File #1257: "2014 South Dakota Wing History"

2014 South Dakota Wing History

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2014 South Dakota Wing History

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HISTORY OF
SOUTH DAKOTA WING
CIVIL AIR PATROL
Official Auxiliary of the United States Air Force

1 January 2014 – 31 December 2014
NARRATIVE

HISTORY
of
SOUTH DAKOTA WING
CIVIL AIR PATROL
Official Auxiliary of the United States Air Force

Prepared By
Major Bruce Kipp, CAP
Assistant Wing Historian

Reviewed By
Major Todd Epp
Wing Historian

Col John N. Seten, CAP
South Dakota Wing Commander
South Dakota Wing Headquarters
Rapid City Regional Airport
South Dakota

i

FRONTISPIECE

South Dakota Wing
Wing Headquarters – Rapid City (Pennington County)
Squadron Locations
1. Brookings
2. Custer
3. Pierre
4. Rapid City
5. Sioux Falls
6. Spearfish

Big Sioux Composite Squadron
Crazy Horse Composite Squadron
Pierre Composite Squadron
Rushmore Composite Squadron
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron
Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron

Figure 1. Location of South Dakota Wing Units

ii

TABLE OF CONTENTS
VOLUME I - NARRATIVE
Title Page ....................................................................................................................
Frontispiece ………………………………………………………………….….……
Table of Contents.........................................................................................................
List of Illustrations ......................................................................................................
Chronology ..................................................................................................................

i
ii
iii
iv
vii

CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................ 1

CHAPTER II

EMERGENCY SERVICES ......................................................................... 2

CHAPTER III

AEROSPACE EDUCATION ...................................................................... 13

CHAPTER IV

CADET PROGRAMS ................................................................................. 16

CHAPTER V

CADET ORIENTATION FLIGHTS .......................................................... 23

CHAPTER VI

OTHER NOTABLE EVENTS ................................................................... 29

LIST OF SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS ................................................................................ 42
VOLUME II - SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS

iii

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure

Page

1.

Location of South Dakota Wing Units …………………………….…….……… ii

2.

Instrument panel of Garmin G1000 equipped C-182…………………………… 3

3. G1000 Classroom in Rapid City………………………………………………… 4
4. Briefing room during Biennial Operational Evaluation………………………… 5
5. Tornado near Silver City, SD on 27 May………………………………………. 6
6. Flooding along Big Sioux River on 19 June……………………………………. 7
7. Terrain around Quonset hut used as ICP for REDCAP………………………… 8
8. Quonset hut used as ICP for REDCAP…………………………………………. 8
9. Pilots load coordinates into aircraft navigation system…………………………. 9
10. Overview of path of Wessington Springs Tornado……………………………… 9
11. SDWG Ground Search Training………………………………...……………… 10
12. Col Beason turns onto final approach at Rapid City Airport……………………. 10
13. Col Seten’s Exercise Briefing……………………………………………...…… 11
14. Sioux Falls Composite Squadron aircraft taxing out for a SAREX sortie……… 11
15. Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron ground search team in action…..…… 11
16. CAP Ground Search Team securing aircraft crash site…………………………. 12
17. CAP Ground Search Team departing aircraft crash site………………………… 12
18. NDWG FLIR-equipped Cessna-182 on static display………………………..… 13
19. Balsa wood and powered glider pilots………………………………….…….… 13
20. CAP Model Rocketry Badge Awardees………………………………………… 14
21. Crazy Horse Composite Squadron Aerospace Excellence award recipients…… 14
22. C/SMSgt Jason Parry launches his rocket………………………………..…….. 16
23. C/TSgt Kyle Stiffarm launches his rocket………………………………..……. 16
24. C/SSgt Thomas Dillon launches his rocket……………………………….…… 16
25. Big Sioux Composite Squadron CyberPatriot-VI team…………………..…… 16
26. Rushmore Composite Squadron Color Guard ready to perform………….…… 17
27. Rushmore Composite Squadron Color Guard undergoing judging…………… 17
28. Regional Johnson Flight Academy graduation ceremony…………..…………
iv

18

29. Johnson Flight Academy wetting down for those who soloed………………… 18
30. Big Sioux Composite Squadron CyberPatriot-VI team receives AFA award…

18

31. Joint Dakotas Encampment logo………………………………………………

19

32. Joint Dakotas Encampment staff and participants…………………………….

19

33. CAP Contingent to 2014 NCSA Blue Beret………………………………..…

20

34. SDWG Contingent to 2014 NCSA Blue Beret…………………………..……

20

35. SDWG Glider Day at Hot Springs……………………………………………

21

36. SDWG cadet prepares for glider orientation ride……………………….……

21

37. SDWG cadet prepares for glider orientation ride……………………….……

21

38. SDWG cadet prepares for glider orientation ride……………………….……

21

39. SDWG cadet prepares for glider orientation ride…………………….………

21

40. SDWG National Character Day classroom…………………………..………

22

41. SDWG National Character Day cadet participants…………………..………

22

42. Rushmore Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride………………………….……

23

43. Sioux Falls Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride………………………………

24

44. Sioux Falls Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride………………………………

24

45. Sioux Falls Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride………………………………

25

46. Sioux Falls Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride………………………………

25

47. Sioux Falls Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride………………………………

26

48. Rushmore Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride………………………….……

27

49. Rushmore Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride………………………………

27

50. Rushmore Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride………………………………

27

51. Sioux Falls Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride…………………..…………

27

52. Sioux Falls Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride…………………..…………

28

53. Rushmore Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride………………………………

28

54. SD Governor poses with SDWG contingent on Rotunda staircase….………

29

55. SDWG CC and CV sit in state Senate gallery on CAP Day…………………

30

56. SDWG cadets sit in state House gallery on CAP Day……………………….

30

57. Low-Level Route Survey photo of towers at Turkey Ridge…………………

31

58. Mountain lion wearing radio tracking collar…………………………………

32

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59. Cessna-421 rescued by CAP at Spearfish………………………………..……

34

60. Maj Goodrich plots LLRS routes in support of the SD Air National Guard.…

36

61. Maj Epp & Museum Director Ms. Sonja Johnson at the SDWG/CAP exhibit..

37

62. A cadet has moulage applied in an exercise supporting the SD ANG………… 38
63. Crew of cadet victims in an exercise supporting the SD ANG………………… 38
64. Capt Schmid after his final landing for Passport South Dakota…………...…… 39
65. Map of all 74 public use airports in South Dakota………………………..…… 39
66. Gold Level patch and tab for Capt Schmid’s civilian flight jacket……..……… 39
67. SDWG Christmas Tree at the State Capitol……………………………………. 40
68. Big Sioux Composite Squadron Wreaths Across America…………….………. 41
69. Big Sioux Composite Squadron Wreaths Across America………………..…… 41
70. Crazy Horse Composite Squadron Wreaths Across America……………..…… 41

vi

SOUTH DAKOTA WING CHRONOLOGY 2014
January
06-07
11
15
18
22
29
31

Mission #14-C-4130 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Wing Split SAREX – Sioux Falls/Rapid City
Mission #14-C-4130 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-C-4130 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Wing Safety Day
Mission #14-C-4130 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-C-4130 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills

February
05
11-12
20
20
25-26

Brief SD Air Nat’l Guard on CAP 2013 Low-Level Route Surveys
Mission #14-C-4526 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Governor’s Declaration of Civil Air Patrol Day in South Dakota
Wing Legislative Day at State Capitol
Mission #14-C-4526 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills

March
04
10
10
12
22-23
25

New Commander – Big Sioux Composite Squadron
AFRCC Mission #14-M-0096A – Missing Person
Mission #14-C-4967 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-C-4967 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Garmin G-1000 Training Clinic (Rapid City)
Mission #14-C-4967 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills

03
04
10-11
18
20
21
21-26
22
24
26
28

New Commander – Crazy Horse Composite Squadron
AFRCC Mission #14-M-0145 – ELT
Mission #14-C-5454 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-C-5454 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
AFRCC Mission #14-M-0166 – ELT
Mission #14-C-5454 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Biennial Operational Evaluation held at Sioux Falls
Mission #14-1-5487 – Low Level Route Survey for SD Air Nat’l Guard
Mission #14-1-5487 – Low Level Route Survey for SD Air Nat’l Guard
South Dakota Wing Annual Conference
AFRCC Mission #14-M-0177 – Missing Aircraft

05
09
14
19-20
27
28

Mission #14-C-5759 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-C-5759 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-C-5759 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-C-5759 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-C-5759 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-1-6074– Tornado Damage Survey in Silver City

April

May

vii

30

President signs CAP CGM bill

05
05-12
10
12-19
19
19
21
21
23
23
27

Mission #14-C-6209 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Aircraft support to NCSA Flight Academy, Mattoon, IL
Mission #14-C-6209 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Support to NCSA Flight Academy, Mattoon, IL
Mission #14-1-6419 – Aerial survey of flooding on Big Sioux River
Mission #14-1-6428– Wessington Springs tornado damage survey
Wing Split SAREX – Sioux Falls/Rapid City
Mission #14-M-0295A– Missing Person
Mission #14-C-6209 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Wing personnel support to Red Cross shelter in Wessington Springs
New Commander – Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron

02-03
08-09
12
15-16
16
16-17
22-23
23-24
28-29

Mission #14-C-6610 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-C-6610 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-1-6809 – Low Level Route Survey for SD Air Nat’l Guard
Mission #14-C-6610 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-1-6809 – Low Level Route Survey for SD Air Nat’l Guard
Mission #14-1-6835 - Falcon Keynote – for SD Air Nat’l Guard
Mission #14-C-6610 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-1-6809 – Low Level Route Survey for SD Air Nat’l Guard
Mission #14-C-6610 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills

June

July

August
04
07-09
08
11
12
14
14-16
16
19
22-23
25
26
27
29

Mission #14-C-7129 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Wing Aerospace Education weekend in Pierre
Wing opens CAP exhibit at SD Air National Guard Museum
Mission #14-1-6809A – Low Level Route Survey for SDANG
Mission #14-C-7129 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-C-7129 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
CAP National Convention – SD Wing wins NCR SAR Missions Award
Mission #14-1-6809A – Low Level Route Survey for SDANG
Mission #14-1-6809A – Low Level Route Survey for SDANG
Wing SAREX – Rapid City/Sioux Falls
Mission #14-C-7129 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-1-6809A – Low Level Route Survey for SDANG
Mission #14-C-7129 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-1-6809A – Low Level Route Survey for SDANG

September
01
03
08
11

Wing Glider Day at Hot Springs
Mission #14-C-7604 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-C-7604 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Wing aircraft flies 9/11 tribute

viii

12
14
16
17
20-21
23

Mission #14-C-7604 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #14-1-7655 – Low Level Route Survey for SDANG
Mission #14-C-7604 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Wing C-172 sent for conversion from Skyhawk to Glasshawk
North Central Region Conference
Mission #14-1-7685 Support to Air Force Magazine at Ellsworth AFB

October
01
07-08
09
11
14
18
19-24
22
29

Mission #15-C-3240 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #15-C-3240 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
AFRCC Mission #14-M-0517 – ELT/EPIRB Search
Wing Split SAREX in Sioux Falls/Spearfish
Mission #15-C-3240 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Joint Dakotas SLS/CLC Course held in Custer, SD
Mission #15-1-3517 Interagency Wind Turbine Radar Interference Study
Mission #15-C-3240 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #15-C-3240 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills

November
04
06
13
20-21
23-23

Mission #15-C-3596 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #15-C-3596 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #15-C-3596 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #15-C-3596 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Joint Dakotas NCR Aerospace Education Weekend

30

AFRCC Mission #14-M-0606 – Missing Aircraft

December
03
05
10
10
19
30
31

Mission #15-C-4710 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #15-C-4710 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #15-C-4710 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
CGM Awarded to WWII-era CAP members – 4 in South Dakota
Mission #15-C-4710 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #15-C-4710 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills
Mission #15-C-4710 Aerial Wildlife Survey – Black Hills

ix

NARRATIVE
CHAPTER I – INTRODUCTION
The South Dakota Wing completed its 73rd year of service to the people of the State of South
Dakota and to the United States of America.
South Dakota Wing Origin
The South Dakota Wing was established 1 December 1941 as “Wing 77” and placed under the
Command of Lt. Col. Thomas B. Roberts, Jr. On 30 May 1955, Wing 77 was re-designated
“Wing 40000”. In 1999, Wing 40000 was again re-designated as “SD001” the designation it
bears today.1 The wing is currently commanded by Col John N. Seten.
Wing Organization
The South Dakota Wing is organized into a Wing Headquarters located at Rapid City Municipal
Airport, Rapid City, SD and, currently, six subordinate units. The units are composite squadrons
consisting of approximately 300 Cadets and Senior Members.
Wing Status
The South Dakota Wing completed 2014 on a high note. It was an especially active year for the
wing in providing emergency services responses to AFRCC-tasked missions (missing aircraft,
missing persons and ELT searches), and county, state and federal tasking for disaster relief
(flooding, tornadoes). Wing aviation assets took part in research for a joint Department of
Defense/Department of Homeland Security project, supported the state’s Air National Guard in
surveying military air routes, and acted as a target for airborne intercept.
Aerospace Education had a substantial role in wing activity for 2014 featuring model rocketry,
powered model aircraft and model gliders. In addition, there was an opportunity to inspect a
FLIR-equipped CAP aircraft, visits to military museums, and a number of home grown AE
activities.
The wing’s Cadet Programs for 2014 were equally active with an encampment, leadership
academies, competitions, participation in National Cadet Special Activities and regional
academies and a lot of just plain fun activities.
2014 was also a year of community activity. Wing units supported and/or took part in numerous
community events across the state. Color Guards were especially active in that respect. A great
deal of support was provided to aviation related events, especially fly-ins. Greatly enhanced
community awareness and public goodwill was generated by the wing’s appearance at and
participation in these activities.

Unpublished Monograph “The Birth and Growth of South Dakota Wing of the Civil Air Patrol” by Col. Lester
W. Snyder, Jr., CAP. Revised, 1 January 2010. Electronic file held by the Wing Assistant Historian.
1

1

CHAPTER II – EMERGENCY SERVICES
JANUARY 2014
 SDWG held a Safety Day on 22 January. By regulation an annual Safety Day is to be
held in all active units sometime during the months of January, February or March to focus on
improving safety knowledge and attitudes. This required day is focused entirely on safety
subjects applicable to the unit. Safety Day education to meet this requirement may take place at a
regularly scheduled unit meeting providing the academic content is devoted to safety.
 Despite the arctic blast on 23 January, Col Seten and Lt Col Larson travelled to Pierre on
a variety of liaison missions. They attended the quarterly meeting of the Volunteer Organizations
Active in Disasters (VOAD), a coalition of the major national voluntary organizations in the U.S.
that have made disaster-related work a priority. During the meeting, they briefed the VOAD on
CAP missions and capabilities. Following the VOAD meeting, they met with Adjutant General
Major General Tim Reisch to discuss recent CAP state missions and future CAP capabilities.
While there, they also met with Assistant Director Steve Harding and members of the National
Guard budget staff. The last stop of the day was a meeting with newly appointed State Director
of Homeland Security Mr. Steve Pluta. He was briefed on CAP "Homeland Skies" capabilities
and presented with a new initiative to support advanced capabilities.
MARCH 2014
 REDCAP: AFRCC Mission #14-M-0096A – Missing Person. Late in the afternoon of 10
March, the South Dakota Wing was placed on alert by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center
at Tyndall AFB, Florida. The mission request, initiated by the Lawrence County Office of
Emergency Management and the City of Spearfish Police Department, was to search for a person
reported as missing in the Lookout Mountain area near Spearfish. Col Mike Beason was the
Incident Commander. A SDWG Cessna-182T took off from Spearfish Municipal Airport about
6:45pm piloted by Lt Col Rodney DeWeese with Capt Bill Collister as observer. The search area
encompassed Spearfish and from I-90 Exit 12 to Lookout Mountain. The aircraft flew for
about1.3 hours before darkness fell. The mission was suspended on 11 March due to severe
weather in the search area. The mission resumed on 12 March with the City of Spearfish Police
Department taking the lead supported by the Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron who
fielded a ground team to search the west side of Lookout Mountain. In addition, the Cessna-182T
searched the Spearfish area from the air for an additional 1.5 hours. Lt Col DeWeese was again
the Mission Pilot with Lt Col Jim Hopewell and Capt Gary Schroeder as Mission Observers.
 Garmin G1000 Training Clinic in Rapid City. SDWG is fortunate to have two Cessna182 aircraft, both with Garmin's leading-edge G1000 avionics packages. Aircrew familiarity with
the operation of these systems is essential for use at their full potential and to ensure standards of
safety and pilot proficiency continue to be met at the highest levels.

2

Over the weekend of 22-23 March, members of five squadrons of South Dakota Wing attended a
CAP-sponsored G1000 training clinic in Rapid City. At this event, 20 members spent 12 hours
working with the G1000 in classroom and hands-on settings. CAP instructors taught the basics of
G1000 operation, and flight operations for both VFR and IFR flight conditions. Instructor pilot
candidates and current instructor pilots attended an instructor pilot module, while pilots not
seeking instructor status entered the cockpit and operated G1000 consoles in the aircraft, with
auxiliary power being provided to ensure the aircraft would remain mission-capable.

Figure 2 - Instrument panel of Garmin G1000 equipped C-182
CAP members shared their knowledge in an interactive classroom environment, which included
use of Garmin's G1000 simulator to conduct IFR procedures. Classroom instructors were 2nd Lt
Jeremy Swier, Maj Craig Goodrich, Capt Joe Oye, Lt Col Greg Lair, and Capt Scott Giles.
Although Lt Col Gary Hewett didn’t do any platform instruction, he monitored the new G1000
instructors, and added commentary based on his extensive experience in the glass cockpit. He
reminded participants of the importance having a backup plan when all the electronics fail. Col
Mike Beason capably assisted Lt Col Hewett with the hands-on portion of the training, which
included a North Dakota Wing aircraft flown in by the CAP-USAF Liaison Region Assistant
Director of Operations, Mr. Greg Maier. The closing question-and-answer session was
informative and lively, focusing on instrument approach "gotchas" and the coordination of air
traffic control between the towers and approach control serving Rapid City Regional Airport and
Ellsworth Air Force Base.
Our pilots and instructors have gained new knowledge, refreshed their skills, and gained an
understanding of how CAP expects the G1000 to be utilized for maximum mission performance.
The Wing is providing a limited number of flights for members who attended, with an emphasis
3

on current instructor currency, instructor candidate development and certification, and mission
and transport pilot currency and development.
Major Goodrich, the Project Officer for the event said, “I think we all learned a lot, and we all
had a good time. It was great to have so many pilots at this training. Building relationships with
our CAP flying buddies and interactive discussion while learning made this into a fantastic
weekend.”

Figure 3 - G1000 Classroom in Rapid City
APRIL 2014
 Biennial Operational Evaluation: The South Dakota Wing took part in a weeklong graded
mission readiness exercise from 21-26 April. Every two years a U.S. Air Force inspection team
evaluates the Wing’s effectiveness in responding to a variety of potential real-world
incidents. Typical scenarios include searches for missing/crashed aircraft, missing persons,
floods, and humanitarian aid. The evaluation culminated Saturday, 26 April, with a major
exercise at the Sioux Falls Regional Airport / Joe Foss Field. Specially equipped Civil Air Patrol
aircraft, vehicles and approximately 80 command staff, ground support and aircrew members
gathered from across the state.
The Mission Base at the airport executed a broad spectrum of operations in response to training
incidents submitted by the USAF Evaluation Team. Maj Bruce Kipp, Wing Public Affairs
Officer commented, “We train continuously in order to prepare for these real-world missions that
affect peoples’ lives and impact the health and welfare of our communities. We are ready to
respond in the event of an actual incident.”
The Wing received a rating of “Highly Successful” from the Air Force for its performance
during its operations evaluation. Several staff sections received the coveted rating of “Excellent”.
In addition, there was not a single “Finding”, an area which requires corrective action. Wing
Commander, Col John Seten, and Wing Vice Commander Lt Col Rick Larson, who was also the
Incident Commander, praised the professionalism of the members, their ability to work together
as a team, and their determination to see a mission through to its successful conclusion. Col
Seten added “The rating of highly successful is a true testament to the hard work of our top
notch, dedicated professional volunteers.”
4

Figure-4 - Briefing room during Biennial Operational Evaluation
 REDCAP: AFRCC Mission #14-M-0145 – ELT. In the early afternoon of 4 April, South
Dakota Wing was placed on alert by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall AFB,
Florida. The mission was to search for an Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) beacon
reported active in the vicinity of Mitchell by several aircraft passing overhead. In addition, a
USAF tanker aircraft was able to obtain a rough triangulation of the signal as well. CAP Incident
Commander Lt Col Rick Larson notified Sioux Falls Composite Squadron to start preparations to
launch two aircraft and form a ground team to search for the ELT. However, prior to the aircraft
taking off and ground team deploying, Lt Col Larson, using Google Earth was able to pinpoint
the ELT in the vicinity of Letcher, about 20 miles northwest of Mitchell. It was determined that
the signal was emanating from a crop-duster aircraft undergoing maintenance and the ELT was
silenced. The mission was initially closed around 1445 local time. However, additional reports
were received that ELT signals continued active, this time in an area south of Yankton. Two
aircraft from the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron tracked the ELT signals to Hartington,
Nebraska. One aircraft landed at Hartington Municipal Airport/Bud Becker Field where it was
discovered that an individual working on his personal ELTs was unaware they had been
triggered. These ELTs were silenced and the aircraft returned to base. The Cessna-172 was
piloted by Capt Matt Meert with Capt Lauren Greenhoff as Mission Observer. The other aircraft,
a Cessna-182, was piloted by Capt Joe Oye with Capt Jerry Gabert as Mission Observer and
Capt Karla West as Mission Scanner. In addition to the two aircraft, two ground search teams
were dispatched from Sioux Falls Composite Squadron. However the ELTs were located shortly
after the ground search teams departed so the teams were recalled to base. In all some 18 SDWG
personnel were involved.
 REDCAP: AFRCC Mission #14-M-0166 – ELT. At 9:05pm on 19 April, the South
Dakota Wing was placed on alert by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall AFB,
Florida. The mission was to search for an Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT) beacon that had
been reported as active in the vicinity of Sioux Falls Regional Airport by aircraft passing
overhead. The CAP Incident Commander, Maj Craig Goodrich, of the Rushmore Composite
Squadron in Rapid City, notified the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron to ready aircrews and a
ground search team to search for the ELT using radio direction finding equipment. A Sioux Falls
5

based CAP Cessna-182T piloted by Maj Justin Johnson with Capt Matt Meert as Mission
Observer and direction finding equipment operator, and Lt Jerald Hayden as Mission Scanner
took off at Midnight and flew a route over a large portion of eastern South Dakota searching for
the signal. The Big Sioux Composite Squadron in Brookings was notified to prepare a ground
search team and activate additional aircrews if needed. At approximately 2:30am the CAP
aircraft pinpointed the ELT at a private airstrip southwest of Huron. The Incident Commander
called the owner of the airstrip who went out and turned off the beacon. As a precaution, the
CAP aircraft continued to circle overhead until its equipment confirmed that the ELT had been
silenced. The aircraft then returned to base, the mission had been successfully completed.
MAY 2014
 Tornado Damage Survey, Mission #14-1-6074. The Pennington County Office of
Emergency Management requested SDWG conduct a time-sensitive mission to photograph the
damage in the wake of the tornado that touched down in the Silver City area of the Black Hills
on 27 May. The severe storm system in the Black Hills also produced hail up to the size of golf
balls near Keystone, Hill City, Pactola Reservoir and Sheridan Lake. The mission objective was
to provide geo-tagged photographs of the extent of the tornado's damage path.
Responding to the mission request, a SDWG Cessna-182T took off from the Rapid City
Regional Airport with Maj Craig Goodrich and Lt Col Gary Hewett; both highly experienced
Mission Pilots, on board. Their survey mission lasted about 1.5 hours, during which they took
nearly 100 high resolution geo-tagged photos that were hand delivered to the Pennington EOM.

Figure-5 - Tornado near Silver City, SD on 27 May
JUNE 2014
 Big Sioux Flooding Survey, Mission #14-1-6419. A week of severe weather during the
middle of the month produced torrential rain that resulted in wide-spread flooding in the East
River area. The state Office of Emergency Management requested the Civil Air Patrol’s South
Dakota Wing conduct an aerial photographic survey on 19 June along the Big Sioux River from
Sioux Falls to where it meets the Missouri River. Later in the day the Federal Emergency
6

Management Agency (FEMA) requested that the photos of the flooding be sent to them. What
began as state tasking changed into a federal disaster relief mission. A Cessna-182T from the
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron was assigned the mission. The aircraft departed Sioux Falls
Regional Airport at approximately 9:00am for the 2 hour sortie. Capt Neil Schmid served as the
SDWG Incident Commander for the mission. The CAP aircrew consisted of Captain Matt Meert
(Mission Pilot), Captain Karla West (Mission Scanner) and 1st Lieutenant Robert Hinkhouse
(Mission Observer). Over 250 photos were taken showing the flow and spread of flood waters
and the damage caused. The photos were uploaded for federal and state emergency management
officials’ analysis and assessment. Photo used with permission of FEMA.

Figure-6 - Flooding along Big Sioux River on 19 June
 REDCAP: AFRCC Mission #14-M-0295A – Missing Person. Around 1800Z, while
engaged in SAREX training activity, the aircrew staging base in Rapid City transitioned to a
mission base for a real-world search and rescue mission. Butte County’s Office of Emergency
Management requested SDWG assistance in locating a woman missing since Wednesday.
Around Noon Central Time on Saturday, 21 June, the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center in
Florida activated the South Dakota Wing to assist in the search. According to media reports, the
women and her friend were swept away by a flash flood late Tuesday. The subject’s friend was
found around Noon Wednesday and was hospitalized in Spearfish.
A Cessna-182T aircraft from Rushmore Composite Squadron (Rapid City) flew two sorties
spending some 4.5 hours over the search area before diverting to Spearfish due to poor weather.
The aircrew consisted of Capt Josh Hall (Mission Pilot), Lt Lisa Swanson (Mission Scanner) and
Maj John Hall (Mission Observer). Capt Bill Collister, from Lookout Mountain Composite
Squadron, drove to the mission base in Rapid City and acted as a Mission Staff Assistant. Lt Col
7

Dave Jeffries, Rushmore Composite Squadron (Rapid City) served as Communications Officer at
the mission base. Capt David Small from Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron went to Butte
County’s Incident Command Post and served as Liaison Officer. The ICP, a Quonset hut, was
about ½ mile east and 2 miles north of Hwy 85 in rolling hills near the junction with County
Road 168. ICP photos with permission of Butte County Sheriff.

Figure-7 - Terrain around Quonset hut used as ICP for REDCAP
BUTTE COUNTY INCIDENT COMMAND POST FOR MISSING PERSON SEARCH. THIS TERRAIN VIEW HIGHLIGHTS THE
REMOTENESS OF THE AREA AND DIFFICULTY OF THE SEARCH. THE MISSING PERSON; SHORT, SLENDER, WEARING
DARK CLOTHING, AND EXPECTED TO BE LYING DOWN WAS BELIEVED SOMEWHERE WITHIN THE SEARCH AREA.

Figure-8 - Quonset hut used as ICP for REDCAP
 South Dakota Wing Statewide Search and Rescue Exercise. On Saturday, 21 June the
South Dakota Wing held its second statewide search and rescue exercise (SAREX) for 2014.
This “Split SAREX” took place in the East River area at the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron in
Sioux Falls which served as a staging base for aircraft and ground search and rescue teams. In
addition, the overall Incident Command Post was also at the squadron headquarters. Captain Neil
Schmid, as the Incident Commander, assisted by a mission base staff, controlled the exercise
across the state. In the West River area a staging base for several aircraft and aircrews was set up
at the Rushmore Composite Squadron in Rapid City, and a staging base for vehicles and ground
search team members was set up at Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron in Spearfish.
The search and rescue scenarios involved air and ground searches for two private aircraft
overdue at their destinations, for an elderly fisherman missing in Newton Hills State Park, and
for an aerial photo survey of flooding conditions near Lake Vermillion. The overall purpose of
the activity was threefold: to train mission base staff in organizing and controlling an emergency
services mission, to train mission aircrews in the techniques of aerial observation and
photography, and to train ground teams in the techniques and skills needed for search and rescue.

8

 Wessington Springs Tornado Damage Survey Mission #14-1-6428. Also on 19 June, the
South Dakota Office of Emergency Management and FEMA tasked SDWG to conduct an aerial
photo survey over the path of the EF-2 tornado (127 mph winds) that struck Wessington Springs
in Jerauld County on the 18th. Both organizations requested photos showing the entire town to
see the path of destruction as well as close-up photos to see the damage. A Cessna-182T from the
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron was assigned the mission. The aircraft departed Sioux Falls
Regional Airport at approximately 2:45pm for sortie lasting about 2.5 hours. Special care and
coordination had to be taken during the flight as South Dakota National Guard aircraft were also
active in the area. Wing Commander Col. Seten served as the SDWG point-of-contact for the
mission. The CAP aircrew consisted of Captain Neil Schmid (Mission Pilot), Major Todd Epp
(Mission Scanner) and Lieutenant Robert Hinkhouse (Mission Observer). Mission photos were
uploaded for federal and state emergency management officials’ analysis and assessment.
According to the 20 June Argus Leader, at least 25 homes were left uninhabitable, three
businesses were destroyed and seven businesses suffered severe damage. In the photo, Mission
Observer Lt Rob Hinkhouse and Mission Pilot Capt Neil Schmidt, both of Sioux Falls
Composite Squadron, enter coordinates into the G1000 equipped ”glass cockpit” Cessna-182T
prior to flying a sortie for the state of South Dakota and FEMA to take photos of tornado damage
in Wessington Springs. Photos used with permission of FEMA.

Figure-9 - Pilots load coordinates into aircraft navigation system

Figure-10 - Overview of path of Wessington Springs Tornado (yellow box added by Maj. Kipp)
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AUGUST 2014
 C/1st Lt Sullivan Busch, under supervision of Wing Director of Operations Maj Nick
Gengler, led 16 Cadets from across the wing and one Senior Member in a field training exercise
focused on the skills employed by CAP ground search and rescue teams. Search and rescue
teams were formed and deployed for realistic training scenarios.

Figure-11 - SDWG Ground Search Training
 Dismal weather on 22-23 August bedeviled South Dakota Wing’s SAREX. Originally to
be held at Pierre Composite Squadron, the weather outlook was so poor that it was decided to
rebase the SAREX between Rushmore Composite Squadron and Sioux Falls Composite
Squadron. An Incident Command Post was set up at both locations to conduct the training
activities. Over the course of the two days, nine mission air sorties were flown. The sorties
practiced aerial search techniques for a grid, route, and creeping line search. The object of these
searches was a simulated small aircraft’s emergency locator transmitter (ELT). Once the search
aircraft’s on-board sensors detected the ELT it flew to the location and orbited. At the same time
the search aircraft were airborne, ground search teams were sent to the general search area and
used hand-held radio-direction finding equipment to search for the ELT. After an aircraft locked
on to an ELT signal it communicated with the ground team to direct them to the simulated crash
site to render aid and assistance. In addition to the aircrews and the ground search teams a
number of personnel were busy at the two Incident Command Posts providing support in
command and control, communications, logistics, public affairs, and general administration.
SDWG demonstrated its capability to quickly adapt to changing conditions on short notice and
conducted effective training for the over 40 personnel involved. In the photo, taken by Lt Ron
Lenz, Col. Mike Beason turns onto final approach to the Rapid City Airport during the SAREX.

Figure-12 - Col Beason turns onto final approach at Rapid City Airport
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OCTOBER 2014
 SDWG held one of its best search and rescue exercises ever on 11 October. Over 50
Wing members participated in the Split SAREX, either at the Mission Base in Sioux Falls or the
Staging Area in Spearfish. A great deal of training was successfully accomplished for aircrews,
mission staff and ground support personnel. The multiple scenarios included air and ground
searches for missing aircraft, air and ground searches for missing people, and aerial photography
of potential flood areas on a reservoir, a lake, and rivers and creeks. All in all a very successful
Saturday. During the course of the SAREX ten air sorties were flown and four ground search
sorties were dispatched.

Figure-13 - Col Seten’s Exercise Briefing
Figure-14 - Sioux Falls Composite Squadron aircraft taxing out for a SAREX sortie
Figure-15- Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron ground search team in action
 REDCAP: AFRCC Mission #14-M-0517 – ELT. Late into the evening hours of 9
October, the South Dakota Wing searched for an aircraft emergency beacon reportedly in
northwest South Dakota. The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) at Tyndall AFB
in Florida alerted SDWG at 3:30pm local time that a satellite picked up an aircraft emergency
locator beacon (EPIRB) in the general area of northern Ziebach County. In addition, the
Minneapolis Air Traffic Control Center reported that passing aircraft has also picked up an ELT
signal. However, the FAA reported no general aviation aircraft were listed as overdue or
missing. A Cessna-182T from the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron was dispatched to the area to
participate in the search. In addition, a second aircraft, a Cessna-182T departed from the
Rushmore Composite Squadron in Rapid City to join in the search. Unable to find the ELT
signal both aircraft were recalled to their bases at approximately 9:30pm local time. Two aircraft
from CAP’s North Dakota Wing (NDWG) also assisted in the search. One of the aircraft flew
“high-bird” acting as a communications relay while the other aircraft conducted a “sniffing”
search for an ELT signal in the general area. Incident Commander Lt Col Rick Larson controlled
the search from a mobile command post and was in continuous contact with the aircraft and local
authorities.
NOVEMBER 2014
 REDCAP: AFRCC Mission #14-M-0606 – Missing Aircraft. Late in the evening of 29
November the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall AFB, Florida notified the South
Dakota Wing and the Wyoming Wing of the Civil Air Patrol that an aircraft was overdue to
return to Spearfish, SD. Poor weather conditions prevented the launch of an immediate search
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that night. Around 6:00am on Sunday a ground search team was dispatched from CAP’s Lookout
Mountain Composite Squadron (Spearfish) to Colony, WY which cell phone forensics indicated
as a possible search site. Later that morning three aircraft; two from South Dakota Wing and one
from Wyoming Wing, were launched to conduct an aerial search for the missing aircraft’s
emergency beacon (ELT). Using special onboard sensors the CAP aircraft began picking up the
ELT signal and worked to refine the location. About one hour later, using aerial triangulation, a
Wyoming Wing aircraft sighted the missing aircraft on the ground in a snow-covered high desert
area near the tiny town of Alzada, MT. The ground search team was re-directed from Colony to
Alzada where they linked up with officers from the Carter County Sheriff’s Office. While the
ground team was en route, WYWG and SDWG aircraft took turns orbiting the crash site to direct
the ground team to the location. The Lookout Mountain ground search team was first at the crash
site arriving ahead of the members of the Clark County Sheriff’s Office. The squadron is very
proud of the dedication and the professionalism displayed by the members of this eight-man
team operating under very trying weather conditions in very rugged terrain. Once Carter County
Sheriff Office personnel were at the crash site the SDWG ground team and both wing’s aircraft
returned to their bases. The outstanding support for the REDCAP was provided by personnel
from Rushmore Composite Squadron, Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron and Wing Staff
members throughout the state using distributed virtual command and control. Photos courtesy of
the Carter County Sheriff’s Office.

