes about Preparedness,” last modified unknown,
http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/preparedness, (accessed on February 14, 2015).
12

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have come to the Asheville Regional Airport to attend the Mountain Fury flying clinic. During
2015, the Asheville Composite Squadron hosted two of these aircrew education events. In the
second weekend in January, aircrews from the Maryland Wing came to Auger Center to receive
training to become mountain qualified.47 Prior to this engagement, Maryland had only one
qualified pilot for rugged terrain. Students received 3.5 hours in ground training before taking to
the skies under the supervision of our Squadron’s qualified experts. Maryland aviators were
introduced to takeoffs and landings at the toughest airports in the region. Pilots also practiced
grid searches, contour searches, ridge crossing and other operations that are unique to mountain
flying. The three graduating pilots are able to provide mountain flying instruction to those within
the Maryland Wing.48
(U) The final two were specific to emergency services qualifications. On the morning of
January 24th, Lt Col Robert Bauer brought in an expert to provide Sky Warn training to
interested personnel.49 Established in 1970, Sky Warn trains civilians to augment professionals
with the observing and reporting of weather in a specific area.50 Lt Col Bauer desires greater
integration by the Civil Air Patrol and civilian response agencies. By becoming certified,
attendees join a national force of 290,000 Sky Warn volunteers.51 Along with the Sky Warn
program, Capt. James Matthews’ team held a first aid course and emergency services skill
training sessions.52 Training included both classroom knowledge and practical application of
emergency services principles. By holding both events at the Auger Center, students could
efficiently rotate between the programs.
(U) As the saying goes, practice makes perfect. Desktop exercises, field training exercises
(FTX) and search and rescue exercises (SAREx) provide opportunities for individuals to apply
their classroom knowledge to the test in a safe environment. These events insure that a CAP
responder will take the proper action when confronted by a real world incident. During April, the
North Carolina conducted a state-wide SAREx. The goal of this exercise was to evaluate the
Wing’s response and asset deployment to address a hurricane strike in Georgetown.53 Scenario
requirements included aerial reconnaissance of damage, establishment of points of distribution
sites and search and rescue operations.54 Missions for Asheville Composite Squadron focused
primarily on its aviation component. Aircrews supported aerial reconnaissance and ground team
support operations.55 Although not tasked, Squadron emergency services officers established
their own scenarios in the Pisgah National Forest to dovetail nicely with the SAREx’s

47

Scott E. Stevens, “Asheville Composite Squadron conducts Mountain Fury training exercise – three Maryland
Wing check pilots certified,” last modified January 15, 2015,
https://www.ncwgcap.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=article.display&articleID=475, (accessed on November 10, 2015).
48
Ibid.
49
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--22 January 2015,” message to Squadron, January 23, 2015, email.
50
National Sky Warn Homepage, “About,” last modified unknown, http://skywarn.org/about/, (accessed on
February 14, 2015).
51
Ibid.
52
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--22 January 2015,” message to Squadron, January 23, 2015, email.
53
Christopher T. Bailey, “Re: [CAPNC] SAREX 20150418,” message to NC Wing, April 17, 2015, email.
54
Lisa Armour, “CAP conducts statewide hurricane exercise,” last modified April 18, 2015,
https://www.ncwgcap.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=article.display&articleID=509, (accessed on November 10, 2015).
55
Ibid.
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overarching themes.56 Air operations would cease on April 18th while ground crews remained in
the field until the nineteenth.57
(U) Emergency services organizations rely upon planning and exercises to evaluate how teams
will respond to events. The outcomes are then used to modify processes and train new
procedures. Agencies do this in order to increase efficiency while decreasing loss of life and
property. Every once and a while, professional response entities request the support of the
Asheville Composite Squadron to aid in these exercises. On May 28th, seniors and cadets assisted
with the mass casualty exercise held at the Asheville Regional Airport (KAVL).58 The event
simulated an aircraft accident on the airport grounds. Local law enforcement, airport security and
emergency medical services participated under the watchful eyes of FAA evaluators. Unit
personnel acted as victims of the incident. This event also meant that some victims would receive
transport to area hospitals. Evaluators had to understand how local hospital personnel would
handle a sudden influx of multi-scenario victims from a central incident. Following the event,
Buncombe County Health Department thanked the participants for making the exercise a
success.59 The FAA requires airport administrators to exercise their emergency plans at least
once every three years.60
(U) The Asheville Composite Squadron is one of 5 units that comprise North Carolina Wing’s
Group One. Basically, Group One represents the five most westerly squadrons within North
Carolina. Within this close knit Group, Squadron leaders work collaboratively to support the
other units within the Group achieve their goals. During May, Gastonia Composite Squadron
(MER-NC-024) held an open house at Gastonia Municipal Airport (KAKH). The event was
designed to recruit cadets while providing junior members with an opportunity to experience
their first flights. Asheville’s Lt Col Harry Fiedler and Charlotte’s John May provided
orientation flights.61The event achieved six initial cadet orientation flights and five observational
flights. Gastonia leadership also provided demonstrations to the public regarding Civil Air Patrol
capabilities. This effort included rides in a 1951 Willys Jeep by Lt Col Jerry Oxendine.62
According to 2nd Lt Beutler, "cadets enjoyed spending time together, and some new CAP friends
were made."63 This would become the first of several Group 1 orientation flight programs
supported by the Asheville Composite Squadron over 2015.

56

William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--16 April 2015,” message to Squadron, April 17, 2015, email.
Christopher T. Bailey, “Re: [CAPNC] Clarification,” message to NC Wing, April 17, 2015, email. & William
Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--16 April 2015,” message to Squadron, April 17, 2015, email.
58
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--4 June 2015,” message to Squadron, June 5, 2015, email.
59
Ibid.
60
“Airport conducts emergency training,” Hendersonville Times, May 28, 2015,
http://www.blueridgenow.com/article/20150528/ARTICLES/150529921/0/search, (accessed on February 3, 2015).
61
Derk R. Beutler, “Wing Gastonia Squadron Open House – A day to learn about CAP,” last modified May 2, 2015,
https://www.ncwgcap.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=article.display&articleID=512, (accessed on June 8, 2015).
62
Ibid.
63
Ibid.
57

14

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(U) The greatest elements of the
Asheville Composite Squadron is its
senior commitment to cadet
programs. More importantly, the
professional knowledge of the unit’s
aviation cadre who insure cadets
have a safe and information flight
instruction. Within these core
aviators, Lt Col Wallace “Wally’
Courtney has lead the field in
providing orientation flights.
Orientation flights provide young
adults with experience handling
aircraft in flight. The O-Flight
program is open to current CAP and
JROTC cadets.64 On 25 June 2013,
Colonel Courtney achieved a CAP career milestone by reaching 250th O-Flights.65 Little could
anyone imagine that Lt Col Courtney would continue to be an orientation flight trail blazer? His
commitment to the O-Flight program reached a new landmark on July 25 of this year. Colonel
Courtney successfully completed his 300th orientation flight upon successfully landing at the
Asheville Regional Airport (KAVL).66 Maj Clint Parker presented him with a certificate of
achievement to recognize this accomplishment. Lt Col Wally Courtney’s dedication serves as a
credit to the Asheville Composite Squadron and its aerospace mission to inspire tomorrow’s
leaders.
(U) Traditionally, Asheville Composite Squadron aircrews and instructors host one Mountain
Fury event annually. This year was somewhat of an anomaly in that regard. In January, Asheville
hosted the first Mountain Fury event for aviators from Maryland. As mid-August arrived,
Squadron personnel conducted in its second Mountain Fury engagement of the year. This event
hosted aircrews from across the Middle East Region. Just as with the January event, Asheville
instructors provided classroom instruction and practical flight experience to visiting teams. The
goal of this course being to certify aircrews in how to navigate and conduct search operations in
a mountainous terrain. Teams also learned how to land and take off at some of the region’s most
treacherous airports. Asheville Composite Squadron instructors certified twenty-three pilots
using eight aircraft for mountain flying operations.67 The professionalism of the ground and
aircrews lead to a zero safety violation event. Through these clinics, regional aviators bring true
value to the Civil Air Patrol’s program and its ability to respond to natural and man-made
incidents regardless of location.

64

“Retired Navy captain makes historic flight in service of WNC,” last modified August 5, 2015,
http://www.citizen-times.com/story/news/local/2015/08/05/retired-navy-captain-makes-historic-flight-servicewnc/31152011/, (accessed on October 10, 2015).
65
David E. Crawford, “NC Wing Pilot Completes 250 Orientation Flights,” Carolina Wingspan (June 2013): 3.
66
“Retired Navy captain makes historic flight in service of WNC,” last modified August 5, 2015,
http://www.citizen-times.com/story/news/local/2015/08/05/retired-navy-captain-makes-historic-flight-servicewnc/31152011/, (accessed on October 10, 2015).
67
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--20 August 2015,” message to Squadron, August 21, 2015, email.
15

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(U) With most emergency response agencies, there is no way to pinpoint when and where an
incident will take place. Computer modeling provide our best means but these also rely a little bit
on guess work. The events of late September through early October would bear witness to this
sentiment. On September 25th, Hurricane Joaquin formed off the coast of Africa. Forecasters
tracked the storm across the Atlantic to the Bahamas.68 While the storm stayed in the Caribbean,
Hurricane Joaquin produced moisture.69 This was then carried north into the United States where
surface lows combined to create the perfect storm. The southeastern United States would
experience rainfall equivalent to a 1-in-1000-year event.70 North Carolina would be far enough
north to suffer only minor localized flooding. Our neighbors to the south would experience the
brunt of the Joaquin’s wrath. South Carolinians would suffer an estimated $12 billion in damage
along with nine souls lost.71 President Barak Obama declared fourteen counties disaster areas
which made South Carolinians in those areas eligible for federal aid. Overall, the storm caused
cost the lives of 25 individuals along the eastern United States.72

(U) National Weather Service 2015 Storm Complex73

(U) During the recovery operations, Civil Air Patrol squadrons from the eastern United States
would support requests from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and South Carolina
emergency managers. The federal agency needed real-time photographic data to evaluate current
and potential future damage. North Carolina Wing command staff activated 10 members

68

Wikipedia, “Hurricane Joaquin,” last modified January 21, 2015,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Joaquin, (accessed on February 15, 2015).
69
Wikipedia, “October 2015 North American Storm Complex,” last modified January 22, 2016,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/October_2015_North_American_storm_complex, (accessed on February 10, 2015).
70
Ibid.
71
Ibid.
72
Ibid.
73
Wikipedia, “October 2015 North American Storm Complex,” last modified January 22, 2016,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/October_2015_North_American_storm_complex, (accessed on February 10, 2015).
16

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including an aircrew from Asheville Composite Squadron.74 Col. Francis Smith, South Carolina
Wing Commander, stated “he aircrews are tasked with assessing the state’s rivers to help plan for
possible search and rescue operations.” The deluge of water had caused several earthen dams to
break. Responders feared that several South Carolinians living around these sites could be swept
away in the escaping tides of water.75 Asheville aircrews took over 200 photographs of South
Carolina disaster areas.76 Lt Col Harald Fiedler, Lt Col Carlisle Lincoln and 1st Lt James Farrey
volunteered to fly several missions.77 Their efforts would not go without being recognized. In
December, Asheville’s aircrew would receive the Civil Air Patrol’s Disaster Relief Ribbon with
V device.78 Echo Loud!
(U) Cadet orientation flights are a vital component of the Civil Air Patrol aerospace program.
These activities provide young adults with real world application of aeronautical principles
learned in the classroom. In many respects, the Asheville Composite Squadron cadet program is
very lucky. Our organization is overflowing with qualified pilots which facilitated the
assignment of two aircraft to the Squadron by the North Carolina Wing. The expectation is that
the Asheville Composite Squadron aviators will provide support to those units without aircraft.
Earlier in the year, Lt Col Fiedler conducted orientation flights for the Gastonia Composite
Squadron. During the months of August and November, aircrews took to the sky to provide
orientation flights to the
Shelby Composite
Squadron.79 Posts on the
Shelby Squadron’s
Facebook site point to a
successful cadet weekend.
With that stated, the
historiographer was unable
to acquire the actual number
of successful orientation
flights conducted for this
report. Following both
engagements, the Asheville
aircrews and aviation assets
returned home with no
incidents.

74

Conrad D’Cruz, “Wing NC Wing Civil Air Patrol assisting with flood damage assessment in South Carolina,” last
modified October 9, 2015, https://www.ncwgcap.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=article.display&articleID=552,
(accessed on February 9, 2015).
75
Ibid.
76
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--8 October 2015,” message to Squadron, October 9, 2015, email.
77
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--22 October 2015,” message to Squadron, October 23, 2015, email.
78
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--10 December 2015,” message to Squadron, December 11, 2015,
email.
79
Shelby Composite Squadron’s Facebook page, accessed on January 29, 2016,
http://www.facebook.com/capshelbysquadron/. & William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--19 November 2015,”
message to Squadron, November 20, 2015, email.
17

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(U) As the calendar was winding down, the Asheville Composite Squadron held one last
major event of the year. During the second weekend in December, thirty-one members
participated in a joint training exercise with the US Forestry Service Schenck Advanced Fire
Management Training Program.80 The Schenck Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center provides
youth with opportunities to gain their GED while also learning a trade.81 Over the fall, Center
students receive 80 hours of National Wildlife Coordinating Group training along with physical
fitness and field training.82 With 28 forestry Job Corps Centers in the nation, Schenck supports
307 students annually.83 In 2015, the two organizations began to collaborate to promote both
programs. Through these engagements, an opportunity arose for the two organizations to pool
assets into a wildfire training event. Asheville deployed aviation and ground team resources
while Job Corps students employed wildfire teams. The joint effort enabled both groups to learn
from one another on wildfire fighting tactics. Sam Lewis, Center Assistant Superintendent,
stated: “Working with the Civil Air Patrol was an excellent cross training experience, it allowed
both agencies to become more familiar with one another, and to have a better understanding of
each other’s capabilities and limitations. I look forward to continuing our relationship.”84
Squadron leadership expressed the same sentiment and look forward to future engagements.
(U) Operationally, fiscal year 2015 was an impressive year for Squadron flight operations.
This is reflected in the end of year reporting. Between 1 October 2014 and 30 September 2015,
Asheville aircrews flew 592 hours. This is the most ever in the Squadron’s history. The number
of sorties reflected 20% of all flight hours flown by North Carolina Wing aircraft.85 In
comparison, the number two squadron flew 350 hours. The Asheville Composite Squadron’s
flight academy, one of the very few squadron level academies, accounted for almost 100 hours.86
While the hours are impressive, the item of real importance is our aircrew safety record. Over the
same period, Asheville aircrews had no safety violations or incidents. This achievement is not
lost on the parents of our cadets. They don’t care about hours flown or qualifications of aircrews.
Their focus is on the safety of their child in the hands of our aviators. This is a concept embraced
by all seniors within the organization. Conducting operations while bringing everyone home safe
is something we can all appreciate. Semper Vigilans!
(U) In recent years, the Civil Air Patrol program has undergone an operational transformation.
These changes are reflected under the Operations heading. Statistically, there are less downed
civil aircraft or traditional Civil Air Patrol related response activities.87 Organizational mission
priorities have shifted into the field of disaster preparedness and response. The transition seems
to indicate that it is due to many external and internal variables. Regardless of the factors, the
80

Arnie Andresen, “Re: Joint Training with U.S. Forestry Service,” message to Squadron, December 17, 2015,
email.
81
US Forestry Service, “Schenck,” last modified unknown,
http://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5386256.pdf, (accessed on February 9, 2015).
82
Carly Allen, “The Fire Crews at Schenck Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center,” Fire Management Today 71.4
(2011): 11, web, last modified unknown, http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/fmt/fmt_pdfs/FMT71-4.pdf.
83
US Forestry Service, “Schenck,” last modified unknown,
http://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5386256.pdf, (accessed on February 9, 2015).
84
Arnie Andresen, “Re: Joint Training with U.S. Forestry Service,” message to Squadron, December 17, 2015,
email.
85
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--1 October 2015,” message to Squadron, October 2, 2015, email.
86
Ibid.
87
Kristi Car, “Statistics Indicate a Shifting SAR Landscape,” Civil Air Patrol Volunteer (January-March, 2013): 11.
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future of operational activities is changing. Over the past twelve months, Asheville Composite
Squadron personnel have embraced these shifts in organizational focus. Members pursued
traditional CAP activities while seeking new opportunities to be able to align with their civilian
counterparts in the professional response community. Unit personnel embraced programs like
aerial photography, points of distribution, incident management and weather watcher. With these
skill sets, Asheville Composite Squadron personnel can continue being a valued resource for
local and state-wide emergency managers. As the year concludes, Squadron personnel will
remain ever vigilant and ready to jump to first in line when the need arises in 2016.

PERSONNEL
(U) Cadet activities and operations would not exist without willing commitment of its adult
volunteers. Membership composition within a particular Civil Air Patrol element varies based on
that element’s function. Without examining command hierarchy, there are three foundational
categorizations within the Civil Air Patrol organization. Our first element focuses on cadet
activities while holding a small supervisory contingent of seniors. Secondly, there are a couple of
squadrons where the membership is comprised solely of adults. Then we have the composite
elements. These are units where cadets and seniors simultaneously conduct activities for both
membership classes. No one format better or worse than the other except when attempting to
provide a holistic understanding of all unit achievements within a history. Unlike a cadet or
senior only squadron, composite unit historians must develop a formula that recognizes the
achievements of both cadets and seniors. Asheville Composite Squadron chroniclers are able to
accomplish this feat dividing out cadet activities while focusing on seniors within this section.
Readers seeking to understand the unit’s cadet programs and successes should review the chapter
entitled Cadet Activities.
Canst thou, O partial sleep, give thy repose
To the wet sea-boy in an hour so rude,
And in the calmest and most stillest night,
With all appliances and means to boot,
Deny it to a king? Then happy low, lie down!
Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.
Henry IV, Act III, Scene I
William Shakespeare88
(U) Assumption of command can be both a burden and blessing. The time and dedication one
needs to commit in order to be a successful leader can wreak havoc on one’s personal and
professional life. Civil Air Patrol understood this sentiment when it instituted term limits for unit
commanders. Held for a period of three year, a unit commander must transfer leadership to
someone new when that tenure expires. On October 1, the Asheville Composite Squadron
formally recognized the unit’s change of command from Maj Clint Parker to Lt Col Harald
Fiedler. The event was held at the Lt Col Robert E. Auger Center at the Asheville Regional