Figure-16 - CAP Ground Search Team securing aircraft crash site
Figure-17 - CAP Ground Search Team departing aircraft crash site

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CHAPTER III – AEROSPACE EDUCATION
August 2014
 Twenty eight SDWG members took part in a joint Aerospace Education – Emergency
Services workshop held in Pierre from Thursday, 7 August to Saturday, 9 August.
Maj David Small supervised nine cadets in CAP’s Model Rocketry Program at the Pierre airport.
Four cadets, C/TSgt Austin Rauscher, C/Amn Nick Kochutin, C/2nd Lt Jared Doyle and C/MSgt
Josiah Huntington, completed all three rocketry phases to earn the coveted CAP rocketry badge.
The rockets were launched near the airport on Saturday with a single stage rocket constructed
and flown by C/MSgt Josiah Huntington reaching a measured altitude of 383.98 feet.
We had special guests fly in from the North Dakota Wing in a FLIR-equipped CAP Cessna-182.
The Forward Looking Infrared Radar is excellent for locating the heat signature of individuals at
night or in heavy cover. NDWG pilots Capt Dan Villas and Lt Graham Frost and FLIR operator
Capt Daryl Billick set up a static display of the FLIR Cessna-182 at the Pierre airport and several
cadets got to operate the sensors.
On Friday and Saturday Capt Gary Dettman taught the intricacies of flight fundamentals and
control to a group of eight cadets. Utilizing STEM kits sent by CAP National HQ the group built
rubber band powered balsa wood aircraft and tested changing various aspects of flight dynamics
and flight configurations. Capt Dettman also supervised the cadets as they assembled and, after
training on a remote control aircraft simulator, flew a remote controlled powered glider with a
six foot wingspan. The model operated at a range of nearly a quarter mile and performed loops
and other acrobatic maneuvers.
Also on Friday, cadets and seniors toured the South Dakota National Guard Museum where
Wing Historian Maj Todd Epp just opened the new SDWG/CAP exhibit. 17 Cadets, 11 Senior
Members and over 60 local children, parents and teachers attended the Open House at the
museum. CAP provided tables for recruiting, airplane building, model rocketry and parachuting.

Figure-18 - NDWG FLIR-equipped Cessna-182 on static display
Figure-19 - Balsa wood and powered glider pilots
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Figure-20 - CAP Model Rocketry Badge Awardees
September 2014
 On 4 September the Crazy Horse Composite Squadron in Custer received a unit award
for excellence in Aerospace Education and C/SMSgt Jason Parry and C/TSgt Thomas Dillon
received individual awards for achievements in Aerospace Education. The squadron earned these
awards by conducting six hands-on aviation and space-related activities during the school year
which included: building rockets out of trash/recyclable materials; building various types of
model rockets; studied the effects of meteoroids and space debris at the ISS; studied the
protective equipment needed to be worn at the ISS and the difficulties of doing tasks in this
protective gear; and completed a two-hour field event by launching Alpha and Tomahawk model
rockets. Lt Vicki Bierwirth was the Aerospace Education instructor for these activities. In the
photo: Back: Lt James Dillon, Lt Kris Bierwirth, Lt Col Doug Westerlund and Maj Sharon
Moad. Front: C/TSgt Thomas Dillon, Lt Vicki Bierwirth (holding the unit AE Award) and
C/SMSgt Jason Dillon.

Figure-21 - Crazy Horse Composite Squadron Aerospace Excellence award recipients
November 2014
 On the weekend of 22-23 November, the North Dakota Wing’s 119th Air National Guard
Cadet Squadron in Fargo hosted a North Central Region Aerospace Education Weekend. Cadets
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and senior members from NDWG, SDWG and MNWG participated. The weekend went fairly
well and the cadets had a great time. NDWG provided presentations by NDSU students in
Aerospace fields. Among the highlights were a tour to the Aerospace Museum in Fargo and the
Ronald Reagan Minuteman Missile Site. The cadets also had the opportunity to try out flight
simulators. O-rides also took place although there were some delays due to icing and flat
tires. Most cadets got to go up but, unfortunately not everyone. The eight SDWG cadets got one
o-ride each. Many thanks to Maj Gengler for heading up the SDWG contingent.

15

CHAPTER IV – CADET PROGRAMS
APRIL 2014
 Crazy Horse Composite Squadron cadets built and successfully launched the two rockets
required to pass Stage 2 in CAP's Model Rocketry Program. We launched the Alpha Estes Model
Rocket and the Tomahawk Cruise Missile Model Rocket on April 26.

Figure-22 - C/SMSgt Jason Parry launches his rocket
Figure-23 - C/TSgt Kyle Stiffarm launches his rocket
Figure-24 - C/SSgt Thomas Dillon launches his rocket
MAY 2014
 Big Sioux Composite Squadron received official word from the Air Force Association as
to our final standing in the recently held “CyberPatriot-VI”, the national high school cybersecurity competition. We came in 7th out of 864 teams in the All-Service Division but were 1st
among the 320 CAP teams that took part. In recognition thereof, the AFA will present us with
the CAP Champion Award in the near future. Members of the team, led by C/Capt Joshua
Klosterman, were C/MSgt Chris Dinnel, C/MSgt Laura Rudnik, C/AB Josiah Jorenby (not
shown) and C/Amn Zebadiah Nelson. This year’s team was coached by then C/2nd Lt Tyler
Gross and mentored by then 1st Lt Shannon Hofer (not shown).

Figure 25 - Big Sioux Composite Squadron CyberPatriot-VI team
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 The cadet color guards of the Rushmore and Big Sioux Composite Squadrons met in
competition on 24 May in Pierre. Competition was tight as both color guards were within a few
points of each other through all the competition’s categories. The lead changed back and forth
several times. In the end, Rushmore’s color guard nosed out Big Sioux by one point! While
Rushmore Composite Squadron won the competition overall, the Big Sioux Composite Squadron
won all the awards: Highest Academic Award, Fleet Foot Male and Fleet Foot Female and
Outstanding Cadet of the Competition. Of note was how the two units encouraged each other
throughout the competition wishing each other good luck and then congratulating each other
upon announcement of the winner. Best of all, both teams won honors at the competition.
The Big Sioux Composite Squadron’s color guard was made up of: C/SrA Zebadiah Nelson,
C/SSgt Jaden Petersen, C/Amn Daniella Petersen, C/SSgt Bronson Lynn, and C/CMSgt Camille
Lynn (alternate). The Rushmore Composite Squadron’s color guard was made up of: C/CMSgt
Errol Kelly, C/MSgt Travis Tenold, C/SSgt Anthony Pruitt, and C/A1C Gunner Gray.

Figure-26 - Rushmore Composite Squadron Color Guard ready to perform
Figure-27 - Rushmore Composite Squadron Color Guard undergoing judging
The officer in charge of the competition was Lt Col Linda Buechler, Director of Cadet Programs.
The judges for the competition were: Col Mary Donley (SD001), Lt Col Myra Christensen
(SD038), C/Capt Silas Busch (SD031) and C/Capt Joshua Klosterman (SD058). SDWG thanks
all of the judges in the competition. Senior Members also present were: Maj Bruce Hack and 1st
Lt Ryan Jones (both from SD031), and 1st Lt Jonathan Becker and Maj Nick Gengler (both of
SD058). All competition was held at the Community Bible Church, Pierre except for the Outdoor
presentation which was held at the Georgia Morse Middle School across from Capitol Building.
JUNE 2014


Regional Glider Academy: Graduation ceremonies at Mattoon, IL, June 2014. Certified
Glider Flight Instructor 1st Lt Marty Larson and Lt Col Gary Hewett attended two glider
academies at Mattoon, in southeastern Illinois, from 14-27 June. The Illinois Wing sponsored a
triple academy for hot air balloons, powered aircraft, and gliders; and Great Lakes Region
sponsored a glider academy. 22 cadet student glider pilots attended the Johnson Flight Academy,
17

and 16 cadet student glider pilots attended the Region Glider Academy. The overall syllabus for
the academies was: Balloon (Familiarization with hot air balloon flight); Basic Glider
(Introduction to gliders); Intermediate Glider (Additional maneuvers and solo flight); Advanced
Glider (Advanced Maneuvers) and Powered Aircraft (basic powered flight). South Dakota Wing
provided a tow plane used in both glider events. In the two weeks of training, CFIGs from
several states used aero-tows for launching gliders for a total of 771 flights.

Figure-28 - Regional Johnson Flight Academy graduation ceremony

Figure-29 - Johnson Flight Academy wetting down for those who soloed
 Tops in Cap Cyber-Security: Mr. Ron Mielke, President of the Air Force Association in
South Dakota, and Mr. Ed Revell, President of AFA’s Sioux Falls “Dacotah Chapter” presented
the Civil Air Patrol Champion Award on 26 June, to the Big Sioux Composite Squadron’s cybersecurity team. Although we came in 7th of 864 teams in the All-Service Division we were 1st of
320 CAP teams that took part in CyberPatriot-VI. (L-R) Mr. Revell, C/SRA Zebadiah Nelson,
C/Capt Joshua Klosterman, C/CMSgt Chris Dinnel, Coach C/2nd Lt Tyler Gross, Mr. Mielke.

Figure-30 - Big Sioux Composite Squadron CyberPatriot-VI team receives AFA award
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JULY 2014
Each year the South and North Dakota Wings hold a joint summer encampment for their cadets.
This year North Dakota Wing hosted the encampment from 12-20 July at Camp Grafton near
Devil’s Lake, ND. Each encampment has a theme; for 2014 the theme was cadet leadership. At
the encampment, senior ranking cadets brought the skills they have learned at squadron, wing,
regional, and national level activities to teach others how to be better leaders. Cadets learn from
other cadets and receive tutorage and guidance from their senior officers. This encampment
taught leadership, teamwork, honor, courage, and determination as well as military customs and
courtesies and drill and ceremonies. There were obstacle courses to run, repelling towers to
traverse, leadership classes, physical fitness, and moral leadership guidance. In addition, the
cadets got a taste of military life by living in open bay barracks and eating in a military dining
facility. Some of the highlights of the encampment were the cadets flying in a UH-60 Blackhawk
helicopter courtesy of the North Dakota Army Guard, and the use of the Guard’s high-tech small
arms marksmanship simulator and Humvee operational trainer.

Figure-31 – 2014 Joint Dakotas Encampment logo

Figure-32 - Joint Dakotas Encampment staff and participants
19

AUGUST 2014
 Imagine an air show with over 500,000 visitors and 10,000 aircraft. This is National Blue
Beret, a two week long experience like no other that CAP offers every year in conjunction with
the Experimental Aircraft Association’s (EAA) “AirVenture” airshow in Oshkosh, WI. This
year, four cadets had the honor of representing South Dakota Wing. Our NBB cadets were First
Lieutenant Sullivan Busch and Chief Master Sergeant Christopher Dinnel, of Big Sioux
Composite Squadron in Brookings, and Captain Nicole Schneider and Major Brandon West, of
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron. As a result of their participation the cadets are authorized to
wear the coveted blue beret with its prized St. Alban’s pin.
The most important mission of the NBB program is to assist the EAA with flight line operations.
Cadets are posted along taxiways during the operational hours of the air show directing pilots to
their destinations. The second mission is crowd control at the ultra-light and military aircraft
areas. The third mission is emergency services - locating lost or overdue aircraft by tracking its
emergency locator beacon (ELT). Cadets also staff two station towers to observe aircraft landing
on each runway to help keep track of which aircraft are on the ground.
NBB Operations are based out of “the compound,” as it is called. This compound includes a
hangar for sleeping, an open field for formations, a communications building and, most
important to every teenage cadet, a mess hall. The compound is run entirely by CAP personnel.
Daily responsibilities include everything from kitchen duty to cleaning bathrooms and doing
laundry for the 140 cadets and 42 senior members.

Figure-33 - CAP Contingent to 2014 NCSA Blue Beret

Figure-34 - SDWG Contingent to 2014 NCSA Blue Beret
20

SEPTEMBER 2014
 1 September 2014 was Glider Day at the Hot Springs Municipal Airport. Despite a pause
for lightning and rain, cadets got orientation rides and cadets and a senior member got glider
rides. A CAP Cessna-182 was used for the o-rides. A CAP Cessna 182 tow-plane and Schleicher
K7 glider owned by the Black Hills Soaring Club were used for gliding. There were a total of ten
o-rides and nine glider rides. It was a wonderful day for everyone, lots of excitement and fun.
The activity was coordinated by Maj Craig Goodrich. Senior members and parents coordinated
the schedule of events, driving vans, and serving as supervisors. Thanks to Col Mike Beason, Lt
Jamie Nowlin, Capt Patrick Nowlin, Lt Ron Lenz, Lt Kris Bierwirth, SM Roy Weller, Capt
Richard Geeting, and SM Melissa Weller. Capt Nowlin flew to recertify as a CAP glider towpilot under the eye of tow-pilot instructor Lt Col Gary Hewett. Lt Marty Larson was the Certified
Flight Instructor in the glider.

Figure-35 - SDWG Glider Day at Hot Springs

Figure-36 - SDWG cadet prepares for glider orientation ride
Figure-37 - SDWG cadet prepares for glider orientation ride
Figure-38 - SDWG cadet prepares for glider orientation ride
Figure-39 - SDWG cadet prepares for glider orientation ride
 SDWG’s National Character Day (NCD) program was on 27 September in Pierre. Cadets
and seniors arrived from Custer, Pierre, Sioux Falls and Rapid City (11 cadets and 10 seniors).
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NCD has two main goals: to motivate cadets to take issues of character and honor seriously, and
commit to the drug-free ethic; and, to further integrate the Drug Demand Reduction program into
CAP’s overall Cadet Program. Activities for the event included speakers and a variety of
activities. Speakers included Lt Col Linda Buechler, Division of Criminal Investigation Officer
Don McCrea, and Lt Col (Dr.) Mark Huntington.

Figure-40 - SDWG National Character Day classroom
Figure-41 - SDWG National Character Day cadet participants
OCTOBER 2014
 Congratulations to Rushmore Composite Squadron and Lookout Mountain Composite
Squadron on being named to CAP’s list of “Quality Cadet Unit” for 2013-2014! On 10 October
Mr. Steven Trupp, Program Manager for Cadet Programs at NHQ announced that 299 CAP units
had earned the title "Quality Cadet Unit".
 CyberPatriot-VII, Round One: The Big Sioux Composite Squadron’s cyber-security team
took part in the CyberPatriot-VII competition Round One was the weekend of 24-26 October. Of
the 1,007 teams competing in the All Services Division our cyber-warriors scored in the top five
teams. The competition is getting tougher and tougher each year! CAP competes in the “All
Services Division” (Army, Air Force, Navy Marine Corps JROTC, Naval Sea Cadet Corps, and
CAP). This year there are 400 teams from CAP alone. Round Two will be held 14-16 November.
NOVEMBER 2014
 CyberPatriot-VII, Round Two: Team “Big Sioux” made it through Round Two and into
the State Round and Platinum Tier. All CyberPatriot teams participate in the State Round but
only the Platinum Tier can advance to the national finals. Only the top third of teams move into
the Platinum Tier. The top six teams move from the State Round to the Regional Round and
from there only the top two teams in each category (CAP/ROTC) go to the national finals. The
State Round runs 5-7 December.

22

CHAPTER V – CADET ORIENTATION FLIGHTS
February 2014
 Big Sioux Composite Squadron: On 22 February, Capt. Matt Meert flew a Cessna-182T
from the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron to Brookings so the cadets there could participate in
the flight orientation program. The day’s first o-ride involved Cadet Salem Pleasants and C/SrA
Zebadiah Nelson, the second C/Amn Graham Dinnel and C/CMSgt Chris Dinnel. Each o-ride
consisted of two sorties; the first sortie was from Brookings Regional Airport to Madison
Municipal Airport where they landed, switched the cadet at the controls and then flew the second
sortie back to Brookings Regional Airport. The orientation ride program exposes the cadets to
the excitement and adventure of aviation, teaches them general aerodynamic principles and
familiarizes them with light aircraft and general aviation.
 Rushmore Composite Squadron: Cadet Airman Malia Goodrich experienced her first
CAP flight on Saturday, February 1. At the aircraft’s controls was her dad, Maj. Craig Goodrich.
It was a sunny, windy and very cold day, with the wind chill well below zero. They were very
thankful that they were able to do the preflight checks in a heated hangar. As can be seen in the
photo they both enjoyed the orientation ride.

Figure-42 - Rushmore Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride
 Sioux Falls Composite Squadron: New senior member Greg Lair, a pilot, has allowed the
squadron to revitalize its orientation ride program. We flew four of six planned o-rides on 15
February. This photo, taken by SM Lair, shows C/Amn Julia Lair and C/Amn Keith Warne after
their sorties. Cadet Lair received a Certificate of First Flight. This was the second flight for
Cadet Warne. Cadets Ivan and Kyle Kreger also flew on an o-ride. Unfortunately, the wind
kicked up after landing from Sortie #4 and there wasn’t time for a photo of Kregers in the rush to
secure the aircraft.
23

Squadron Commander Capt. Erickson, pictured at right, wants to reinstate passing out orientation
ride parent information brochures, presenting Orientation Flight Certificates to participants at the
next squadron meeting, and news releases sent to local media. In addition, Capt. Erickson has
secured permission from Col. Seten to periodically fly aircraft to Brookings to conduct
orientation rides for their cadets. Further SFCS o-ride sorties are planned for 22 February.

Figure-43 – Sioux Falls Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride
March 2014
 Sioux Falls Composite Squadron: A break in the cold and wind on 8 March gave three
cadets the opportunity to earn “First Flight” Certificates. Cadets Tristan Fischer, Christopher
Schuppan and Cadet Airman Kyle Clement flew their initial orientation flights. The three excited
and enthusiastic cadets enjoyed their pilot duties, each flying the aircraft for one hour. Cadets
Clement and Fischer flew with pilot Capt. Neil Schmid. The first o-ride consisted of two sorties.
The first, with Cadet Fischer at the controls, was from Sioux Falls Airport to Madison Municipal
Airport where they landed, switched the cadet at the controls, then Cadet Clement flew the
aircraft back to Sioux Falls. The second o-ride was a single sortie with Lt. Col. Greg Lair as pilot
with Cadet Schuppan at the controls. That flight was around the local Sioux Falls area.

Figure-44 - Sioux Falls Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride
24

May 2014
 Sioux Falls Composite Squadron: Saturday, May 10th, was a big day for C/Amn Dylan
Purkapile - his very first ride in an airplane of any kind! Not only that, he successfully flew a
Cessna-172 as part of the CAP’s Orientation Flight program. According to Pilot and O-Flight
Coordinator Lt. Col. Greg Lair, Dylan flew the aircraft from Sioux Falls Regional Airport to the
Madison Municipal Airport. “He was very smooth on the controls, a natural pilot” said
Lair. Dylan’s goal is to learn to fly and join the military, possibly becoming a fighter pilot. His
first flight was a memorable experience. At the other end of the spectrum, C/CMSgt Devon
Brown experienced his fourth powered flight, part of the CAP’s 10 flight program. Devon
learned the use of instruments in flight as he piloted the Cessna-172 from Madison Municipal
Airport to Sioux Falls Regional Airport. This flight completes 7 rides for Devon, including two
prior glider flights. Devon’s goal is to attend the Naval Academy and join the Navy, just like his
Dad, CAP 1st Lt. Vinnie Brown. This summer Devon plans to further his flying experience by
attending a CAP-sponsored powered flight academy in Nebraska.

Figure-45 - Sioux Falls Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride
 Sioux Falls Composite Squadron: Saturday morning, 17 May, was a perfect time for
Cadets Christopher Schuppan and Blake Hayden to complete their second powered CAP
Orientation Flights. Both cadets completed the normal flight maneuver syllabus, which includes
aircraft stability, attitude flying, trim controls, shallow banked turns, and load factors on the
aircraft. Both cadet-pilots flew for an hour and maintained excellent aircraft control while
touring the areas of Sioux Falls, Brookings and Lake Madison.

Figure-46 - Sioux Falls Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride
25

July 2014
 Sioux Falls Composite Squadron: On 5 July, Pilot-in-Command Lt. Col. Greg Lair
(center) took two cadets for an orientation ride on a CAP Cessna-172P. On the first sortie C/A1C
Julia Lair was at the controls for a flight from Sioux Falls Regional Airport to the municipal
airport at Madison. Cadet Lair (left) enjoyed her second powered flight. A natural pilot, she
easily navigated to Madison. She looks forward to studying Aeronautical Engineering and hopes
to become a USAF Fighter Pilot. On the second sortie C/SRA Ivan Kreger (right) was at the
controls enjoying his fourth powered flight as he flew from Madison Municipal Airport back to
Sioux Falls Regional Airport. He was smoothly demonstrated skills he learned on previous
orientation flights. He hopes to continue flight training and in the future intends to study
meteorology. Both cadets assisted with the pre-flight activities putting their CAP Aircraft
Ground Handling skills to work. The weather was perfect, and the cadets had a great time.

Figure-47 - Sioux Falls Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride
August 2014
 Rushmore Composite Squadron: On 18 August, C/AB Jonathan Busch and C/A1C
Nicholas Kochutin took off on a cadet orientation flight. Command pilot, Maj. Craig Goodrich,
piloted the Cessna-182 to Custer County Airport, with aerial tours of the Shrine of Democracy
(Mount Rushmore) and Crazy Horse Memorial on the way. The plan was to land at Custer
County Airport and swap seats. However, although the stated crosswind on the Automated
Surface Observing System was just 5 knots, the actual wind was significant and gusty. The
aircraft received a significant gust just as it was touching down and ballooned considerably, so
Maj. Goodrich rejected the landing. Valuing safety over mission, he decided to return to Rapid
City for a full stop. As it was a bumpy day to fly, Cadet Busch wanted Maj. Goodrich to do 95%
of the flying that day – it took a lot of work to keep the wings level and for everyone to feel OK.
The moderate turbulence on the way home took away the desire to fly any more that day. But
the cadets were heroes – they didn’t get sick! Cadet Kochutin didn’t get to have another O-ride
that day as planned, but he got a ride in the back seat.

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Figure-48 - Rushmore Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride
Figure-49 - Rushmore Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride
Figure-50 - Rushmore Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride
September 2014
 Sioux Falls Composite Squadron: 6 September was the first flight for Cadet Oscar
Holmberg. In fact, this was his first flight in a small aircraft. Under the watchful eye of Capt.
Neil Schmid, he successfully piloted the plane from Sioux Falls to Vermillion and landed at
Yankton. He’s looking forward to future flights in the program. C/SSgt Kyle Kreger flew his
fourth powered flight and learned the use of instruments while airborne. After a brief tour of
Gavin’s Point Dam and sail boat races, he skillfully piloted the Cessna-172 back to Sioux Falls.

Figure-51 – Sioux Falls Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride
November 2014
 Sioux Falls Composite Squadron: The cold weather on 22 November finally took a break,
which turned out to be a great day for an o-ride piloted by Capt. Neil Schmid. This day was the
first flight in any kind of airplane for C/AB Eric Ortega (left) and he enjoyed every minute of the
one hour flight from Sioux Falls to Yankton. After a rest stop in Yankton, C/A1C Chris
Schuppan (right) flew the Cessna-172 from Yankton airport to the Gavin’s Point Dam and
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around the lake. There were hundreds of geese floating in the lake, enjoying the warm sunshine.
On the return leg to Sioux Falls, Chris flew the advanced flight maneuvers described in syllabus
8/3rd powered orientation flight. These maneuvers demonstrated slow flight, steep turns, s-turns,
and search patterns used in SAR. There was a discussion of stalls, steep spirals, spins and load
factors affecting the aircraft.

Figure-52 - Sioux Falls Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride
December 2014
 Rushmore Composite Squadron cadets took to the sky over Christmas break. Nearzero temperatures, clear skies, and low winds were a perfect formula for a great day to fly.
C/Amn Samuel Lawrence, C/A1C Tyler Eberle, C/Amn Isaak Weller, and C/TSgt Joe
Jagodzinski each had the opportunity to sit at the aircraft’s controls. The flights departed Rapid
City and headed west over the city and then over the northern Black Hills. Cadet Lawrence was
first in the front seat as it was his first o-flight. The cadets had opportunity to see the entire Black
Hills. The first stop was Spearfish then, flying IFR (I Follow Roads), to Lead following Hwy 385
south to Pactola Reservoir and Sheridan Lake. This was followed by a quick jaunt to the Mount
Rushmore area, around Harney Peak, Crazy Horse, again stopping at Custer County Airport.
From Custer we flew south to Hot Springs before returning to Rapid City. In the photo, front left
is C/Amn Samuel Lawrence, front right is Capt. Josh Hall.

Figure-53 - Rushmore Composite Squadron Cadet O-Ride

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CHAPTER VI – OTHER NOTABLE EVENTS
January 2014
 SDWG flew Mission #14-C-4130 - Aerial Surveys of Terrestrial Wildlife on the 6th, 7th, 15th,
18th, 29th and 31st of January in support of the state Department of Game, Fish & Parks and South
Dakota State University. The GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and elk while SDSU
surveyed elk and bobcats. 12.5 flight hours were in support of GF&P and 11.1 flight hours were
in support of SDSU for a total of 23.6 hours flying over western South Dakota and the Black
Hills. CAP Pilots for the January surveys were Lt Col Gary Hewett and Col Mike Beason.
February 2014
 Governor Dennis Daaugard issued a proclamation that designated 20 February as Civil
Air Patrol Day in South Dakota. The proclamation commends SDWG for its multitude of
missions and service to local communities, counties and the state.

Figure-54 - SD Governor poses with SDWG contingent on Rotunda staircase
 On Thursday, 20 February members of the Wing from across the state converged on the
state Capitol in Pierre to meet with legislators to thank them for their support. Over 40 members
representing all six squadrons made the trip.
Col Seten commented, “The purpose is to tell state policymakers the story of Civil Air Patrol in
South Dakota, of the many volunteer hours spent on air and ground missions for local, county,
tribal, state and federal government, law enforcement agencies and first responder organizations.
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We also want them to know of our cadet program that prepares young people not just for careers
in the military, but to be good citizens.” He also said it is important that the public understands in
a time of limited budgets, SDWG helps stretch the resources of the state and saves money by
using well-trained, professional volunteers, volunteers who are held to the same level of
performance and knowledge as their paid colleagues.
At the opening of their respective sessions the state Senate and House recognized the many
contributions of the South Dakota Wing with a prolonged standing ovation. In the Senate, Lt.
Gov. Matt Michels, who was presiding, specifically commended our involvement in the state’s
flood response efforts in 2011 and our support in state recovery efforts from 2013’s Winter
Storm Atlas.
Uniformed members of Wing served a snack in the lobbies off the Senate and House chambers
for legislators, lobbyists, staff and others. Our personnel briefed senators and representatives on
the latest enhancements and advancements to the Wing’s abilities and capabilities, answered
questions and handed out copies of CAP’s annual financial report and SDWG’s legislative
brochure.
A pleasant surprise for a small group of our members was an impromptu chat with U.S. Senator
John Thune (R-SD) who was in the Capitol building on other business. He stopped his scheduled
itinerary and spent several minutes shaking hands and talking with us.

Figure-55 - SDWG CC and CV sit in state Senate gallery on CAP Day
Figure-56 - SDWG cadets sit in state House gallery on CAP Day
 SDWG flew Mission #14-C-4525 - Aerial Surveys of Terrestrial Wildlife on the 11th,
12th, 25th, and 26th of February in support of the state Department of Game, Fish & Parks and
South Dakota State University. The GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and elk while
SDSU surveyed elk and bobcats. 10.3 flight hours were in support of GF&P and 6.0 flight hours
were in support of SDSU for a total of 16.3 hours flying over western South Dakota and the
Black Hills. The CAP Pilot for the February surveys was Lt Col Gary Hewett.
 On 5 February, SDWG officers Lt Neil Schmid and Lt Col Larson met with two officers
of the South Dakota Air National Guard, Lt Col Greg Lair, Commander of the 175th Fighter
Squadron (also a CAP pilot) and Capt Jerry Grotjohn, 175th Fighter Squadron Airspace Manager,

30

to brief them on the results of SDWG 2013 Low-Level Route Survey (LLRS) missions and to
begin making plans for SDWG LLRS missions in 2014.
Each year since 1998 the South Dakota Air National Guard requests SDWG conduct LLRS of
selected military training air routes and aerial Military Operations Areas (MOA). The purpose is
to locate and identify uncharted obstructions such as antenna towers and noise sensitive areas
(such as stock pens) that should be avoided by SDANG pilots.
When SDWG flies a LLRS, a command post is set up for C3 support for the aircraft. SDWG Lt
Col Larson serves as Incident Commander. 1st Lt Schmid of the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron
is Project Officer and Lead Planner for LLRS missions. Wing Commander Col Seten and Vice
Commander Lt Col Larson thank all of the flight crews on the 2013 LLRS missions - 65 hours
flying in direct support to military flight safety.

Figure-57 - Low-Level Route Survey photo of towers at Turkey Ridge
March 2014

 Capt Shannon Hofer assumed command of Big Sioux Composite Squadron in Brookings
on 4 March. He will continue his duties as the Director of IT for the wing as well.

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 SDWG flew Mission #14-C-4967 - Aerial Surveys of Terrestrial Wildlife on the 10th, 12th
and 25th of March in support of the state Department of Game, Fish & Parks and South Dakota
State University. The GF&P surveyed deer, mountain goats, mountain lions, and elk. The SDSU
surveyed elk and bobcats. 7.8 flight hours were in support of GF&P and 7.7 flight hours were in
support of SDSU for a total of 15.5 hours flying over western South Dakota and the Black Hills.
The CAP pilot for the March surveys was Lt Col Gary Hewett.

Figure-58 - Mountain lion wearing radio tracking collar
APRIL 2014
 After the CAP-USAF Operational Evaluation on Saturday, 26 April, participants swiftly
changed into their dress uniforms to attend the 2014 Wing Conference and Awards Banquet at the
beautiful Holiday Inn-City Centre in downtown Sioux Falls. Maj Todd Epp was Master of
Ceremonies and he kept the speeches and the awards presentations flowing smoothly. One of the
highlights was the year-in-review slideshow which highlighted some of the more serious aspects
of what SDWG does, but also included some of the lighter moments as well. Sunday, 27 April,
was set aside for workshops and breakout sessions for the senior members on a variety of key
aspects of Wing operations and administration. A special program had also been set up to keep
the cadets active and engaged. It was a busy weekend for all the attendees but at the end the
universal comment was that it had all been worthwhile, informative and instructive.
 SDWG flew Mission #14-C-5454 – Aerial Surveys of Terrestrial Wildlife on the 10th,
11th, 18th and 21st of April in support of the state Department of Game, Fish & Parks (GF&P) and
South Dakota State University (SDSU). The GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and
elk. SDSU surveyed elk and bobcats. The surveys resulted in a total of 18.3 hours flying over
32

western South Dakota and the Black Hills. The CAP pilots for the April surveys were Lt Col
Buck DeWeese on the 10th and 11th and Lt Col Gary Hewett on the 18th and 21st.
 Exercise Falcon Keynote 2014, Mission #14-1-5487 – Airborne Intercept. SDWG again
provided support to the South Dakota Air National Guard by participating as the target aircraft in
SDANG Exercise Falcon Keynote 2014. The purpose of the exercise was to provide the114th
Fighter Wing’s alert aircrews training in aerospace control alert intercept procedures, a function
of its Homeland Security mission. A CAP Cessna-182T aircraft, based in Sioux Falls, acted as
the target aircraft. The objective for the pilots of the F16s of the 175th Fighter Squadron was to
hone the skills of being able to quickly and safely intercept and evaluate a slow moving aircraft
that could pose a security risk or that may have inadvertently strayed into restricted airspace.
SDWG is pleased and proud to provide this cost effective support to SDANG by providing target
aircraft for them to practice air intercept techniques. CAP partners with the USAF helping to
provide a total force approach to readiness and enhanced national security.
 1st Lt Kris Bierwirth assumed command of the Crazy Horse Composite Squadron in
Custer on 3 April. She has filled many roles within the squadron since 2007.
May 2014
 SDWG flew Mission #14-C-5759 - Aerial Surveys of Terrestrial Wildlife on the 5th, 9th,
14 , 19th, 20th, and 27th of May in support of the state’s Department of Game, Fish & Parks
(GF&P) and the South Dakota State University (SDSU). GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain
lions, and elk while SDSU surveyed elk and bobcats. The surveys resulted in just over of 25
hours flying over western South Dakota and the Black Hills. The CAP pilot for the May surveys
was Lt Col Gary Hewett. He was accompanied by personnel from GF&P and SDSU.
th

June 2014
 SDWG flew Mission #14-C-6209 - Aerial Surveys of Terrestrial Wildlife on the 5th, 10th
and 23rd of June in support of the Department of Game, Fish & Parks (GF&P) and the South
Dakota State University (SDSU). GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and elk while
SDSU surveyed elk and bobcats. The surveys resulted in 11.4 hours flying over western South
Dakota and the Black Hills. The CAP pilot for the flights on the 5th and 10th June surveys was Lt
Col Gary Hewett. The pilot for the flight on the 23rd was Maj Craig Goodrich. They were
accompanied by Mr. Brandon Tycz from SDSU.
 Well over 30 CAP members and family attended the "Change of Command Party" where
Capt Bill Collister officially took the reins of the Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron on
Saturday, 28 June 2014. Members from the Crazy Horse Composite Squadron, Rushmore
Composite Squadron, Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron and the Air Force Reserve were
present. Capt Collister started his CAP career in the early 1970s as a cadet, advancing through
the ranks into the cadet officer grades. He’s been very active in South Dakota and Wyoming
wings over the years and has a wealth of knowledge and experience in CAP.

33

 Hurricanes don’t happen too often in the Black Hills. However, on Thursday evening, 26
June 2014, in Spearfish, SD, weather conditions rivaled the monsters usually seen at lower
latitudes. A line of thunderstorms produced winds clocked at peak 69 mph at the Spearfish
airport; with sustained velocities not much less than that (winds of 80 mph west of town in the
same weather event).
The squadron was in the midst of its regular meeting while howling winds rattled the squadron
building. At one point C/CMSgt Connor Caneva stepped out onto the small porch to peer at the
angry skies and noticed an airplane on the ramp, 100 yards away, moving backwards toward a
row of parked cars. The large, twin-engine Cessna-421 had been parked across the direction of
the wind. The force of the wind weathervaned the plane, putting the nose into the wind, and
caused it to jump the wooden wheel chocks. The Cessna then began to be blown backward. The
forecast apparently under-predicted the storm’s intensity, and the plane wasn’t tied down.
Lt Col Buck DeWeese and C/CMSgt Rosby joined Cadet Caneva in running over to the scene.
Their combined efforts managed to bring the aircraft to a halt just short of the parked cars. They
re-chocked the aircraft’s wheels so it would not move, then the cadets also took some clothesline
type cord and braided into a strong rope to help secure the aircraft from the high wind. After the
aircraft had been secured the airport manager was called and the information passed along.
Though the Cessna-421 “rescue” was unexpected and not associated with a specific mission as
such, the CAP members were happy to participate in this “save,” that prevented airplane and
automobile owners from untold inconveniences and expenses.