88

Literary Devices, “Heavy is the Head that Wears the Crown,” last modified unknown,
http://literarydevices.net/heavy-is-the-head-that-wears-the-crown/, (accessed on February 9, 2016).
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Airport as part of the regular meeting.89 Maj David Newman served as the master of ceremonies
while C/1Sgt Josiah Bilbrey represented continuity between the transfer of command.90 Lt Col
Joseph Weinflash, Group One Commander, oversaw the transition in Squadron leadership. The
Group One Commander recognized Maj Parker’s accomplishments including but not limited to a
massive renovation project of Squadron facilities.91 Maj Parker stated “I feel that I could not
leave the squadron n better hands than that of Lt Col Fiedler.” Lt Col Harald Fiedler brings
“several decades” of civil and military aviation experience to the position.92 Following the
ceremony, personnel celebrated the outgoing and incoming commanders.
(U) Since this chronicler became a Squadron member, there have been several constants over
the years. One of these faithful variables has been Lt Col Jeff Moore. Through the years, he has
served as the Squadrons’ liaison with the United States Air Force. Lt Col Moore came to the unit
as an US Air Force Reserve individual mobilization augmentee. IMAs are reservists who are
unpaid but who are seeking a reserve retirement through a points for participation service. After
a set period of time and meeting the minimum points for retirement, IMAs can then step down
from their military obligation. On September 17th, members of the Asheville Composite
Squadron came together to celebrate Lt Col Moore’s retirement from the Air Force.93 Lt Col
David Newman (CMSgt/USAF Ret.) served as master of ceremonies as Squadron command
talked of Lt Col Moore’s contribution to the organization. Cadet members saluted his service by
performing a pass in review. Lt Col Moore gave a moving speech to those in attendance. With
the ceremony concluded, Lt Col Moore became a senior member of the Asheville Composite
Squadron.94 Unit personnel welcomed him and his family to the team.
(U) The final personnel achievement for our Squadron personnel came during the North
Carolina Wing conference in December. Annually, the Wing presents various awards to
members who go above and beyond in their commitment to service to the Civil Air Patrol. This
year’s conference would bestow awards upon two seniors. Lt Col Wallace Courtney would
receive 2015 North Carolina Wing Senior Member of the Year.95 Command bestowed this honor
upon him for his commitment to the Wing’s emergency service, flight academy, and cadet
aerospace education activities. The second award went to TSgt Louis Toms for 2015 North
Carolina Historian of the Year. During 2015, TSgt Toms engaged in several activities to advance
preservation and appreciation of Civil Air Patrol History.96 These activities included writing the
unit’s annual history, writing an article for the national historical journal and developing an
online training program for new historians. The achievements by Lt Col Courtney and TSgt
89
Scott Stevens, “Asheville Squadron Holds Change of Command – New Squadron Commander brings decades of
experience,” last modified October 1, 2015,
https://www.ncwgcap.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=article.display&articleID=555, (accessed on November 10, 2015).
90
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--1 October 2015,” message to Squadron, October 2, 2015, email.
91
Scott Stevens, “Asheville Squadron Holds Change of Command – New Squadron Commander brings decades of
experience,” last modified October 1, 2015,
https://www.ncwgcap.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=article.display&articleID=555, (accessed on November 10, 2015).
92
Ibid.
93
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--17 September 2015,” message to Squadron, September 18, 2015,
email.
94
Ibid.
95
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--10 December 2015,” message to Squadron, December 11, 2015,
email.
96
Michael Willis, “Re: Historian of the Year,” message to author, December 12, 2015, email.

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Toms were submitted to the Middle East Region (MER) command for regional and national
awards consideration. MER selection will occur sometime in spring 2016.97 For their
accomplishments over the past twelve months, the Asheville Composite Squadron tips out hats to
these leaders. Echo Loud!

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
(U) Community engagement is a vital component of a service non-profit’s survivability. This
may appear to be a bit overreaching but public awareness is just as critical as aerospace
education, cadet programs and/or emergency services. Non-profit entities have a federal mandate
by virtue of their tax status to engage their target population or community in order to address a
concern. Outreach may not contain the same luster felt by flying or successfully executing a
ground search but it is no less important. Public engagement provides the unit with an
understanding of their connection to the community they serve. These activities serve to bolster
unit morale, recruitment or public awareness just to name a few. Outreach can also require more
attention and time than the traditional duties associated with the Civil Air Patrol mission.
Possibly, these additional skill sets deter many squadrons from pursuing an active outreach
program. Whatever the reason, successful organizations will always find a way to promote
community enrichment activities. Although there is always room for improvement, this section
addresses the active engagement by the Asheville Composite Squadron over the course of the
past year.
(U) Participation in aviation open houses provide an excellent opportunity for a unit to get
their name and mission out into the public. Although these events are not what one envisions
when discussing engagement, occasions like these help to inform the community while
promoting recruiting efforts. Over the past twelve months, Squadron members contributed to two
such engagements. On June 20th, the unit participated in an open house sponsored by Asheville
Regional Airport’s Landmark Aviation.98 Over the years, Landmark Aviation has vigorously
supported the Squadron through direct and indirect sponsorship. This event was deemed
important to the organization to return thanks for their support of the unit. Maj Clint Parker,
Capt. William Wallace and a contingent of cadets promoted the value of Civil Air Patrol
programs to the visiting public.99 In addition to the Landmark event, the unit also participated in
the Asheville Regional Airport Tenant Appreciation Day. Held on October 28th, the airport
authority set out to thank tenant organizations for their commitment western North Carolina
aviation.100 Participating in these two community engagements and similar events over the years,
the Asheville Composite Squadron has been able to grow it membership rolls while giving in
return to those who have given directly to the Squadron.
(U) Through the years, community organizations have pursued the Squadron’s engagement
in various events and activities. Juggling these requests against unit requirements can pose a
level of difficulty to manage. Every once and a while, there emerges an event that begs the
97

Ibid.
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--18 June 2015,” message to Squadron, June 19, 2015, email.
99
Asheville Composite Squadron’s Facebook page, accessed on January 29, 2016,
http://www.facebook.com/AshevilleCAP.
100
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--22 October 2015,” message to Squadron, October 23, 2015, email.
98

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members attention. This was the case regarding two requests from area youth organizations.
Buncombe County Cub Scouts summer encampment and YMCA of Western North Carolina
approached Squadron leadership with a desire to have members promote aerospace education.
They sought to use unit subject matter experts to advance their individual summer programs.
With everyone in agreement, Squadron volunteers hosted nearly 200 boys and girls over the
period from mid-June to mid-July.101 Unit personnel gave tours of CAP aircraft, made balsa
wood gliders and basic aerospace education. Because the Squadron operates out of a hanger, the
summer camp participants enjoyed watching the aircraft taking off and landing at the airport.102
Based on the feedback of group leaders, the children really enjoyed the interaction with the
Squadron’s instructors. Event activities and feedback presented to and featured on the Civil Air
Patrol’s national Aerospace Education website.103
(U) Fourteen years ago, terrorists
high jacked four America commercial
aircraft. While in flight, the terrorist
would wrestle controls of the craft from
their aircrews. These jets were then
flown into the World Trade Centers and
Pentagon. Passengers onboard Flight 93
attempted to wrestle control away from
the terrorist before it crashed in a field
in Pennsylvania. Although official totals
vary, the one day death total is
estimated at 2,977.104 Since this horrific
incident, the parishioners of Trinity
Baptist Church in Asheville have held
an annual service to recognize the
contributions of local emergency responders. This year’s event was held on Sunday, September
13.105 Capt. William Wallace and four cadets attended the honor service. They also took this
opportunity to setup a Squadron recruiting booth.106 Cadets took guided tours through various
response vehicles on static display. Squadron personnel appreciated the outpouring of support
received by the Trinity Baptist Church community.
(U) The final event of the year has become a staple for building connectivity to the
community while demonstrating the unit’s commitment to America’s veterans. Wreaths Across
America promotes the laying of wreaths at veteran’s cemeteries by community organizations.
101

William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--16 July 2015,” message to Squadron, July 18, 2015, email.
Ibid.
103
Civil Air Patrol, “MER-NC-019 Asheville Composite Squadron Hosts AE Outreach Events,” last modified
unknown,
http://ae.capmembers.com/media/cms/AE_EVENTSCUB_SCOUTS_AND_YMCA_Ashvil_672355158B9E3.pdf,
(accessed on February 15, 2015).
104
Wikipedia, “September 11 attacks,” last modified February 1, 2016,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/September_11_attacks, (accessed on February 7, 2016).
105
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--10 September 2014,” message to Squadron, September 12, 2015,
email.
106
Asheville Composite Squadron’s Facebook page, accessed on January 29, 2016,
http://www.facebook.com/AshevilleCAP.
102

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Interested organizations solicit donations from the public to purchase wreaths. Beginning in
January, unit personnel sought out family and friends for donations. Squadron leadership added
to the furor by adding a friendly completion to recognize those who received the most donations.
With the donations in hand, orders were made to the Wreaths organization around the October /
November timeframe. This year Squadron personnel raised enough money for 561 wreaths.107
On December 12, seniors and cadets met at the Western North Carolina Veterans Cemetery.108
The event included participants from local JROTC units, Patriot Riders Motorcycle Club, Blue
Star Mothers, and the Buncombe County Fire and Sherriff’s Honor Guard. In January 2016,
Squadron leadership announced the winners of the contest to raise donations for Wreaths Across
America.109 Awardees were C/SSgt Cherie Carson, Lt Col Bauer, C/A1C Alyssa McRae, Maj
Barbara Bow, Maj Richard Bow, C/Capt Molly Boothe and Lt Col Harold Fiedler.110 Thanks to
everyone’s efforts in surpassed last year’s totals by 66.111 Echo Loud!
(U) There are many activities that comprise the mission of the Civil Air Patrol. Outlined in
the national charter, Squadrons promote cadet programs, aerospace education and emergency
services. These often become the sole focus of unit leaders. Within these organizations,
opportunities to connect with the community is often overlooked. Over the past twelve months,
the Asheville Composite Squadron embraced its connectivity to western North Carolina by
hosting various activities for community enrichment. These labor intensive engagements mean
personnel must juggle work, family and traditional Squadron activities. Within these conflicting
priorities, the Asheville Composite Squadron actively connected with the community over the
past twelve months. These activities ranged from meeting local leaders to attending church
recognition events to giving talks to other community organizations. Through these events, unit
personnel gain valuable insight into their communities. In return, the public gains insight into the
mission and values of the Civil Air Patrol program. Collectively, all parties learn to build
stronger connections. Asheville Composite Squadron members anticipate an active outreach
program for the upcoming year.