Figure-59 - Cessna-421 rescued by CAP at Spearfish
July 2014
 SDWG has been selected as the North Central Region winner of the Search and Rescue
Missions Award. This marks the second time in three years that South Dakota Wing has been
awarded this high honor. North Central Region commander, Colonel Robert Todd, stated that the
award is well merited as the Wing has been both aggressive and innovative in finding new
missions for our aircraft and personnel. While SDWG is one of the smallest wings in the nation
we are in the top ten nationally in “per-capita” flight hours. The award will be presented to
SDWG commander Col Seten at CAP’s National Convention to be held in Las Vegas from 1416 August 2014.
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 SDWG flew Mission #14-C-6610 - Aerial Surveys of Terrestrial Wildlife on ten days in
July in support of the Department of Game, Fish & Parks (GF&P) and the South Dakota State
University (SDSU). GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and elk while SDSU surveyed
elk and bobcats. The surveys resulted in 14.2 flight hours for SDSU and 12.7 flight hours for
GF&P for a total of 26.9 hours flying over western South Dakota and the Black Hills. The CAP
pilot for all the flights was Lt Col Gary Hewett. He was accompanied by Mr. Brandon Tycz from
SDSU on the flights on the 2nd, 9th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th and by Ms. Paige Mueggenberg from
GF&P on the flights on the 3rd, 8th, 16th, 23rd and 28th.
 Exercise Falcon Keynote 2014, Mission #14-1-5487 – Airborne Intercept. SDWG
continued to provide support to the South Dakota Air National Guard by participating on three
occasions as a target aircraft in SDANG Exercise Falcon Keynote 2014. The purpose of the
exercise was to provide the114th Fighter Wing’s alert aircrews training in aerospace control alert
intercept procedures, a function of its Homeland Security mission. A CAP Cessna-172P aircraft,
based in Sioux Falls, acted as the target aircraft. The objective for the pilots of the F16s of the
175th Fighter Squadron was to hone the skills of being able to quickly and safely intercept and
evaluate a slow moving aircraft that could pose a security risk or that may have inadvertently
strayed into restricted airspace. SDWG is pleased and proud to provide this cost effective support
to SDANG by providing target aircraft for them to practice air intercept techniques. CAP
partners with the USAF helping to provide a total force approach to readiness and enhanced
national security.
 SDWG flew Mission #14-1-6809 - Low-Level Route Surveys. Each year the South
Dakota Air National Guard (SDANG) requests South Dakota Wing conduct low-level route
surveys (LLRS) of selected military air training routes and aerial Military Operations Areas
(MOA). These military air training routes cover southeastern South Dakota, northwestern Iowa
and northeastern Nebraska leading to and from the O’Neill MOA in northeastern Nebraska.
The purpose of these sorties is to search for uncharted antenna towers and changes to charted
towers, and noise sensitive areas (stock pens and feedlots), areas to be avoided by SDANG
pilots. There are an amazing number of these between Sioux City and Omaha. SDWG aircrews
noted many on air training routes. Updated charts provided by SDANG have helped SDWG
aircrews in eliminating duplicate photos of known targets.
During the month of July, SDWG flew seven sorties for a total of 18 flight hours that covered
approximately 1739 nautical miles. The budget calls for 6,000 miles with 67 flying hours. At
this point, we have completed 30% of the mission. The amazing thing is that these flights
occurred between 16-24 July. There have been numerous flight cancellations due to unstable
weather and thunderstorms, including planned 700 mile sorties for completion of the O’Neill
MOA. The goal is to complete all low-level route surveys no later than 31 August.
August 2014
 SDWG flew Mission #14-C-7129 - Aerial Surveys of Terrestrial Wildlife on five days in
August in support of the Department of Game, Fish & Parks (GF&P) and the South Dakota State
University (SDSU). GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and elk while SDSU surveyed
35

elk and bobcats. The surveys resulted in 9.9 flight hours for GF&P and 8.9 flight hours for SDSU
and for a total of 18.8 hours flying over western South Dakota and the Black Hills. The CAP
pilot on the 4th, 14th and 27th was Lt Col Gary Hewett. He was accompanied by Ms. Paige
Mueggenberg of GF&P. The pilot on the 12th and 25th was Maj Craig Goodrich. He was
accompanied by Mr. Brandon Tycz from SDSU.
 SDWG flew Mission #14-1-6809 - Low-Level Route Surveys. Each year the South
Dakota Air National Guard’s 114th Fighter Wing requests South Dakota Wing conduct Low
Level-Level Route Surveys (LLRS) of military air training routes (MTR) and aerial Military
Operations Areas (MOA). These MTRs cover southeastern South Dakota, northwest Iowa, and
northeast Nebraska leading to/from the O’Neill MOA in northeast Nebraska. Sioux Falls’ Joe
Foss Field is an Air Combat Command (ACC) F-16 base and this airspace is used by active and
reserve ACC units.
The purpose of these surveys is to ensure obstruction clearance at the minimum altitude usable
for training. The CAP aircrews note potential hazards and obstacles not listed on current charts,
assess possible air traffic conflicts from public use airports, airways and airstrips, and assess
other potential flight safety hazards. In addition, they note the locations of noise sensitive areas
such as stock pens and feedlots.
During the month of August, SDWG flew 12 sorties for a total of 35.6 flight hours that covered
approximately 3,886 nautical miles. For 2014 SDWG flew a total of 19 LLRS sorties for just
under 53 hours of flight time that covered 6,051 nautical miles. The activity involved two
Cessna-172 and two Cessna-182 aircraft. The aircrews were comprised of 18 members from
Sioux Falls, Brookings, Pierre and Rapid City. SDWG’s unique uses for its aircraft put it in the
Top 20 wings in the continental U.S. for aircraft utilization.

Figure-60 - Maj Goodrich plots LLRS routes in support of the SD Air National Guard
 On 8 August, Wing Historian Maj Todd Epp opened the SDWG/CAP exhibit opened at
the South Dakota National Guard Museum in Pierre. The exhibit will run through October. The
exhibit celebrates SDWG/SDNG assistance to the other in the accomplishment of their missions.

36

The exhibit features current and decommissioned CAP uniforms such as the "Smurf Suit," the
Corporate Dress Uniform, current and past flight jackets and a battle dress uniform. It also
includes current and past equipment such as an aircraft radio, a ground radio, a GPS unit and
pilot kneeboard. It also includes CAP insignia, the SDWG Roundup magazines, various awards,
patches, a chart with LLRS routes highlighted, etc. A PowerPoint presentation showcases photos
of SDWG and SDNG members and activities. All of the items are identified with descriptions,
with the history of the CAP, cooperation between the SDWG and the SDNG and other notable
and interesting facts about the SDWG and CAP and SDNG on placards. The SDWG items are in
two large cases, three mannequins, and two easels.

Figure-61 - Maj Epp and Museum Director Ms. Sonja Johnson at the SDWG/CAP exhibit
September 2014
 SDWG flew Mission #14-C-7604 - Aerial Surveys of Terrestrial Wildlife on 4 days in
September in support of the state Department of Game, Fish & Parks (GFP) and the South
Dakota State University (SDSU). GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and elk while
SDSU surveyed elk and bobcats. The resulted in 13.6 flight hours in September flying hours over
western South Dakota and the Black Hills. CAP pilots for the flights were Lt Col Buck DeWeese
and Lt Col Gary Hewett. They were accompanied by either Mr. Brandon Tycz from SDSU or by
Ms. Paige Mueggenberg or Ms. Lauren Wiechman from GF&P.
 SDWG flew Mission #14-1-7655 - Low-Level Route Survey – West River on 14
September. Ellsworth AFB’s 28th Bomb Wing requested a low-level route survey on a specific
military training route (MTR) in the West River area. The purpose of this LLRS was to look for
uncharted obstacles, environmentally sensitive areas and potential safety hazards to military
aircraft operating at high speed at a low level in that area. This task was assigned to a crew from
Rushmore Composite Squadron consisting of Capt Joshua Hall (Mission Pilot), Capt Ryan Jones
(Mission Observer), and 1st Lt Christina Voll (Mission Scanner Trainee). The aircrew flew a
Cessna-182T on three sorties surveying the MTR from Rapid City into Wyoming for a total of
9.3 flying hours during the course of which several new towers were photographed and charted.
 Six members of the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron took part in an attack response
exercise at the 114th Fighter Wing of the South Dakota Air National Guard. Playing the part of
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injured airmen, they were “moulaged” as victims, simulating injuries sustained as participants in
the exercise. Led by Capt Jerry Foy, himself an ANG veteran, the CAP crew underwent an
extreme makeover by ANG medics from the 114th Medical Group. ANG Lt Col Larry DeBuhr
and his staff were tasked with assessing Guard member's ability to perform self-aid and buddy
care throughout the event, held on Saturday, 6 September. That's where the CAP crew came in.
The CAP crew arrived on base and was moulaged with various simulated injuries, ranging from
minor to major; burns, lacerations, amputations - all the trappings of a disaster. The crew then
broke up into groups led by inspectors who traveled with the "wounded" throughout the base
during exercise incidents. The teams presented the "victims" in various work centers, gauging the
response to the casualties, and assessing proper procedures to address the injuries. The CAP
“victims” were treated by ANG members who learned hands-on procedures. Fortunately, after
expert treatment, everyone survived the exercise! Lt. Col. DeBuhr commented that the
professionalism of the CAP members aided greatly in the exercise evaluation, and thanked each
member for their involvement.

Figure-62 - A cadet has moulage applied in an exercise supporting the SD ANG
Figure-63 - Crew of cadet victims in an exercise supporting the SD ANG
 North Central Region Conference in Des Moines, IA was the site for this year’s North
Central Region CAP Conference. It kicked off 20 September, as NCR Wing Commanders and
their representatives presented yearly overviews of each of the seven Wings’ activities and
accomplishments. Col Larry Ragland, CAP NHQ Chief of Staff, addressed the group on behalf
of National Commander Maj Gen Joe Vasquez. Col Ragland said the new leadership team is
looking to decrease the regulatory footprint in CAP, increase recruiting and retention and
develop new CAP missions for America. Wing staff attending included SDWG Commander, Col
John Seten, his wife and SDWG Personnel Officer, 1st Lt Lori Seten, SDWG Professional
Development Officer and past CC, Col Mary Donley, SDWG Vice Commander, Lt Col Rick
Larson, and SDWG Cadet Programs Director Lt Col Linda Buechler. Cadet members from
across the region held a Cadet Advisory Council meeting. C/Maj Joshua Klosterman represented
SDWG CAC. At the Saturday evening awards banquet a POW-MIA ceremony was held and Col
Todd paid tribute to long serving CAP members. Receiving awards were SDWG PAO Maj
Bruce Kipp (NCR PAO of the Year) and SDWG Aerospace Education Officer Lt Col Buck
DeWeese (NCR Frank G. Brewer Memorial Aerospace Lifetime Achievement Award). Col
Seten commented "it's a real testament to the dedication of SDWG’s members when we can brief
being the top flying hour wing in NCR, have the top national CAP CyberPatriot team and gain
top NCR SAR wing honors!"
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October 2014
 SDWG flew Mission #15-1-3517, locally dubbed “Operation Windmill” from 19-24
October. Field tests were conducted in the vicinity of the Tyler Minnesota Common Air Route
Surveillance radar site near Brookings. The tests were part of an interagency effort to assess
wind turbine radar interference mitigation technologies, radar systems calibration, and how wind
farms hamper the ability to detect objects in the area. The tests were conducted by Sandia
National Laboratories and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Lincoln Laboratory. The
test operations included the use of SDWG aviation assets for approximately 48 flight hours. CAP
aircraft and crews flew flight operations daily during each field test. Essentially, the CAP aircraft
flew around at an assigned altitude and pattern for eight hours a day. Capt Neil Schmid of Sioux
Falls Composite Squadron was the project officer.
 SDWG flew Mission #15-C-3240 - Aerial Surveys of Terrestrial Wildlife on 6 days in
October in support of the state Department of Game, Fish & Parks (GFP) and the South Dakota
State University (SDSU). GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and elk while SDSU
surveyed elk and bobcats. The resulted in 24.91flight hours flying hours over western South
Dakota and the Black Hills. CAP pilots for the flights were Lt Col Buck DeWeese and Lt Col
Gary Hewett. They were accompanied by either Mr. Brandon Tycz from SDSU or by Ms. Paige
Mueggenberg or Ms. Lauren Wiechman from GF&P.
 Capt. Neil Schmid of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron attained a significant aviation
achievement on 29 October! Flying a SDWG aircraft he completed his “Passport South Dakota
Gold Level Award”. The program, which began in 2010, is sponsored by the South Dakota Pilots
Association to promote general aviation within the state. The program involves attendance at
aviation safety seminars, visiting South Dakota museums with aviation displays and to land at
SD public airports. Neil completed the final requirement with stops at Belle Fourche, Spearfish,
Sturgis, Philip, Kadoka and Presho. The Gold Level Award requires the Neil have landed at all
74 of the public-use airports in the state, attend four air safety seminars and visit four South
Dakota museums with aviation-related displays. The Passport South Dakota Award consists of
an “I Flew South Dakota” patch and, for the gold level, a “74 Airports” tab for wear on his
civilian flight jacket.

Figure-64 - Capt Schmid after his final landing for Passport South Dakota
Figure-65 - Map of all 74 public use airports in South Dakota
Figure-66 - Gold Level Award patch and tab for Capt Schmid’s civilian flight jacket

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November 2014
 SDWG flew Mission #15-C-3596 - Aerial Surveys of Terrestrial Wildlife on 5 days in
November in support of the Department of Game, Fish & Parks (GF&P) and South Dakota State
University (SDSU). GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and elk while SDSU surveyed
elk and bobcats. The result was 15.7 hours flying over western South Dakota and the Black Hills.
CAP pilot for the flights was Lt Col Gary Hewett. Depending on whom the sortie supported they
were accompanied by either Mr. Brandon Tycz from SDSU (6 flying hours) or by Ms. Lauren
Wiechman from GF&P (9.7 flying hours).
 Members of Pierre Composite Squadron met at the state capitol building on 22 November
to decorate a Civil Air Patrol Christmas tree for the 34th annual “Christmas at the Capitol”. This
year’s theme commemorates the 125th Anniversary of statehood for South Dakota. The number
of trees is limited and it is prestigious to be allowed to place a tree in the capitol. The display will
be visited by thousands of people during the open house dates. The Grand Lighting Ceremony
took place on 25 November after a welcome, introduction and Christmas wishes from Governor
Dennis Daugaard and First Lady Linda Daugaard.

Figure-67 - SDWG Christmas Tree at the State Capitol
December 2014
 SDWG flew Mission #15-C-4710 – SDWG flew aerial surveys of terrestrial wildlife on
six days December in support of the state Department of Game, Fish & Parks and South Dakota
State University. GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and elk while SDSU surveyed elk
40

and bobcats. The result was 18.5 hours for GF&P and 7.2 hours for SDSU for a total of 25.7
hours flying over western South Dakota and the Black Hills. CAP pilot for the flights was Lt.
Col. Gary Hewett. Depending on whom the sortie supported he was accompanied by Ms. Lauren
Wiechman from GF&P or Mr. Brandon Tycz of SDSU.
 Five members of Big Sioux Composite Squadron took part in laying decorative holiday
wreaths on veterans’ graves at the Greenwood Cemetery in Brookings. The local Veterans of
Foreign Wars and the local American Legion were also in attendance and participated in the
ceremony and the laying of wreaths. The squadron’s color guard, albeit a diminished one,
presented and retired the colors adding an additional note of solemnity to the occasion.

Figure-68 - Big Sioux Composite Squadron Wreaths Across America
Figure-69 - Big Sioux Composite Squadron Wreaths Across America
 Crazy Horse Composite Squadron was all ready for the big day but much to our dismay
our wreaths got lost in transit. Fortunately, we were able to locate seven wreaths for the
ceremony and it went beautifully. Better late than never, we finally received our shipment of
wreaths on 13 December. The squadron, the Hot Springs American Legion and people from the
Custer and Hot Springs communities helped to place the wreaths at the Hot Springs National
Cemetery. In the photo, taken by Lt. V. Bierwirth, C/Amn Antony Dillon, C/MSgt Thomas
Dillon, and C/CMSgt Jason Parry salute honor our fallen veterans.

Figure-70 - Crazy Horse Composite Squadron Wreaths Across America

41

LIST OF SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS
No. Title
1.

SDWG Electronic Newsletter - Skychaser - January 2014

2.

SDWG Electronic Newsletter - Skychaser - February 2014

3.

SDWG Electronic Newsletter - Skychaser - March 2014

4.

SDWG Electronic Newsletter - Skychaser - April 2014

5.

SDWG Electronic Newsletter - Skychaser - May 2014

6.

SDWG Electronic Newsletter - Skychaser - June 2014

7.

SDWG Electronic Newsletter - Skychaser - July 2014

8.

SDWG Electronic Newsletter - Skychaser - August 2014

9.

SDWG Electronic Newsletter - Skychaser - September 2014

10.

SDWG Electronic Newsletter - Skychaser - October 2014

11.

SDWG Electronic Newsletter - Skychaser - November 2014

12.

SDWG Electronic Newsletter - Skychaser - December 2014

13.

South Dakota Wing Roundup #1 - Winter 2014

14.

South Dakota Wing Roundup #2 - Summer 2014

15.

South Dakota Wing Roundup #3 - Fall 2014

42

“THE SKYCHASER”
South Dakota Wing Electronic Newsletter for January 2014
Official Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force - Citizens Serving Communities: Above and Beyond
Publishers: Wing Commander Colonel John Seten / Wing Vice Commander Lieutenant Colonel Richard Larson
Editor: Major Bruce Kipp  Wing Public Affairs Officer  (605) 261-4507  paa.sdwg@gmail.com

WING TIPS
HOT NEWS: U.S. HOUSE BILL H.R.3708 - GENERAL AVIATION PILOT PROTECTION ACT WOULD
ELIMINATE THE REQUIREMENT FOR A MEDICAL EXAM FOR GENERAL AVIATION PILOTS. The bill
would replace the compulsory FAA Third Class medical exam with the requirement that a general aviation pilot
simply possess a valid driver’s license as proof of health. It would also limit pilots to flying with no more than
five passengers, not above 14,000 feet and at no more than 250 knots, in aircraft that have a maximum takeoff
weight of 6,000 lbs. Other conditions in the bill limit flights to visual flight rules (VFR) and to flights within the
United States. Compensation for flights would also be prohibited. The bill gives the FAA 180 days from the
date the bill is enacted to adopt the changes. Contact Rep. Kristi Noem and urge her to support H.R.-3708.
 SAFE IS BETTER THAN SORRY. SDWG held a Safety Day on 22 January. By regulation an annual
Safety Day is to be held in all active units sometime during the months of January, February or March to focus
on improving safety knowledge and attitudes. This required day is focused entirely on safety subjects applicable
to the unit. Safety Day education to meet this requirement may take place at a regularly scheduled unit meeting
providing the academic content is devoted to safety.
 SPIDERTRACKS. On 16 January, Col. Seten, Lt. Col. Larson and Lt. Schmid of Sioux Falls Composite
Squadron met with Mr. Jerry Lee a representative of the company that manufactures the Spidertracks real-time
satellite tracking system to discuss SDWG's deployment of the system and high degree of success with fielding.
While in town from Florida (just in time for a blizzard), Mr. Lee shared the company's direction along with
some helpful hints on use of the tracker. Those steps will become part of the aircrew user training soon.
 TOP TWO SDWG LEADERS IN ACTION. Despite the arctic blast on 23 January, Col. Seten and Lt.
Col. Larson travelled to Pierre on a variety of liaison missions. They attended the quarterly meeting of the
Volunteer Organizations Active in Disasters (VOAD), a coalition of the major national voluntary organizations
in the U.S. that have made disaster-related work a priority. During the meeting, they briefed VOAD members
1

on CAP missions and capabilities. Lt. Col. Larson commented that this was primarily to show-the-flag and to
touch base with organizations that CAP works with in disaster recovery.
Following the VOAD meeting, they met with Major General Tim Reisch, State Adjutant General, to discuss
recent CAP state missions and future CAP capabilities. While there, they also met with Assistant Director Steve
Harding and members of the National Guard budget staff, thanking them for their support! The last stop of the
day was a meeting with newly appointed State Director of Homeland Security Mr. Steve Pluta. He was briefed
on CAP "Homeland Skies" capabilities and presented with a new initiative to support advanced capabilities.
Among the other awareness missions undertaken during the 23 January trip was groundwork for the upcoming
"CAP Day" activities planned Thursday, 20 Feb at the state Capitol. All SDWG members are invited to the
event, which will run from 1400-1600 Central Time. The day will focus on legislative interaction and on-going
support for SDWG! Last year's session was highly successful, with record member participation and a visit by
and photo session with Governor Daugaard. Also planned for 20 February is a proclamation to be signed by the
governor designating 20 February as CAP Day throughout the state.
 FIRST SEARCH AND RESCUE EXERCISE OF 2014. Over 70 SDWG members held the first training
session of the year on Saturday, 11 January with a state-wide search and rescue exercise (SAREX). This “Split
SAREX” took place in the West River area with an incident command post at Rushmore Composite Squadron
and in the East River area with an incident command post at Sioux Falls Composite Squadron.
The overall purpose of the activity was threefold: to train mission base staff in organizing and controlling an
emergency services mission, to train mission aircrews in the techniques of aerial observation and photography,
and to train ground teams in the techniques and skills needed for search and rescue.
The East River portion of the Split SAREX was held at Sioux Falls Composite Squadron HQ. Col. John Seten
served as the Incident Commander supported by a mission base staff. The search and rescue scenarios played
involved air and ground searches for private aircraft overdue at their destinations and a scenario for a mission
from the state Office of Emergency Management to survey and photograph ice conditions along Split Rock
Creek in Palisades State Park near Garretson, SD. Two aircraft and two ground search teams took part.
The West River portion of the Split SAREX was held at the Rushmore Composite Squadron HQ in Rapid City.
Maj. Craig Goodrich served as the Incident Commander supported by a mission base staff. They played a
complex scenario involving two missing persons (a mentally unstable male out on bond on drug charges and his
girlfriend), abandoned vehicles, a break-in at a remote cabin, and a stolen private aircraft with only one person
on board. At the notional request from the Lawrence County Sheriff’s Office a search was conducted in western
South Dakota for the female missing person and the stolen aircraft. Three aircraft and two ground search teams
took part. Kudos to the West River scenarist for an unusual and interesting scenario.

EAST RIVER SAREX MISSION BRIEFING

2

GROUND TEAM W/HAND-HELD RDF

 The January-March edition of CAP Volunteer is out. One of the front cover feature articles is our Winter
Storm Atlas recovery efforts. The magazine is online at www.capvolunteernow.com/cap_volunteer/
 The Jan-Mar online edition of CAP Vector - a quarterly news and information tool designed to "get the
word out" on CAP initiatives, events and policies is at: www.capmembers.com/cap_national_hq/capvector/
 SAFETY SPECIALTY TRACK UPDATE - As a result of increased capabilities of the CAP Learning
Management System the prerequisites for the Safety Specialty Track tests have been updated to reflect the need
to take the appropriate test while working through the specialty track. To take the Safety Specialty Track Senior
test (Senior Lesson and Exam: Safety), you must have obtained the Technician rating in the Safety Specialty
Track and it must be annotated in eServices. The same prerequisite is required to take the Safety Specialty
Track Master test, you must have obtained Senior rating and it must be annotated in eServices. The Safety
Technician Specialty Track test can be taken as long as the Introduction to Safety course has been completed.

STAFF NOTES
WING COMMANDER
Col. John Seten, CAP
 Congratulations to Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron in Spearfish for earning the Quality Cadet
Unit Award for 2012-2013. Great Job!
 I'd like to send a very special thank you to Capt. Jerry Foy for disposing of numerous items that have
been pending turn in for many years to include four vehicles. Great job to Jerry and those that helped him this
past weekend.

WING VICE COMMANDER
Lt. Col. Richard Larson, CAP

Civil Air Patrol in South Dakota has proven its utility and value to community, state and nation over the years.
It’s amazing to see the ways CAP contributes to the betterment of society. Examples of flight related missions
include assistance to the Department of Defense and Federal Aviation Agency to determine the impact of wind
generator farms, aerial flood surveys for FEMA and state emergency management, completing west river
damage assessments for state government, missing persons searches, ensuring safety of flight along low level
military training routes, providing target aircraft for air defense intercept missions, homeland security missions
over large special events and tracking wildlife during conservation projects.
Non-flying missions in the past include providing base support for Ellsworth AFB’s 28th Bomb Wing and the
SDANG’s 114th Fighter Wing, assisting at airshows, marching in parades, promoting highway safety, working
with Veterans organizations, helping with community events such as ZooBoo, Riverboat Days, Arts Festivals,
Festival of Lights, and Veterans March, including interoperable communications and/or cybersecurity training.
The missions and events listed above are on top of the demands of meeting the dynamic requirements of CAP
members’ training and certification.
3

When Colonel Seten and I meet with others to tell the South Dakota CAP story, we are told that our enthusiasm
shows. We are both quick to say that it is our member’s performance of duty that makes us proud.
Our high-tech crystal ball says that in the near future CAP members will be operating enhanced and advanced
technology, have more air and ground missions, and work even closer with law enforcement, first responders,
emergency management personnel and government officials at the local, state and federal level in joint training,
emergency services education and real-world response.
Having been in CAP for over 30 years in 3 different wings I knew that South Dakota CAP was good, but am
constantly amazed by what we are achieving! Let’s keep challenging ourselves to continue training, making
contributions and racking up achievements and successes. We’ve made a critical difference on a lot of fronts…
millions of dollars saved, increased Homeland Security and National Defense and just plain doing what’s right
by being leaders in the community. I am proud of each of you and pleased to be a part of our dynamic team!

WING DIRECTOR OF LOGISTICS
Capt. Jerry Foy, CAP
 I wish to express my sincere thanks to the crew who helped me retire about 65 items, including vehicles,
computers and peripherals, microwaves, a television, outmoded GPS equipment, an overhead projector and a
number of pieces of office automation equipment. It took a lot of processing to get the items ready for disposal
at the Defense Logistics Agency’s Disposition Services at Ellsworth AFB. For several days I, 1st Lt. Rachel
Kuecker, 1st Christina Voll, C/SSgt Travis, C/SSgt Levi Woodard, C/MSgt Joseph Voll and Mr. Anthony Voll
worked to get the items ready. My thanks to all the squadrons who helped prepare for this “retirement party”,
plus we were able to reassign needed items and discovered a “lost” item. Round 2 coming up next month. The
end result? Lots more space at Wing Headquarters and a simplified inventory at the end of the year.

SQUADRON HIGHLIGHTS
BIG SIOUX COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-058, BROOKINGS)
THE THIRD TIME’S THE CYBER-CHARM - The cadet cybersecurity team of the

Big Sioux Composite Squadron is hoping the third time’s the charm as they head into
the national finals of “CyberPatriot-VI,” the Air Force Association national high
school cyber-defense competition to be held on 26 March in Gaylord, MD.
For the Big Sioux cybersecurity team, it’s their third straight finals The SDWG cadets
finished first in the 2013 Cisco Networking event at the national competition and won
4

the competition’s inaugural cyber-forensics phase in 2012. Going into the finals, the Big Sioux cybersecurity
team is in second place in the All Service Division and fifth in the Cisco Networking Challenge. Winning teams
in the championship receive scholarships and prizes from CyberPatriot sponsors.
The members of this year’s Big Sioux cyber-security team, led by Cadet Captain Joshua Klosterman are Cadet
Master Sergeant Chris Dinnel, Cadet Master Sergeant Laura Rudnik, Cadet Airman Basic Josiah Jorenby and
Cadet Airman Zebadiah Nelson. The team is coached by Cadet Second Lieutenant Tyler Gross and mentored by
First Lieutenant Shannon Hofer.
During the three preliminary rounds the Big Sioux team faced realistic computer network threats at their home
location. They had six hours to seek out weaknesses in simulated online networks and work to defend those
networks from threat scenarios. A Cisco networking challenge was also a part of the competition. The team was
scored according to how quickly and effectively they established and maintained secure networks.
The “All Service Division” is comprised of CAP Cadets and Naval Sea Cadets, as well as Junior ROTC units
from all four military services. CAP teams accounted for 360 of the 864 teams in the All Service Division. CAP
has three of 14 finalist slots in the All Service category for the second consecutive year. Marine Corps JROTC
has three teams, Army, Air Force and Navy JROTCs and the Naval Sea Cadets have two teams each.
The CyberPatriot competition has two divisions; All Service and Open. Between the two divisions a record
1,537 teams from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Canada, as well as U.S. Department of
Defense Dependent Schools in Japan, South Korea and Germany registered to compete in competition that
began on 15 November 2013.
CRAZY HORSE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-068, CUSTER)
(Items and photos submitted by: 1st Lt. K. Bierwirth)
 RECRUITMENT, RECRUITMENT, RECRUITMENT has been the squadron’s theme this month.
We’ve been hitting the pavement and advertising!
-In December our squadron hosted a Paper & Pets Drive at our local food pantry.
-We put an announcement for the squadron on the web page of the Custer Chamber of Commerce.
-Cadets Parry and Stiffarm did a recruitment presentation to 78 Custer Middle School students
-We have put photos in the local newspaper.
-We handed out brochures to the middle school students.
-We put flyers in the county extension and 4-H newsletters for Custer and Fall River Counties.
- Last but not least C/TSgt Stiffarm is working on a squadron advert for the local television station.
So far the middle school presentation has resulted in one potential new member with more to follow.

LEFT PHOTO: CADETS PARRY AND STIFFARM AT CUSTER MIDDLE SCHOOL
RIGHT PHOTO: CAPT. MOAD, LT. DILLON, CADET PARRY, CAPT. GEETING AND CADET DILLON AT CUSTER FOOD PANTRY

5

1st Lt. Vicki Bierwirth has started the cadets on CAP’s model rocketry
program. If all goes as planned we hope to complete the instructional
modules by spring. Everyone is looking forward to punching holes in
the sky with their model rockets by mid-summer. There was a bit of
grousing about being limited to low-power rocket motors, some were
hoping to to recreate a moon mission.
All of the participants are looking forward to adding the coveted CAP
model rocketry badges to their uniform.
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-063, SPEARFISH)
(Item submitted by: Capt. David Small, text and photos by Lt. Col. Hopewell)
 IT WAS AN UN-ORDINARY THURSDAY EVENING at the Spearfish airport on 9 January 2013,
1800 hours, the time for the squadron meeting. 1st Lt. Brandon Caneva, first to arrive at the Squadron building,
opened to door to the sound of cascading water. His immediate thought was, “This
can’t be good.” Days before local temperatures of around zero prevailed in the area.
Though we’ve had prolonged colder weather in the past with no problems, this time
the constant wind and cold just overwhelmed the old plumbing. The pipes in and
under the building had burst flooding the floor and crawl space. The prime suspect,
it seems, was the failed thermostat for the heaters in the crawl space. Walking on
the carpet produced visible mini-waves and splashes, and the sink under-counter
area literally dammed up inches of water. Cadets and seniors immediately switched
gears from the original plans and launched a team effort to remove thoroughly
soaked (ruined) carpet from the wood under-flooring, and dismantled the water
softened cabinet components. The impromptu recovery team consisted of seniors
1st Lt. Brandon Caneva, Capt. Gary Dettman, Lt. Col. Daryl Miles, Lt. Col. Buck
DeWeese, Lt. Col. James Hopewell, and cadets C/Col William Small, C/SMSgt
Connor Caneva, C/CMSgt Jared Doyle, C/SSgt Justin Harris, C/Amn Ryan Harris,
C/Amn Peter Iverson. Dettman and DeWeese came back during the following week
and replaced the cracked pipes and end-caps. Complete restoration of floors and
cabinet is still forthcoming, and somewhat dependent on available funds.
PIERRE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-038, PIERRE)
(No items submitted for this issue)
RUSHMORE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-031, RAPID CITY)
(Items submitted are in the promotions section)
SIOUX FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-050, SIOUX FALLS)
(Items submitted are in the promotions section)

HH

PROMOTIONS

HH

Senior Member Promotion
Congratulations to Jim Schimelfening on Wing Staff on his promotion to the rank of First Lieutenant!

6

Cadet Officer Promotions
Congratulations to Silas Busch of Rushmore Composite Squadron on promotion to the rank
of Cadet Captain and receipt of the Earhart Award!

Congratulations to Nicole Schneider of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on her promotion to the
rank of Cadet First Lieutenant and on appointment to the cadet staff as Administrative officer.
Cadet Noncommissioned Officer Promotions
Congratulations to Connor Caneva of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron and to Devon Brown of
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on their promotion to the rank of Cadet Chief Master Sergeant and
receipt of the Goddard Award!

Congratulations to Jason Parry of Crazy Horse Composite Squadron, Bradley Blansett of Lookout
Mountain Composite Squadron and Austin Cole of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on promotion to
the rank of Cadet Senior Master Sergeant and receipt of the General Jimmy Doolittle Award!
Congratulations to Nicholas Nash of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron and Travis Tenold of Rushmore
Composite Squadron on promotion to Cadet Master Sergeant and receipt of the Lindbergh Award!

Congratulations to Justin Harris of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron and to Kyle Stiffarm of
Crazy Horse Composite Squadron and to Jaden Roblewsky of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on
their promotion to the rank of Cadet Technical Sergeant and receipt of the Eddie Rickenbacker Award!
Congratulations to Keyvin Rauscher and Austin Rauscher of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron
and Rushmore Composite Squadron’s Anthony Pruitt, Joseph Jagodzinski, and Levi Woodard, on their
promotion to the rank of Cadet Staff Sergeant and receipt of the Wright Brothers Award!
Cadet Airman Promotions
Congratulations to Thomas Dillon of the Crazy Horse Composite Squadron and to Jaden Petersen of
Big Sioux Composite Squadron their promotion to the rank of Cadet Senior Airman and receipt of the
Mary Feik Award!
Congratulations to Julia Lair of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron and Daniella Petersen of Big Sioux
Composite Squadron on promotion to the rank of Cadet Airman and receipt of the Gen. Curry Award!

HH

KUDOS

HH

H Congratulations to SrA Jaden Peterson of Big Sioux Composite Squadron on his selection as squadron
Assistant Public Affairs Officer!
7

“THE SKYCHASER”
South Dakota Wing Electronic Newsletter for February 2014
Official Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force - Citizens Serving Communities: Above and Beyond
Publishers: Wing Commander Colonel John Seten / Wing Vice Commander Lieutenant Colonel Richard Larson
Editor: Major Bruce Kipp  Wing Public Affairs Officer  (605) 261-4507  paa.sdwg@gmail.com

WING TIPS
HOT NEWS: GOV. PROCLAIMS 20 FEBRUARY CIVIL AIR PATROL DAY IN SOUTH DAKOTA.

Governor Dennis Daaugard issued a proclamation that designated 20 February as Civil Air Patrol Day in South
Dakota. The proclamation commends SDWG for its multitude of missions and service to local communities,
counties and the state. A copy of the proclamation is attached at the end of this newsletter.

GOV. DAUGAARD POSES WITH THE SDWG CONTINGENT AT THE STATE CAPITOL ON CIVIL AIR PATROL DAY
Photo by Lieutenant Vincent Brown, Sioux Falls Composite Squadron

1

HOT NEWS: WING LEGISLATIVE DAY AT STATE CAPITOL: On Thursday, 20 February members of

the Wing from across the state converged on the state Capitol in Pierre to meet with legislators to thank them
for their support. Over 40 members representing all six squadrons made the trip.
Col. Seten commented, “The purpose is to tell state policymakers the story of Civil Air Patrol in South Dakota,
of the many volunteer hours spent on air and ground missions for local, county, tribal, state and federal
government, law enforcement agencies and first responder organizations. We also want them to know of our
cadet program that prepares young people not just for careers in the military, but to be good citizens.” He also
said it is important that the public understands in a time of limited budgets, SDWG helps stretch the resources
of the state and saves money by using well-trained, professional volunteers, volunteers who are held to the same
level of performance and knowledge as their paid colleagues.
At the opening of their respective sessions the state Senate and House of Representatives recognized the many
contributions of the South Dakota Wing with a prolonged standing ovation. In the Senate, Lieutenant Governor
Matt Michels, who was presiding, specifically commended our involvement in the state’s flood response efforts
in 2011 and our support in state recovery efforts from 2013’s Winter Storm Atlas.
Uniformed members of Wing served a snack in the lobbies off the Senate and
House chambers for legislators, lobbyists, staff and others. Thanks to Lieutenant
Rachel Kuecker the cupcakes all had CAP and SDWG insignia on them as did the
water bottles on the table. Our personnel briefed senators and representatives on
the latest enhancements and advancements to the Wing’s abilities and capabilities,
answered questions and handed out copies of CAP’s annual financial report and
SDWG’s legislative brochure.
A pleasant surprise for a small group of our members was an impromptu chat with
U.S. Senator John Thune (R-SD) who was in the Capitol building for other
business. He stopped his scheduled itinerary and spent several minutes shaking
hands and talking with us. Later that afternoon Governor Dennis Daugaard met the
nearly 40 members representing all six squadrons and the wing staff on the Grand
Staircase of the Capitol Rotunda for a brief visit and group picture.

Wing Commander Col. John Seten and Lt. Col. Jim Hopewell of the Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron contributed to this item.
The photo is by Lieutenant Vincent Brown of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron.

HOT NEWS: SDWG’S NEWEST PILOT: SDWG has a brand new pilot, C/Col William Small. On 6

February, William travelled from his home in Spearfish to Brookings in a CAP aircraft. In Brookings he met
with FAA Designated Pilot Examiner John Barney who administered his practical and oral tests and the flight
checkride for a private pilot’s license. William flew to Brookings as a student pilot but returned to Rapid City as
“pilot-in-command” of the CAP aircraft. William was accompanied to Brookings by his chief flight instructor,
Lt. Col. Gary Hewett, himself a Certified Flight Instructor (CFI), who spent many hours closely working with
2

William on the entire process. William also received training and advice from CAP members (and CFIs) 1st Lt.
Marty Larson, Lt. Col. Jerry Densmore and Maj. Craig Goodrich. Col. Seten, Lt. Col. Hewett and Capt. D.
Small contributed to this article.

PHOTO-1

PHOTO-2

PHOTO-3

PHOTO-1 - DESIGNATED PILOT EXAMINER JOHN BARNEY ADMINISTERS THE PRIVATE PILOT EXAMS TO WILLIAM
PHOTO-2 - DESIGNATED PILOT EXAMINER JOHN BARNEY CONGRATULATES WILLIAM AFTER HIS SUCCESSFUL CHECKRIDE
PHOTO-3 - LT. COL. GARY HEWETT, WILLIAM’S CHIEF FLYING INSTRUCTOR, CONGRATULATES SDWG’S NEWEST PRIVATE PILOT
Photo Credits: Photo-1 & Photo-2, Lt. Col. Gary Hewett; Photo-3, Paul Hanusa, FBO manager at Brookings Airport

 SOUTH DAKOTA’S JOE FOSS HONORED IN ARIZONA . South Dakota native Joe Foss has
been honored in Arizona. Members and the color guard of Yuma Composite Squadron 508 of the Arizona Wing
attended a ceremony in which the honor was bestowed. Foss was honored by having an aircraft hangar named
for him at the dedication of the new Aviation Industrial Center within the Defense Contractor Complex at Yuma
International Airport in Yuma, Arizona. The Aviation Industrial Center is a single structure housing a huge,
24,000 square foot hangar plus space for offices and engineering shops. The aviation center will fill a vital role
in research and development of advanced technologies for the aerospace industry.
Joseph Jacob "Joe" Foss (1915-2003) was the leading fighter ace of the Marine Corps during World War II and
a 1943 recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions during the Guadalcanal campaign. In postwar years, he
achieved fame as the founder of South Dakota’s Air National Guard and eventually rose to the rank of General
in the Air Guard, was the 20th Governor of South Dakota, two time President of the National Rifle Association,
the first commissioner of the American Football League, and had a career as a television broadcaster as well.
Ironically, several years ago Foss gave Arizona aviation officials a bit of a black eye. At Phoenix’s International
Airport Joe, then 86, was detained by airport security when screening detected his Medal of Honor. The security
officers, not recognizing what is was, wanted to confiscate and destroy the medal and the related memorabilia
he was carrying. Publicity of the incident embarrassed Arizona aviation officials. In later years Joe and his wife
lived in Scottsdale, AZ. He died on January 1, 2003 and is buried in Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia.

ARIZONA WING CAP LIEUTENANT JANET WATSON HOLDS A PIECE OF THE HANGAR DEDICATION BANNER
Photos by: CAP Lieutenant Mark Watson, used with permission of the Arizona Wing

3

 AERIAL WILDLIFE SURVEYS: SDWG flew aerial surveys of terrestrial wildlife on the 6th, 7th, 15th,
18th, 29th and 31st of January in support of the state Department of Game, Fish & Parks and South Dakota State
University. The GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and elk. The SDSU surveyed elk and bobcats. 12.5
flight hours were in support of GF&P and 11.1 flight hours were in support of SDSU for a total of 23.6 hours
flying over western South Dakota and the Black Hills. CAP Pilots for the January surveys were Lt. Col. Gary
Hewett and Col. Mike Beason. In February similar missions were flown on the 11th, 12th, 25th &26th for a total
of 16.3 flying hours (10.3 for GF&P, 6.0 for SDSU). The pilot was Lt. Col. Hewett.
 LOW, SLOW AND IN THE KNOW! Submitted by Lt. Col. Larson. On 5 February, CAP officers Lt.
Neil Schmid and Lt. Col. Larson met with two officers of the South Dakota Air National Guard, Lt. Col. Greg
Lair, Commander of the 175th Fighter Squadron (also a
CAP pilot) and Capt. Jerry Grotjohn, 175th Fighter
Squadron Airspace Manager, to brief them on the results
of SDWG 2013 Low-Level Route Survey (LLRS)
missions and to begin making plans for SDWG LLRS
missions in 2014.

Each year since 1998 the South Dakota Air National
Guard requests SDWG conduct LLRS of selected military
training air routes and aerial Military Operations Areas
(MOA). The purpose is to locate and identify uncharted
obstructions such as antenna towers and noise sensitive
areas (such as stock pens) that should be avoided by
SDANG pilots.
When SDWG flies a LLRS, a command post is set up for C3 support for the aircraft. SDWG Lt. Col. Larson
serves as Incident Commander. Lt. Schmid of the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron is Project Officer and Lead
Planner for LLRS missions. Wing Commander Col. Seten and Vice Commander Lt. Col. Larson thank all of the
flight crews on the 2013 LLRS missions - 65 hours flying in direct support to military flight safety.
In the photo (L-R): - Lt. Col. Greg Lair, 175th Fighter Squadron Commander, SDANG; SMSgt (Lt. Col., CAP) Rick Larson, SDANG; Capt. Jerry Grotjohn, 175th
Fighter Squadron, SDANG; Lt. Neil Schmid, CAP. Photo by SSgt Garret Gibbs, SDANG.

CAP LIEUTENANT VINCENT BROWN
PHOTOGRAPHS POTENTIAL OBSTRUCTIONS
AND NOISE SENSITIVE AREAS

A CAP LOW-LEVEL ROUTE SURVEY FLIGHT IDENTIFIED RADIO ANTENNA TOWERS AT TURKEY RIDGE THAT COULD POSE A HAZARD
TO LOW FLYING MILITARY AIRCRAFT

4

 SDWG FORMING STATE LEGISLATIVE SQUADRON: In February SDWG began planning for
formation of a Legislative Squadron. A Legislative Squadron consists of state legislators, elected state officials,
and their key staff members. Largely a ceremonial unit, there are no annual dues for members nor any duties or
responsibilities. Members receive a membership certificate and membership card and are granted the honorary
rank of Major. Members are authorized to fly in CAP aircraft, visit CAP unit meetings and attend CAP social
events. The South Dakota Legislative Squadron will have the unit identifier NCR-SD-999. Letters of invitation
were sent out to all 105 state legislators (70 Representatives and 35 Senators) and to selected state officials to
include the Adjutant General. 43 states currently have Legislative Squadrons.
 CAP COMMAND COUNCIL MEETS IN WASHINGTON: From NHQ/PA [edited]: Before CAP’s
Command Council convenes in Washington, D.C., from 28 February – 1 March, for its annual winter meeting,
it will gather on Capitol Hill for Legislative Day on Feb. 27 to brief Congress on the CAP’s three primary
missions of emergency services, aerospace education and cadet programs. Legislative Day will also feature
induction of U.S. Senator Tom Harkin into CAP’s Hall of Honor.
CAP will thank Harkin for his 30 years of CAP service during a congressional reception in the Senate’s Russell
Office Building. Harkin – a former Navy fighter pilot who commands CAP’s Congressional Squadron – will
become the 34th person inducted into the Hall of Honor in CAP’s 72-year history, and only the second member
of Congress, joining former New York Congressman and fellow CAP Col. Lester Wolff, inducted in 1985.
Since joining CAP in 1984, Harkin has been a rated CAP mission pilot and flown a number of training and
actual missions, including counterdrug flights off the southern tip of Florida. He also has served as an adviser to
CAP’s national commanders, providing valuable insight on how CAP can best address some of its budget and
operational challenges. Most recently, he introduced Congressional Gold Medal legislation honoring the service
of CAP’s founding members during World War II, which quickly passed the Senate under unanimous consent
and with 83 cosponsors. CAP officers and cadets visiting Capitol Hill for Legislative Day will urge support for
H.R. 755, the companion House bill to honor founding members of CAP with a Congressional Gold Medal for
their volunteer service in conducting combat operations and other emergency missions during World War II.
CAP’s Command Council will follow Legislative Day with its annual winter meeting, scheduled for Feb. 28
and March 1 in Washington. The Command Council consists of CAP’s national commander, national vice
commander, chief of staff, CAP’s eight region commanders and its 52 wing commanders representing the 50
states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Its members serve as advisers to the
national commander. South Dakota Wing Commander, Colonel John Seten, flew to Washington, DC to take
part in the Legislative Day activity and participate in the meeting of the Command Council.

STAFF NOTES
WING COMMANDER
Col. John Seten, CAP
 Please join me in congratulating C/Maj Elizabeth Foy of the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on her
acceptance to the US Military Academy at West Point. I know she has worked very hard for this and I also
know that she will serve the US Army well. Great job and well deserved!!
 Commanders and Wing Staff, thanks to all of you that were able to participate in our day at the SD State
Capitol. It was a great success once again with a great turnout. Please thank your members on my behalf for
5

participating. Also, a special shout out to 2nd Lt Rachel Kuecker for all of the work she did in preparation. The
cupcakes were AWESOME!!

WING HISTORIAN
Maj. Todd Epp

I met with Sonja Johnson, director of the SD National Guard Museum, Thursday morning before SD CAP Day
at the capitol. We have a very good talk. She is very excited about working with the SDWG to put up an exhibit
that shows how the CAP and the SDNG have worked and trained together on numerous missions and activities.
The deadline to assemble our exhibit, which would be up for three months or so to start (and could become
permanent later), is the first part of August.
In conjunction with the exhibit, she would like for us to put on a short presentation about the CAP and the
SDWG and how it has worked with the SDNG. She'd also like for some of our members who have been or are
in the National Guard to also talk about their experiences.
The second presentation would be a day where we put on aerospace activities for a day in August during the
museum's "summer camps." We would teach and have activities for 100-150 children total over the course of
the day. Seems like a great opportunity to do some cadet recruiting and do a very public aerospace activity.
So, I am looking for photos, charts, objects, etc. on the following missions and activities we have done with the
SDNG:
 Low Level Route Surveys
 Golden Coyote
 Radio training
 Use of and training in Air Guard's mobile command center
 MG Reich presenting C/Col. Small his Spaatz
 Encampments at Camp Rapid
 Flooding missions where the Air Guard assisted us (and we assisted them--I think we flew waders to

Aberdeen for the Army Guard).

 Fire training by Air Guard firefighters.
 CPR training by Air Guard firefighters.
 Events at the Sioux Falls Air Guard base
 List of members who have been in both the SDNG and CAP. Gen. Mielke comes to mind as one of the

more prominent members. Our CC and VC are either former or active SDNG, so that's also a big tie.

If I could get any materials you have on the above list (or anything I've missed) by 1 May 2014, that
would be great. That will give me time to go through them, track down information, consult with Sonja,
6

organize the exhibit, and put together the 10 slide PowerPoint presentation that will kick off the event (and be
shown with the exhibit.) I need to have the exhibit ready to go by late July.
Let me know if I have missed any joint activities.
I do have quite a few photos from 2010 to 2013, no so much pre-2009.
Also, I'll need someone to help me with the aerospace activities with the children. They'll generally be grade
school aged.
I'm also tackling a more general exhibit about the SDWG at the Air and Space Museum at Ellsworth. More on
that later.

SQUADRON HIGHLIGHTS
BIG SIOUX COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-058, BROOKINGS)
(Item submitted by C/SrA Jared Peterson)

 CADET ORIENTATION RIDES: On 22 February, Capt. Matt Meert flew a Cessna-182T from the Sioux
Falls Composite Squadron to Brookings so the cadets there could participate in the flight orientation program.
The day’s first o-ride involved Cadet Salem Pleasants and C/SrA Zebadiah Nelson, the second C/Amn Graham
Dinnel and C/CMSgt Chris Dinnel. Each o-ride consisted of two sorties; the first sortie was from Brookings
Regional Airport to Madison Municipal Airport where they landed, switched the cadet at the controls and then
flew the second sortie back to Brookings Regional Airport. The orientation ride program exposes the cadets to
the excitement and adventure of aviation, teaches them general aerodynamic principles and familiarizes them
with light aircraft and general aviation.
CRAZY HORSE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-068, CUSTER)
(Item submitted by 2nd Lt. K. Bierwirth, photos by 2nd lt. K. Bierwirth and Capt. Moad)
SQUADRON VISITATION: The squadron was pleased to have had a guest speaker

in February. Retired Air Force MSgt Slade Heeb spoke to us about his Air Force
service and discussed some of the tips and tricks on preparing for inspections. He
also discussed his career in law enforcement, search and rescue and the fire
department. We learned a lot of useful things from him and we hope he will
return to speak with us again. In the photo, taken by Lt. K. Bierwirth, Retired
USAF Master Sergeant Heed talks with C/SrA Thomas Dillon, C/TSgt Kyle
Stiffarm and C/SMSgt Parry.

RED COSS SHELTER TRAINING: Squadron Commander Capt. Sharon Moad and C/SMSgt

Jason Parry assisted with shelter training that the American Red Cross conducted in Rapid
City. In the photo, taken by Capt. Moad, poor, homeless C/SMSgt Jason Parry, victim of a
major catastrophe checks in with an American Red Cross shelter worker in his quest to find
shelter, sympathy and hopefully a snack.

7

MODEL ROCKETRY: On the squadron’s Aerospace Education

night we continued working on the CAP model rocketry program.
All of the cadets scored 100% on their model rocketry written
exam. They then began working on building the next model
rocket in the series. The participants are enthusiastic and
thoroughly enjoy the fun and excitement of the program. Kudos
to Lt. V. Bierwirth for leading the program, and to the cadets for
their commitment! In the photo by Capt. Moad, C/SrA Thomas
Dillon, Lt. V. Bierwirth, C/SMSgt Jason Parry and C/TSgt Kyle
Stiffarm get to work on their model rockets.

LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-063, SPEARFISH)
(Item and photo by submitted by Capt. D. Small and Capt. S. Small)
 NEW CADET COMMANDER: The mantle of cadet command was passed as C/Col William Small
handed over the position of Cadet Commander to C/TSgt Justin Harris in a ceremony on 13 February.
C/Col Small, from Piedmont, finished his second tenure as
Cadet Commander, in preparation for a busy next few
months before entering college at Rose-Hulman Institute of
Technology in pursuit of a degree in electrical engineering.
Later this month, he is off to Washington, to participate in
the National Cadet Advisory Council, a group of only ten
Cadet Colonels in the country entitled to wear the gold
shoulder braid. He then leaves D.C. to go to Wuhan, China,
to a language school for 12 weeks to study Mandarin. This
summer, C/Col Small will, in the role of Encampment Cadet
Commander, oversee the Joint Dakota Encampment.
Incoming Cadet Commander Justin Harris is from
Spearfish. He lettered in Cross Country at Spearfish High School, where he also has achieved Honor Roll
status. Harris also is active in indoor soccer, and competes with the Black Hills Gold Swim Team.
Photo (L to R): Capt. David Small, Squadron Commander, Outgoing Cadet Commander C/Col William Small, Incoming Cadet Commander C/TSgt Justin
Harris and Cadet Administrative NCO C/CMSgt Connor Caneva.

PIERRE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-038, PIERRE)
(No Items submitted for this issue)
RUSHMORE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-031, RAPID CITY)
(Items and photos submitted by Maj. Goodrich)
 WELCOME ABOARD: Our squadron has five new senior members: Jacqueline Klatte-Rolfe, Gregory
Klatte, Kevin Tenold, Andrew Weathers and to Capt. Marty Larson who rejoined. We are pleased you have
chosen to join (and rejoin) CAP and proud that you are serving in our squadron.
 ANNUAL AWARDS BANQUET: The squadron’s annual awards banquet was held on January 17th at
Minerva’s Restaurant. The theme of the night was “America Party” as we celebrated the ideals of America in
several ways. Live music during the mixer was provided by 2nd Lt. Jack Jensen, 2nd Lt. Mike Morgan, and
Major Craig Goodrich. The musicians added Maj. Goodrich’s daughter, Olivia, to help sing a parody song by
Tim Hawkins, “The Government Can”. After the Colors were posted, they led the squadron in singing
“America the Beautiful”. At the end of the program, the squadron sang “God Bless the USA” as the colors were
8

retired. Special guests present were, Senator John Thune’s West River Chief of Staff, Qusi Al-Haj, and SD
Senator Phil Jensen and his family. Keynote speaker was Major “Durka” Davis, a B-1B bomber instructor pilot
and mission commander. Durka presented a terrific briefing on recent B-1 participation in various theaters of
war. He has flown 136 B-1 Combat Sorties and provided a lot of insight into how the B-1 is employed, and
what daily life is like of a deployed B-1 crewman.
Squadron Annual Awards presented were:
Jefferson Award: 2nd Lt. Jack Jensen
The Jefferson Award is presented annually to the squadron Senior Member who has demonstrated the greatest
vision and potential during their first year of membership.
Roosevelt Award: C/A1C Blake Berry
The Roosevelt Award is presented annually to the squadron Cadet who has demonstrated the greatest vision and
potential during their first year of membership
Washington Award: Lt. Col. Randy Borton
The Washington Award is presented annually to the squadron Senior Member who has demonstrated the greatest
dedication and leadership during the year.
Lincoln Award: C/MSgt Errol Kelly
The Lincoln Award is presented annually to the squadron Cadet who has demonstrated the greatest dedication and
leadership during the year.
FIRST FLIGHT: Cadet Airman Malia Goodrich experienced her first CAP flight on
Saturday, February 1. At the aircraft’s controls was her dad, Maj. Craig Goodrich. It was
a sunny, windy and very cold day, with the wind chill well below zero. They were very
thankful that they were able to do the preflight checks in a heated hangar.

As can be seen in the photo they both enjoyed the orientation ride.
This photo will be on the cover of the next issue of South Dakota Wing Roundup
magazine.
SIOUX FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-050, SIOUX FALLS)
(Items by: Maj. Kipp, SM Lair, Capt. Schmid, Capt. Erickson, photos by Capt. Erickson, SM Lair)
 SQUADRON LEADERSHIP SCHOOL/CORPORATE LEARNING COURSE: On 8 February, a Squadron
Leadership School (SLS) and a Corporate Learning Course (CLC) were conducted simultaneously at the
squadron headquarters. Both courses were headed by Col. Mary Donley assisted by talented and experienced
individuals who taught various course modules.

Both of these courses are components of the CAP’s Senior Member
Professional Development Program. SLS is a requirement for Level
II and CLC a requirement for Level III.
Congratulations to all of the graduates!
In the photo Col. Donley explains the day’s activities to participants.

9

 ORIENTATION RIDES: New senior member Greg Lair, a pilot, has allowed the squadron to revitalize
its orientation ride program. We flew four of six planned o-rides on 15 February. This photo, taken by SM Lair,
shows C/Amn Julia Lair and C/Amn Keith Warne after their sorties.
Cadet Lair received a Certificate of First Flight. This was the
second flight for Cadet Warne. Cadets Ivan and Kyle Kreger also
flew on an o-ride. Unfortunately, the wind kicked up after landing
from Sortie #4 and there wasn’t time for a photo of Kregers in the
rush to secure the aircraft.
Squadron Commander Capt. Erickson, pictured at right, wants to
reinstate passing out orientation ride parent information brochures,
presenting Orientation Flight Certificates to participants at the next
squadron meeting, and news releases sent to local media.
In addition, Capt. Erickson has secured permission from Col. Seten to periodically fly aircraft to Brookings to
conduct orientation rides for their cadets. Further SFCS o-ride sorties are planned for 22 February.


COLD WEATHER CAN’T HOLD US DOWN: SFCS folks must be hardy stock! In late January the day

started out a cool -18 F but warmed up to a balmy +10 F. At the weekly Thursday night meeting, the attendance
was standing room only with 55 seniors, cadets and parents attending. The meeting covered the required annual
safety briefing focusing on operational risk management. All in attendance were attentive to Capt. Erickson’s
presentation and, as always, learning tips on the elements of safety and risk avoidance were shared.

STANDING ROOM ONLY AT A JANUARY SIOUX FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON MEETING

 COLOR GUARD CHANGE IN COMMAND: On 6 February, C/CMSgt Devon Brown became the new
Color Guard Commander. He follows in the command position previously held by C/Capt Brandon West. The
color guard is guided by the expert leadership of senior members
Maj. Justin Johnson, the Deputy Commander for Cadets, and by
Capt. Karla West, Color Guard Coordinator and the designated
“Mom” of the elite team. This year the team’s goal is to continue
to perform at community events and to provide honor guard and
color guard training to help cadets, especially younger cadets, to
develop leadership skills and build character. The current Color
Guard is comprised of Cadets: C/CMSgt Devon Brown, C/SMSgt
Austin Cole, C/TSgt Josiah Huntington, C/A1C Ivan Kreger,
C/A1C Kyle Kreger, C/CMSgt Matias Kowang, C/MSgt Nicholas
Nash, C/Amn Lathen Norling, C/TSgt Jaden Roblewsky, and
C/Amn Keith Warne (not pictured).
10

HH

PROMOTIONS

HH

Senior Member Promotions
Congratulations to Bryan Sharp of Rushmore Composite Squadron on a well-deserved promotion to
Major! He recently moved to North Dakota so will likely be transferring to NDWG soon.

Congratulations to Neil Schmid of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank of
Captain!
Congratulations to Tyler Cavin of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank of
First Lieutenant, effective 9 December!

Cadet Noncommissioned Officer Promotions
Congratulations to Cadet Chris Dinnel and Cadet Laura Rudnik of Big Sioux Composite Squadron on
their promotion to the rank of Cadet Chief Master Sergeant and receipt of the Goddard Award!

Congratulations to Cadet Austin Rauscher of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron on his
promotion to Cadet Staff Sergeant and receipt of the Wright Brothers Award!

Cadet Airman Promotions
Congratulations to Cadet Bronson Lynn and Cadet Zebadiah Nelson, both of Big Sioux Composite
Squadron, and to Cadet Ryan Harris of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron on their promotion to
the rank of Cadet Senior Airman and receipt of the Mary Feik Award!

Congratulations to Cadet Steven Diaconu of the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron and to Cadet Ayrika
Dempsey of Big Sioux Composite squadron on promotion to the rank of Cadet Airman First Class and
receipt of the General Hap Arnold Award!

Congratulations to Cadet Tyler Eberle and Cadet Dalton Mann of Rushmore Composite Squadron and
to Cadet Graham Dinnel and Cadet Josiah Jorenby of Big Sioux Composite Squadron on promotion to
the rank of Cadet Airman and receipt of the General Curry Award!

HH

KUDOS
11

HH

AFA OUTSTANDING CIVIL AIR PATROL CADET OF THE YEAR: U.S. Air Force Maj James Smith, a B-1

instructor from Ellsworth AFB and President of the Rushmore Chapter of the Air Force
Association, presented the Air Force Association’s Outstanding Civil Air Patrol Cadet
of the Year for the Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron to C/Col William Small.
This award comes with a special AFA ribbon bar and medal.

AFA CAP CADET OF THE YEAR RIBBON

CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT INSTRUCTOR: In February, Capt. David Small presented Capt. Sylvia Small

with the certificate appointing her a CAP Character Development Instructor (CDI). CDIs are part of the CAP
Chaplain Corps and are appointed to provide character development instruction in
the cadet program under the direction of a chaplain designated by the wing
chaplain. When no chaplain is assigned to a unit, the CDI works directly for the
unit commander while maintaining liaison with the wing chaplain. Character
Development Instructors are required to undergo a stringent vetting process by
NHQ before acceptance as a CDI. When duly appointed, and upon completion of
technician training, CDIs may wear the specialty badge.
TECHNICIAN LEVEL BADGE FOR A CDI. IN THE PHOTO CAPT. D. SMALL
PRESENTS THE CDI CERTIFICATE TO CAPT. S. SMALL

Congratulations to C/CMSgt Camile Lynn of the Big Sioux Composite Squadron on earning the Neil
Armstrong Award!

Congratulations to 1st Lt. Tyler Cavin of the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on his receipt of the
Benjamin O' Davis Jr. Award! The award is presented to CAP members who complete Level II of the
Senior Member Professional Development Program.

Congratulations to SM Jeffrey Dill and to SM Ronald Lenz of the Rushmore Composite Squadron on
their receipt of the Membership Ribbon! The award is presented to members who complete Level I of
the CAP Senior Member Professional Development Program.

Congratulations to 1st Lt. Christine Voll on her appointment as Rushmore Composite Squadron Supply
Officer, Testing Officer and Bldg. Manager, to SM Jeffrey Dill on his appointment as squadron Safety
Officer, and to SM Ronald Lenz on his appointment as squadron AE Officer and Asst. Bldg. Manager.
Congratulations to C/Capt Brandon West of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on his appointment as
Squadron Commander at the 2014 Joint Dakota Cadet Leadership Encampment.
Congratulations to C/CMSgt Jared Doyle of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron on appointment
as Cadet Stan/Eval Organizer at the 2014 Joint Dakota Cadet Leadership Encampment.
12

“THE SKYCHASER”
South Dakota Wing Electronic Newsletter for March 2014
Official Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force - Citizens Serving Communities: Above and Beyond
Publishers: Wing Commander Colonel John Seten / Wing Vice Commander Lieutenant Colonel Richard Larson
Editor: Major Bruce Kipp  Wing Public Affairs Officer  (605) 261-4507  paa.sdwg@gmail.com

WING TIPS
 HOTTEST NEWS: RENAME THE ROUNDUP CONTEST. A wing-wide contest is underway for a new
name and a new logo for the Wing magazine currently called the Roundup. The contest is open to all SDWG
members. Each member may submit as many entries for a new name and/or logo as they wish. Any logo must
not violate anyone’s copyright. If a logo is copyrighted you must first obtain the copyright holder’s written
permission to use it. The logo must be free use, no royalties will be paid. Submit all entries to Maj. Kipp. The
contest closes 8 April. Col. Seten, Lt. Col. Larson and Maj. Kipp will select the top three (maybe top five) name
and logo candidates and they will be put out to a wing-wide vote in mid-April. The winning name and logo will
be used for the next issue of the SDWG magazine which is currently set for publication in mid-May.
 REDCAP: Late in the afternoon of 10 March, the South Dakota Wing was placed on alert by the Air
Force Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall AFB, Florida. The mission request, initiated by the Lawrence
County Office of Emergency Management and the City of Spearfish Police Department, was to search for a
person reported as missing in the Lookout Mountain area near Spearfish. Col. Mike Beason was the Incident
Commander. A SDWG Cessna-182T took off from Spearfish Municipal Airport about 6:45pm piloted by Lt.
Col. Rodney DeWeese with Capt. Bill Collister as observer. The search area encompassed Spearfish and from I90 Exit 12 to Lookout Mountain. The aircraft flew for about1.3 hours before darkness fell. The mission was
suspended on 11 March due to severe weather in the search area. The mission resumed on 12 March with the
City of Spearfish Police Department taking the lead supported by the Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron
who fielded a ground team to search the west side of Lookout Mountain. In addition, the Cessna-182T searched
the Spearfish area from the air for an additional 1.5 hours. Lt. Col. DeWeese was again the Mission Pilot with
Lt. Col. Jim Hopewell and Capt. Gary Schroeder as Mission Observers.
 AERIAL WILDLIFE SURVEYS: SDWG flew aerial surveys of terrestrial wildlife on the 10th, 12th and
25 of March in support of the state Department of Game, Fish & Parks and South Dakota State University. The
GF&P surveyed deer, mountain goats, mountain lions, and elk. The SDSU surveyed elk and bobcats. 7.8 flight
hours were in support of GF&P and 7.7 flight hours were in support of SDSU for a total of 15.5 hours flying
over western South Dakota and the Black Hills. The CAP pilot for the March surveys was Lt. Col. Gary Hewett.
th

1



CAP JOINS SEARCH FOR MISSING MALAYSIAN AIRLINER: “It’s a normal search and rescue

mission,” Lt. Col. John Henderson said of Civil Air Patrol’s role in the search for missing Malaysia Airline
Flight 370. Henderson, a radar analyst for the U.S. Air Force’s 84th Radar Evaluation Squadron (RADES) at
Hill Air Force Base, Utah, is vice commander of CAP’s 10-member National Radar Analysis Team. “CAP
brings different and unique tools to the table,” said Henderson, who is working 24/7 to narrow the search area
based on the airline’s radar forensics information. “We have a lot of experience using different types of radar
data, and our software tools are designed to use a lot of different formats of radar data. The goal is to utilize the
radar data and radar signatures from the aircraft to determine its ultimate flight path,” he said. “Between the 84
RADES and Civil Air Patrol, we have a very robust capability to reduce radar data into usable and actionable
forms, to include stitching together tracks from multiple radar systems,” said U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Ian Kemp,
commander of the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center. CAP performs 85 percent of continental U.S. inland
search and rescue missions as tasked by the AFRCC. Henderson’s SAR track record is impressive. In 13 years,
he has participated in more than 600 CAP radar analysis missions with “well over 150 finds” and about 45 lives
saved, he said. In 2007 he helped narrow the search for Adam Flight 574, an Indonesian B-737 that went
missing during a flight between Surabaya and Manado with 96 passengers and six crewmembers aboard.
Recruited by the U.S. State Department for assistance after a massive effort to find the jet failed, Henderson
was able to direct searchers within a mile of the crash site in 6,500 feet of water in the Makassar Strait.
“Searchers were having a hard time picking up the black box pings, and the more time that goes by, the weaker
it becomes,” he said, adding, “My analysis got ships in a very close position so they could pick up the pings.”
“The black box is really key to knowing what happened, besides finding the wreckage,” he said. Radar analysis
“can be extremely accurate,” Henderson said. In the CAP team’s case, “over 90 percent of the time we narrow
the search area based on forensics information. We’ve come within 65 feet of where a crash occurred and
sometimes miles. It depends on the radar environment.”
Source: www.capvolunteernow.com/todays-features/?cap_joins_search_for_missing_malaysian_airliner&show=news&newsID=18283

 GARMIN G1000 TRAINING CLINIC IN RAPID CITY. Submitted by SM Scott Kuznicki with input from
Maj. Craig Goodrich: The South Dakota Wing is fortunate to have two Cessna-182 aircraft, both equipped with
Garmin's leading-edge G1000 avionics packages. Aircrew familiarity with the operation of these systems is
essential for use at their full potential and to ensure standards of safety and pilot proficiency continue to be met
at the highest levels.
Over the weekend of 22-23 March, members from five squadrons from the South
Dakota Wing attended a CAP-sponsored G1000 training clinic in Rapid City. At this
event, 20 members spent 12 hours working with the G1000 in classroom and hands-on
settings. CAP instructors taught the basics of G1000 operation, and covered flight
operations for both VFR and IFR flight conditions. Instructor pilot candidates and
current instructor pilots attended an instructor pilot module while pilots not seeking
instructor status were able to enter the cockpit and operate actual G1000 consoles in the
aircraft, with auxiliary power being provided to ensure the aircraft would remain
mission-capable.
CAP members shared their knowledge in an interactive classroom environment, which included use of Garmin's
G1000 simulator to conduct IFR procedures. Classroom instructors were 2nd Lt. Jeremy Swier, Maj. Craig
Goodrich, Capt. Joe Oye, Lt. Col. Greg Lair, and Capt. Scott Giles. Although Lt. Col. Gary Hewett didn’t do
any platform instruction, he monitored the new G1000 instructors, and added commentary based on his
extensive experience in the glass cockpit. He reminded participants of the importance having a backup plan
when all the electronics fail. Col. Mike Beason capably assisted Lt. Col. Hewett with the hands-on portion of
the training, which included a North Dakota Wing aircraft flown in by the CAP-USAF Liaison Region Assistant
Director of Operations, Mr. Greg Maier. The closing question-and-answer session was informative and lively,
focusing on instrument approach "gotchas" and the coordination of air traffic control between the towers and
approach control serving Rapid City Regional Airport and Ellsworth Air Force Base.
2

The evening session on Saturday night was a "bring your own steak" event at Sioux Falls Composite Squadron
Commander Erickson's home near Lead. Capt. Erickson and his wife graciously opened their home to hungry
pilots and friends old and new gathered to enjoy a few hours of camaraderie and, of course, airplane stories.
Our pilots and instructors have gained new knowledge, refreshed their skills, and gained an understanding of
how CAP expects the G1000 to be utilized for maximum mission performance. The Wing is providing a limited
number of flights for members who attended, with an emphasis on current instructor currency, instructor
candidate development and certification, and mission and transport pilot currency and development.
Major Goodrich, the Project Officer for the event said, “I think we all learned a lot, and we all had a good time.
It was great to have so many pilots at this training. Building relationships with our CAP flying buddies and
interactive discussion while learning made this into a fantastic weekend.”
The Wing wishes to express gratitude to Maj. Goodrich for his dedication to planning and organizing this event.
The attendees express sincere appreciation to Melissa Goodrich for preparing a delicious lunch on Saturday and
to 2nd Lt. Jon “Jack” Jensen and SM Deb Jensen for the terrific bagels from Black Hills Bagels on Sunday
morning. The Wing also thanks the Rapid City Fire Department for providing a meeting space at Fire Station 8
at the Rapid City Regional Airport.

PHOTOS BY MAJ. CRAIG GOODRICH

 Updated versions of CAPF-12, Application for Senior Membership, and CAPF-15, Application for
Cadet Membership are available on eServices at www.capmembers.com/media/cms/F012_15378C3760422.pdf
and www.capmembers.com/media/cms/F015_9C2337B9FC619.pdf respectively.

STAFF NOTES
WING VICE COMMANDER
Lt. Col. Richard Larson, CAP

During the evening of 17 March I was a phone-in guest on Sioux Falls radio station KSOO (1140 AM) on-air
program View Point University to discuss how lost aircraft searches are conducted and its application to the
Malaysia Airlines aircraft disappearance. Topics discussed encompassed: how a search like this is coordinated,
how this search is complicated because of the number of nations involved, factors that complicate a search, the
differences between primary and secondary radar, why the airliner's sharp turn to the southwest between
Malaysia and Vietnam important, and finally how SDWG’s train to find lost aircraft.
3

WING STANDARDIZATION/EVALUATION OFFICER
Maj. Craig Goodrich, CAP
Pilots are requested to NOT use the Spidertracks device on training flights unless they want to self-fund the use
of the device at $2.10 per hour used. This includes G-1000 training flights under the USAF Mission. Pilots
should use the Spidertracks units for all actual search missions and missions paid by the State of SD, as well as
SAREX’s and the upcoming SAREVAL. Also, it is acceptable to use them briefly while on CAPF 5/91 check
rides to ensure that all pilots understand how they are to be used.