SPECIAL EVENTS
(U) What do we mean by special events? Looking over the pages of this chronicle, one could
argue that this document is filled with special activities. In perspective, there is difficulty in
finding an argument to counter that point. Awards, encampments, exercises, training and a host
of other events made special by our Squadron’s participation. Meetings, exercises and training
follow a strict regimen in order to meet cadet, aviation and emergency service requirements.
Accompany these formal schedules, many engagements require a day or two to learn a skill
before demonstrating that the competencies was learned. Combined, these events may require
members to spend an entire month of weekends to meet the national proficiency goals. Looking
at these commitments, one may ask…. where is the fun? Asheville Composite Squadron
leadership understand that all work and no play makes Jack and Jill a dull boy and girl.
107

William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--27 January 2016,” message to Squadron, January 29, 2016, email.
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--10 December 2015,” message to Squadron, December 11, 2015,
email.
109
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--27 January 2016,” message to Squadron, January 29, 2016, email.
110
Ibid.
111
Joseph A. Myers and Louis V. Toms, History of the Ashville Composite Squadron, 1 January-31 December
2014, Tech, North Carolina Wing (2015): 20, print.
108

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Therefore, unit leaders actively promote alternative events as a means of releasing the pressure
valve of learning all the time. These special activities do not fit within the Civil Air Patrol’s
traditional mission-based model but are vital to preserve esprit d’ corps while allowing members
to decompress. This section explores those types of events and other activities where members
reached a significant life goal.
(U) Over the past two years,
Squadron personnel have worked
diligently to bring a shell of a hanger up
to code in order to make it into a
suitable living space. This effort
required everyone to pitch in and help
out. Although not everyone is skilled to
operate a circular saw or weld a
hammer, there are other contributions
that are much more attainable. Carrying
construction materials, driving to the
local hardware store to pick up nails,
mopping the floors or just holding a
board while someone else hammered it
into place. No task is too small.
Recognizing the contributions of all, Squadron leaders elected to hold a cookout in appreciation
for everyone’s support. With all in agreement, the event would be sponsored by the seniors and
held the fifth Thursday in April. Personnel were required to bring a pot-luck dish from home.
Hot dogs and hamburgers would be supplied by the leadership. Maj Arnie Andresen dazzled the
crowd by demonstrating his grill cooking skills.112 Based on feedback, this activity and the food
combination worked well. The success of this event may lead to future grill activities.
(U) Since 2014, the Asheville Composite Squadron Mini Golf Tournament has become an
opportunity for members to blow off steam and have a good time. On July 30, Squadron
competitors along with their family and friends gathered at Tropical Gardens Mini Golf on
Patton Avenue in Asheville for the second annual golf outing.113 Participants competed for best
cadet and overall golf scores. Tropical Gardens features a mini golf course, batting cage and
video games. The variety in pursuits allowed everyone in attendance to enjoy themselves. Those
pursuing mini golf played the hill side course dotted with various natural features including
several life size statues of animals. When everything was said and done, Maj Clint Parker had the
highest points among the seniors while Cadet Jacob Davis took home the honors for the
cadets.114 Celebrated by family and friends, the Asheville Composite Squadron looks forward to
Third Annual Squadron Mini Golf Tournament and engaging in similar activities in order to
strengthen comradery between members.

112

Asheville Composite Squadron’s Facebook page, accessed on January 29, 2016,
http://www.facebook.com/AshevilleCAP.
113
William Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes--2 July 2015,” message to Squadron, July 3, 2015, email.
114
Willian Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--6 August 2015,” message to Squadron, August 7, 2015, email.
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(U) As one may expect, Civil Air
Patrol draws a portion of its
membership from those with prior
service experience. Across the five
branches along with officers and
enlisted, they all find a home with
CAP. However, this diversity comes
with a bit of friendly rivalry. With the
Asheville Composite Squadron, the
rivalry makes itself overtly known
around the Army-Navy Game. Since
becoming a member of the Squadron,
there has always been an open invitation by squadron members to view the big game. This year
would prove a bit more difficult than in years past. The big game was on the same day as
Wreaths Across America. This did not deter anyone from making it to the two events.115 With
Navy’s win, Maj Andresen and Lt Col Courtney inscribed the winning score on the Squadron
game trophy football.116 Those of us who are prior-Army will need to wait another year before
we get a chance at the trophy once more.
(U) There are many activities that occur within the Squadron over the period of a year.
Recognizing and properly cataloging them is a bit more difficult to achieve even for the most
effective chronicler. Unfortunately, many of these remarkable events go uncovered. There are
occasions when someone goes out of their way to maintain a decent record of events. Much of
what is in this historiography is due to one such individual. Almost without exception, Capt
William Wallace goes out of his way to provide meticulous notes of the weekly meetings. These
notes serve as the historical record for the majority of information presented in this annual. His
reporting has meant that the Asheville Composite Squadron is one of a handful of unit’s
providing a narrative of important activities to National. Therefore, I would like conclude this
segment by recognizing Capt William Wallace’s dedication to the preservation of Unit heritage.
Semper Vigilans!

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
(U) Logistics is a necessary and vital component to the daily operations of the Civil Air
Patrol. Flying, personnel management, emergency services, cadet activities and the host of other
engagements require resources to make them successful. A broken fuel gage on an aircraft will
prevent a plane from flying but has secondary implications. Without a functioning aircraft,
Squadron search and rescue missions may have to be reassigned to other operational units. While
waiting for parts, cadets are unable to participate in O-Flights. This inactivity prevents the
awarding of emergency services, cadet and aviation proficiencies. Therefore, those engaged in
resource management have a heavy responsibility while engaging in a yeoman’s level of work.
Over the past twelve months, these leaders made sure that meetings and missions were
achievable. This section of the annual history provides an understanding into the
115

William Wallace, Re: Minutes of Meeting--3 December 2015,” message to Squadron, December 4, 2015, email.
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--18 December 2015,” message to Squadron, December 19, 2015,
email.
116

25

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accomplishments of the Squadron’s logistical managers in relation to facilities, finance and
information technology.

Facilities
(U) Since April 2013, the Asheville Composite Squadron has worked diligently to transform a
hanger shell into a suitable space for meetings and operations. This year would see the final steps
undertaken to make the Lt Col Robert E. Auger Center home. Under the leadership of Lt Col
Ray Davis, small and large renovations continued on the facilities. During 2015, renovations
focused on the second floor areas and egress. The upstairs space required hanging sheetrock,
ceiling tile placement, finishing and painting. With regards to egress, city planners required an
emergency fire exit to the outside. Additionally, the Squadron desired a direct connection
between the facility and perimeter fence. This access point would free up manpower dedicated to
watching the gate access point for 30 to 40 minutes at the start and end of meetings. The effort
would require nine months of intensive commitment by construction teams but their exertion
would pay off. On September 19th, Buncombe County government issues a Certificate of
Occupancy.117 Hats off to Lt Col Davis and the countless volunteers who sacrificed their time to
make the Auger Center a safe and suitable place to learn.

Finance
(U) The average unit member does not actively pursue or seek to understand the challenges of
financial operations of the Squadron. For the most part, we participate in organization activities
with little care about the resources necessary to successfully hold the event. Cadet activities,
emergency services, flight operations and weekly meetings have costs associated with them. The
Squadron Finance Officer is charged with managing organizational funds and identifying
shortfalls to the leadership. With these shortfalls, unit leaders problem solve to address potential
funding streams to support programmatic and organizational requirements. Sponsorships provide
the squadron with flexibility to supplement cadet activities, repair equipment and acquire
resources. These contributions make programs more affordable for cadets and seniors who may
not otherwise have the resources necessary to engage in CAP activities. Fund seeking requires a
commitment by the unit’s leadership to prioritize requirements and solicit funding from external
sources. Over the past twelve months, the Asheville Composite Squadron continued its two
pronged business model to seek external sponsorships while actively fundraising. Within this
section, the chronicler promotes insight into the Squadron’s endeavors. Information does not
address monetary funds held by the organization or funds received as part of the Civil Air
Patrol’s budgetary allocation.
(CBU/DECL 20211231) I believe that every squadron commander wrestles with the concept
of membership dues. There are dozens pros and cons associated with any decision to internally
raise money. Squadron leaders juggled these opposing forces for a couple of years. In the past,
organizational leadership was able to identify external funding to supplement operational costs
and the need to institute dues never came to light. Beginning in 2014, the senior membership
agreed to institute a policy of dues. With the facility construction costs mounting, leaders were
117

Asheville Composite Squadron’s Facebook page, accessed on January 29, 2016,
http://www.facebook.com/AshevilleCAP.
26