SQUADRON HIGHLIGHTS
BIG SIOUX COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-058, BROOKINGS)
(Item by: Maj. Gengler and Maj. Kipp)
 CYBERPATRIOT. The cadet cybersecurity team of the Big Sioux Composite Squadron
has returned to South Dakota after participating in the national finals of “CyberPatriot-VI,” the
Air Force Association’s national high school cyber-defense competition held 26-29 March at
the Gaylord National Harbor Hotel and Convention Center near Washington, D.C.
The members of this year’s cyber-security team, led by Cadet Captain Joshua Klosterman were Cadet Master
Sergeant Chris Dinnel, Cadet Master Sergeant Laura Rudnik, Cadet Airman Basic Josiah Jorenby and Cadet
Airman Zebadiah Nelson. The team is coached by Cadet Second Lieutenant Tyler Gross and mentored by First
Lieutenant Shannon Hofer.
Although the squadron’s team did not place in the top three of the cybersecurity competition they did take first
place in the scavenger hunt at the museums. It wasn't part of the original competition but the team members did
win iPod Nanos for their success.
The Big Sioux team competed in the “All Service Division”, comprised of CAP Cadets and Naval Sea Cadets,
and Junior ROTC units from all four military services. CAP teams accounted for 360 of the 864 teams in the All
Service Division. For the third consecutive year CAP had three of 14 finalist slots in the All Service category.
The South Dakota Wing and the Big Sioux Composite Squadron thank the “Dakotah Chapter” of the Air Force
Association for their donation of $300 to help defray the travel expenses of the squadron’s cybersecurity team
to the national competition.
CRAZY HORSE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-068, CUSTER)
(Items by Lt K. Bierwirth, photos by Lt. K. Bierwirth and Katie Ping of Custer Chamber of Commerce)
COUNTER-NARCOTICS SEMINAR. On the 6th of March we had a very interesting

seminar on marijuana given by an agent from the South Dakota Division of Criminal
Investigations (name withheld). He answered a lot of questions and greatly clarified
for us what is fact and what is fiction about the use of marijuana and its effects on the
human body. The squadron expresses its appreciation the South Dakota Division of
Criminal Investigations and their agent for his visit to our squadron. In the photo Lt.
V. Bierwirth, C/MSgt Jason Parry, C/SSgt Thomas Dillon and C/1st Lt James Dillon.
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 MEET AND GREET AT THE CUSTER TRADE SHOW. On the 8th of March we were asked to be
greeters for the Custer Trade Show held at the Custer High School. We got to meet and greet a bunch of people,
welcome them to the trade show and talk to them about Civil Air Patrol.
Best of all we got lucky! Two CAP Lieutenant Colonels will transfer
to our squadron. Between the two of them we are gaining 70 years of
Civil Air Patrol experience!
In the photo taken by taken by Ms. Katie Ping of the Custer Chamber
of Commerce, Lt. Kris Bierwirth, Capt. Sharon Moad, C/MSgt Jason
Parry, C/TSgt Kyle Parry and C/SSgt Thomas Dillon man the table at
the entrance to the Custer Trade Show.
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-063, SPEARFISH)
(Items by Lt. Col. Hopewell and Capt. Small, photos by Capt. Small)
 SQUADRON RECEIVES GRANT FROM SPEARFISH OPTIMISTS CLUB. As reported on 20 March in
the “Local Scene” section of the Black Hills Pioneer newspaper, on 19 March the squadron was honored to
receive a $900 grant from the Spearfish Optimists Club. The grant will be used to fund the squadron’s Color
Guard, aerospace education program and search and rescue operations. C/SSgt Justin Harris, squadron Cadet
Commander, accepted the check on behalf of the squadron.
 NEW OLD SENIOR MEMBER. Welcome back aboard to Tom Irvin who has rejoined CAP after an
absence of over 40 years. Tom was a CAP pilot back in the '60's but has not been active since. He recently
retired to the Spearfish area and has joined our squadron. We welcome his knowledge and experience.
 MODEL & REMOTE CONTROL AIRCRAFT STEM KIT. We’re working on our second Science,
Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Kit. Each kit contains several hundred dollars’ worth of materials.
In the case of our most recent kit, Model & Remote Controlled Aircraft, it contained a 6-foot wing-span remote
controlled airplane and a flight simulator. All a squadron needs to do is request one of the five STEM Kits then
spend six hours working with it and then you can get a new kit. These activities count toward the unit’s CAP
Aerospace Excellence (AEX) Award.
The STEM Kit Program, managed by the USAF STEM Outreach Coordination Office in partnership with CAP
and AFJROTC, provides financial support for STEM education. The program’s goal is to generate enthusiasm
among cadets for STEM’s hands-on, inquiry-based learning. The conduit for the STEM Kit Program is CAP AE
Officers. Five STEM Kits are available: Astronomy, Flight Simulator, Model & Remote Control Aircraft,
Robotics, and Rocketry. Check out www.capmembers.com/aerospace_education/general/stemkit

LEFT PHOTO: C/CMSGT CONNOR CANEVA (SEATED), C/TSGT JUSTIN HARRIS, C/SSGT KEYVIN RAUSCHER AND
C/CAPT SAM HUNTINGTON (MEMBER OF SIOUX FALLS SQUADRON) EXAMINE THE FLIGHT SIMULATOR
RIGHT PHOTO: C/SSGT KEYVIN RAUSCHER AND C/SRA RYAN HARRIS WORK ON MODEL AIRCRAFT

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PIERRE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-038, PIERRE)
(Item by Lt. Col. Gatje, photos by Lt. Col. Christensen)
 THE SOUTH DAKOTA DISCOVERY CENTER AVIATION DAYS. Members of the squadron recently
participated in the Elk’s Aviation Day sponsored by the Pierre Elk’s Lodge and held at the Discovery Center.
This gave an opportunity for area youth to develop an interest in the CAP Cadet Program. Students were invited
to a free admission to the Discovery Center on a day that featured an “early release” for the local schools. Over
500 people attended. CAP members worked with young people interested in aviation. They built and flew
pencil rockets and soda straw airplanes. Kids were encouraged to fly their creations from the Center’s second
floor balcony area toward targets on the first floor. Our participants included Lt. Col. Myra Christensen, 1st Lt.
Roberta Vaughan, Lt. Col. Nancy McKenney and SM Ruth Carley.

LEFT PHOTO: CAP MEMBERS SM CARLEY (LEFT) AND LT. VAUGHAN WORK WITH AVIATION DAY ATTENDEES ON A PROJECT.
RIGHT PHOTO: LT. COL. MCKENNEY (RIGHT) HELPS A GIRL WITH THE CONSTRUCTION OF HER SODA STRAW AIRPLANE.

RUSHMORE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-031, RAPID CITY)
(Item by Lt. Col. Hopewell and 1st Lt. Black)
 SOUTH DAKOTA AIRPORTS CONFERENCE. On Thursday, 27 March Maj. Craig Goodrich stood in
for Col. Seten and Lt. Col. Larson who had planned to present a briefing at the South Dakota Department of
Transportation Airport Conference, in Spearfish. They had planned to fly there for the presentation, but the
weather didn’t cooperate.
The state of the State of South Dakota aviation was the theme of the annual conference. Among the over 150
attendees were distinguished aeronautics luminaries, airport managers, numerous public sector leaders including
the head of the state’s Department of Public Safety, local and national FAA officials, the head of the National
Business Aviation Association, and Air Force representatives.
Maj. Goodrich spoke about the history and organization of CAP, detailed many of the types of missions CAP
does nationwide, reported on the recent history of SDWG missions here in South Dakota. He enumerated the
benefits SDWG provides to communities and the state and highlighted the economic impact SDWG provides to
airport businesses in South Dakota each year. For example: SDWG will purchase approximately $60,000 of fuel
in Fiscal year 2014; SDWG currently has contracts with aircraft maintenance facilities at Rapid City, Huron and
Sioux Falls where annual inspections and scheduled major maintenance are done; oil changes and unscheduled
maintenance are usually done by local Fixed Base Operators.
He also spoke on the CAP Cadet Program and its positive influence on young men and women where the South
Dakota Wing’s squadrons are based.

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SIOUX FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-050, SIOUX FALLS)
(Items by: Capt. Schmid, photo by Cadet Fischer’s parent)
 THREE CADETS EARN “FIRST FLIGHT” CERTIFICATES. A break in the cold and wind on the 8th of
March gave three cadets the opportunity to earn their “First Flight” Certificates. Cadets Tristan Fischer,
Christopher Schuppan and Cadet Airman Kyle Clement experienced their initial orientation flights. The three
excited and enthusiastic cadets enjoyed their pilot duties, each flying the aircraft for one hour.
Cadets Clement and Fischer flew with
pilot Capt. Neil Schmid. The first o-ride
consisted of two sorties. The first, with
Cadet Fischer at the controls, was from
Sioux Falls Regional Airport to Madison
Municipal Airport where they landed,
switched the cadet at the controls, then
Cadet Clement flew the aircraft back to
Sioux Falls. The second o-ride was a
single sortie with Lt. Col. Greg Lair as
pilot with Cadet Schuppan at the controls.
That flight was around the local Sioux
Falls area.
The orientation ride program exposes the cadets to the excitement and adventure of aviation, teaches general
aerodynamic principles and familiarizes them with light aircraft and general aviation. More flights for these and
other qualified cadets are planned in the near future.

HH

PROMOTIONS

HH

Senior Member Promotions
Congratulations to Jeffrey Dill of Rushmore Composite Squadron and to Gregory Lair of Sioux Falls
Composite Squadron on their promotion to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel! Both Lt. Col. Dill and Lt.
Col. Lair received advanced appointment based on their prior military service.
Cadet Officer Promotion
Congratulations to Samuel Huntington of Big Sioux Composite Squadron on his promotion
to the rank of Cadet Captain and receipt of the Earhart Award!

Cadet Noncommissioned Officer Promotions
Congratulations to Austin Cole of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank of
Cadet Chief Master Sergeant and receipt of the Goddard Award!

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Congratulations to Brianna Lynn of Big Sioux Composite Squadron and to Nicholas Nash of Sioux
Falls Composite Squadron on their promotion to the rank of Cadet Senior Master Sergeant and receipt
of the General Jimmy Doolittle Award!

Congratulations to Thomas Dillon of Crazy Horse Composite Squadron; to Jaden Petersen of Big
Sioux Composite Squadron; and to Franklin Michael of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on promotion
to the rank of Cadet Staff Sergeant and receipt of the Wright Brothers Award!

Cadet Airman Promotions
Congratulations to Ivan Kreger and to Kyle Kreger, both of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron, on their
promotion to the rank of Cadet Senior Airman and receipt of the Mary Feik Award!

Congratulations to Peter Iverson of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron and to Julia Lair of Sioux
Falls Composite Squadron on their promotion to the rank of Cadet Airman First Class and receipt of
the General Hap Arnold Award!

Congratulations to Kyle Clement of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank of
Cadet Airman and receipt of the General Curry Award!

HH

KUDOS

HH

Double congratulations to First Lieutenant Victoria Bierwirth of Crazy
Horse Composite Squadron who earned “Technician” Level in Specialty
Track – Aerospace Education Officer and “Technician” Level in Specialty
Track – Logistics Officer in the Senior Member Professional Development
Program.
Congratulations to C/1st Lt Sullivan Busch of Big Sioux Composite Squadron on his appointment as
the squadron’s Cadet administrative Officer.
Congratulations to C/Maj Brandon West of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on his appointment as
the squadron’s Cadet Operations Officer.
Congratulations to Lt. Jamie Nowlin, Rushmore Composite Squadron’s Emergency Services Officer,
who graduated from ICS-300, Incident Command System for Expanding Incidents class held during
the week of 24 March in Rapid City and from ICS-400, Advanced ICS for Command and General
Staff, Complex Incidents and MACS for Operational First Responders was held during the week of 31March in
Rapid City, SD. Both courses required a considerable commitment of time.
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Congratulations to Capt. Gary Schroeder, Rushmore Composite Squadron’s Squadron Maintenance
and Assistant Operations Officer, who graduated from ICS-300, the Incident Command System for
Expanding Incidents class held during the week of 24 March and from ICS-400, Advanced ICS for Command
and General Staff, Complex Incidents and MACS for Operational First Responders was held during the week
of 31 March in Rapid City, SD. Both courses required a considerable commitment of time.
Congratulations to C/A1C Blake Berry of Rushmore Composite Squadron on successful completion of
the Leadership Chapter 3 test!
Congratulations to SM Gregory Klatte of Rushmore Composite Squadron on completing Level I of the
CAP Senior Member Professional Development Program and the award of the Membership Ribbon!

Congratulations to Lt. Col. Jeff Dill of Rushmore Composite Squadron and to Lt. Col. Greg Lair of
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on completing Level I of the CAP Senior Member Professional
Development Program and the award of the Membership Ribbon! Although newcomers to CAP their
advanced rank is derived from prior military service. This accounts for why a Lieutenant Colonel is
just now completing Level I.

HH

TRIBUTE

HH

BRYN MAWR, Pa. — Referred to as the Father of Black Aviation, Chief Flight
Instructor of the prestigious Tuskegee Airmen C. Alfred “Chief” Anderson, was
immortalized on a stamp on 13 March.
“The Postal Service is proud to honor Charles Alfred “Chief” Anderson, a Black
aviation pioneer who inspired, motivated and educated thousands of young people
in aviation careers, including the famed Tuskegee Airmen of World War II,” said
U.S. Postal Service Judicial Officer William Campbell.
The Father of Black Aviation
“Chief” Anderson (1907-1996), traced his fascination with airplanes to his early
childhood when he lived with his grandmother in the Shenandoah Valley near
Staunton, VA. She was troubled by his habit of running off in search of planes.
After returning to his parents’ home in Bryn Mawr, PA, Anderson pursued his dream of becoming a pilot. Since
no flight schools would accept him as a student because of his race, he needed a plane of his own to learn how
to fly. Incredibly, he was able to raise $2,500 from supportive members of his community and bought a used
plane. As Anderson later recalled, he learned to fly by reading books, getting some help from a few friendly
white pilots, and, in his own words, “fooling around with” the plane. By 1929, he taught himself well enough,
against all odds, to obtain a private pilot’s license.
To help him qualify for an air transport, or commercial license, Anderson eventually found an instructor, the
owner of a flying school near Philadelphia, who was able to refine his techniques and even persuade a federal
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examiner to let Anderson take the commercial pilot’s test. When Anderson secured the license in 1932, he was
the only African-American in the nation qualified to serve as a flight instructor or to fly commercially.
The Charles Lindbergh of Black Aviation
Anderson was soon breaking flight records and inspiring other blacks to become pilots. In 1933, he and Albert
E. Forsythe, an African-American physician and Tuskegee Institute alumnus, teamed up to become the first
black pilots to complete a round-trip transcontinental flight. With that flight and their goodwill tour to the
Caribbean in 1934, they sought to prove to the world the abilities and skills of black aviators. It was this flight
that led to Anderson’s being dubbed “The Charles Lindbergh of Black Aviation.”
The Tuskegee Airmen
World War II gave Anderson the opening he needed to make a career in aviation. In 1939, as war erupted in
Europe, Congress created the Civilian Pilot Training Program at the urging of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
The program provided funding to train tens of thousands of young people who could be transitioned to military
service in the event of war. A provision in the legislation permitted civilian flight training for blacks, a
significant step toward the long-range goal of opening up the all-white Army Air Corps to black applicants.
Tuskegee Institute won a government contract to establish a Civilian Pilot Training Program and named
Anderson chief flight instructor soon after hiring him in 1940. To those who learned their piloting skills in the
program, he was affectionately known as “Chief.”
Tuskegee’s subsequent role in training the nation’s first African-American military pilots began in January of
1941, the year leading up to the country’s entry into World War II. The War Department announced plans to
create a “Negro pursuit squadron” that would be trained at Tuskegee. In March, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, a
champion of equal opportunity, came to the airfield Tuskegee was using for flight instruction and was
introduced to Anderson. He later recalled her saying that everybody told her blacks couldn’t fly. “I’m going up
with you,” she told him, “to find out for sure.” After Anderson gave her an aerial tour of the campus and
surrounding area, she announced, “Well, you can fly all right.”
Soon after her flight, Roosevelt participated in the decision to finance the construction of Tuskegee Institute’s
own airfield, Moton Field, for a primary flying school. Under a contract with the War Department, the flying
school would conduct the first phase of pilot training for black aviation cadets. Construction also began in the
summer of 1941 on the Tuskegee Army Air Field, the military airfield where graduates of the primary flying
school moved on to complete basic and advanced military flight training.
The War Department’s plans for a black pursuit squadron took shape when ground crews of the 99th Pursuit
Squadron (later renamed the 99th Fighter Squadron) began their training in March 1941. The first class of black
pilots graduated in March 1942, and soon thereafter the nation’s first all-black military aviation unit became
fully manned. In 1943, the 99th of the U.S. Army Air Forces began combat operations in North Africa.
Members— along with members of several other all-black flying units whose pilots began their training under
Anderson at Moton Field — are now commonly known as the Tuskegee Airmen.
During the war, the Tuskegee Airmen escorted heavy bombers on hundreds of missions in the European theater.
They flew thousands of sorties, destroyed more than a hundred German aircraft, and received scores of
Distinguished Flying Crosses. Their professionalism and effectiveness in combat was a significant reason that
in 1949 the newly independent U.S. Air Force became the nation’s first armed service to desegregate.
For the rest of his life after the war, Anderson pursued his passion for flying and for teaching others to fly. In
1967, he helped organize Negro Airmen International to encourage interest in aviation among AfricanAmerican youth. In 1996, the “father of black aviation,” as Anderson is often called, died at his home in
Tuskegee at age 89.
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Source: - www.militarytrader.com/military-trader-news/tuskegee-airmen-to-dedicate-stamp-honoring-father-of-black-aviation?et_mid=665512&rid=241892389#sthash.PeayzTNh.dpuf

Susan Carol Larson, mother of Lt. Col. Rick Larson, passed away on Wednesday, 26 March 2014. The South
Dakota Wing expresses its sincere condolences to the Larson family in their time of sorrow.

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“THE SKYCHASER”
South Dakota Wing Electronic Newsletter for April 2014
Official Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force - Citizens Serving Communities: Above and Beyond
Publishers: Wing Commander Colonel John Seten / Wing Vice Commander Lieutenant Colonel Richard Larson
Editor: Major Bruce Kipp  Wing Public Affairs Officer  (605) 261-4507  paa.sdwg@gmail.com

WING TIPS
 SDWG UNDERGOES BIENNIAL
OPERATIONAL EVALUATION: The South
Dakota Wing took part in a weeklong graded
mission readiness exercise from 21-26 April.
Every two years a U.S. Air Force inspection
team evaluates the Wing’s effectiveness in
responding to a variety of potential real-world
incidents. Typical scenarios include searches
for missing/crashed aircraft, missing persons,
floods, and humanitarian aid. The evaluation
culminated Saturday, 26 April, with a major
exercise at the Sioux Falls Regional Airport /
Joe Foss Field. Specially equipped Civil Air
Patrol aircraft, vehicles and approximately 80
command staff, ground support and aircrew
members gathered from across the state. The
Mission Base at the airport executed a broad spectrum of operations in response to training incidents submitted
by the USAF Evaluation Team. Maj. Bruce Kipp, Wing Public Affairs Officer commented, “We train
continuously in order to prepare for these real-world missions that affect peoples’ lives and impact the health
and welfare of our communities. We are ready to respond in the event of an actual incident.”
The Wing received a rating of “Highly Successful” from the Air Force for its performance during its operations
evaluation. Several staff sections received the coveted rating of “Excellent”. In addition, there was not a single
“Finding”, an area which requires corrective action. Wing Commander, Col. John Seten, and Wing Vice
Commander Lt. Col. Rick Larson, who was also the Incident Commander, praised the professionalism of the
members, their ability to work together as a team, and their determination to see a mission through to its

1

successful conclusion. Col. Seten added “The rating of highly successful is a true testament to the hard work of
our top notch, dedicated professional volunteers.”
The Wing expresses its gratitude to Landmark Aviation for the use of its facilities and also thanks the Sioux
Empire Chapter of the American Red Cross for providing meals for the 80 plus people who took part in the
activity. In addition, the Wing thanks the South Dakota Air National Guard’s 114th Fighter Wing for providing
their Mobile Emergency Operations Center.
Our operational evaluation was well covered in local, state and national print and broadcast media. One
standout was Lt. Col. Larson’s on-camera interview to a reporter from KSFY-TV.
Source: Larson interview www.ksfy.com/story/25393690/south-dakotas-civil-air-patrol-receives-highly-successful-evaluation

 REDCAP: In the early afternoon of 4 April, South Dakota Wing was placed on alert by the Air Force
Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall AFB, Florida. The mission was to search for an Emergency Locator
Transmitter (ELT) beacon reported active in the vicinity of Mitchell by several aircraft passing overhead. In
addition, a USAF tanker aircraft was able to obtain a rough triangulation of the signal as well. CAP Incident
Commander Lt. Col. Rick Larson notified the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron to start preparations to launch
two aircraft and form a ground team to search for the ELT. However, prior to the aircraft taking off and ground
team deploying, Lt. Col. Larson, using Google Earth was able to pinpoint the ELT in the vicinity of Letcher,
about 20 miles northwest of Mitchell. It was determined that the signal was emanating from a crop-duster
aircraft undergoing maintenance and the ELT was silenced. The mission was initially closed around 1445 local
time. However, additional reports were received that ELT signals continued active, this time in an area south of
Yankton. Two aircraft from the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron tracked the ELT signals to Hartington,
Nebraska. One aircraft landed at Hartington Municipal Airport/Bud Becker Field where it was discovered that
an individual working on his personal ELTs was unaware they had been triggered. These ELTs were silenced
and the aircraft returned to base. The Cessna-172 was piloted by Capt. Matt Meert with Capt. Lauren Greenhoff
as Mission Observer. The other aircraft, a Cessna-182, was piloted by Capt. Joe Oye with Capt. Jerry Gabert as
Mission Observer and Capt. Karla West as Mission Scanner. In addition to the two aircraft, two ground search
teams were dispatched from Sioux Falls Composite Squadron. However the ELTs were located shortly after the
ground search teams departed so the teams were recalled to base. In all some 18 SDWG personnel were
involved. The mission ended at 2050 local time.
 REDCAP: At 9:05pm on 19 April, the South Dakota Wing was placed on alert by the Air Force Rescue
Coordination Center at Tyndall AFB, Florida. The mission was to search for an Emergency Locator Transmitter
(ELT) beacon that had been reported as active in the vicinity of Sioux Falls Regional Airport by aircraft passing
overhead. The CAP Incident Commander, Maj. Craig Goodrich, of the Rushmore Composite Squadron in
Rapid City, notified the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron to ready aircrews and a ground search team to search
for the ELT using radio direction finding equipment. A Sioux Falls based CAP Cessna-182T piloted by Maj.
Justin Johnson with Capt. Matt Meert as Mission Observer and direction finding equipment operator, and Lt.
Jerald Hayden as Mission Scanner took off at Midnight and flew a route over a large portion of eastern South
Dakota searching for the signal. The Big Sioux Composite Squadron in Brookings was notified to prepare a
ground search team and activate additional aircrews if needed.
At approximately 2:30am the CAP aircraft pinpointed the ELT as being located at a private airstrip southwest of
Huron, SD. The Incident Commander called the owner of the airstrip who went out and turned off the beacon.
As a precaution, the CAP aircraft continued to circle overhead until its equipment confirmed that the ELT had
been silenced. The aircraft then returned to base, the mission had been successfully completed.

2

SPIDERTRACKS OF THE CAP AIRCRAFT SEARCHING FOR THE ELT REPORTED ACTIVE NEAR HURON, SD



REDCAP: At around 3:00am on 28 April, the South Dakota Wing was notified by the Air Force Rescue

Coordination Center at Tyndall AFB, Florida that a private aircraft had been reported missing while en route
from Texas to Gettysburg, SD. CAP Incident Commander, Maj. Craig Goodrich, of the Rushmore Composite
Squadron in Rapid City, immediately notified key members of the Wing. He emphasized that the wing was on
standby as no official mission tasking had been received. Wing members began to closely monitor the situation
in the expectation of a mission. However, the wreckage of the small aircraft was discovered shortly thereafter in
a wind farm near Huron, SD. Had there been a need for support, South Dakota Wing was poised to assist
 2014 SOUTH DAKOTA WING CONFERENCE AND AWARDS BANQUET: After the end of the CAPUSAF Operational Evaluation on Saturday, 26 April, participants swiftly changed into their dress uniforms to
attend the 2014 Wing Conference and Awards Banquet at the beautiful Holiday Inn-City Centre in downtown
Sioux Falls. Maj. Todd Epp was Master of Ceremonies and he kept the speeches and the awards presentations
flowing smoothly. One of the highlights was the year-in-review slideshow which highlighted some of the more
serious aspects of what SDWG does, but also included some of the lighter moments as well. Sunday, 27 April,
was set aside for workshops and breakout sessions for the senior members on a variety of key aspects of Wing
operations and administration. A special program had also been set up to keep the cadets active and engaged. It
was a long and busy weekend for all the attendees but at the end the universal comment was that it had all been
worthwhile, informative and instructive.
 AERIAL WILDLIFE SURVEYS: SDWG flew aerial surveys of terrestrial wildlife on the 10th, 11th, 18th and
21st of April in support of the state Department of Game, Fish & Parks and South Dakota State University. The
GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and elk. SDSU surveyed elk and bobcats. The surveys resulted in a
total of 18.3 hours flying over western South Dakota and the Black Hills. The CAP pilots for the April surveys
were Lt. Col. Buck DeWeese on the 10th and 11th and Lt. Col. Gary Hewett on the 18th and 21st.
 LIGHTSPEED NAMES 2014 GRANT FINALISTS: On 2 April, the Civil Air Patrol was named as one of
the 15 aviation charities selected as finalists in the Lightspeed Aviation Foundation’s Pilot's Choice Awards
program for 2014. The foundation distributes grants to aviation organizations dedicated to growing the pilot
community or using aviation to serve others. Your vote determines the grant winners - the top 8 beneficiaries
will receive a grant from $2,000 to $10,000 from the Lightspeed Aviation Foundation. CAP has received a
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Lightspeed grant in each of the past four years. The 2013 grant benefited CAP's Aerospace Connections in
Education program. To vote for CAP to receive a 2014 grant, go to:
www.lightspeedaviationfoundation.org/content.cfm/Voting/Get-to-know-the-2014-finalists/Civil-Air-Patrol.
SCALE MODEL CAP CESSNA-172: The Minicraft Model Company is

offering a 1/48th scale Civil Air Patrol Cessna-172 plastic model kit.
This highly detailed model aircraft kit features recessed panel lines, a
detailed engine with mount, removable cowl panels, exquisite fourseat cockpit and cabin interior, and decals for two Civil Air Patrol
aircraft. Based on an Internet survey, the average price for this model
kit is $25.
 EXERCISE FALCON KEYNOTE 2014. SDWG again provided support to the South Dakota Air National
Guard, this time by participating as the target aircraft in SDANG Exercise Falcon Keynote 2014. The purpose
of the exercise was to provide the114th Fighter Wing’s alert aircrews training in aerospace control alert intercept
procedures, a function of its Homeland Security mission. A CAP Cessna-182T aircraft, based in Sioux Falls,
acted as the target aircraft. The objective for the pilots of the F16s of the 175th Fighter Squadron was to hone the
skills of being able to quickly and safely intercept and evaluate a slow moving aircraft that could pose a security
risk or that may have inadvertently strayed into restricted airspace. SDWG is pleased and proud to provide this
cost effective support to SDANG by providing target aircraft for them to practice air intercept techniques. CAP
partners with the USAF helping to provide a total force approach to readiness and enhanced national security.
 NEW NATIONAL COMMANDER SELECTED: The Civil Air Patrol’s Board of
Governors has selected current National Vice Commander Brigadier General Joe Vazquez
as the next national commander and chief executive officer. The change-of-command
ceremony, and Vazquez’s promotion to Major General, will be at CAP’s National
Conference in Las Vegas on 15 August. Gen. Vazquez has almost 40 years of CAP
experience having started as a cadet in 1975.

STAFF NOTES
WING COMMANDER
Col. John Seten, CAP
If you haven’t already, please join me in welcoming 1st Lt. Kris
Bierwirth as the new commander of the Crazy Horse Composite
Squadron. Kris has been active with the squadron in Custer and has
filled many roles within the squadron since 2007. I’m confident that
Kris will do a great job with a great squadron.
Also please join me in thanking Capt. Sharon Moad for serving as
commander of the Crazy Horse Squadron for the past four years. I’m
sure we’ll continue to see her helping out with DDR activities and
many other activities within the Wing. With her years with the Red
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Cross, CAP and in the fire service we trust that she will continue to share her wealth of knowledge with all of
us. (Photo by Ashley Muhm)

 Please join me in welcoming Capt. Shannon Hofer as the new commander of the Big Sioux Composite
Squadron. I look forward to working with him in the future. He will continue with his duties as the Director of
IT for the wing as well.

SQUADRON HIGHLIGHTS
BIG SIOUX COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-058, BROOKINGS)
(No items submitted for this issue)
CRAZY HORSE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-068, CUSTER)
(Items and photos submitted by 1st Lt. K Bierwirth and Capt. Moad)
 MODEL ROCKETRY: Squadron cadets built and successfully launched the two rockets required to pass
Stage 2 in CAP's Model Rocketry Program. We launched the Alpha Estes Model Rocket and the Tomahawk
Cruise Missile Model Rocket on April 26.

C/SMSGT JASON PARRY

C/TSGT KYLE STIFFARM

C/SSGT THOMAS DILLON

 Lt. Victoria Bierwirth is taking part in a Hunting-101 course taught by the Rapid City Outdoor Campus
West at the Rapid City Trap and Skeet Club to encourage hunting by women and girls. The program teaches the
history of hunting and its importance to humankind, including survival and conservation, firearms safety, gamelaw, and hunting techniques. These classes lead up to hunting real game. "I know that after I’ve gone hunting it
will definitely be like a ‘hoorah I did it!’ - type thing," Bierwirth commented.
Source: www.kotatv.com/story/25335783/children-first-female-students-learning-how-to-hunt
 1St Lt. Kris Bierwirth recruited 3 new senior members to the squadron! Applications have been sent to
NHQ and are awaiting approval.
 CAP MEMBERS TRAIN WITH THE AMERICAN RED CROSS: On Saturday, 19April, Dave and Joyce
Jefferies along with Capt. Sharon Moad attended a day of training for Government Liaison in an Emergency
Operations Center at the Black Hills Area Chapter of Red Cross. This training is also useful for liaison function
in CAP missions in an EOC. On April 21, Maj. Nancy McKinney, from Pierre Composite Squadron and Capt.
Sharon Moad from Crazy Horse Composite Squadron left early for two days of training with the Red Cross in
Sioux Falls at the Sioux Empire chapter. A total of 60 participants attended the training to learn how to integrate
the incident command system into the Red Cross system for working in disaster situations. The four CAP
5

members have all spent many years with both organizations and have all worked many presidentially declared
disasters as well as many CAP missions. Between the four there is more than 80 years of experience in Red
Cross and over 100 years with CAP.

MAJ. MCKENNEY AND CAPT. MOAD

MAJ. MCKENNEY

 RADIO DAZE: C/SMSgt Jason Parry (Agent Hubert) and C/TSgt Kyle Stiffarm (Agent Peabody) took to
the stage in the Custer High School production of "Radio Daze". They also used knowledge from their video
production class about subliminal messages in advertising; placing a WWII era CAP poster center stage.

LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-063, SPEARFISH)
(Item and photos submitted Capt. D. Small)
 NEW RUG & NEW PAINT: We’ve just refurbished the main area of our squadron headquarters with
fresh paint and new carpet. Our headquarters started out as a worn Cold War surplus building. Now it is a worn
Cold War surplus building with a bright new interior. Helping with the project were Lt. Col. DeWeese, Capt.
Dettman, Capt. Collister and myself. We were able to persuade the cadets to help move the furniture.

BEFORE

AFTER

6

PIERRE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-038, PIERRE)
(No items submitted for this issue)
RUSHMORE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-031, RAPID CITY)
(No items submitted for this issue)
SIOUX FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-050, SIOUX FALLS)
(Submitted by Maj. Kipp and Lt. Brown, photos by Lt. Brown)
SOUTH DAKOTA AIR NATIONAL GUARD ANNUAL EASTER EGG HUNT: On the

afternoon of 13 April the Easter Bunny visited Hanger 40 of the 114th Fighter Wing of
the South Dakota Air National Guard for their annual Easter egg hunt. The Sioux Falls
Composite Squadron has helped facilitate the event over the last several years. We had
a good turnout of cadets and senior members to help the kids with games, hand out
baskets, set up and tear down, help direct traffic and assist with parking. We even got a
few of our own family members to volunteer, which didn’t go un-noticed or
unrewarded. It is a day of fun for the kids and families as well as for those who
volunteer. Families were very appreciative of seeing us volunteer so that Guard
members could enjoy being with their loved ones and comrades for the event. As
always, we conducted ourselves in a professional manner and had a bit of fun doing it
at the same time. (Photo: SrA Nick Boone, in costume; MSgt/First Sgt Shawn Greer
and Ms. Pamela McDowell, Youth Programs Coordinator)

THE EVENT

THE SIOUX FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON CONTINGENT

SDANG FAMILIES LISTEN TO OPENING REMARKS

THE KIDS FILL THEIR BASKETS WITH EASTER EGGS

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 TELEVISION INTERVIEWS: Capt. Neil Schmid gave an on-camera interview to KELO-TV on 28 April
on how wind conditions can affect small aircraft in flight. At the time the media was abuzz with reporting about
a small aircraft that crashed near Highmore, SD after colliding with a wind tower while flying in poor weather
conditions. He gave a similar interview to KSFY-TV on 30 April. Both news items ran about two minutes long
and gave excellent exposure to SDWG. Both news items are available online on the stations’ websites.
KELO Source: http://www.keloland.com/newsdetail.cfm/civil-air-patrol-grounded-day-of-plane-disappearance/?id=163717
KSFY Source: http://www.ksfy.com/story/25397493/pilot-gives-tips-on-safe-flying
 ETHNIC YOUTH DAY AT SIOUX FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON: On 24 April, about 80 middle
schools students from Axtell and Whittier visited the squadron as part of the Sioux Falls Multi-Cultural Center’s
Ethnic Youth Day. Squadron Commander, Capt. Jason Erickson, welcomed them then gave an impromptu talk
about aerodynamics, flight planning, weight and balance and CAP’s aerial search and rescue missions. After
Capt. Erickson’s talk the students went to the hangar where they examined a CAP aircraft and asked questions.

HH

PROMOTIONS

HH

Senior Member Promotion
Congratulations to Kris Bierwirth of Crazy Horse Composite Squadron on her promotion to the rank of
First Lieutenant!
Cadet Noncommissioned Officer Promotions
Congratulations to Bradley Blansett and Isaac Rosby, both of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron,
on their promotion to the rank of Cadet Chief Master Sergeant and receipt of the Goddard Award!

Congratulations to Jaden Roblewsky of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank
of Cadet Master Sergeant and receipt of the Lindbergh Award!

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Congratulations to Levi Woodard of the Rushmore Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank
of Cadet Technical Sergeant and receipt of the Captain Eddie Rickenbacker Award!

Congratulations to Ryan Harris of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron and to Bronson Lynn of
Big Sioux Composite Squadron on their promotion to the rank of Cadet Staff Sergeant and receipt of
the Wright Brothers Award!

Cadet Airman Promotion
Congratulations to Nicholas Kochutin of Rushmore Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank
of Cadet Airman and receipt of the General Curry Award!

HH

KUDOS

HH

Congratulations to Capt. Sharon Moad received the DDR Member of the Year award!

Congratulations to C/SMSgt Jason Parry of Crazy Horse Composite Squadron who has been awarded
Superior Honor Roll status with a grade point average of 3.70 or above at Custer High School!
Congratulations 1st Lt. Victoria Bierwirth of Crazy Horse Composite Squadron who received a
Certificate of Appreciation for her dedication to CAP Aerospace program.
Congratulations to C/SMSgt Jason Parry and Cadet Mara Lemke who were on the Custer High School
honor roll this past semester!
Congratulations 1st Lt. Christina Voll of Rushmore Composite Squadron who has been appointed as
the squadron’s Assistant Personnel Officer!
Congratulations to Capt. Sharon Moad who was named a “Woman of Outstanding Leadership” by the
International Women’s Leadership Association. She was honored for her contributions to family,
career and community!
Congratulations to Lt. Kris Bierwirth who earned Technician Level in the Senior Member professional
Development Program in Specialty track - Public Affairs Officer! In addition, Kris received the
Achievement Award for her PAO duties for the squadron!

Congratulations SM Douglas Robbins, to SM Andrew Weathers and to SM Jacqueline Klatte-Rolf, all
of the Rushmore Composite Squadron, who completed Level I (Foundations) of the Senior Member
Professional Development Program and in recognition thereof received the Membership Ribbon!

9

HH

TRIBUTE

HH

 COL. MARY FEIK CELEBREATES 90TH BIRTHDAY: Civil Air
Patrol Colonel Mary Feik celebrated her 90th birthday on 13 April in
her hometown of Annapolis, MD.
She has been deeply involved with the Civil Air Patrol for over 30
years. For her work with the CAP from 1982 to 2004 she was awarded
the CAP’s Distinguished Service Award and presented with lifetime
membership in CAP.
Feik is the recipient of an extensive list of achievements and awards including the coveted Federal Aviation
Administration’s Charles Taylor Master Mechanic Award and induction into the Women in Aviation Pioneer
Hall of Fame. However, she considers her greatest honor to be the Civil Air Patrol cadet achievement created in
her name in 2003.
CAP’s Mary Feik Award Ribbon
Having worked on automobile engines from the age of 13, Feik became involved in aircraft maintenance and
military aviation by the time she was 18. In 1942, she taught aircraft maintenance for the United States Army
Air Corps, and would later be credited with over 5,000 hours as a flight engineer and pilot for military bombers,
fighters, cargo and training aircraft.
Feik gives speeches to Civil Air Patrol cadets all over the country to address cadets every year. Her daughter,
Lt. Col. Robin Vest, believes that her mother has travels about 30,000 miles annually to speak at Wing
conferences and to present young recipients of the Mary Feik Achievement with signed certificates.
Source: www.capitalgazette.com/all_yours/your_news/my-time-civil-air-patrol-honors-pilot-s-th-birthday/article_3a64a33f-817e-5db4-bcf7-4185044cdcc3.html

HH

BLAST FROM THE PAST

HH

DID YOU KNOW SOUTH DAKOTA WING’S PHILIP COMPOSITE SQUADRON HAD A
MOUNTED SEARCH AND RESCUE PATROL FROM 1992-2002

10

Photo courtesy of Capt. Marsha Sumpter, former commander of the Philip Composite Squadron (standing right
front in photo)

11

“THE SKYCHASER”
South Dakota Wing Electronic Newsletter for May 2014
Official Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force - Citizens Serving Communities: Above and Beyond
Publishers: Wing Commander Colonel John Seten / Wing Vice Commander Lieutenant Colonel Richard Larson
Editor: Major Bruce Kipp  Wing Public Affairs Officer  (605) 261-4507  paa.sdwg@gmail.com

Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SDWingCAP and on Twitter at @SDWingCAP

WING TIPS
HOT NEWS: It's official! On Friday, 30 May, President Obama signed into law S.309, the bill awarding a
Congressional Gold Medal to Civil Air Patrol for its service during World War II. The Congressional Gold
Medal marks the first major recognition CAP’s members have received for their World War II service. Fewer
than 100 of these early members are believed to be alive today.
The legislation recognizes the volunteer service of more than 120,000 men, women and teenagers who joined
CAP immediately before and during the war. They helped protect the nation by warding off German U-boat
attacks on American oil tankers bound for Allied nations.
CAP was founded Dec. 1, 1941, a week before the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the United States’ entry into
WWII. CAP organizations along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts volunteered to
carry out anti-submarine patrols. The coastal patrols began within three months,
after the Petroleum Industry War Council requested protection for oil tankers
falling prey to German subs. Over the next 15 months, CAP members used their
own planes to watch for German subs. Those patrols accounted for 86,685
missions that involved 244,600 flight hours and over 24 million air miles. They
sighted 173 submarines, are credited with dropping bombs that sank two subs,
and located more than 300 survivors of U-boat attacks.
In the interior of the US, CAP’s early members also took to the skies to patrol the nation’s borders, tow targets
for military training, watch for forest fires, conduct search and rescue missions, provide disaster relief, transport
people and parts and conduct orientation flights for future pilots.
Overall the members of the Civil Air Patrol logged an estimated 750,000 hours of flight time during the war,
Sixty-four members died in service during World War II.
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More information about CAP’s World War II service is available at www.capgoldmedal.com, the organization’s
Congressional Gold Medal website.
 TORNADO DAMAGE SURVEY MISSION: The Pennington
County Office of Emergency Management requested SDWG conduct
a time-sensitive mission to photograph the damage in the wake of the
tornado that touched down in the Silver City area of the Black Hills
on 27 May. The severe storm system in the Black Hills also produced
hail up to the size of golf balls near Keystone, Hill City, the Pactola
Reservoir and Sheridan Lake. The mission objective was to provide
geo-tagged photographs of the extent of the tornado's damage path.
Responding to the mission request, a SDWG Cessna-182T took off
from the Rapid City Regional Airport with Maj. Craig Goodrich and Lt. Col. Gary Hewett; both highly
experienced Mission Pilots, on board. Their survey mission lasted about 1.5 hours, during which they took
nearly 100 high resolution geo-tagged photos that were hand delivered to the Pennington EOM for analysis.
 AERIAL WILDLIFE SURVEYS: SDWG flew aerial surveys of terrestrial wildlife on the 5th, 9th, 14th, 19th,
20 , and 27th of May in support of the state’s Department of Game, Fish & Parks and the South Dakota State
University. GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and elk while SDSU surveyed elk and bobcats. The
surveys resulted in just over of 25 hours flying over western South Dakota and the Black Hills. The CAP pilot
for the May surveys was Lt. Col. Gary Hewett. He was accompanied by personnel from GF&P and SDSU.
th

 COLOR GUARD COMPETITION: The cadet color guards of the Rushmore and Big Sioux squadrons met
in competition on 24 May in Pierre. Competition was tight as both color guards were within a few points of
each other through all the competition’s categories. The lead changed back and forth several times. In the end,
Rushmore’s color guard nosed out Big Sioux by one point! While Rushmore Composite Squadron won the
competition overall, the Big Sioux Composite Squadron won all the awards: Highest Academic Award, Fleet
Foot Male and Fleet Foot Female and Outstanding Cadet of the Competition. Of note was how the two units
encouraged each other throughout the competition wishing each other good luck and then congratulating each
other upon announcement of the winner. Best of all, both teams won honors at the competition.
The Big Sioux Composite Squadron’s color guard was made up of: C/SrA Zebadiah Nelson, C/SSgt Jaden
Petersen, C/Amn Daniella Petersen, C/SSgt Bronson Lynn, and C/CMSgt Camille Lynn (alternate). The
Rushmore Composite Squadron’s color guard was made up of: C/CMSgt Errol Kelly, C/MSgt Travis Tenold,
C/SSgt Anthony Pruitt, and C/A1C Gunner Gray.

RUSHMORE COMPOSITE SQUADRON’S COLOR GUARD READY TO PERFORM AND UNDERGOING JUDGING

2

The officer in charge of the competition was Lt. Col. Linda Buechler, wing Director of cadet Programs. The
judges for the competition were: Col. Mary Donley (SD001), Lt. Col. Myra Christensen (SD038), C/Capt Silas
Busch (SD031) and C/Capt Joshua Klosterman (SD058). SDWG thanks all of the judges in the competition.
Senior Members also present were: Maj. Bruce Hack and 1st Lt. Ryan Jones (both from SD031), and 1st Lt.
Jonathan Becker and Maj. Nick Gengler (both of SD058). All competition was held at the Community Bible
Church, Pierre, SD, except for the Outdoor presentation which was held at the Georgia Morse Middle School
across from Capitol Building.
 An ICS-300 course will be taught in Aberdeen on 20-21 June. There is a maximum of 30 students. For
information contact Teresa Tople, SD OEM, 605-773-3231 or Teresa.Tople@state.sd.us. Register online at
http://dps.sd.gov/emergency_services/emergency_management/training_schedule.aspx.The next ICS-300 and
ICS-400 courses are tentatively set for September but no specific dates or locations as yet.
 On http://members.gocivilairpatrol.com/cadet_programs/?&show=entry&blogID=1279 is a post on the
Cadet Blog, from 29 May that states; “Starting this week when a cadet’s promotion is approved in eServices
their notification email will include a link to share the good news on Facebook. If a cadet choses to share the
information a picture of their new grade insignia will post to their Wall. Friends and family who follow the link
will be taken to a page that outlines the requirements the cadet completed to earn the achievement or milestone.
Sharing is a great way for cadets to celebrate their accomplishments and increase the visibility of CAP. You can
see the announcement and like us on the Cadet Programs Facebook at www.facebook.com/pages/CAP-CadetPrograms/156363627727624.
 MILITARILY SIGNIFICANT DATES IN JUNE: The month of June has several dates that are significant
in the military history of the United States. Over the years the names of some of the organizations have changed
as our armed forces evolved, and historians have assigned names for certain events. What hasn’t changed is the
spirit to defend the rights, liberties and freedoms we cherish. We honor those who went before and respect those
who currently serve our great nation.
6 June 1944 – D-Day, Allied forces launch the assault to liberate France during World War II.
14 June 1775 – Funding of the Continental Army, forerunner of today’s U.S. Army.
20 June 1941 – Founding of the U.S. Army Air Corps, forerunner of the U.S. Air Force.
25 June 1950 – The Korean War began.

STAFF NOTES
WING DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS
Maj. Nick Gengler, CAP

 We will send two SDWG aircraft out of the state in June to be used at this summer’s National Cadet
Special Activity’s Flight Academies. One aircraft will go to Nebraska and one aircraft will go to Illinois.
 In the near future we will be receiving updated radio-direction finding equipment, Incident Command
status boards to be used for SAREXs and actual missions, and Incident Command vests for better identification
of key personnel during SAREXs and actual missions.
Don’t forget the Split SAREX coming up on Saturday, 21 June!
3

WING DIRECTOR OF AEROSPACE EDUCATION
Maj. Rodney “Buck” DeWeese, CAP

 Planning is underway for an SDWG Aerospace Education event in conjunction with the South Dakota
Air National Guard Museum’s open house to be held 8-10 August in Pierre. Currently we envision a static
display of a CAP C-182T aircraft, an open house display table, ground school for the “fly-a-teacher” (TOPS)
program, radio-controlled model aircraft flights, model rocketry activity, cadet o-rides, and TOPS flights. It will
be a big deal event and maximum turnout of seniors and cadets is requested.

SQUADRON HIGHLIGHTS
BIG SIOUX COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-058, BROOKINGS)
(Items submitted by Maj. Gengler)
 MEMORIAL DAY PARADE: The squadron’s color guard took part in a local Memorial Day parade and
celebration at the United Living Center in Brookings. The ceremony was held in conjunction with Brooking’s
VFW Post 2118 (George Dokken Post).
 ADIOS: The squadron bids farewell to three Cadet Lynns; C/CMSgt Camille, C/SMSgt Brianna, and
C/SSgt Bronson. They moved to North Dakota and transferred to the Jamestown Composite Squadron (ND031). We wish them the best.
 TOPS IN CAP CYBER-SECURITY: We received official
word from the Air Force Association as to our final standing in
the recently held “CyberPatriot-VI”, the national high school
cyber-security competition. We came in 7th out of 864 teams in
the All-Service Division but were 1st among the 320 CAP teams
that took part. In recognition thereof, the AFA will present us
with the CAP Champion Award in the near future. Members of
the team, led by C/Capt Joshua Klosterman, were C/MSgt Chris
Dinnel, C/MSgt Laura Rudnik, C/AB Josiah Jorenby (not
shown) and C/Amn Zebadiah Nelson. This year’s team was coached by then C/2nd Lt Tyler Gross and mentored
by then 1st Lt. Shannon Hofer (not shown).
CRAZY HORSE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-068, CUSTER)
(Items submitted by C/SMSgt Parry, Capt. Moad, Lt. Col. Christensen)
 HIGH SCHOOL FRESHMAN IMPACT PROGRAM by C/SMSgt Jason Parry: Freshman impact is a
program consisting of many local emergency departments showing high school freshmen the effects of driving
under the influence of drugs and alcohol. Throughout the day, the students participate in team building activities
as well as driving a golf cart while wearing drunk goggles. They also experience a live demo of a rollover
showing the effects of seat belts being buckled and unbuckled. After the students have lunch, they watch a short
play in which a couple of friends go to a party where they get high and drunk, then leave the party to drive
home. At the end of the play, the stage goes dark and a mock 911 call is played over the speakers about the
friends that had left the party. Immediately after the call, the students go into the parking lot where a mock crash
4

has been set up. The crash consists of stunt doubles that have been made to look like they have realistic injuries,
as well as two cars from real wrecks that are positioned to look like they had hit head on.
Once all the students get out to the crash, the police, ambulance and fire trucks show up and handle the crash
like its real. The driver of the car gets arrested and a few people get taken away in the ambulances. One of the
passengers was killed and is taken away in a body bag in the back of a local morgue’s hearse. Afterwards, the
students go back into the theater and watch a mock trial of the driver who killed and injured his friends. I took
part in the play and was the one who provided the alcohol and drugs. Even though it was all fake I had a really
hard time participating in the mock trial seeing my friend get sentenced to prison and the effects he has caused
in the rest of the other actor’s pretend lives. I think it is a great program and impacted many of the students
there to make good choices as they grow up.
 A CIRCLE IN LIFE: Life in a family often completes a circle, so it was for former Crazy Horse cadet
Tyler Stritar (Capt. Moad's grandson). On 30 May 30 2014, U.S. Air Force Master Sergeant Mathew Stritar was
honored at a formal retirement presentation at Ellsworth AFB in Rapid City. MSgt Stritar served 20 years in the
special security forces. He began his career at Ellsworth AFB and ended it there with many bases in between.
His son, former cadet Stritar, begins his intended 20 years of service in the special security services at Ellsworth
AFB, with his next base of assignment at Warren AFB in Cheyenne, WY. Both men are following the career
of MSgt. Stritar’s father who was a B-52 pilot who retired after 20 years of service at Ellsworth AFB.
 WREATHS ACROSS AMERICA: The squadron is off
to a running start for the drive to sign up sponsors for the
2014 Wreaths Across America Program. Each Saturday
during the summer there will be members offering sponsorship applications to visitors attending an outdoor flea market
in Pringle, SD. So far the members have had a fair amount of
success. Pouring rain sometimes put a damper on things (no
pun intended) but they continue in the spirit of fortitude.

Lieutenant Colonels Doug and Frizel Westerlund staff the
table at the Pringle, SD flea market seeking sponsorships for
the 2014 Wing Wreaths Across America program
 MOUNTAIN OPERATIONS TRAINING AND EDUCATION: The squadron hosted a Mountain Operations
Training and Education (MOTE) weekend on 9 through 11 May. The event wasn’t a typical emergency services
training. Rather it was a journey into the psychology of survival on searches, outdoor safety of self and others as
well as those in need of help, and crime scene forensics. The weekend was deemed a success by the attendees.

5

Cadets started Friday night off with shelter building and protection from the incoming rain. After shelters were
in place and the out of town trainees arrived the program was started off with a class on drug demand reduction
class presented by Chief Deputy Sheriff Neal Moad from Charles Mix County.

Deputy Moad is also on the state drug task force team and is a certified lab technician for
the state. Attendees were given a shorter version of the class on Meth house take downs
given to electric companies, county employees, highway worker, fire departments and
many other organizations. He gave a presentation on the danger posed by discarded drug
paraphernalia, especially those from the preparation of meth. He stressed the importance
of safety if finding these types of bottles while doing ditch clean up, walking trails, etc.
He emphasized the high degree of caution that law enforcement officers use in gathering
evidence at meth labs. All attendees had the opportunity to wear the hazmat suit.

On Saturday classes began with Capt. Sharon Moad giving a presentation on the anatomy and field dressing of
an Army individual soldier’s field ration, known as the MRE. Originally the class was to be taught by Army
Specialist Ken Moad, but as he was on TDY at the time the class was taught by his mom. Some heavy MRE
contents swapping went on after the class.
This was followed by a class on the psychology of survival and searching where a great deal of information was
shared on not just CAP searches but many kinds of searchers. The why, when, how and what to do when a
searcher becomes lost or separated from the group. The focus was on lifetime knowledge with an emphasis on
safety in all aspects.

A wilderness first aid session with hands on training was led by two Red Cross
members Ken Mickelson from Rapid City and Dave Ramberg of Spearfish. They
brought lots of bandaging and splinting material and there was no lack of willing
“victims”. Participants learned about several different types of patient carries and
got to practice them. After lunch, provided by the local Pizza Hut, participants
enjoyed a presentation by Jake Ehlert of the state Department of Game, Fish and
Parks. He spoke about the ten most deadly creatures in the world, the top three of
which we could encounter on any search anywhere. There was some surprise that
the mosquito is number one and a great deal of surprise that cows and horses are
numbers two and three.

The participants were then offered the opportunity to check out a
closed box which squadron commander Bierwirth already knew
contained dead, frozen snakes. Nevertheless, that didn't stop her
from jumping backwards about three feet when someone let out a
yell.

6

A mid-afternoon session was held at the Custer County Search and Rescue building where a video on ice rescue
was shown. This was followed by a tour of their facility and inspection of their equipment. Steve Baldwin, one
of the SAR members, took his 24-hour pack apart to show the items. It was very similar to the 24-hour pack that
CAP ground search teams carry.

After supper, Deputy Moad, who is also a firefighter, gave a class on how
to use a magnetic compass to determine azimuth and reverse azimuth. He
also taught about topographical maps, how to read them, and discussed
how mapping is used in all kinds of life, including criminal investigations.
All members present were given a National Geographic cloth map of our
area donated by the U.S. Forestry Service. The evening ended with the use
of $4,000.00 a pair night vision monoculars and a camp fire with
Mexican S-mores provided by Lt. Col. Christensen.

Sunday’s classes were on the psychological aspects of different types of lost people. For example, the difference
of a three year old to a thirty three year old or a hunter verses a hiker. This was followed by SD Highway Patrol
Officer Shann showing a video on the effects of texting while driving. He also spoke about driving while under
the influence of alcohol or narcotics, exactly what that means and the consequences that can result.
One of the comments made by C/TSgt Thomas Dillon summed it all up. "What I learned most was what Capt.
Moad said, “STOP, THINK, OBSERVE, PLAN.”
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-063, SPEARFISH)
(See entry in Cadet NCO Promotions Section)
PIERRE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-038, PIERRE)
(See entry in Cadet Airman Promotion Section)
RUSHMORE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-031, RAPID CITY)
(Items submitted by Maj. Goodrich and Capt. Black)
 SQUADRON STAFF APPOINTMENTS: SM Gregory Klatte has been appointed Supply Officer. SM
Andrew Weathers has been appointed Assistant Safety Officer. SM Jacqueline Klatte-Rolfe has been appointed
Assistant Transportation Officer. SM Doug Robbins has been appointed Drug Demand Reduction Officer.
 NEW MEMBERS: Welcome aboard to our new members: SM Roy V Weller, Cadet Caleb J Weller, and
Cadet Isaak B Weller. We are pleased that you have decided to join Civil Air Patrol and proud that you have
chosen our squadron for membership.
 ICUT COMPLETION: The following individuals have completed ICUT training: Lt. Col. Jeffrey Dill,
Capt. Scott Giles, C/Amn Malia Goodrich, SM Greg Klatte, SM Jacqueline Klatte, SM Ronald Lenz, 2nd Lt.
Jamie Nowlin, and C/MSgt Travis Tenold.
 LEVEL I COMPLETION: SM Andrew Weathers, SM Gregory Klatte, SM Jacqueline Klatte-Rolfe, and
SM Douglas Robbin have completed Level I in the Senior Member Professional Development Program.
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 GES QUALIFICATION: The following individuals completed the requirements for General Emergency
Services qualification: 1st Lt. Christina Voll, 2nd Lt. Jamie Nowlin, C/A1C Blake Berry, C/Amn Dalton Mann,
C/Amn Tyler Eberle, SM Andrew Weathers, SM Douglas Robbins, SM Gregory Klatte, and SM Jacqueline
Klatte-Rolfe.
SIOUX FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-050, SIOUX FALLS)
(Items and photos submitted by Capt. West, Capt. Schmid)
 BRANDON LOYALTY DAY PARADE: The 46th Annual Brandon Loyalty Day parade was on 4 May. The
squadron participated in the event with our color guard and a parade vehicle. A contingent of cadets and seniors
helped provide crowd control.

(L-R): C/MSGT JADEN ROBLEWSKY, C/CMSGT DEVON BROWN, C/CMSGT AUSTIN COLE, C/TSGT JOSIAH HUNTINGTON

Other cadets participating were: C/SrA Ivan Kreger, C/SrA Kyle Kreger, C/Amn Kyle Clement, C/Amn Lathen
Norling, C/Amn Dylan Purkapile, and Cadet Christopher Schuppan. Senior Members taking part were 2nd Lt.
Dale Palmer, SM Melanie Schuppan, 1st Lt. Robert Hinkhouse, and 1st Lt. Karen Espeland
 CADET ORIENTATION RIDE: Saturday, May 10th, was a big day for C/Amn Dylan Purkapile - his very
first ride in an airplane of any kind! Not only that, he successfully flew a Cessna-172 as part of the CAP’s
Orientation Flight program. According to Pilot and O-Flight Coordinator Lt. Col. Greg Lair, Dylan flew the
aircraft from Sioux Falls Regional Airport to the Madison Municipal Airport. “He was very smooth on the
controls, a natural pilot” said Lair. Dylan’s goal is to learn to fly and join the military, possibly becoming a
fighter pilot. His first flight was a memorable experience. At the other end of the spectrum, C/CMSgt Devon
Brown experienced his fourth powered flight, part of the CAP’s 10 flight program. Devon learned the use of
instruments in flight as he piloted the Cessna-172 from Madison Municipal Airport to Sioux Falls Regional
Airport. This flight completes 7 rides for Devon, including two prior glider flights. Devon’s goal is to attend the
Naval Academy and join the Navy, just like his Dad, CAP 1st Lt. Vinnie Brown. This summer Devon plans to
further his flying experience by attending a CAP-sponsored powered flight academy in Nebraska.

(L-R) C/AMN DYLAN PURKAPILE, LT. COL. GREG LAIR, C/CMSGT DEVON BROWN

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 CADET ORIENTATION RIDE: Saturday morning, 17 May, was a perfect time for Cadets Christopher
Schuppan and Blake Hayden to complete their second powered CAP Orientation Flights. Both cadets completed
the normal flight maneuver syllabus, which includes aircraft stability, attitude flying, trim controls, shallow
banked turns, and load factors on the aircraft. Both cadet-pilots flew for an hour and maintained excellent
aircraft control while touring the areas of Sioux Falls, Brookings and Lake Madison.

(L-R) C/TSGT BLAKE HAYDEN, C/AB CHRISTOPHER SCHUPPAN, CAPT. NEIL SCHMID

 Cadets and senior members of the squadron placed flags on the graves of military veterans at the Hills of
Rest Memorial Park Cemetery & Mausoleum in Sioux Falls on Friday morning, 23 May.

9

 IN SQUADRON MINI-SAREX: What began as our fifth Thursday meeting briefing was interrupted by a
“Training Alert”! The Minnehaha County Sheriff’s office advised us that a skydiver was overdue into the Sioux
Falls airport. There were witness reports of an out-of-control decent by a skydiver south of Hartford. However,
conflicting eyewitness reports as to the location required a slightly expanded search area.
Two aircrews and a ground team were briefed and dispatched. The aircraft were assigned distinct creeping line
search patterns; our C-172 flew north-to-south from Colton to Oakleaf Airfield near Hartford while our C-182T
flew south-to-north from 5 miles west of Marv Skie-Lincoln County Airport (Y14) in Tea north to Oakleaf
Airfield. After takeoff and having entered their respective search grids, Mission Base advised that they had lost
communications with the ground team. Lost communication procedures were a focus of this event along with
first aid for the ground team and search and rescue pattern GPS programming and procedures for the aircrew.
During the final phase of the exercise our two aircraft were over Oakleaf Airfield/Hartford. The ground team,
having located the subject, communicated using “lost communication procedures” with our C-172 which was at
about 2,500 feet. Our C-182T was over the same area at some 3,500 feet; both aircraft were under the direction
of Sioux Falls Approach Control.
From start to finish this training exercise took just over two hours from the “alert” to the end of the debriefing.
Many “gung ho” trainees were very disappointed when they were excluded from participation on ground crew
or aircrew due to lack of safety currency or not being in proper uniform. We definitely made the most of the
available training resources, moved numerous participants further along in their search and rescue SQTRs and, I
would safely conclude, all participants frankly “had a blast!”

HH

PROMOTIONS

HH

Senior Member Promotion
Congratulations to Morgan “Dani” Black of the Rushmore Composite Squadron on her promotion to
the rank of Captain!
Cadet Noncommissioned Officer Promotions
Congratulations to Nicholas Nash of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank of
Cadet Chief Master Sergeant and receipt of the Goddard Award!

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Congratulations to Justin Harris of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron on his promotion to the
rank of Cadet Master Sergeant and receipt of the Lindbergh Award!

Congratulations to Thomas Dillon of the Crazy Horse Composite Squadron on his promotion to the
rank of Cadet Technical Sergeant and receipt of the Captain Eddie Rickenbacker Award!
Cadet Airman Promotion
Congratulations to John Hall of Pierre Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank of Cadet
Airman and receipt of the General Curry Award!

HH

KUDOS

HH

Congratulations to Maj. Bruce Hack of Rushmore Composite Squadron who earned “Senior”
Level in Specialty Track – Cadet Programs in the Senior Member Professional Development
Program!

Congratulations to Maj. Bruce Kipp and Maj. Sharon Moad who completed the week-long FEMA ICS
All-Hazards Position Specific Public Information Officer Course in Deadwood from 12-16 May.
Congratulations to C/2nd Lt Tyler Gross of Big Sioux Composite Squadron who met the requirements
for Achievement 9 (Flight Commander) of the Command Phase of the Cadet Promotion Program!
Congratulations to C/Capt Joshua Klosterman of the Big Sioux Composite Squadron who has met the
requirements for Achievement 12 (Leadership Officer), Executive Phase, Cadet Promotion Program!
Congratulations to the Rushmore Composite Squadron’s color guard for winning the recent SDWG
color guard competition!
Congratulations to C/SSgt Bronson Lynn of Big Sioux Composite Squadron who achieved the highest
score on the written knowledge test in the recent SDWG cadet color guard competition!
Congratulations to C/SSgt Jaden Petersen of Big Sioux Composite Squadron who won “Outstanding
Cadet” in the recent SDWG cadet color guard competition!

Congratulations to C/Amn Daniella Petersen of Big Sioux
Composite Squadron who won the award for “Fleet Foot” for
females in the recent SDWG cadet color guard competition!
Congratulations to C/SrA Zebadiah Nelson of Big Sioux
Composite Squadron who won the award for “Fleet Foot” for
males in the recent SDWG cadet color guard competition!
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Congratulations to Capt. Joshua Hall, Capt. Scott Giles, Maj. Craig Goodrich, and Lt. Col. Gary
Hewett, all of the Rushmore Composite Squadron, who recently completed their CAP Form 5!
Congratulations to Lt. Col. Gary Hewett of the Rushmore Composite Squadron, who recently
completed his CAP Form 91!
Congratulations to Capt. Joshua Hall of the Rushmore Composite Squadron on his recent appointment
to Form 5 Check Pilot / Check Pilot Examiner!
Congratulations to 2nd Lt. Jack Jensen of Rushmore Composite Squadron who has qualified as a CAP
Transport Mission Pilot!
Congratulations to C/CMSgt Laura Rudnik of Big Sioux Composite Squadron who met requirements
for Achievement 8 of the Leadership Phase of the Cadet Promotion Program. In recognition thereof
she received the Neil Armstrong Award!

HH

UNUSUAL CAP HERALDRY

HH

From time to time I come across unusual items of CAP heraldry I think would be of interest to our members.
This “morale patch” for the Central New York Group of the New York Wing is one such item.

12

Former South Dakota Wing Commander Col. Lester W. Snyder, Jr. (Lt. Col. USAF (Ret))
of Rapid City, unexpectedly passed away Monday, May 12, at age 93 while working as a
bailiff at the Pennington County Courthouse.
Col. Snyder joined CAP in 1970 and just four years later became the SD Wing Commander
serving from May 1973 to June 1977. In in addition to his time as Wing CC, he served five
years as Wing historian; for four of those years, he received the National Historian of the
Year award! He remained a CAP member to the end with 44 years of service.
Col. Snyder was born on May 8, 1921, in Chelsea, MA. He graduated from Howe High School in Billerica, MA
in 1939. He served in the United States Army Air Force during World War II, flying combat missions as a
navigator-bombardier off the island of Tinian in a B-29 Superfortress. For his service, he earned a Distinguished
Flying Cross. Returning stateside, he graduated with a BS Cum Laude from the Louisiana Polytechnic Institute,
in 1949. Duty called again in 1951 and he was summoned by the Air Force to the Korean Conflict, flying B-26
missions from near Pusan, South Korea.
Les returned to complete his MS in Industrial Administration from the Carnegie Institute of Technology in
1955. After numerous jobs in several different states, including working for the Eastman Kodak Company, Les
and Nell arrived in Rapid City on August 14, 1959. He would then begin his 29-year run as a Professor of
Mechanical Engineering at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology. While at the School of Mines, he
met and married Alice Davis in 1980. Their 29-year marriage ended with Alice’s death in 2009. They traveled
extensively seeking new adventures along the way. He retired from the School of Mines in 1985. Soon after, he
became a bailiff at the Pennington County Courthouse, where he would serve for 27 years until his death.
His community involvement during his 55 years in Rapid City included membership in the First Congregational
Church, the Air Force Reserve, the Boys Scouts, “The Group” Community Theater, Hardrocker Flying Club,
Reserve Officers Association, and Civil Air Patrol. He was also a member of the Black Hills Veterans Writing
Group, Elks Club Lodge 1187 and Historic Deadwood Lodge No. 7 AF&M as a Master Mason.
Col. Snyder flew 58 combat missions in WWII and Korea and accumulated over 2,000 private flying hours as a
licensed pilot. He retired from the military as a Lieutenant Colonel, with 16 decorations. After 29 years in his
vocation, he retired as a Professor Emeritus from South Dakota Tech. During his avocation as a Colonel in the
Civil Air Patrol, he earned 22 decorations and awards. Lester W. Snyder Jr. was truly part of the Greatest
Generation. For his efforts, he was rewarded with a spot on the Honor Flight to Washington, D.C. in 2010 to
recognize his service to his country in WWII.
A memorial service was held on May 16. Inurnment with military honors rendered by Ellsworth Air Force Base
and Rushmore VFW Post 1273 took place at Black Hills National Cemetery near Sturgis.

13

“THE SKYCHASER”
South Dakota Wing Electronic Newsletter for June 2014
Official Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force - Citizens Serving Communities: Above and Beyond
Publishers: Wing Commander Colonel John Seten / Wing Vice Commander Lieutenant Colonel Richard Larson
Editor: Major Bruce Kipp  Wing Public Affairs Officer  (605) 261-4507  paa.sdwg@gmail.com

“Follow” us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SDWingCAP and “Like” us on Twitter at @SDWingCAP

WING TIPS
 JUNE IS GENERAL AVIATION MONTH: Governor Daugaard
has proclaimed June as “General Aviation Appreciation” month in
South Dakota. “General aviation plays a critical role with its citizens,
businesses, farms and ranches, and is important to the state’s
economy,” says Transportation Secretary Darin Bergquist. Given
South Dakota’s geography this service is also important for providing
access to medical services, disaster relief and aerial forest fighting.
Aviation in South Dakota includes the airline industry, education
institutions, aviation organizations and Ellsworth Air Force Base and
a Civil Air Patrol Wing. South Dakota’s 70 public-use airports serve
2,262 certified pilots and 1,350 registered general aviation aircraft.
The official proclamation cites the importance of general aviation to businesses and communities in the state.
In the photo Gov. Daugaard signs a proclamation declaring June as “General Aviation Appreciation” month in
South Dakota” with the South Dakota Department of Transportation Aeronautics Commission. Pictured left to
right are: Skip VanDerhule, Gov. Daugaard, Richard Pearson and Arnie Hauge. Commissioners not pictured are
Chris Funk, Travis Lantis, Eric Odenbach, and Chad Hatch. Photo courtesy of SD Office of Air, Rail & Transit.
 FAA APPROVES NEW EMERGENCY LOCATOR: The FAA approved the ELT-1000, a new emergency
locator transmitter for aviation. The unit can transmit GPS location data within 100 meters to search-and-rescue
workers in less than a minute. The ELT-1000 is a value-priced upgrade to standard 121.5 MHz transmitters,
which are no longer monitored by the Cospas-Sarsat system. The 406 MHz transmitter produces a much more
accurate position, typically 3 kms as compared with 15-20 kms for 121.5 MHz ELTs. When coupled to the
aircraft navigation system the ELT-1000's accuracy improves to approximately 100 meters.
Source: News of the Force: Monday, June 16, 2014 - Page 2 and http://www.acrartex.com/products/catalog/elts-general-aviation/elt1000/

1

 BIG SIOUX FLOODING SURVEY MISSION: A week of severe weather during the middle of the month
produced torrential rain that resulted in wide-spread flooding in the East River area. The state Office of
Emergency Management requested the Civil Air Patrol’s South Dakota Wing conduct an aerial photographic
survey on 19 June along the Big Sioux River from Sioux Falls to where it meets the Missouri River. Later in the
day the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) requested that the photos of the flooding be sent to
them. What began as state tasking changed into a federal disaster relief mission. A Cessna-182T from the Sioux
Falls Composite Squadron was assigned the mission. The aircraft departed Sioux Falls Regional Airport at
approximately 9:00am for the 2 hour sortie. Capt. Neil Schmid served as the SDWG Incident Commander for
the mission. The CAP aircrew consisted of Captain Matt Meert (Mission Pilot), Captain Karla West (Mission
Scanner) and 1st Lieutenant. Robert Hinkhouse (Mission Observer). Over 250 photos were taken showing the
flow and the spread of the flood waters and the damage caused. The photos were uploaded for federal and state
emergency management officials’ analysis and assessment. Photo used with permission of FEMA.

 REDCAP: Around 1800Z, while engaged in training activity, the aircrew staging base in Rapid City
transitioned to a mission base for a real-world search and rescue mission. Butte County’s Office of Emergency
Management requested SDWG assistance in locating a woman missing since Wednesday. Around Noon Central
Time on Saturday, 21 June, the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center in Florida activated the South Dakota
Wing to assist in the search. According to media reports, the women and her friend were swept away by a flash
flood late Tuesday. The subject’s friend was found around Noon Wednesday and was hospitalized in Spearfish.
A Cessna-182T aircraft from Rushmore Composite Squadron (Rapid City) flew two sorties spending some 4.5
hours over the search area before diverting to Spearfish due to poor weather. The aircrew consisted of Capt.
Josh Hall (Mission Pilot), Lt. Lisa Swanson (Mission Scanner) and Maj. John Hall (Mission Observer). Capt.
Bill Collister, from Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron, drove to the mission base in Rapid City and acted
as a Mission Staff Assistant. Lt. Col. Dave Jeffries, Rushmore Composite Squadron (Rapid City) served as
Communications Officer at the mission base.
2

Capt. David Small from Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron went to Butte County’s Incident Command
Post and served as Liaison Officer. The ICP, a Quonset hut, was about ½ mile east and 2 miles north of Hwy 85
in rolling hills near the junction with County Road 168. ICP photos with permission of Butte County Sheriff.

BUTTE COUNTY INCIDENT COMMAND POST FOR MISSING PERSON SEARCH

THIS TERRAIN VIEW HIGHLIGHTS THE REMOTENESS OF THE AREA AND DIFFICULTY OF THE SEARCH. THE MISSING PERSON; SHORT,
SLENDER, WEARING DARK CLOTHING, AND EXPECTED TO BE LYING DOWN WAS BELIEVED SOMEWHERE WITHIN THE SEARCH AREA.
IN THE TOP CENTER OF THE PHOTO A SDWG CESSNA-172 (158CP) FLIES OVER THE SEARCH AREA AT ABOUT 1,000 FEET AND
TRAVELLING AT ABOUT 120 MPH.