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left no other course but to institute a membership fee.118 Senior members could pay $5 per
month, $20 per quarter or $60 per year.119 Funds raised would support construction efforts while
residue monies could augment unit programs. This program would not impact the membership
costs associated with the cadet corps. Within the policy, leadership identified a couple of
exemptions to the fee policy. Personnel unable to support the increased costs are able to donate
their time and effort to Squadron activities. While omitting cadets from the program, the policy
welcomes donations made by parents of cadets.120 Annually, unit leadership will determine if fee
schedule needs adjustment.
(CBU/DECL 20211231) The Squadron’s fundraising effort sometimes overlooks toward
angel donors. The term angel donor refers to individuals who give to an organization because the
contributor believes in the beneficiary’s program. Traditionally, angel donations are smaller but
no less appreciated. Over the years, the Asheville Composite Squadron has seen its share of these
patrons and we appreciate them for their support. During 2015, the organization received
contributions from three patrons. Tom Whitehead’s, C/MSgt Ryan Santiago’s grandfather, estate
donated to the Squadron in January.121 This was followed up by a donation by Industrial
Ceramics representative Mr. Doug McDaris in the amount of $500.00. Mr. McDaris served as a
cadet with the Ashville Squadron from 1977 until 1982.122 The final sponsor announced in midsummer a donation of $500.00 to the Squadron. Mr. McDaris and Maj Parker approached the
folks at Kyocera about supporting cadet programs.123 These three donations and other gifts
throughout the years have enabled the unit to successfully remodel facilities, cover costs
associated with cadet programs, and other vital operations that have made the Asheville program
successful. Considering the nation is still clambering out of an economic recession, these angel
donors are deeply appreciated by all Squadron personnel.
(CBU/DECL 20211231) Innovation and imagination are often the best resources one has to
finding new revenue streams. With the hanger remodeling effort requiring resources, the unit
leadership focused on alternative methods to raising funds. Glad handing works well but there
are other methods used effectively by schools and churches. Pancake breakfasts are relatively
cheap to operate but have the potential for a high return. This philosophy served as the catalyst
for holding the Squadron’s first pancake breakfast. 1st Lt Teresa Cannon would serve as project
manager for the activity. Under her leadership, the Squadron held this successful event on 11
April 2015 at the Applebee’s on Smokey Park Highway in west Asheville.124 Unlike the previous
year, the Command staff announced gift certificates to the three most successful Squadron ticket
sellers. The gift certificates were donated by Asheville Combat Zone.125 Unit personnel sold
tickets to the general public, family and friends in the weeks leading up to the breakfast. On the
big day, Squadron volunteers became workers in the food service industry. Their efforts did not
go unrewarded. In total, the pancake breakfast netted $1,008.00 for the Squadron. Receipts

118

Clint Parker, “Re: Squadron Dues,” message to Squadron, February 8, 2014, email.
Ibid.
120
Ibid.
121
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--16 January 2015,” message to Squadron, January 16, 2015, email.
122
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--5 March 2015,” message to Squadron, March 6, 2015, email.
123
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--2 July 2015,” message to Squadron, July 3, 2015, email.
124
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--12 March 2015,” message to Squadron, March 13, 2015, email.
125
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--5 March 2015,” message to Squadron, March 6, 2015, email.
119

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demonstrated an increase from the previous year’s total by $181.00.126 The most ticket sales
awardees were C/TSgt Grant McDaris (first place), C/Amn Blaise Thibodeaux (second place)
and C/SSgt Jasen Sanchez (third place).127 The event’s success inspired leadership to plan for a
larger activity in 2015.
(CBU/DECL 20211231) On 17 October 2015, the final fundraising event was held by the
Asheville Composite Squadron. On this day, unit members hosted a yard sale at the Woodfin
Community Center.128 Personnel donated various items from home to sell. Beginning at 0730
hours, eleven members supported the event.129 By itself, the yard sale would add $450.00 to the
Squadron coffers. This was not the only source of funding for the day. The McGlinsky family
added to the day’s success by donating $250.00 to the effort. Their act of kindness netted
$700.00 in the black for the Squadron’s effort.130 Leadership commended the contributions of
everyone who made this a successful undertaking.
(U) In the world of big finance and world economies, a couple of thousand dollars raised is
nothing spectacular. There are non-profit organizations that are able to raise millions upon
millions for their charter. These entities all have certain elements in common that make their
successes achievable. First and foremost, they are reliant upon a paid staff to actively solicit and
manage their receipts. They also rely on a large budget dedicated to raising external funding. The
Asheville Composite Squadron has no such mechanisms in place. Unit fundraising relies upon its
volunteers to actively pursue funding from external entities. There are no paid management
teams who direct these activities. This lack of paid administrative and financial staff equates to
greater bang for the buck from those who support Squadron activities. Monies raised or donated
go directly to operational and programmatic costs to facilitate cadet growth and community
engagement. There are very few organizations who can boost that most of the monies received
go to the program. This is only achievable when you have individuals who are dedicated to the
Squadron’s collective success rather than their personal gain. For this reason, everyone who
dedicated their own time and money to the organization’s financial triumph should give
themselves a hand. Echo Loud!

Information Technology
(U) Information technology (IT) is a relatively new term in the world of exchanging of ideas.
When one speaks of IT, the discussion is about how one communicates with one or more
individuals. In this respect, IT follows the long history of human communication both spoken
and unspoken. Communication is so valuable to the chronicling society and human development
that scholars define history into two periods. The non-written period or prehistory and written
period or Paleolithic Age. During this early period, our ancient ancestors documented their
existence in the form of drawings and symbols. The Chauvet cave paintings (30,000 years ago)
provide an excellent example of these early chronicles. These cave illustrations provide insight

126

William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--16 April 2015,” message to Squadron, April 16, 2015, email.
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--27[sic] April 2015,” message to Squadron, April 24, 2015, email.
128
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--15 October 2015,” message to Squadron, October 16, 2015.
129
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting--22 October 2015,” message to Squadron, October 23, 2015.
130
Ibid.
127

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into the life to Paleolithic peoples and the animal life that surrounded them.131 In contrast,
historians must rely upon archology and scholarly interpretation to tell us about the daily lives of
prehistoric peoples. Without a formal record, the scholar is left to hypothesize about ancient life
which leads to continual lineal changes as new theories replace the old. Since the good ole days,
humankind has vastly improved its abilities to communicate and exchange ideas. The later
twentieth century people witnessed space exploration designed to attempt contact with other
interstellar worlds.
(U) In modern history, societies
worldwide employ the wealth of
communication mediums (i.e., landline
telephones, internet, cell phones,
satellites, etc.) to actively engage one
another in real-time exchange of ideas.
Successful employment of these and
other mass media instruments
normally require a horde of technology
and branding specialist. Within the
Asheville Composite Squadron,
management of information
technology resources falls to Capt.
Scott Stevens’ expertise. Beginning in 2013, Captain Stevens began revamping the Squadron’s
online presences. He overhauled
the unit’s website
(http://www.ashevillecap.org) and
established standardized email
addresses for all its personnel
using Google Mail. In 2014, the
Asheville Composite Squadron’s
website drew 4,000 visitors.
Within this figure, the overseas
visitors numbered 2,300 from 60
countries.132 During 2015, the
number of website visitors rose to
5,300. This figure represents a
30% increase in web traffic since
the site launched in 2014.133
(U) These upgrades in web presence included improvements to the Squadron’s social media
presence. Looking back over the years, there were problems with how best to manage social
media. There are definite benefits and pitfalls to their use. The lack of understanding meant that
131

Irving Fang, A History of Mass Communication – Six Information Revolutions (Boston, MA: Focal Press, 1997):
30, print.
132
Scott Stevens, “RE: Request for Assistance – Information Technology Section of Unit History,” message to the
author, January 13, 2015, email.
133
Scott Stevens, “RE: Request for Assistance – Squadron IT Support CY2015,” message to the author, January 6,
2016, email.
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social media’s early days resembled something akin to the Wild West. Beginning in 2013, Capt.
Scott Stevens dove into the murky waters of the Squadron’s social media presence and
standardized organizational content. One of the organization’s largest footprint in the social
media universe is its presence on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/AshevilleCAP). In 2014,
the Squadron had 940 Facebook followers.134 This number rose to 1018 in 2015.135 There will
always be a ceiling with how many individuals will friend the organization. With that
understanding, one can only hope that the Squadron’s Facebook account will see a 10% increase
from this year’s numbers.
(U) Before we could formally compose verbal sentences, we mimicked words spoken or
signed by others. This information is then integrated into our vocabulary to serve as a base to
begin the structuring of formal sentences. Our proficiency in communicating is then honed
through education and experiences. The same can be said of understanding computers and
technology. Those who learn on their own may not fair a good as those who receive instruction.
Capt. Stevens understands this principle. With the adoption of Google application by the
Squadron, there is a potential for some members to become overwhelmed. Rather than pursuing
a Darwinian approach to the adoption, Capt. Stevens held classroom instruction on the benefits
and use of Google products. Held in April, senior and cadet members were able to acquire a
functional understanding of Google’s suite of apps like Calendar, Gmail, Drive, and a couple of
others.136 This formal instruction was augmented by one on one support to Squadron personnel
for them to better understand their accounts. These activities have proven beneficial. Successful
adoption by the unit personnel and their use owes their success in large part to Capt. Steven’s
efforts.
(U) While addressing the organization’s web presence, there were the traditional
responsibilities that had to be addressed. This required troubleshooting technology concerns
while managing resources. Traditionally, these are not complicated undertakings but made
difficult by construction and moving. Over the past three years, Squadron meetings and
operations were held in five different locations spanning two counties. Since summer 2013, the
unit took up permanent residence within a hangar at the Asheville Regional Airport. Captain
Stevens had the responsibility to troubleshoot internet connectivity while installing the unit’s
technological resources. With all these moves, he was able to maintain control of Squadron
property. During 2015, Capt. Stevens’ ensured that cadets and seniors had workable machines
and internet connectivity to conduct successful training and operational activities. His
accomplishments are echoed in the pages of our historical review.

WRAPPING UP AND LOOKING FORWARD
(U) This historical document chronicles the activities and accomplishments of the squadron
and its personnel over a twelve month period. Historians know this type of effort can be quite
daunting at times. In our case, the effort was made much easier by the quality of work being
134

Scott Stevens, “RE: Request for Assistance – Information Technology Section of Unit History,” message to the
author, January 13, 2015, email.
135
Asheville Composite Squadron’s Facebook page, accessed on January 29, 2016,
http://www.facebook.com/AshevilleCAP.
136
Scott Stevens, “RE: Request for Assistance – Information Technology Section of Unit History,” message to the
author, January 13, 2015, email.
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done by others in the unit. For example, Capt. William Wallace captures the highlights of
squadron meetings through his meeting minutes. These notes of important events and
achievements serve as an important historical reference. Over the years, his work has served as
the backbone for our chronical. There are many others whose work has made life for the
historical chroniclers easier. With everyone’s support, the research team had difficulty
identifying every event held by Squadron personnel. These holes in the historical fabric may
have prevented a full understanding of events and/or achievements. It is our hope that future
researchers can appreciate the work done while forgiving us to that which we have missed.
While not perfect, we believe that this historical annual preserves the spirit of the Asheville
Composite Squadron’s activities for 2015.
(U) Over the past twelve months, squadron personnel made great strides in maintaining
mission readiness. Aircrew instructors and ground team leaders train personnel to the highest
caliber. This is evident in the squadron’s response capabilities during training and real world
contingency activities. The squadron has become a leader in navigating in the mountains that it
conducts an annual flying clinic for the region and wing. Ground team leaders work to provide
training that meets acceptable practices of civilian emergency services practitioners by having
them conduct training for squadron personnel. This means that cadets and seniors are able to
integrate with the operations of local recovery efforts. Aviation and emergency services is only a
small component of the past year. Squadron personnel gave back to the community and built unit
esprit d ‘corps. Because of the quality and dedication of unit personnel, the historical team is able
to present their outcomes in this document.
(U) Two-thousand and sixteen promises to be an exciting year for the squadron. As we begin
a new year, the Asheville Composite Squadron begins National Weather Service StormSpotter
training, Mountain Fury and Wing SAREx. Seniors and cadets will hone their skills in
emergency services and aerospace education efforts over the spring. Members will continue
volunteering manpower and resources to bring the Squadron offices up to standard. June and
July will bring national and regional events such as summer camps and other events provide
cadets and seniors with activities involving hands on missions. When the cadets return to school
in August, the unit will turn to continued community engagement and unit proficiencies. Then
comes winter when the squadron historian prepares to collect and write about the achievements
of the squadron and its personnel. As these events and others occur, the unit remains ever
vigilant to meet the goals of searching for downed aircraft in the mountains of Western North
Carolina.

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THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY

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APPENDIX A
GENERAL SQUADRON INFORMATION
As of 31 December 2015

Unit Designation

Asheville Composite Squadron (MER-NC-019)

Previous Designations

Asheville Senior Squadron (1957-1976)
Asheville Squadron (1945-1957)
Western Carolina Squadron (1942-1945)

Authority

Civil Air Patrol National Organization Charter

Higher Headquarters

North Carolina Wing (MER-NC-001)

Commander

Lt Col Harold P. Fiedler (October 2015-Present)
Maj Charles C. Parker III (January 2014-October 2015)
Lt Col Joseph A. Weinflash (July 2009-January 2014)
Lt Col Robert Bauer (2001-July 2009)

Deputy Commander – Seniors Lt Col William L. Fleming (December 2011-Present)
Deputy Commander – Cadets

1 Lt Dennis A. Fagnant (May 2012-Present)

Cadet Commander

C/Capt. Molly R. Boothe (December 2015-Present)
C/2Lt Jacob B. Davis (August 2014-December 2015)
C/2Lt Logan M. Lueck (October 2013-August 2014)

Station

Asheville Regional Airport

Aircraft Flown

Cessna 172
Cessna 182

Awards and Decorations

Unit Citation (2011)

Approved Emblem
Significance: Traditional Air Force squadron
type design. Insignia features CAP aircraft
flying over the city of Asheville. Disc contains
the Asheville Composite Squadron’s designation
NC-019 and Civil Air Patrol. The outer scrolls
identify the unit’s motto Echo Loud and identify
the city of Asheville. Insignia size slightly larger
than traditional Air Force squadron emblem
patterns. Approved emblem approved in 2010.

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Functional Emblem
Significance: Rectangular insignia. Emblem
presents a cartoon image of the squadron’s
aircraft in profile. Presented on the side of the
aircraft are “N99700” and the CAP emblem. The
figure of Gumby sits in the pilot’s seat. Beneath
the aircraft image, “NCO19 SEMPER GUMBY”
is in quotes. This image symbolizes the
flexibility of the unit and its personnel to
accomplish the mission.

Significance: Disc face contains two OR bands
used to separate the key elements. Outer disc
provides the unit’s designation in AZURE on an
ARGENT field. The wording presented is
“Civil Air Patrol” in the Chief position while
“Asheville Sq, NC 019” appears in the base.
Inner disc present a predominantly ARGENT
Cessna-type aircraft flying over a mountain
range. The mountains signify the predominant
terrain feature of western North Carolina and the
home of the Asheville Composite Squadron.
Challenge Coin
Significance: Blue disc face contains a white
triangle containing a red three blade propeller.
Beneath the lower blades appears the words
“Asheville Squadron.” External to the triangle
the date “Feb 1942” and “U.S.” This signifies
when the Asheville Composite Squadron began
its lineage. The obverse side features a stylized
propeller with the Squadron’s motto “Echo
Loud” presented. Designer: Maj. Joseph Myers.

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APPENDIX B
PERSONNEL STATISTICS
As of 31 December 2015137
(CBU/DECL 20211231) Senior Members (80)
Enlisted
1

Officer
1%

59

74%

Cadet Sponsor
3
4%

Patron
17

21%

(CBU/DECL 20211231) Cadet Members (57)
Enlisted
36
63%

Officer
11

Cadet
19%

10

18%

(CBU/DECL 20211231)Gender (137)
Seniors
Male
Female
70
10

137

Cadets
Male
Female
47
10

Data compiled from CAP e-Services.
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APPENDIX C
CADET ACHIIEVMENT AWARDS
As of 31 December 2015138

Amelia Earhart
C/Capt Jacob B. Davis

General Billy Mitchell
C/Capt Molly R. Boothe
C/2Lt Josiah D. Bilbrey

C/2Lt Zachary W. Cannon
C/2Lt Robert B. Lewis

Neil Armstrong
C/Capt Molly R. Boothe
C/2Lt Josiah D. Bilbrey
C/2Lt Robert B. Lewis

C/CMSgt Nathan A. Bernhardt
C/CMSgt Benjamin S. Carpenter

Dr. Robert H. Goddard
C/2Lt Josiah D. Bilbrey
C/2Lt Robert B. Lewis
C/CMSgt Nathan A. Bernhardt

C/CMSgt Joshua M. McGlinksky
C/CMSgt Jocob D. Mcintosh
C/CMSgt Nolan V. Middlemas

General Jimmy Doolittle
C/2Lt Josiah D. Bilbrey
C/2Lt Robert B. Lewis
C/CMSgt Nathan A. Berhardt
C/CMSgt Joshua M. McGlinksky

C/CMSgt Jacob D. Mcintosh
C/CMSgt Nolan V. Middlemas
C/SMSgt Matthew R. McGlinksky

Charles A. Lindbergh
C/2LT Josiah D. Bilbrey
C/2Lt Robert B. Lewis
C/CMSgt Joshua M. McGlinsky
C/CMsgt Jacob D. Mcintosh

C/SMSgt Matthew R. McGlinksky
C/MSgt Joshua N. Garcia-Billings
C/MSgt Ryan T. Santiago

Captain Eddie Rickenbacker
C/CMSgt Joshua M. McGlinsky
C/CMSgt Jacob D. Mcintosh
C/SMSgt Matthew R. McGlinsky
C/MSgt Joshua N. Garcia-Billings
C/MSgt Ryan T. Santiago

C/TSgt Bryce H. Jackson
C/TSgt Grant C. McDaris
C/TSgt Daniel A. Owen
C/TSgt Alyssa M. Paull

Wright Brothers
C/CMSgt Jacob D. Mcintosh
C/MSgt Joshua N. Garcia-Billings
C/TSgt Bryce H. Jackson
138

C/TSgt Grant C. McDaris
C/TSgt Daniel A. Owen
C/TSgt Alyssa M. Paull

Data compiled from CAP e-Services.
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C/SSgt Cherie Cheyenne Carson
C/SSgt Ashlie L. Mason
C/SSgt Brian N. McCall

C/SSgt Jasen A. Sanchez
C/SSgt Dylan R. Sasser

Mary Feik
C/CMSgt Jacob D. Mcintosh
C/MSgt Joshua N. Garcia-Billings
C/TSgt Bryce H. Jackson
C/TSgt Grant C. McDaris
C/TSgt Daniel A. Owen
C/TSgt Alyssa M. Paull
C/SSgt Cherie Cheyenne Carson

C/SSgt Ashlie L. Mason
C/SSgt Brian N. McCall
C/SSgt Jasen A. Sanchez
C/SSgt Dylan R. Sasser
C/SrA Benjamin S. Bridges
C/SrA Cameron D. King
C/SrA Haleigh N. King

General H. H. “Hap” Arnold
C/MSgt Joshua N. Garcia-Billings
C/TSgt Grant C. McDaris
C/TSgt Daniel A. Owen
C/TSgt Alyssa M. Paull
C/SSgt Cherie Cheyenne Carson
C/SSgt Ashlie L. Mason
C/SSgt Brian N. McCall
C/SSgt Jasen A. Sanchez