3

 AERIAL WILDLIFE SURVEYS: SDWG flew aerial surveys of terrestrial wildlife on the 5th, 10th and 23rd
of June in support of the Department of Game, Fish & Parks and the South Dakota State University. GF&P
surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and elk while SDSU surveyed elk and bobcats. The surveys resulted in
11.4 hours flying over western South Dakota and the Black Hills. The CAP pilot for the flights on the 5th and
10th June surveys was Lt. Col. Gary Hewett. The pilot for the flight on the 23rd was Maj. Craig Goodrich. They
were accompanied by Mr. Brandon Tycz from SDSU.
 SOUTH DAKOTA WING STATEWIDE SEARCH AND RESCUE EXERCISE: On Saturday, 21 June the
South Dakota Wing held its second statewide search and rescue exercise (SAREX) for 2014. This “Split
SAREX” took place in the East River area at the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron in Sioux Falls which served
as a staging base for aircraft and ground search and rescue teams. In addition, the overall Incident Command
Post was also at the squadron headquarters. Captain Neil Schmid, as the Incident Commander, assisted by a
mission base staff, controlled the exercise across the state. In the West River area a staging base for several
aircraft and aircrews was set up at the Rushmore Composite Squadron in Rapid City, and a staging base for
vehicles and ground search team members was set up at Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron in Spearfish.
The search and rescue scenarios involved air and ground searches for two private aircraft overdue at their
destinations, for an elderly fisherman missing in Newton Hills State Park, and for an aerial photo survey of
flooding conditions near Lake Vermillion.
The overall purpose of the activity was threefold: to train mission base staff in organizing and controlling an
emergency services mission, to train mission aircrews in the techniques of aerial observation and photography,
and to train ground teams in the techniques
and skills needed for search and rescue.

SAREX COMMAND STAFF: (L-R) SM MELANIE
SCHUPPAN; COL. MARY DONLEY; CAPT. NEIL
SCHMIDT; CHAP. (LT. COL.) GARY RAE; C/MAJ.
ELIZABETH FOY; C/TSGT BLAKE HAYDEN (COL.
DONLEY, LT. COL. RAE AND C/MAJ FOY ARE ON THE
WING STAFF, THE OTHER THREE ARE WITH THE SIOUX
FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON)

 REMAINS OF PERSONNEL FROM 1952 CRASH RECOVERED: The Pentagon announced on 18 June
that Defense Department forensic scientists have identified the remains of 17 U.S. military personnel, including
12 airmen, who died in the crash of a C-124 transport aircraft in Alaska, west of Mount Gannett, in 1952. The
C-124 went down on Nov. 22, 1952, while en route to Elmendorf AFB, Alaska, from McChord AFB, Wash. 11
crewmembers and 41 passengers were on board. In June 2012, the crash site was discovered and recovery
operations began that same month. According to a DOD news release, their remains will be returned to their
families for burial with full military honors. Future attempts to recover the still-missing personnel are possible.
Source: Air Force Magazine Online for Thursday, 19 June 2014.



SUPPORT TO SOUTH DAKOTA RED CROSS: On 23 June, the Red Cross requested assistance at the

shelter set up in Wessington Springs for those whose homes were damaged or destroyed by the recent tornado.
Members of the SD Army National Guard and volunteers assisting in the clean-up also use the shelter. On the
26th Col. Mary Donley and Capt. Joseph Oye helped out. On the 27th Col. Donley and Maj. Todd Epp helped
out. Previously helping at the shelter were Lt. Col. David and Maj. Joyce Jeffries and Maj. Nancy McKenney.
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 WESSINGTON SPRINGS TORNADO DAMAGE
SURVEY: Also on 19 June, the South Dakota Office of
Emergency Management and FEMA tasked SDWG to
conduct an aerial photo survey over the path of the EF-2
tornado (127 mph winds) that struck Wessington Springs
in Jerauld County on the 18th. Both organizations
requested photos showing the entire town to see the path
of destruction as well as close-up photos to see the
damage. A Cessna-182T from the Sioux Falls Composite
Squadron was assigned the mission. The aircraft departed
Sioux Falls Regional Airport at approximately 2:45pm
for sortie lasting about 2.5 hours. Special care and
coordination had to be taken during the flight as South
Dakota National Guard aircraft were also active in the area. Wing Commander Col. Seten served as the SDWG
point-of-contact for the mission. The CAP aircrew consisted of Captain Neil Schmid (Mission Pilot), Major
Todd Epp (Mission Scanner) and 1st Lieutenant. Robert Hinkhouse (Mission Observer). The mission photos
were uploaded for federal and state emergency management officials’ analysis and assessment. According to
the 20 June Argus Leader, at least 25 homes were left uninhabitable, three businesses were destroyed and seven
businesses suffered severe damage. In the photo, Mission Observer Lt. Rob Hinkhouse and Mission Pilot Capt.
Neil Schmidt, both of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron, enter coordinates into the G1000 equipped ”glass
cockpit” Cessna-182T prior to flying a sortie for the state of South Dakota and FEMA to take photos of tornado
damage in Wessington Springs. Photos used with permission of FEMA.

OVERVIEW OF THE PATH OF THE TORNADO THROUGH WESSINGTON SPRINGS (YELLOW BOX ADDED BY MAJ. KIPP)

5

CLOSE-UP VIEW OF THE DAMAGE CAUSED BY THE WESSINGTON SPRINGS TORNADO

 SPACE WALL OF HONOR UNVEILED: After
60 Years, the U.S. “Home of Space” unveiled the
first names carved on the Space Wall of Honor and
inducted the first class of space pioneers. Air Force
officials and dignitaries dedicated the Gen. Bernard
Schriever Wall of Honor at Los Angeles AFB, CA.
On 19 June, Lt. Gen. Samuel Greaves, commander of
the USAF Space and Missile Systems Center, along
with Mr. Thomas Taverney, chairman of the Air
Force Association's General Schriever Chapter,
unveiled the wall. The 2014 inductees are: Karel Jan
Bossart, rocket designer; Ivan Alexander Getting,
instrumental in the creation of the Global Positioning
System; retired Brig. Gen. William King; retired Col.
Frederic C.E. Oder; Simon Ramo; and retired Maj.
Gen. Osmond Jay Ritland. During the Space and Missile Center’s 60th Anniversary, space pioneers were
recognized for their contributions to the U.S. space effort. In the photo, Air Force officials and dignitaries
dedicated the Gen. Bernard A. Schriever Wall of Honor, shown here, and unveiled the wall’s 2014 inductees
during a ceremony at Los Angeles AFB, Calif., June 19, 2014. Air Force photo by Joe Juarez.
Source: Air Force Magazine Online for Thursday, 26 June 2014.

 KEY NHQ APPOINTMENTS: Col. Larry Myrick, special advisor to Maj. Gen. Carr, has been selected as
the new national vice commander. He will assume the position and be promoted to CAP Brigadier General
during the National Convention in Las Vegas in August. Middle East Region Commander Col. Larry Ragland
has been selected as the new national chief of staff and CAP Lt. Col. Jayson Altieri of the North Carolina Wing,
6

an active-duty U.S. Army colonel and commander of the 110th Aviation Brigade at Fort Rucker, Alabama, has
been selected as the new vice chairman of the CAP Board of Governors.

Col. Myrick

Col. Ragland

Lt. Col Altieri

 NEW CAP UNIFORM MANUAL: CAPM 39-1, 26 Jun 14, CAP Uniforms, is posted on the publications
page at: http://members.gocivilairpatrol.com/media/cms/M391_E6F33EAAEC28A.pdf. Questions concerning
wear instructions should be directed to the Knowledgebase, http://capnhq.custhelp.com. Requests for changes
to policy must be submitted through the chain of command to the National Uniform Committee. Col. Richard L.
Griffith, chair of the National Uniform Committee can be reached at r.griffith@inwg.cap.gov. The OPR for this
manual is Ms Susan Parker at sparker@capnhq.gov.
 SPAATZ ASSOCIATION AEROSPACE LEADERSHIP SCHOLARSHIPS: Applications for Aerospace
Leadership Scholarships will be accepted from 1 August - 31 October 2014. $2,500 flight scholarships are
available to cadets who: are at least 15 years old; have earned the Mitchell award; have earned Solo wings in a
powered aircraft; and have maintained at least a 3.0 GPA in high school. Four or more scholarships will be
awarded at the 2015 TSA Mid-Winter Dinner in February 2015. Apply online at www.spaatz.org/.
 REGIONAL GLIDER ACADEMY GRADUATION: Graduation ceremonies at Mattoon, IL, June 2014.
Certified Glider Flight Instructor 1st Lt. Marty Larson and Lt. Col. Gary Hewett attended two glider academies
at Mattoon, in southeastern Illinois, from 14-27 June. The Illinois Wing sponsored a triple academy for hot air
balloons, powered aircraft, and gliders; and Great Lakes Region sponsored a glider academy. 22 cadet student
glider pilots attended the Johnson Flight Academy, and 16 cadet student glider pilots attended the Region Glider
Academy. The overall syllabus for the academies was: Balloon (Familiarization with hot air balloon flight);
Basic Glider (Introduction to gliders); Intermediate Glider (Additional maneuvers and solo flight); Advanced
Glider (Advanced Maneuvers) and Powered Aircraft (basic powered flight). South Dakota Wing provided a tow
plane used in both glider events. In the two weeks of training, CFIGs from several states used aerotows for
launching gliders for a total of 771 flights.

GRADUATION CEREMONY OF CADETS AT CIVIL AIR PATROL’S JOHNSON FLIGHT ACADEMY IN MATOON, IL.

7

L
LEFT: THE TRADITIONAL WATER BATH FOR GRADUATES
RIGHT CFIG LT. LARSON CLIPS THE “TAIL FEATHERS” OF SOLO STUDENT CADET ROBERT BOSH, A TRADITIONAL CEREMONY

 COLONEL LES SNYDER MEMORIAL: The daughter-in-law of former South Dakota Wing Commander
Col. Lester W. Snyder, Jr. (Lt. Col. USAF (Ret)) who passed away 12 May stopped in the Wing office on 1 July
to drop off numerous checks for a total of $500.00 in memory of her father-in-law. The wing also received a
$25.00 donation as well. The wing will send an "informal" thank you to each contributor. This was a huge
blessing to the wing in memory of a great man. Attached is also a "thank you note" from his family.

STAFF NOTES
WING COMMANDER
Col. John Seten, CAP
I am pleased to announce the following command and staff appointments. Please join me in congratulating:




Capt. Bill Collister will be assuming command of the Lookout Mountain squadron this weekend
Capt. Jerry Gabert is the new Wing Director of Communications
Capt. Collister will be the Wing Assistant Director of Communications
8

I’d like to welcome Capt. Collister as commander of the Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron. I’m confident
the squadron is in good hands. In addition, I’d like to thank Capt. Small for his years of dedication as squadron
commander. The squadron is one of our most active in the wing and participates in nearly every activity that
the wing has. The squadron has produced a Spaatz cadet under the command of Capt Small which is highly
commendable and has received other well deserved awards in the past four few years. I expect many more good
things to come in the future for the Lookout Mountain Squadron.

SQUADRON HIGHLIGHTS
BIG SIOUX COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-058, BROOKINGS)
(Items submitted by Capt. Hofer, photo by Maj. Gengler)
 TOPS IN CAP CYBER-SECURITY: Mr. Ron Mielke, President of the Air
Force Association in South Dakota, and Mr. Ed Revell, President of AFA’s
Sioux Falls “Dacotah Chapter” presented the Civil Air Patrol Champion Award
on 26 June, to the squadron’s cyber-security team. Although we came in 7th out
of 864 teams in the All-Service Division we were 1st of the 320 CAP teams that
took part in CyberPatriot-VI, the national high school level cyber-security
competition. Members of the team, led by C/Capt Joshua Klosterman, were C/MSgt Chris Dinnel, C/MSgt
Laura Rudnik, C/AB Josiah Jorenby (not shown) and C/Amn Zebadiah Nelson. The team was coached by then
C/2nd Lt Tyler Gross and mentored by then 1st Lt. Shannon Hofer (not shown).

(L TO R) MR. REVELL, C/SRA ZEBADIAH NELSON, C/CAPT JOSHUA KLOSTERMAN, C/CMSGT CHRIS DINNEL, COACH C/2ND LT TYLER
GROSS, MR. MIELKE. PHOTO BY MAJ. GENGLER.

CRAZY HORSE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-068, CUSTER)
(Items submitted by Capt. Moad and Lt. K. Bierwirth, photo submitted by Capt. Moad)
 GROUND SEARCH ALERT: On 6 June, the squadron was put on alert
for possible assistance in the search for a juvenile missing in the Custer area.
The squadron’s ground search teams were on stand-by but, as it thankfully
turned out, were not needed and were stood down.
The juvenile was located around 2300L. Agencies that took part in the search
were the Custer County office of Emergency Management, Custer County
Sheriff’s Department, Custer County Search & Rescue, and the Pennington
County Search & Rescue who had brought a tracker dog with them. The
American Red Cross assisted with canteen services.
9



ALL PINE TREES LOOK ALIKE: First Lieutenants Vicki and Kris Bierwirth and C/TSgt Thomas Dillon

attended the ground search and rescue team training portion of the Split SAREXS that was held by Lt. Col.
Miles in Spearfish. Boy-o-boy did we learn lots! It very educational and we got a taste of what a mission would
be like and what happens if you mess up on your pace count...all the pine trees look the same!
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-063, SPEARFISH)
(Items submitted by Capt. David Small, Lt. Col. Hopewell, photos by Lt. Caneva, clip-art by Maj. Kipp)
 CHANGE OF COMMAND: Well over 30 CAP members and family attended the "Change of Command
Party" where Capt. Bill Collister officially took the reins of the Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron on
Saturday, 28 June 2014. It was a casual event on a beautiful summer evening for friends and family to relax
and enjoy friendship. Members from the Crazy Horse Composite Squadron, Rushmore Composite Squadron,
Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron and the Air Force Reserve were present. Capt. Collister started his
CAP career in the early 1970s as a cadet, advancing through the ranks into the cadet officer grades. He’s been
very active in South Dakota and Wyoming wings over the years and has a wealth of knowledge and experience
in CAP. There is no question our vibrant, active squadron is in his capable hands. A brief ceremony occurred
with Lt. Col. DeWeese presenting outgoing Commander, Capt David Small with an award of appreciation.

LEFT PHOTO: CAPT. SMALL (RIGHT) CONGRATULATES NEW SQUADRON COMMANDER CAPT. BILL COLLISTER
RIGHT PHOTO: CAPT. COLLISTER, CAPT. SMALL WITH AWARD, LT. COL. DEWEESE

 MICKELSON TRAIL MARATHON: Meandering through the beautiful Black Hills of South Dakota along
a former mining railroad is the Mickelson Trail. Every June, runners far and wide congregate for a marathon
and half-marathon, with the finish line in Deadwood. On 1 June, cadets and seniors from the squadron staffed a
drink and snack station along the trail, 20 miles into the marathon course (which also was the 8 mile mark of the
half-marathon.) Cadets there were C/CMSgt Brad Blansett, C/CMSgt Connor Caneva, C/CMSgt Jared Doyle,
C/MSgt Justin Harris, C/TSgt Ryan Harris, C/SSgt Austin Rouscher, and C/SSgt Keyvin Rouscher. Capt. Gary
Dettman, Capt. Bill Collister, and 2nd Lt. Brandon Caneva, and SM Tom Irvin made up the seniors contingent.
Some of the time the marathoner runners came by the snack station in ones and twos but at other times, the CAP
crew experienced frenetic periods of handing our sports beverages and snacks to packs of (by then) hot and tired
“runner zombies.”
Rain that day mitigated some of the sun’s heat, but did not help the condition of the dirt service road that took
the squadron van to the hydration station. Consequently, on the way out the van became mired in mud up to the
running boards. Two private vehicles belonging to senior members had 4-wheel-drive and were able to navigate
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the exit path. Alas, 4WD was probably not an available option when the van was purchased, as it had to remain
there a couple of days more until extricated; heavy duty all-terrain tires notwithstanding.
Many expressions of thanks were given in passing by marathoners to the “uniformed agents of refreshment”. A
couple of well-intended but exhausted competitors had particular gratitude as they ran out of every bit of energy
they thought they had and asked the seniors present for a ride to the finish line. And so, the “Rescue” part of
SAR took on some mildly unconventional facets for squadron members that day. You’ll recall that at last year’s
Mickelson Trail Marathon squadron members were involved in a real-world aid and evacuation of a collapsed
and seriously dehydrated runner.

 AIRCRAFT “SAVE” AT SPF: Hurricanes don’t
happen too often in the Black Hills. However, on
Thursday evening, 26 June 2014, in Spearfish, SD,
weather conditions rivaled the monsters usually seen
at lower latitudes. A line of thunderstorms produced
winds clocked at peak 69 mph at the Spearfish airport;
with sustained velocities not much less than that (winds of 80 mph west of town in the same weather event).
The squadron was in the midst of its regular meeting while howling winds rattling the squadron building. At
one point C/CMSgt Connor Caneva stepped out onto the small porch to peer at the angry skies and noticed an
airplane on the ramp, 100 yards away, moving backwards toward a row of parked cars. The large, twin-engine
Cessna-421 had been parked across the direction of the wind. The force of the wind weather-vaned the plane,
putting the nose into the wind, and caused it to jump the wooden wheel chocks. The Cessna then began to be
blown backward. The forecast apparently under-predicted the storm’s intensity, and the plane wasn’t tied down.
Lt. Col. Buck DeWeese and C/CMSgt Rosby joined Cadet Caneva in running over to the scene. Their combined
efforts managed to bring the aircraft to a halt just short of the parked cars. They re-chocked the aircraft’s wheels
so it would not move, then the cadets also took some clothesline type cord and braided into a strong rope to help
secure the aircraft from the high wind. After the aircraft had been secured the airport manager was called and
the information passed along.
Though the Cessna-421 “rescue” was unexpected and not associated with a specific mission as such, the CAP
members were happy to participate in this “save,” that prevented airplane and automobile owners from untold
inconveniences and expenses.
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 COLOR GUARD AT STATE GOP CONVENTION: The squadron’s color guard presented the colors at the
banquet at the South Dakota GOP State Convention on 20 June. Held at Rapid City’s Rushmore Plaza Holiday
Inn, the convention was attended by over 400 delegates and guests including Gov. Daugaard and Sen. Thune.
The color guard was made up of C/2nd Lt Jared Doyle, C/CMSgt Connor Caneva, C/CMSgt Brad Blansett and
C/SSgt Austin Rauscher. Present but not in the color guard were; Capt. David Small, 1st Lt Tom Irvin, 2nd Lt
Angie Blansett, and C/Col William Small.

FROM FRONT TO REAR, AND LEFT TO RIGHT, ARE CADETS DOYLE, CANEVA, BLANSETT AND RAUSHER

 GRASSMEN TO THE RESCUE: The squadron sends a big "Thank You" to
Cadet Staff Sergeants Austin and Keyvin Rauscher for providing lawn and yard
service at the squadron this summer. A couple of senior members had been scratching
their heads trying to figure out how the lawn mysteriously got mowed. The Rauschers
quietly took the initiative to help keep our squadron looking good while the grass
grows fast - and it is much appreciated!


The blues worn by C/SrA Peter Iverson during his recent promotion ceremony are the same blues worn
by his father, Jon Iverson, during his ROTC tenure and as a junior officer in the USAF some years ago.
PIERRE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-038, PIERRE)
(Item and photos submitted by Lt. Col. Gatje)
 AMERICAN LEGION AND OAHE DAYS PARADE: The squadron participated in two parades recently in
the Capitol City. The first was on 20 June during Oahe Days, Pierre’s summer Community Celebration that
includes activities such as airboat rides, a car show, art show, mountain bike race, a Cardboard Boat Regatta and
numerous entertainment events as well as a large and well-attended parade. CAP was one of the first units in the
Oahe Days Parade. A large number of other groups followed. The second parade, the next day, was to honor the
veterans of the American Legion during their statewide convention held in Pierre. Participating in the parades
were senior members Lt. Col. Myra Christensen, Lt. Col. Tam Gatje, and 1st Lt. Jon Becker. Cadets included
C/TSgt Hannah Becker, Cadet Margot Pearson and C/Amn Brant Malfero. Major Lee Vaughan brought the
CAP squadron aircraft mockup from Philip for use in the parade. This was constructed earlier by members of
the Pierre and Philip Squadrons and has been used in parades and other activities a number of times.

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RUSHMORE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-031, RAPID CITY)
(Items submitted by Lt. Kuecker and Lt. Col. Hewett, photos by Lt. Col. Hewett)
 WELCOME ABOARD: Our squadron has a new senior member: John Duffield. We are pleased you have
chosen to join CAP and proud that you are serving in our squadron.
 FAMILY FUN NIGHT: The third time’s a charm. On Monday night, 30 June, the squadron held its fifth
Monday of the month Family Fun night at squadron headquarters on Ellsworth AFB. This event was scheduled
to happen twice before, but due to snow, wind, rain and the lovely South Dakota weather we have had to postpone it. Hamburgers and drinks were provided by the Squadron. Senior Members brought a side dish, and the
cadets brought a dessert. We had a great turnout and had a lot of fun. Dan Kuecker, a former CAP member who
now works for the Black Hills Red Cross, gave a quick overview of the Red Cross and how families can prepare
for a disaster including a handout with tips on how to prepare and what you might need in your emergency kit.
We had numerous door prizes including beach balls for the kids, some dive sticks, a gift card to Black Hills
Bagels, and other items for the adults. Unsurprisingly when dealing with teenagers there were no desserts left
over at the end of the night and very little food. It was a terrific evening and a good time was had by all. We
were all so busy having fun no photos taken! Huge thanks to everyone for the food and preparations. A special
thank you to the Voll family for the use of the grill, popcorn machine, and for cooking. Also, thank you to SM
Voll and Cadet Voll for their help in setting up and clean up.
SIOUX FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-050, SIOUX FALLS)
(Items submitted by Capt. Neil Schmid, photos by Capt. Karla West)


EASTERN SOUTH DAKOTA RED CROSS BANQUET: On Wednesday, 18

June, the squadron color guard presented the colors at the annual Eastern South
Dakota Red Cross Banquet held at the Ramkota Hotel in Sioux Falls. Newly joined
CAP Senior Member Jeff Veire is a Red Cross employee and arranged for our
participation. As usual the cadets look sharp and performed flawlessly posting and
retiring the colors. Our “Ambassadors of Professionalism” consistently garner many
favorable comments wherever they appear. They lead the way in raising public
awareness of the squadron in Sioux Falls and the surrounding communities, as well
as promoting SDWG and CAP.

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MARION SUMMER CELEBRATION: The SFCS Color Guard

proudly led the 2014 Marion Summer Celebration and All-School
Summer Reunion Parade on Saturday, 28 June. The event is an annual
reunion of all classes from the Marion schools and is a two day
celebration of fun, food, fireworks and activities for young and old. The
parade included members of the Fire Department with their equipment,
Legion Motor Cycle riders, floats from local businesses, and classic and
vintage cars. Our color guard, is gaining large notice in the community.
CAP Maj. Justin Johnson, a local resident, says the school
superintendent is impressed with our professionalism and is interested
in further community participation with CAP.
 WELCOME ABOARD: Our squadron has a new senior member: Jeff Veire. We are pleased you have
chosen to join CAP and proud that you are serving in our squadron.

HH

PROMOTIONS

HH

Senior Member Promotions
Congratulations to Brandon Caneva of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron on his advanced
promotion to the rank of Captain! On the strength of his recently acquired A&P license with
Inspection Authorization he has been promoted for having a mission related skill. Caneva is active in
the squadron as the Deputy Commander of Cadets and the Transportation Officer.
Congratulations to Tom Irvin of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron who, based on his mission
related skills as a Commercial Pilot, received advanced promotion to the rank of First Lieutenant!
Cadet Officer Promotions
Congratulations to Nichole Schneider of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on her promotion
to the rank of Cadet Captain and receipt of the milestone Amelia Earhart Award!

Congratulations to Jared Doyle of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron and to Devon Brown of
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on their promotion to the rank of Cadet Second Lieutenant and receipt
of the milestone Billy Mitchell Award! C/2nd Lt Doyle is the first new cadet officer at Lookout
Mountain Composite Squadron in the past three years.

Cadet Noncommissioned Officer Promotions
Congratulations to Jason Parry of the Crazy Horse Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank
of Cadet Chief Master Sergeant and receipt of the Goddard Award!

Congratulations to Jaden Roblewsky of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron Falls on his promotion to the
rank of Cadet Senior Master Sergeant and receipt of the General Jimmy Doolittle Award!
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Congratulations to Keyvin Rauscher of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron on his promotion to
the rank of Cadet Technical Sergeant and receipt of the Captain Eddie Rickenbacker Award!
Cadet Airman Promotions
Congratulations to Steven Diaconu of the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron, and to Peter Iverson of the
Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron on their promotion to the rank of Cadet Senior Airman and
receipt of the Mary Feik Award!

Congratulations to Lathen Norling of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank of
Cadet Airman First Class and receipt of the General Hap Arnold Award!

Congratulations to Brant Malfero of Pierre Composite Squadron, to Nathaniel Fleet of the Big Sioux
Composite Squadron, and to Christopher Schuppan of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on promotion
to the rank of Cadet Airman and receipt of the Curry Award!

HH

KUDOS

HH

Congratulations to Lt. Tom Irvin of the Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron who successfully
completed the Aerospace Education Program for Senior Members and in recognition thereof received
the Brigadier General Charles E. “Chuck” Yeager Aerospace Education Achievement Award!

A special thanks to SM Christy Voll, of Rushmore Composite Squadron, for the hours of time she has
spent at the Wing HQ office helping on various projects (Legislative Day, Wing Conference, etc.).
The Wing Administrator passes on her thanks to thank Capt. John Wallace and all the Squadron TO's
for all the work on getting the vans repaired from last year’s hail damage. It has taken a lot of effort to
get them all done and out of the shops.
Congratulations to C/Capt Silas Busch of Rushmore Composite Squadron who completed IS-100!

Congratulations to C/SSgt Jaden Petersen of Big Sioux Composite Squadron who completed IS-100
and IS-700!
Congratulations to C/Amn Christopher Schuppan of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron, and to C/Amn
Daniella Petersen and C/Amn Nathaniel Fleet of Big Sioux Composite Squadron, who completed their
General Emergency Services qualification.
MASS KUDOS: The Split SAREX this month resulted in a number of senior members and cadets enhancing
their Emergency Services credentials either by recertifying or earning new operations qualifications.
SD-001 – Lt. Col. Mark Huntington qualified as Liaison Officer, Mission Observer and recertified as a Mission
Staff Assistant
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SD-031 – Lt. Col. Dave Jeffries received Pilot Rating
SD-031 – C/MSgt Errol Kelly qualified as a Ground Team Member Levels 1, 2 and 3
SD-031 – Lt. Col Gary Hewett re-qualified as Check Pilot (Airplane, G-1000, Glider), Check Pilot Examiner
(Airplane, Glider, G1000), Glider Pilot, Instructor Pilot (Airplane, Glider), Instrument Pilot, Orientation Pilot
(AFROTC, Airplane, Glider), Tow Pilot, VFR Pilot, VFR Pilot (G1000)
SD-050 – C/Capt Samuel Huntington qualified as Ground Team Leader, Ground Team Member Levels 2 & 3
SD-050 – 1st Lt. Robert Hinkhouse qualified as Ground Team Member Levels 1, 2 & 3, and UDF Team
SD-050 – C/CMSgt Nicholas Nash qualified as Ground Team Member Levels 2 & 3
SD-050 – 1sr Lt. Karen Espeland qualified as Ground Team Member Level 3
SD-050 – 1st Lt. Tyler Calvin qualified as Mission Scanner
SD-050 – Capt. Joseph Oye qualified as Mission Staff Assistant
SD-058 – C/CMSgt Chris Dinnel qualified as Ground Team Member Levels 2 & 3, and UDF Team Member
SD-058 – C/2nd Lt Tyler Gross qualified as Ground Team Member Level 3, and UDF Team Member
SD-058 – C/SSgt Jaden Petersen qualified as Ground Team Member Level 3
SD-058 – C/SSgt Jaden Petersen qualified as Mission Radio Operator
SD-058 – C/Capt. Joshua Klosterman qualified as Mission Radio Operator and Mission Staff Assistant
SD-058 – Maj. Nicholas Gengler qualified as Mission Radio Operator
SD-063 – Lt. Col. Buck DeWeese qualified as a Glider Pilot

HH

MILITARY TRIBUTE

HH

THE DOOLITTLE RAIDERS
There were 80 Doolittle Raiders in April 1942, when they carried out
one of the most courageous and dangerous military operations in our
nation's history.
After Japan's sneak attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1942,
with the United States reeling, something dramatic was needed to
turn the war effort around.
Even though there were no friendly airfields close enough to Japan
for the United States to launch a retaliation raid, a daring plan was
devised. Sixteen B-25s were modified to take off from the deck of an
aircraft carrier. This had never before been tried -- sending such big, heavy bombers from a carrier.
The 16 five-man crews, under the command of Lt. Col. James Doolittle, who himself flew the lead plane off the
USS Hornet, could not return to the carrier. They would have to hit Japan and then hope to make it to China for
landing. But on the day of the raid, the Japanese military caught wind of the plan. The Raiders were told they
would have to take off from much farther out in the Pacific Ocean than they had counted on. They were told
that because of this they would not have enough fuel to make it to safety. And those men went anyway.
They bombed Tokyo, and then flew as far as they could. Four planes crash-landed; 11 more crews bailed out,
and three of the Raiders died. Eight more were captured; three were executed. Another died of starvation in a
Japanese prison camp. One crew made it to Russia.
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Of the 80 Raiders, 62 survived the war. As 2013 began, there were five living Raiders; then, in February, one
passed away at age 96. Now only four out of the original 80 survive: Dick Cole (Doolittle's co-pilot), Robert
Hite, Edward Saylor and David Thatcher. All are in their 90s.
Beginning in 1946, the surviving Raiders held a reunion each April, to commemorate the mission. The reunion
is in a different city each year. This year at Fort Walton Beach, Florida they decided that there are too few of
them for the public reunions to continue. The events in Fort Walton Beach marked the end. It has come full
circle; Florida’s nearby Eglin Field was where the Raiders trained in secrecy for the Tokyo mission. The men
have decided that after this final public reunion they will wait until a later date -- sometime this year -- to get
together once more, informally and in absolute privacy. That is when they will open a bottle of 1896 Hennessy
Very Special cognac to drink a final farewell toast to their fallen comrades. The year 1896 is not happenstance:
that was the year Jimmy Doolittle was born.
This is their 70th Anniversary photo.

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“THE SKYCHASER”
South Dakota Wing Electronic Newsletter for July 2014
Official Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force - Citizens Serving Communities: Above and Beyond
Publishers: Wing Commander Colonel John Seten / Wing Vice Commander Lieutenant Colonel Richard Larson
Editor: Major Bruce Kipp  Wing Public Affairs Officer  (605) 261-4507  paa.sdwg@gmail.com

Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SDWingCAP and Like us on Twitter at @SDWingCAP

WING TIPS
HOT NEWS: SOUTH DAKOTA WING WINS NCR SEARCH AND RESCUE MISSIONS AWARD: SDWG has
been selected as North Central Region winner of the Search and Rescue Missions Award. This marks the
second time in three years that South Dakota Wing has been awarded this high honor. North Central Region
commander, Colonel Robert Todd, stated that the award is well merited as the Wing has been both aggressive
and innovative in finding new missions for our aircraft and personnel. While SDWG is one of the smallest
wings in the nation we are in the top ten nationally in “per-capita” flight hours. The award will be presented to
SDWG commander Col. Seten at CAP’s National Convention to be held in Las Vegas from 14-16 August 2014.
 AERIAL WILDLIFE SURVEYS: SDWG flew aerial surveys of terrestrial wildlife on ten days in July in
support of the Department of Game, Fish & Parks and the South Dakota State University. GF&P surveyed deer,
goats, mountain lions, and elk while SDSU surveyed elk and bobcats. The surveys resulted in 14.2 flight hours
for SDSU and 12.7 flight hours for GF&P for a total of 26.9 hours flying over western South Dakota and the
Black Hills. The CAP pilot for all the flights was Lt. Col. Gary Hewett. He was accompanied by Mr. Brandon
Tycz from SDSU on the flights on the 2nd, 9th, 15th, 22nd, and 29th and by Ms. Paige Mueggenberg from GF&P
on the flights on the 3rd, 8th, 16th, 23rd and 28th.
 EXERCISE FALCON KEYNOTE 2014. SDWG continued to provide support to the South Dakota Air
National Guard by participating on three occasions as a target aircraft in SDANG Exercise Falcon Keynote
2014. The purpose of the exercise was to provide the114th Fighter Wing’s alert aircrews training in aerospace
control alert intercept procedures, a function of its Homeland Security mission. A CAP Cessna-172P aircraft,
based in Sioux Falls, acted as the target aircraft. The objective for the pilots of the F16s of the 175th Fighter
Squadron was to hone the skills of being able to quickly and safely intercept and evaluate a slow moving
aircraft that could pose a security risk or that may have inadvertently strayed into restricted airspace. SDWG is
pleased and proud to provide this cost effective support to SDANG by providing target aircraft for them to
1

practice air intercept techniques. CAP partners with the USAF helping to provide a total force approach to
readiness and enhanced national security.
 LOW-LEVEL ROUTE SURVEYS: Each year the South Dakota Air National Guard (SDANG) requests
South Dakota Wing conduct low-level route surveys (LLRS) of selected military air training routes and aerial
Military Operations Areas (MOA). These military air training
routes cover southeastern South Dakota, northwestern Iowa and
northeastern Nebraska leading to and from the O’Neill MOA in
northeastern Nebraska.
The purpose of these sorties is to search for uncharted antenna
towers and changes to charted towers, and noise sensitive areas
(stock pens and feedlots), areas to be avoided by SDANG
pilots. There are an amazing number of these between Sioux
City and Omaha. SDWG aircrews noted many on air training
routes. Updated charts provided by SDANG have helped
SDWG aircrews in eliminating duplicate photos of known
targets.
During the month of July, SDWG flew seven sorties for a total
of 18 flight hours that covered approximately 1739 nautical
miles. The budget calls for 6,000 miles with 67 flying hours.
At this point, we have completed 30% of the mission. The
amazing thing is that these flights occurred between 16-24 July.
There have been numerous flight cancellations due to unstable
weather and thunderstorms, including planned 700 mile sorties for completion of the O’Neill MOA. The goal is
to complete all low-level route surveys no later than 31 August.
SDWG aircrew members have been Capt. Matt Meert, Lt. Shannon Hofer, Lt.
Karen Espeland, Capt. Neil Schmid, Maj. Todd Epp, Maj. Nick Gengler, Col.
John Seten and Lt. Col. Rick Larson.
In the photo (l-r) Maj. Todd Epp, Maj. Nick Gengler and Capt. Neil Schmidt fly
an LLRS on 23 July aboard a Sioux Falls-based CAP Cessna-182T.
When SDWG flies a LLRS, a command post is set up for C3 support for the aircraft. SDWG Lt. Col. Larson
serves as Incident Commander. Capt. Neil Schmid of the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron is Project Officer
and Lead Planner for SDWG LLRS missions. He submitted this report.
 ELLSWORTH AFB'S OPEN HOUSE: SDWG has been invited to participate in Ellsworth AFB's open
house on Saturday 16 August. Capt. Josh Hall is in charge of the operation which includes setting up a table/
canopy, handing out recruiting materials and selling CAP water bottles. We may do an ELT demo. We hope to
have one of our Cessna-182, plugged into a power unit for show and tell. If not, then just a static display.
 CAP SUPPORTS HAYWARD AIR RALLY: The Rapid City Regional Airport held an open house 26 July
to showcase general aviation in the Black Hills. The event coincided with the staging of some 30 aircraft taking
part in the Hayward Air Rally cross-country competition, the longest continually-held proficiency flying event
in North America. Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron members employed their culinary skills cooking a
pancake breakfast and hamburger lunch for the participants and attendees. Members of Rushmore Composite
Squadron provided setup and site security for the event putting up safety cones and barrier tape to help with
2

crowd control in the aircraft static display area. Lt. Col. Gary Hewett stood by CAP’s Cessna-182 with G1000
"glass" cockpit to answer questions. Col. Mike Beason directed and supervised the CAP contingent.