C/SSgt Dylan R. Sasser
C/SrA Cameron D. King
C/SrA Haleigh N. King
C/A1C Luke A. Bridges
C/A1C Samuel E. Hey
C/A1C Aaron A. King
C/A1C Alyssa McRae
C/A1C Emely Ramos

General J. F. Curry
C/TSgt Grant C. McDaris
C/TSgt Daniel A. Owen
C/TSgt Alyssa M. Paull
C/SSgt Cherie Cheyenne Carson
C/SSgt Ashlie L. Mason
C/SSgt Brian N. McCall
C/SSgt Jasen A. Sanchez
C/SrA Haleigh N. King
C/A1C Samuel E. Hey
C/A1C Aaron A. King

C/A1C Alyssa McRae
C/A1C Emely Ramos
C/Amn Jacob A. Bright
C/Amn Luca Dean
C/Amn Joseph I. Diaz
C/Amn Xavier Hernandez-Pera
C/Amn Jacob N. Jahant
C/Amn Adam P. Lytle
C/Amn Dylan R. Myers
C/Amn Soto Omar Santiago

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APPENDIX D
SENIOR ACHIIEVMENT AWARDS
As of 31 December 2015139

Paul E. Garber Award
Maj David S. Newman

Grover Loening Aerospace Award
Maj Charles W. Sprinkle
Capt Evonna E. Myers

Capt Ronnie T. Yount

Benjamin O. Davis , Jr. Award
Capt Rhonda S. Auger

1st Lt James M. Farrey

General Charles Yeager Aerospace Education Award
Lt Col Carlisle A. Lincoln
1st Lt Donald A. Briola
2nd Lt William H. Moore
2nd Lt David Anthony Nedved

2nd Lt Christian E. Sluder
SM Douglas J. McDavis
SM Jeffrey Moore

Membership Award
1st Lt Donald A. Briola
1st Lt Gregory R. Larson
2nd Lt Robert K. Lewis
2nd Lt David Anthony Nedved
SM Deniece M. Carson
SM. Devron D. Chevalier

139

SM Zachary S. Henry
SM Bruce W. MacDonald
SM Douglas J. McDavis
SM Jeffery Moore
SM Dwaine Smith

Data compiled from CAP e-Services.
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APPENDIX E
SQUADRON AIRCRAFT

CESSNA 172 SKYHAWK140

Type

Four seat light aircraft

Purpose

Search, reconnaissance, communications, transport.

Performance
General
Horsepower
Top Speed
Cruise Speed
Stall Speed (dirty)
Gross Weight
Empty Weight
Fuel Capacity
Range
Aircrew
Take Off
Ground Roll
Over 50 ft Obstacle
Rate of Climb
Ceiling
Landing
Ground Roll
Over 50 ft Obstacle

150
122 knots
115 knots
43 knots
2300 pounds
1315 pounds
42.00 gallons
417 nautical miles
Pilot +3
865 feet
1525 feet
645 feet per minute
13100
520 feet
1250 feet

140

PilotFriend, “Cessna 172 I Skyhawk Performance and Specifications,” Aircraft Database, last modified
unknown, http://www.pilotfriend.com/aircraft%20performance/Cessna/1/15.htm, (accessed on December 31, 2009).
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CESSNA 182 SKYLANE141

Type

High performance four seat light aircraft

Purpose

Search, reconnaissance, communications, transport.

Performance
General
Horsepower
Top Speed
Cruise Speed
Stall Speed (dirty)
Gross Weight
Empty Weight
Useful Load
Fuel Capacity
Range
Aircrew
Take Off
Ground Roll
Over 50 ft Obstacle
Rate of Climb
Ceiling
Landing
Ground Roll
Over 50 ft Obstacle

230
143 knots
135 knots
54 knots
2550 pounds
1540 pounds
1213 pounds
55.00 gallons
443 nautical miles
Pilot +3
620 feet
1020 feet
620 feet
1020
610 feet
1290 feet

141

PilotFriend, “Cessna 182 Performance and Specifications,” Aircraft Database, last modified unknown,
http://www.pilotfriend.com/aircraft%20performance/Cessna/3/3.htm, (accessed on December 31, 2009).
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APPENDIX F
ASHEVILLE REGIONAL AIRPORT DIAGRAM

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GLOSSARY OF REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION
References
AFI 84-101, Historical Products, Services, and Requirements
AFI 84-105, Organizational Lineage, Honors, and Heraldry
CAPP 5, Civil Air Patrol Written History Self-Study Guide
CAPR 210-1, The Civil Air Patrol Historical Program
Department of the Army. Organizational History. Washington, DC: Center for Military History,
1999.

Abbreviations and Acronyms
§
1 AF/NORTHCOM
AE
AFB
AFI
AK
Asst
AVL
C
CAP
CAPP
CAPR
CBU
CD ROM
DECL
ELT
ES
FAA
FEMA
FL
ft
GA
HO
IT
JROTC
MADCAP
MCAS
MER
MOB
MS
NASA
NC

Section
1st Air Force / North Command
Aerospace Education
Air Force Base
Air Force Instruction
Alaska
Assistant
Asheville or Asheville Regional Airport
Cadet
Civil Air Patrol
Civil Air Patrol Pamphlet
Civil Air Patrol Regulation
Confidential But Unclassified
Compact Disk – Read Only Memory
Declassify
Emergency Locator Transmitter
Emergency Services
Federal Aviation Administration
Federal Emergency Management Administration
Florida
Feet
Georgia
History Office
Information Technology
Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps
Madison County / Civil Air Patrol
Marine Corps Air Station
Middle East Region
Mobile Office Building
Mississippi
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
North Carolina
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NCGS
NH
RCS
SAR
SAREx
STEM
TX
U
UAS
US
USAF
USC
VA

North Carolina General Statutes
New Hampshire
Record Control Symbol
Search and Recovery
Search and Recovery Exercise
Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
Texas
Unclassified
Unmanned Aerial System
United States
United States Air Force
United States Code
Virginia

Terms
Argent (White or Silver) - Positive: daylight, innocence, perfection, purity, truth, and wisdom.
Negative: blank, cold, ghostly, spectral, and void.
Azure (Blue) – Positive (light blue): calm seas, charity, cold, constancy, daylight, devotion,
innocence, plant Jupiter, loyalty, piety, sincerity, sky, thinking, and truth. Negative (dark blue):
doubt, discomfort, night, and stormy seas.
Disc – Shape on which the heraldic devices, symbols, or elements of a unit emblem are
displayed. The disc of today originated with a roundel, which consisted of a white five-pointed
star in a blue circle, with a red disc in the center of the star. The roundel was displayed
unofficially on early USA Signal Corps airplanes, adopted officially in 1917 for airplanes, and
later evolved into the national star and bar aircraft marking of today. The US Air Force adopted
the disc in the early 1950s as the official shape for squadron emblems.
Element – In an emblem design, a symbol or group of symbols, such as a constellation or bundle
of arrows, portraying a single characteristic, trait, or concept.
Emblem – An officially approved symbolic design portraying the distinctive history, mission,
and general information of an organization. It is an important, abiding element of the
organization’s heritage.
Functional Emblems – Unofficial, non-unit emblems locally designed, authorized, and
displayed. These are often referred to as “morale patches.”
Or (Yellow or Gold) – Positive: Constancy, dissemination, divinity, elevation of mind,
excellence, highest values, honor, illumination, intellect, intuition, justice, light, loyalty,
magnanimity, riches, ripened grain, sun, supreme wisdom, and wisdom. Negative: cowardice and
treachery.

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Unit – A Civil Air Patrol organization with no headquarters. Squadrons and numbered flights are
units.

Gazetteer
Arden – A town in south Buncombe County, North Carolina.
Asheville – A city in and the county seat of Buncombe County, North Carolina.
Asheville Regional Airport (FAA: AVL) – A class C airport in the town of Fletcher, 9 miles
south of the city of Asheville, in the state of North Carolina.
Barnardsville – A town in northern Buncombe County, North Carolina.
Boone – A city in and the county seat of Watauga County, North Carolina.
Buncombe County – A county located in western North Carolina, United States.
Burlington – A city in Alamance County, North Carolina.
Columbus AFB (FAA: CBM) – A United States Air Force Base located in Lowndes County,
Mississippi. Base assigned to the Air Education and Training Command.
Charlotte – A city in and the county seat of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina.
Charlotte-Douglas International Airport (FAA: CLT) – An airport outside the town of
Charlotte in the state of North Carolina. Charlotte-Douglas International Airport is the
sixth busiest in the world.
DuPont State Park – A 10,000 acre tract, located in Henderson and Transylvania counties in
western North Carolina.
Eastern North Carolina Justice Academy – A state operated police academy within the town
of Salemburg in Sampson County.
Gastonia – A city in and the county seat of Gaston County, North Carolina.
Hickory – A city in north-western Catawba County, North Carolina.
MCAS Cherry Point (FAA: NKT) – United States Marine Corps Air Station located in Craven
County, North Carolina. Base is home to the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing.
Rome – A city in and the capital of the European country of Italy.
Shelby – A city in and the county seat of Cleveland County, North Carolina.

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Stanly County Airport (FAA: VUJ) – Airport outside the town of Albemarle in the state of
North Carolina. The airport serves as a facility for the North Carolina National Guard.
Swannanoa – A town in eastern Buncombe County, North Carolina.
Weaverville – A town in northern Buncombe County, North Carolina.
Western North Carolina State Veterans Cemetery – A cemetery outside Swannanoa in
Buncombe County for the internment of veterans.
Woodfin – A town in northern Buncombe County, North Carolina.

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WORKS CITED
“Airport conducts emergency training.” Hendersonville Times. May 28, 2015.
http://www.blueridgenow.com/article/20150528/ARTICLES/150529921/0/search. Accessed
on February 3, 2015.
Allen, Carly. “The Fire Crews at Schenck Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center.” Fire
Management Today 71.4 (2011): 10-12. Web, Last modified unknown.
http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/fmt/fmt_pdfs/FMT71-4.pdf.
Amour, Lisa. “CAP conducts statewide hurricane exercise.” Last modified April 18, 2015.
https://www.ncwgcap.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=article.display&articleID=509. Accessed on
November 10, 2015.
Andresen, Arnie. “Re: Joint Training with U.S. Forestry Service.” Message to Squadron.
December 17, 2015. Email.
“Asheville area students and staffers earn awards and honors.” Asheville Citizen Times.
November 10, 2014. http://www.citizen-times.com/story/life/2014/11/09/asheville-areastudents-staffers-earn-awards-honors/18778169/. Accessed on November 15, 2014.
Bailey, Christopher T. “Re: [CAPNC] Clarification.” Message to NC Wing. April 17, 2015.
Email.
Bailey, Christopher T. “Re: [CAPNC] SAREX 20150418.” Message to NC Wing. April 17,
2015. Email.
Benson, Kit and Benson, Organ. “Lieut Gill Robb Wilson.” Find a Grave. May 15, 2006.
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February 2010.
Beutler, Derk R. “Wing Gastonia Squadron Open House – A day to learn about CAP.” Last
modified May 2, 2015.
https://www.ncwgcap.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=article.display&articleID=512,. Accessed
on June 8, 2015.
Car, Kristi. “Statistics Indicate a Shifting SAR Landscape.” Civil Air Patrol Volunteer (JanuaryMarch 2013): 7-11.
Civil Air Patrol. “202 Units Tapped for Quality Cadet Unit Awards.” Last modified September
18, 2015.
http://www.capvolunteernow.com/news/%3F202_units_tapped_for_quality_cadet_unit_awar
ds%26show%3Dnews%26newsID%3D20733. Accessed on January 27, 2016.
Civil Air Patrol. “History of Civil Air Patrol.” Last modified unknown.
http://www.gocivilairpatrol.com/about/. Access on 9 February 2016.
Civil Air Patrol. “List of 2011-2012 Winners.” Last modified unknown,
http://www.capmembers.com/media/cms/20112012_Winners_3D85A16CE3BB3.pdf.
Accessed on January 27, 2016.
Civil Air Patrol. “List of 2013-2014 Winners.” Last modified unknown.
http://www.capmembers.com/media/cms/2014_Quality_Winners_C4D10DCB05EE8.pdf.
Accessed on January 27, 2016.
1
Civil Air Patrol. “List of 2014-2015 Winners.” Last modified unknown.
http://www.capmembers.com/media/cms/2015_QCUA4_85E67A91C8BA6.pdf. Accessed
on January 27, 2016.
Civil Air Patrol. “MER-NC-019 Asheville Composite Squadron Hosts AE Outreach Events.”
Last modified unknown.
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http://ae.capmembers.com/media/cms/AE_EVENTSCUB_SCOUTS_AND_YMCA_Ashvil_
672355158B9E3.pdf. Accessed on February 15, 2016.
Civil Air Patrol. “Quality Cadet Unit Award.” Last modified unknown.
http://www.capmembers.com/cadet_programs/library/quality-cadet-unit-award/. Accessed on
January 27, 2016.
Civil Air Patrol. “SUPTFC.” Last modified unknown. http://suptfc.com. Accessed on December
12, 2015.
Crawford, David E. “NC Wing Pilot Completes 250 Orientation Flights.” Carolina Wingspan.
June 2013.
D’Cruz, Conrad. “Wing NC Wing Civil Air Patrol assisting with flood damage assessment in
South Carolina.” Last modified October 9, 2015.
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February 9, 2015.
Facebook, Inc. “Asheville Composite Squadron’s Facebook Page.” Last modified on January 30,
2016. Accessed on February 17, 2016. https://www.facebook.com/AshevilleCAP.
Facebook, Inc. “Shelby Composite Squadron’s Facebook Page. Last modified on December 11,
2015. Accessed on January 29, 2016. http://www.facebook.com/capshelbysquadron/.
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MA: Focal Press, 1997. Print.
Furstenberg Jr., Frank F. and Hughes, Mary Elizabeth. “Social Capital and Successful
Development among At-Risk Youth.” Journal of Marriage and the Family 57, no. 3 (August
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Good Reads. “Quotes about Preparedness.” Last modified unknown.
http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/preparedness. Accessed on February 14, 2015.
Literary Devices. “Heavy is the Head that Wears the Crown.” Last modified unknown.
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2016.
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Accessed on February 14, 2015.
Myers, Joseph A. and Louis Toms. History of the Asheville Composite Squadron, 1 January-31
December 2013. Tech. North Carolina Wing, 2015. Web. Last modified unknown.
http://history.cap.gov/files/original/19d60a99d5d98fbfead94cd52f3ef042.pdf. Accessed on
February 3, 2016.
Myers, Joseph A. and Louis V. Toms. History of the Ashville Composite Squadron, 1 January-31
December 2014, Tech. North Carolina Wing, 2015. Print.
Parker, Clint. “Re: Squadron Dues.” Message to Squadron. February 8, 2014. Email.
Retired Navy captain makes historic flight in service of WNC.” Last modified August 5, 2015.
http://www.citizen-times.com/story/news/local/2015/08/05/retired-navy-captain-makeshistoric-flight-service-wnc/31152011/. Accessed on October 10, 2015.
The Spaatz Association. “Aerospace Leadership Scholarships.” Last modified unknown.
https://spaatzassociation.wordpress.com/programs/aviation-scholarships/. Accessed on
January 27, 2016.
The Spaatz Association. “Scholarship Recipients.” Last modified unknown.
https://spaatzassociation.wordpress.com/scholarship-recipients/. Accessed on January 27,
2016.

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Stevens, Scott E. “Asheville Composite Squadron conducts Mountain Fury training exercise –
three Maryland Wing check pilots certified.” Last modified January 15, 2015.
https://www.ncwgcap.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=article.display&articleID=475. Accessed on
November 10, 2015.
Stevens, Scott. “Asheville Squadron Holds Change of Command – New Squadron Commander
brings decades of experience.” Last modified October 1, 2015.
https://www.ncwgcap.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=article.display&articleID=555. Accessed on
November 10, 2015.
Stevens, Scott. “RE: Request for Assistance – Information Technology Section of Unit History.”
Message to the author. January 13, 2015. Email.
Stevens, Scott. “RE: Request for Assistance – Squadron IT Support CY2015.” Message to the
author. January 6, 2016. Email.
Turner, Perry. “10 Milestone Flights.” Air & Space Smithsonian. March 2003. Web.
http://www.airspacemag.com/history-of-flight/10-milestone-flights-4056259/?noist=&page=2. Accessed on February 3, 2015.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--16 January 2015.” Message to Squadron. January
16, 2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--22 January 2015.” Message to Squadron. January
23, 2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--27 January 2015.” Message to Squadron. January
29, 2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--5 March 2015.” Message to Squadron. March 6,
2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--12 March 2015.” Message to Squadron. March 13,
2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--16 April 2015.” Message to Squadron. April 17,
2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--27 [sic] April 2015.” Message to Squadron. April
24, 2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Meeting Minutes--7 May 2015.” Message to Squadron. May 8, 2015.
Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--14 May 2015.” Message to Squadron. May 15,
2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--4 June 2015.” Message to Squadron. June 5, 2015.
Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--11 June j2015 [sic].” Message to Squadron. June
12, 2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--18 June 2015.” Message to Squadron. June 19,
2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--2 July 2015.” Message to Squadron. July 3, 2015.
Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--16 July 2015.” Message to Squadron. July 18,
2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--6 August 2015.” Message to Squadron. August 7,
2015. Email.

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Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--13 August 2015.” Message to Squadron. August
14, 2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--20 August 2015.” Message to Squadron. August
21, 2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--10 September 2015.” Message to Squadron.
September 12, 2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--17 September 2015.” Message to Squadron.
September 18, 2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--1 October 2015.” Message to Squadron. October 2,
2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--8 October 2015.” Message to Squadron. October 9,
2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--15 October 2015.” Message to Squadron. October
16, 2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--22 October 2015.” Message to Squadron. October
23, 2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--19 November 2015.” Message to Squadron.
November 20, 2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--20 August 2015.” Message to Squadron. August
21, 2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--3 December 2015.” Message to Squadron.
December 4, 2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--10 December 2015.” Message to Squadron.
December 11, 2015. Email.
Wallace, Wallace. “Re: Minutes of Meeting--18 December 2015.” Message to Squadron.
December 19, 2015. Email.
Willis, Michael. “Re: Historian of the Year.” Message to Author. December 12, 2015. Email.
US Forestry Service. “Schenck.” Last modified unknown.
http://www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5386256.pdf. Accessed on
February 9, 2015.
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abbas_ibn_Firnas. Accessed on February 7, 2016.
Wikipedia. “Civil Air Patrol,” Last modified February 10, 2015:
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Wikipedia. “Hurricane SandyJoaquin.” Last modified January 21, 2015:
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Gillespie_Magee,_Jr. Accessed on February 7, 2015.
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Wikipedia. “Technology during World War II.” Last modified February 5, 2016:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technology_during_World_War_II. Accessed on February 9, 2016.

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DISTRIBUTION LIST
OFFICE
AVL/CC
AVL/HO
NC WG/HO
MER/HO
CAP HQ/HO

COPY NUMBER
1
2
2
1
1

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