CAP AIRCRAFT ON STATIC DISPLAY AT RAPID CITY REGIONAL AIRPORT



WWII CAP CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL UPDATE: A CGM is to be awarded collectively to CAP

members in recognition of their service and exemplary record during the WWII. These unpaid volunteer civilian
members of CAP used their own aircraft to perform a myriad of essential tasks for the military and the Nation,
logging more than 500,000 flying hours, sinking two enemy subs, and saving hundreds of crash victims during
World War II.
• The U.S. Mint, with CAP’s assistance, is working on several designs. Once these are complete the best design
will be selected. After that, the gold CGM medal and bronze replicas will be struck.
• Congress, the White House and CAP will agree on an award ceremony date. A formal CGM award ceremony
is envisioned for early 2015 in Washington, in the Rotunda of the Capitol with a special presentation ceremony
later that day for veterans/families receiving the bronze replica medals. Veterans/families of veterans (who have
already passed) not able to travel to Washington can receive replica medals in their home state at a later date.
The gold medal will go to the Smithsonian Institution where it will be available for display and research.
To receive a replica medal a CAP veteran (or families of those who've passed) must be listed and validated as
having been in CAP during WWII. List new names at http://capmembers.com/cap_national_hq/goldmedal/ and
the link “Add Gold Medal Candidate”. All entries must contain current contact information for either the
veteran/member or their family.
 GROUP TO RECREATE FIRST U.S. COMBAT AIRFIELD: On March 9, 1916, the U.S. was invaded by
forces under the command of the Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa. Villa and his troops attacked civilians
and the military post in the small border town of Columbus, New Mexico.
Eighteen Americans were killed before the attackers were turned back. In
response, President Woodrow Wilson ordered the American military
“Punitive Expedition” to cross into Mexico to destroy Villa and his
fighting forces. Accompanying the U.S. ground forces was a small
detachment of U.S. Army airplanes which were based at a landing field
outside of Columbus. This deployment of the First Aero Squadron, flying
Curtiss “Jenny” biplanes, was the first use of American military aircraft in
a combat campaign. Their Columbus-based operation was, in effect, the
birth of the U.S. Air Force. The First Aero Squadron Foundation plans to
recreate the "Birthplace of American Airpower" by building a replica of
the original military flight line on the edge of Columbus, N.M. In 2007, a group of aviation enthusiasts met to
discuss how to protect the site of the original aerodrome where the First Aero Squadron was based in 1916/17.
In 2008, the group formed the First Aero Squadron Foundation (FASF) to secure, preserve and restore the
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historic aerodrome. The aerodrome will be reconstructed along with a museum to house a selection of early
World War I and pre-World War II aircraft. FASF feels it is important for everyone to know the history of our
nation’s air force that began in a tiny town in southern New Mexico. The painting, by aviation artist Peter R.
Westacott, is titled “Cradle of American Air Power”.
Source: News of the Force, 10 July 2014. http:newsofthe force.org, and, http://firstaerosquadron.com/, accessed 10 July 2014.

STAFF NOTES
WING COMMANDER
Col. John Seten, CAP

 I’m pleased to inform you of Sharon Moad’s promotion to Major. She has worked tirelessly for SDWG
through the years having served as squadron commander for the Crazy Horse Composite Squadron and she has
worked equally hard at the DDR program within the wing. Sharon brings a tremendous amount of firefighting
experience to the table which enhances her ability to train our members in the Incident Command System. I’m
confident Maj. Moad will continue to be a great asset to SDWG and to CAP.
 I am happy to announce that Capt. Sylvia Small has been assigned as the Wing Finance Officer. She has
an extensive background in accounting and will serve the position well.
 I’m also happy to announce that Col. Mike Beason has been assigned as the Wing Inspector General.
As a former wing commander, He will bring vast knowledge and experience to the position. I would also like
to thank Col. Beason for his years as Wing Finance Officer. Col Beason served in that position well and earned
the National Finance Officer of the Year award in 2012. I would like to thank both of them for stepping
forward and helping out with these very important staff positions.

WING VICE COMMANDER
Lt. Col. Richard Larson, CAP
 During the afternoon of 5 July I was interviewed by KELO radio’s Jon Michaels for his “Forum” public
affairs show. The topics discussed were SDWGs recent relief efforts with photo missions, Red Cross assistance,
Butte County SAR, and spotlighting Emergency Services. I also mentioned our USAF evaluated SAREX. The
show aired on Sunday morning, 6 July, on six local AM/FM radio stations. The podcast can be listened to at:
http://kelo.com/podcasts/jon-michaels-forum/889/forum-week-1896-civil-air-patrol-in-sioux-falls/

WING ADMINISTRATOR
Ms. Rachel Kuecker
 I’m looking for a small (dorm size) refrigerator for the Wing HQ office. If anyone has one for sale or is
willing to donate one to Wing HQ please contact me.
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 I was on vacation for two weeks in July and I am still getting thru my backlog. If there is something that
someone is missing - please follow up with me. It may have been overlooked in my mile high stack.

WING DIRECTOR OF CADET PROGRAMS
Lt. Col. Linda Buechler, CAP

 National Character Day is an opportunity for cadets to learn why moral character will play a part in
shaping their future, to help cadets develop a personal code of honor, and to re-commit themselves to the drugfree ethic. This year National Character day will be 26-28 September with members arriving by Friday evening.
National Character Day is on Saturday, and departure is on Sunday morning. The special guest speaker is Lt.
Col. Mark Huntington with Col. John Seten planning to speak also if plans allow.
Cost is $30 for food for the weekend. Location is the Community Bible Church in Pierre. Bring sleeping bags,
towels, wash cloths, toiletries, BDU's and civilian clothing. There is $1000 to help defray fuel expenses and
supplies. Point of contact is Lt Col Linda Buechler. 605-212-7032 or ltclindab@aol.com

WING DIRECTOR OF AEROSPACE EDUCATION
Lt. Col. Rodney “Buck” DeWeese, CAP

 Planning is in the final stages for a combined SDWG Aerospace Education/Emergency Services event in
conjunction with the South Dakota Air National Guard Museum’s open house to be held 7-10 August in Pierre.
Currently we envision a static display of a CAP C-182T aircraft, an open house display table, ground school for
the “fly-a-teacher” (TOPS) program, radio-controlled model aircraft flights, model rocketry activity, cadet orides, and TOPS flights. It will be a big deal event and maximum turnout of seniors and cadets is requested.
Aerospace Education funds are available for group transportation round trip by van. I know David Small is
having some ground search team training on Thursday for whoever wants to "double up" on weekend events.
Because we all will be camping at Farm Island in Pierre and providing meals, it is very important we hear from
those planning on coming. We expect to check into the campground after 1700 on Wednesday, 6 August.
Dinner that night will not be provided so either bring your own or eat before checking in.
Thursday will be cadet led emergency services training - a chance to get your ground team qualifications
updated. Friday and Saturday will have lots of AE activities and some ES training. Cadets; if you are really
motivated to get your rocketry badge - which allows you to wear a cool metal badge on your blues - we should
be able to get this accomplish it this weekend. We will also have a chance to learn about aviation principles,
build balsa wood, rubber band powered airplanes, fly remote controlled airplanes and get some o-flights.
Right now we don’t have activities for Sunday, 10 August so we can leave after the Cadet Advisory Council
meeting is over, around 1800 Saturday evening. If cadets would like to spend Saturday night at the camp ground
that may be a possibility - let me know if you would like to do so.
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If you have any questions please call Maj. David Small at (605) 431-2604 or e-mail at abennerigus@gmail.com

SQUADRON HIGHLIGHTS
BIG SIOUX COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-058, BROOKINGS)
(Item submitted by Maj. Gengler)
 OSHKOSH B’GOSH: C/1st Lt Sullivan Busch and C/CMSgt Chris Dinnel are off to the National Cadet
Special Activity (Blue Beret) at the Experimental Aircraft Association’s gigantic air show “AirVenture 2014” in
Oshkosh, WI, from 21 July to 4 August. Participants at National Blue Beret have the chance to provide support
to one of the largest, most prestigious air shows in the world. Each participant works in several areas including
the flight line and exhibits. Training includes techniques of aircraft marshaling and electronic direction finding.
CRAZY HORSE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-068, CUSTER)
(Items submitted by 1st Lt. K. Bierwirth, photo by SM Peter Bierwirth)
 The squadron participated in the Patriots parade in Custer
on the 4th of July. This annual event honors Custer’s active/veteran
military members and emergency services personnel. Our color
guard led the parade and later we assisted with the Flag-Raising
Ceremony at the 5th Street Flagpole. Further, we helped raise the
flag at the historic 1881 Courthouse Museum. Squadron
Commander Lt. Kris Bierwirth was a member of the July 4th
activities board.
FRONT C/CMSGT JASON PARRY AND C/TSGT THOMAS DILLON. BACK LT. KRIS BIERWIRTH AND LT. VICKI BIERWIRTH



Lt. James Dillon and Capt. Richard Geeting did a presentation on the Civil Air Patrol, South Dakota
Wing and our squadron at the meeting of the Fall River County Commissioners.
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-063, SPEARFISH)
(Items and photos submitted by Maj. Small)
 INDEPENDENCE DAY AT MOUNT RUSHMORE: On 3 July, ten
seniors and cadets from the Lookout Mountain and Rushmore Composite
Squadrons visited Mount Rushmore. The Air Force Academy band, the
“Falconaires” performed patriotic and other music at Mount Rushmore's
amphitheater. The weather was perfect and the crowd was enthusiastic. During
a break in the music a distinguished multi-service swearing in ceremony was
held. A group of over 50 applicants to the U.S. armed forces filed out in two
columns in front of the amphitheater. After the four service recruiters
present (Army, Navy, Marines, and Air Force) formally reported that their
candidates were "present and accounted for” the Oath of Enlistment was given
by all and received by Col. Kevin Kennedy commander of the 28th Bomb
Wing, at Ellsworth AFB. Lt. Gen. Michelle Johnson, Superintendent of the Air
Force Academy, gave a brief speech highlighting the freedom that we have in
the United States and pointing out that it came at a cost.

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Attending from the Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron in Spearfish were Lt. Col. William Collister, 1st Lt.
Tom Irvin, Maj. Sylvia Small, Maj. David Small and cadets C/AB Katie Spruill, C/2nd Lt Jared Doyle and
C/SrA Peter Iverson. From Rushmore Composite Squadron were Lt. Col. Dave and Maj. Joyce Jeffries and
C/Amn Nicholas Kochutin.
 On 26 July, squadron members provided support to the Rapid City Regional Airport open house. The
event showcased general aviation in the Black Hills and coincided with the staging of approximately 30 aircraft
participating in the Hayward Air Rally cross-country competition. Personnel who took part were: Seniors Collister, DeWeese, Dettman, Caneva, Hopewell, and D. Small, Jr. Cadets - Blansett, Caneva, A. Rauscher, K.
Rauscher, Spruill and Small.
PIERRE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-038, PIERRE)
(Items/photos submitted by Lt. Col. Gatje)
 PIERRE CADET ATTENDS MANKATO FLIGHT ACADEMY:
C/TSgt Hannah Becker recently attended the North Central Region Joint
Flight Academy along with cadets from Minnesota, Missouri, California
and Florida Wings. The academy was held near Mankato, MN from 1119 July. Each cadet received about 10 hours of flight time getting them
well started on their course to being pilots licensed by the FAA. During
the academy cadets experienced two sessions of flying each day and two
sessions of ground school. Both will be needed for the FAA written and
flying tests. Volunteer certified flight instructors provided the
knowledge the cadets will need.
Cadet Becker said the high points of the academy were (especially) the
flying and talking to other cadets about flying and “stuff”. On the low
end she thought the weather days were worst. Hurry up and wait for
good weather. Each of the ten cadets at the powered flight academy
completed their supervised solo and those in the glider program also
completed their supervised solo with two completing their regular solo.
When not actively flying or attending ground school, the cadets received a briefing and tour from a Mayo Clinic
“Mayo One” helicopter pilot who described their day-to-day operation. They also had the opportunity to tour a
Dassault Falcon 20 and Dassault Falcon 50 (three-engine) aircraft operated by North Star Aviation of Mankato.
IN THE PHOTO: C/TSGT HANNAH BECKER AT THE CONTROLS DURING FLIGHT TRAINING AT THE JOINT FLIGHT ACADEMY

 PIERRE MEMBERS ARE ALL WET!: Several senior and cadet members
recently participated in a six-hour raft trip down the Niobrara River. Squadron
members Lt. Col. Myra Christensen, Lt. Jon Becker, C/TSgt Hannah Becker,
C/Amn Brant Malfero, Cadet Margot Pearson, the parent of one of the cadets and
two former cadets floated down the Niobrara River from Berry Bridge to Stan’s
Landing. All was not just fun and frolic as they used the trip to practice CAP
related subjects. For example, before leaving Pierre everyone received a safety
briefing on the possible hazards of the trip. This included water hazards, sun,
heat, hot weather first aid and hydration. Preparing to leave Pierre and en route to
the river they practiced map reading and determining their current location. All
the “floaters” reported that the trip was great fun and wanted to do it again in the
future. It was a very relaxing trip without email or cell phones to worry about. It
was suggested that other units that might be interested. Costs will depend on the
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available vendors next year. If your squadron is interested in making this trip next year, contact Lt. Col.
Christensen to make your desire known. In the photo, (L-R) Cadets Hannah Becker, Brant Malfero and Margot
Pearson cool off under a waterfall on the Niobrara River raft trip.
RUSHMORE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-031, RAPID CITY)
(Item submitted by Maj. Kipp)
 On 26 July, squadron members provided support to the Rapid City Regional Airport open house. The
event showcased general aviation in the Black Hills and coincided with the staging of approximately 30 aircraft
participating in the Hayward Air Rally cross-country competition. Personnel who took part were: Seniors Beason, Speirs, Hewett, Larson, the Dills, Hack and Voll. Cadets - Kochutin, Kelly, L. Woodard, T. Woodard,
Voll and Weller.
SIOUX FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-050, SIOUX FALLS)
(Item and photo submitted by Lt. Col. Lair)
 OSHKOSH B’GOSH: C/Maj Brandon West and C/Capt Nicole Schneider are off to the National Cadet
Special Activity (Blue Beret) at the Experimental Aircraft Association’s gigantic air show “AirVenture 2014” in
Oshkosh, WI., from 21 July to 4 August. Participants at National Blue Beret have the chance to provide support
to one of the largest, most prestigious air shows in the world. Each participant works in several areas including
the flight line and exhibits. Training includes techniques of aircraft marshaling and electronic direction finding.
 CADET ORIENTATION RIDES: On 5 July,
Pilot-in-Command Lt. Col. Greg Lair (center) took two
cadets for an orientation ride on a CAP Cessna-172P.
On the first sortie C/A1C Julia Lair was at the controls
for a flight from Sioux Falls Regional Airport to the
municipal airport at Madison. Cadet Lair (left) enjoyed
her second powered flight. A natural pilot, she easily
navigated to Madison. She looks forward to studying
Aeronautical Engineering and hopes to become a USAF
Fighter Pilot. On the second sortie C/SRA Ivan Kreger
(right) was at the controls enjoying his fourth powered
flight as he flew from Madison Municipal Airport back
to Sioux Falls Regional Airport. He was smoothly
demonstrated skills he learned on previous orientation
flights. He hopes to continue flight training and in the
future intends to study meteorology. Both cadets assisted with the pre-flight activities putting their CAP Aircraft
Ground Handling skills to work. The weather was perfect, and the cadets had a great time.

HH

PROMOTIONS

HH

Senior Member Promotions
Congratulations to David Small, Jr. of the Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron and to Sharon
Moad of Crazy Horse Composite Squadron on their well-deserved promotion to the rank of Major!

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Cadet Noncommissioned Officer Promotions
Congratulations to Blake Hayden and Josiah Huntington, both of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron,
and to Ryan Harris of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron on their promotion to their rank of
Cadet Master Sergeant and receipt of the Lindbergh Award!

Congratulations to Austin Rauscher of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron, and to Jaden Petersen
of the Big Sioux Composite Squadron on their promotion to the rank of Cadet Technical Sergeant and
receipt of the Captain Eddie Rickenbacker Award!

Congratulations to Zebadiah Nelson of Big Sioux Composite Squadron and to Steven Diaconu of
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on promotion to the rank of Cadet Staff Sergeant and receipt of the
Wright Brothers Award!

Cadet Airman Promotions
Congratulations to Julia Lair of the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on her promotion to the rank of
Cadet Senior Airman and receipt of the Mary Feik Award!

Congratulations to Keith Warne of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron, and to Daniella Petersen of the
Big Sioux Composite Squadron on their promotion to the rank of Cadet Airman First Class and receipt
of the General Hap Arnold Award!

HH

KUDOS

HH

Congratulations to 1st Lt. Tom Irvin of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron who completed the
requirements of the Aerospace Education Program for Senior Members and in recognition thereof he
received the Charles E. “Chuck” Yeager Aerospace Education Achievement Award!

Congratulations to Maj. Sharon Moad of Crazy Horse Composite Squadron who completed Level III
(Management) of the Senior Member Professional Development Program and in recognition thereof
received the Grover C. Loening Award!

Congratulations to C/Major Silas Busch of Rushmore Composite Squadron on his appointment as the
squadron’s Cadet Operations Officer.
Congratulations to C/1LT Tyler Gross of Big Sioux Composite Squadron on his appointment as the
squadron’s Cadet Administrative Officer!
Kudos to Col. Mary Donley for arranging for the Brookings van to get repaired while at Encampment!
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HH

2014 JOINT DAKOTA ENCAMPMENT

HH

Each year the South and North Dakota Wings hold a joint summer encampment for their
cadets. This year North Dakota Wing hosted the encampment from 12-20 July at Camp
Grafton near Devil’s Lake, ND. Each encampment has a theme; for 2014 the theme was
cadet leadership. At the encampment, senior ranking cadets brought the skills they have
learned at squadron, wing, regional, and national level activities to teach others how to be
better leaders. Cadets learn from other cadets and receive tutorage and guidance from
their senior officers. This encampment taught leadership, teamwork, honor, courage, and
determination as well as military customs and courtesies and drill and ceremonies. There
were obstacle courses to run, repelling towers to traverse, leadership classes, physical fitness, and moral
leadership guidance. In addition, the cadets got a taste of military life by living in open bay barracks and eating
in a military dining facility. Some of the highlights of the encampment were the cadets flying in a UH-60
Blackhawk helicopter courtesy of the North Dakota Army Guard, and the use of the Guard’s high-tech small
arms marksmanship simulator and Humvee operational trainer.

CAMP GRAFTON, ND, SITE OF THE 2014 JOINT DAKOTA CADET LEADERSHIP ENCAMPMENT

NORTH DAKOTA AND SOUTH DAKOTA WINGS’ PARTICIPANTS AT THE 2014 JDCLE

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“THE SKYCHASER”
South Dakota Wing Electronic Newsletter for August 2014
Official Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force - Citizens Serving Communities: Above and Beyond
Publishers: Wing Commander Colonel John Seten / Wing Vice Commander Lieutenant Colonel Richard Larson
Editor: Major Bruce Kipp  Wing Public Affairs Officer  (605) 261-4507  paa.sdwg@gmail.com

Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SDWingCAP and Like us on Twitter at @SDWingCAP

WING TIPS
 WING CALENDAR OF EVENTS: SDWG members like to know what’s happening in the wing in any
given month. Please list your squadron’s upcoming events on the calendar on the Wing Website homepage.
 REMINDER: The SDWG exhibit at the South Dakota Air National Guard Museum in Pierre is still up
and will remain so until about 3 October. If you happen to be heading to or through Pierre stop in at the
museum and check out our exhibit. It’s well worth the visit.
 AUGUST SEARCH AND RESCUE EXERCISE: Dismal weather conditions on 22-23 August bedeviled
South Dakota Wing’s Search and Rescue Exercise (SAREX). Originally to be held at the Pierre Composite
Squadron, the weather outlook for the weekend there was so poor that it was decided to rebase the SAREX
between Rushmore Composite Squadron and Sioux Falls Composite Squadron.
An Incident Command Post was set up at both locations to conduct the training
activities. Over the course of the two days, nine mission air sorties were flown.
The sorties practiced aerial search techniques for a grid, route, and creeping line
search. The object of these searches was a simulated small aircraft’s emergency
locator transmitter (ELT). Once the search aircraft’s on-board sensors detected
the ELT it flew to the location and orbited. At the same time the search aircraft
were airborne, ground search teams were sent to the general search area and used
hand-held radio-direction finding equipment to search for the ELT. After a search
aircraft locked on to an ELT signal it communicated with the ground team to
direct them to the simulated crash site to render aid and assistance. In addition to
the aircrews and the ground search teams a number of personnel were busy at the
two Incident Command Posts providing support in command and control,
communications, logistics, public affairs, and general administration. *SDWG
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demonstrated its capability to quickly adapt to changing conditions on short notice and conducted effective
training for the over 40 personnel involved. In the photo, taken by Lt. Ron Lenz, Col. Mike Beason turns onto
final approach to the Rapid City Airport during the SAREX.
 AERIAL WILDLIFE SURVEYS: SDWG flew aerial
surveys of terrestrial wildlife on five days in August in
support of the Department of Game, Fish & Parks and the
South Dakota State University. GF&P surveyed deer, goats,
mountain lions, and elk while SDSU surveyed elk and
bobcats. The surveys resulted in 9.9 flight hours for GF&P
and 8.9 flight hours for SDSU and for a total of 18.8 hours
flying over western South Dakota and the Black Hills. The
CAP pilot on the 4th,14th and 27th was Lt. Col. Gary Hewett.
He was accompanied by Ms. Paige Mueggenberg of GF&P.
The pilot on the 12th and 25th was Maj. Craig Goodrich. He
was accompanied by Mr. Brandon Tycz from SDSU.
 LOW-LEVEL ROUTE SURVEYS: Each year the South Dakota Air National Guard’s 114th Fighter Wing
requests South Dakota Wing conduct Low Level-Level Route Surveys (LLRS) of military air training routes
(MTR) and aerial Military Operations Areas (MOA). These MTRs cover southeastern South Dakota, northwest
Iowa, and northeast Nebraska leading to/from the O’Neill MOA in northeast Nebraska. Sioux Falls’ Joe Foss
Field is an Air Combat Command (ACC) F-16 base and this airspace is used by active and reserve ACC units.
The purpose of these surveys is to ensure obstruction clearance at
the minimum altitude usable for training. The CAP aircrews note
potential hazards and obstacles not listed on current charts, assess
possible air traffic conflicts from public use airports, airways and
airstrips, and assess other potential flight safety hazards. In addition,
they note the locations of noise sensitive areas such as stock pens
and feedlots.
During the month of August, SDWG flew 12 sorties for a total of
35.6 flight hours that covered approximately 3,886 nautical miles.
For 2014 SDWG flew a total of 19 LLRS sorties for just under 53
hours of flight time that covered 6,051 nautical miles. The activity involved two Cessna-172 and two Cessna182 aircraft. The aircrews were comprised of 18 members from Sioux Falls, Brookings, Pierre and Rapid City.
SDWG’s unique uses for its aircraft put it in the Top 20 wings in the continental U.S. for aircraft utilization.
 When SDWG flies a LLRS, a command post is set up to support the aircraft. SDWG Lt. Col. Larson
serves as Incident Commander. Capt. Neil Schmid of the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron is Project Officer
and Lead Planner for SDWG’s LLRS missions. Lt. Scott Kuznicki was an aircrew member during the LLRS
sorties flown in July. His name was inadvertently omitted from the July Skychaser article.
 NATIONAL BLUE BERET – OSHKOSH, WI: Imagine an air show with over 500,000 visitors and 10,000
aircraft. This is National Blue Beret (NBB), a two week long experience like no other that CAP offers every
year in conjunction with the Experimental Aircraft Association’s (EAA) “AirVenture” airshow in Oshkosh, WI.
This year, four cadets had the honor of representing South Dakota Wing. Our NBB cadets were First Lieutenant
Sullivan Busch and Chief Master Sergeant Christopher Dinnel, of Big Sioux Composite Squadron in Brookings,
and Captain Nicole Schneider and Major Brandon West, of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron. As a result of
their participation the cadets are authorized to wear the coveted blue beret with its prized St. Alban’s pin.
2

The most important mission of the NBB program is to assist the
EAA with flight line operations. Cadets are posted along
taxiways during the operational hours of the air show directing
pilots to their destinations. The second mission is crowd control
at the ultra-light and military aircraft areas. The third mission is
emergency services - locating lost or overdue aircraft by
tracking its emergency locator beacon (ELT). Cadets also staff
two station towers to observe aircraft landing on each runway
to help keep track of which aircraft are on the ground.
NBB Operations are based out of “the compound,” as it is
called. This compound includes a hangar for sleeping, an open field for formations, a communications building
and, most important to every teenage cadet, a mess hall. The compound is run entirely by CAP personnel. Daily
responsibilities include everything from kitchen duty to cleaning bathrooms and doing laundry for the 140
cadets and 42 senior members. Article from information and photos by Capt. Karla West, Sioux Falls Composite Squadron

 AEROSPACE EDUCATION - EMERGENCY SERVICES WORKSHOP IN PIERRE: Twenty eight SDWG
members took part in a joint Aerospace Education (AE) – Emergency Services (ES) workshop held in Pierre
from Thursday, 7 August to Saturday, 9 August.
Maj. David Small supervised nine cadets in CAP’s Model Rocketry Program at the Pierre airport. Four cadets,
C/TSgt Austin Rauscher, C/Amn Nick Kochutin, C/2nd Lt Jared Doyle and C/MSgt Josiah Huntington,
completed all three rocketry phases to earn the coveted CAP rocketry badge. The rockets were launched near
the airport on Saturday with a single stage rocket constructed and flown by C/MSgt Josiah Huntington reaching
a measured altitude of 383.98 feet.
C/1st Lt Sullivan Busch, under supervision of Wing Director of Operations Maj. Nick Gengler, led 16 Cadets
and one Senior Member in a field training exercise focused on the skills employed by CAP ground search and
rescue teams. Search and rescue teams were formed and deployed for realistic training scenarios.
We had special guests fly in from the North Dakota Wing in a FLIR-equipped CAP Cessna-182. The Forward
Looking Infrared Radar is excellent for locating the heat signature of individuals at night or in heavy cover.
NDWG pilots Capt. Dan Villas and Lt. Graham Frost and FLIR operator Capt. Daryl Billick set up a static
display of the FLIR Cessna-182 at the Pierre airport and several cadets got to operate the sensors.
3

On Friday and Saturday Capt. Gary Dettman taught the intricacies of flight fundamentals and control to a group
of eight cadets. Utilizing STEM kits sent by CAP National HQ the group built rubber band powered balsa wood
aircraft and tested changing various aspects of flight dynamics and flight configurations. Capt. Dettman also
supervised the cadets as they assembled and, after training on a remote control aircraft simulator, flew a remote
controlled powered glider with a six foot wingspan. The model operated at a range of nearly a quarter mile and
performed loops and other acrobatic maneuvers.
Also on Friday, cadets and seniors toured the South Dakota National Guard Museum where Wing Historian
Maj. Todd Epp had just opened the new SDWG exhibit. 17 Cadets, 11 Senior Members and over 60 local
children, parents and teachers attended the Open House at the museum. CAP provided tables for recruiting,
airplane building, model rocketry and parachuting.
17 cadets pitched tents by the shelter at Farm Island State Recreation Area. A special thanks to Lt. Col. Myra
Christiansen and Capt. Sylvia Small for providing three great meals per day. Lt. Col. DeWeese showed grill
skills and Col. Mary Donley made sure everything ran smoothly. [Maj. David Small and Lt. Col. Buck
DeWeese contributed to this article]

PHOTO 1

PHOTO 2

PHOTO 3
PHOTO 4
PHOTO CAPTIONS:
1 - MODEL ROCKETRY BADGE RECIPIENTS: CADETS JOSIAH HUNTINGTON, JARED DOYLE, AUSTIN RAUSCHER, NICK KOCHUTIN
2 - GROUND SEARCH AND RESCUE TEAM TRAINING
3 - FLIR-EQUIPPED CESSNA-182 STATIC DISPLAY
4 - BALSA WOOD AND POWERED GLIDER PILOTS


AIR FORCE ACADEMY CREATES CYBERSECURITY MAJOR: [Edited] The US Air Force Academy in

Colorado Springs, Colo., has created an academic major focused on cybersecurity. The new major, dubbed
“Computer Network Security”, is designed to help cadets understand what the cyberspace domain is and how
the Air Force will establish cyberspace superiority in future conflicts. The computer network security track will
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teach cadets how to reverse engineer software to analyze viruses and other malware to figure out how it
operates. Other classes deal with computer forensics, strategy, political science, and law.
Source: Air Force Magazine Online for Thursday, 14 august 2014.

 BIRDBATH: A KC-135 Stratotanker taxis through the wash rack, also known as the “bird bath”, after a
mission on 18 August 2014. The KC-135 is assigned to the Tennessee Air National Guard's 134th Air Refueling
Wing. (Air National Guard photo by TSgt. Jonathan Young).
Source: Air Force Magazine Online for Monday, 25 August 2014.

STAFF NOTES

WING COMMANDER
Col. John Seten, CAP

LET’S FLY ALL AIRCRAFT: This September 11th marks the Thirteenth Anniversary of the terrorist attacks on

the north and south towers of the World Trade Center in lower Manhattan, on the Pentagon in Washington, DC
and the tragic event near Shanksville, Pennsylvania. To commemorate the anniversary I challenge all SDWG
pilots to fly all six of our aircraft on 11 September. Let our red, white and blue aircraft be seen in the skies all
over South Dakota. When South Dakotans hear our aircraft’s motor they will look up and see our national
colors in the sky above them.
If you were going to do some proficiency flying, choose to do it on the 11th. Take other members, particularly
new members, up with you. Wear your flight suits and tell people the story of CAP. I also ask that you take
aloft with you an American flag, any American flag. The flag is a symbol of our freedom and our resolve as
5

Americans. Lastly, take photos of those participating in our 9/11 flights, both in the air and on the ground for
display at wing conference. We’ll likely still have some O-Flight money available so we can fly cadets when
they get out of school.
Together, let's honor those that died on September 11th and those that have died in our War on Terror by flying
our aircraft and demonstrating what it is to be free.

WING ADMINISTRATOR
Ms. Rachel Kuecker

END OF THE FISCAL YEAR: October 1st marks the beginning of the new Fiscal Year and each Squadron has

paperwork that is required to be turned in for FY14. Please try to get that done and submitted on time. Please
let Capt. Sylvia Small or me know if you have any questions.

WING CHIEF OF STAFF
Maj. David Small, Jr.

SD 2014 ANNUAL AVIATION HALL OF FAME EVENT: On Saturday, 6 September, the South Dakota FAA

Safety Team will hold a Hall of Fame Event at Black Hills Aero at Black Hills Airport/Clyde Ice Field in
Spearfish. The theme of the event is “Critical Thinking at Critical Moments”. The day will start with a Sunrise
Breakfast at 0700 followed by activities throughout the day. It will be a great time to meet fellow aviators from
all backgrounds. Come and attend this all-day venture. Coincidentally, Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron
is having an open house at the same location at the same time.

WING HISTORIAN
Maj. Todd Epp, CAP

SDWG EXHIBIT AT SDNG MUSEUM: On 8 August, the SDWG exhibit opened at the South Dakota National

Guard Museum in Pierre. The exhibit will probably run through October or so.
The exhibit celebrates the SDWG/SDNG assistance to each other in the accomplishment of their missions. For
example, the SDWG performs low level route surveys for the SDANG; the SDANG has allowed the SDWG to
use its mobile emergency operations center for SAREXs and communications training.
The exhibit features current and decommissioned CAP uniforms such as the "Smurf Suit," the Corporate Dress
Uniform, current and past flight jackets and a battle dress uniform. It also includes current and past equipment
such as an aircraft radio, a ground radio, a GPS unit and pilot kneeboard. It also includes CAP insignia, the
SDWG Roundup magazines, various awards, patches, a chart with LLRS routes highlighted, etc. A PowerPoint
presentation showcases photos of SDWG and SDNG members and activities. All of the items are identified
6

with descriptions, with the history of the CAP, cooperation between the SDWG and the SDNG and other
notable and interesting facts about the SDWG and CAP and SDNG on placards. The SDWG items are in two
large cases, three mannequins, and two easels.
Thank you to SDNG Maj. Anthony Deiss for finding photos of Major General Tim Reisch at some of our joint
events such as Falcon Keynote. Thanks to Capt. Jerry Foy, Capt. Jason Erickson, Capt. Jerry Gabert and Capt.
Karla West in helping locate items for display; to Lt. Col. Myra Christensen for loaning her "Smurf Suit"; to the
late Lt. Col. Dick Forman and his family for the donation of items to the SFCS that are on loan at the exhibit; to
Lt. David Stockinger for providing outstanding photos for the PowerPoint presentation and to Capt. Foy and Lt.
Col. Rick Larson for donating photos of them in the Guard and CAP activities for the PowerPoint. Also, thanks
to Maj. David Small for taking photos of the exhibit. SDNG Museum Director Sonja Johnson made the exhibit
possible through her enthusiasm, hard work and support.
I now begin work on the SDWG/CAP exhibit at the SD Air and Space Museum at Ellsworth AFB.

LEFT: MS. SONJA JOHNSON, DIRECTOR OF THE S.D. NATIONAL GUARD MUSEUM, POSES IN FRONT OF THE MUSEUM
RIGHT: MAJ. TODD EPP, SDWG HISTORIAN, AND MS. SONJA JOHNSON, DIRECTOR OF THE S.D. NATIONAL GUARD MUSEUM, POSE WITH
PAST AND PRESENT CAP UNIFORMS AT THE SDWG EXHIBIT

SQUADRON HIGHLIGHTS
CRAZY HORSE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-068, CUSTER)
(Item submitted by Lt. K. Bierwirth)


COMMUNICATIONS TRAINING: H(otel) E(cho) L(ima) L(ima) O(scar) South Dakota Wing THIS IS

Crazy Horse Composite Squadron. BREAK. We have been working on our communications skills. Sometimes
things come out GARBLED and we need to SAY AGAIN that we WILCO to the directives given. Sometimes
we just have to WAIT while someone needs to STAND BY. So far the training has been pretty CHARLIE
OSCAR OSCAR LIMA and we say AFFIRMATIVE to that! So until next month we are OUT.
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-063, SPEARFISH)
(Items submitted by Maj. D. Small, Jr.)


SQUADRON OPEN HOUSE: We are having an open house Saturday, 6 September, at our headquarters

building. Our open house coincides with the FAA Hall of Fame Event also at the Black Hills Airport/Clyde Ice
Field in Spearfish so we are hoping for a somewhat higher number of visitors.
7

RUSHMORE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-031, RAPID CITY)
(Item submitted by Lt. Kuecker, photo by Lt. Lenz)
 FIRST CAP FLIGHT: Lt. Rachel Kuecker had a wonderful first flight
experience as she zoomed into the overcast skies over the West River area on
23 August during the recent SAREX. Although she admitted to being a bit
apprehensive, the photo bears out her claim that she wasn’t nervous, and is
proud of the fact that she did not get airsick. The front seaters were Lt. Ron
Lenz and Capt. Josh Hall, who took the photo.
 ELLSWORTH AFB OPEN HOUSE: On 16 August, Ellsworth AFB held an open house as part of its
Black Hills Community Appreciation Day to show its appreciation to its neighbors. The squadron was present
to support the event. A CAP Cessna aircraft was on static display with Col. Mike Beason on hand to answer
questions from the public and to hoist younger visitors in and out of the aircraft. A crew of cadets and senior
members were inside the hanger at a table with various CAP materials and to answer question.

COL. BEASON ANSWERING QUESTIONS AT THE STATIC DISPLAY

CAP TABLE IN THE MAIN EVENT HANGER

 CADET ORIENTATION RIDES: On 18 August, C/AB Jonathan Busch and C/A1C Nicholas Kochutin
took off on a cadet orientation flight. Command pilot, Maj. Craig Goodrich, piloted the Cessna-182 to Custer
County Airport, with aerial tours of the Shrine of Democracy (Mount Rushmore) and Crazy Horse Memorial on
the way. The plan was to land at Custer County Airport and swap seats. However, although the stated crosswind
on the Automated Surface Observing System was just 5 knots, the actual wind was significant and gusty. The
aircraft received a significant gust just as it was touching down and ballooned considerably, so Maj. Goodrich
rejected the landing. Valuing safety over mission, he decided to return to Rapid City for a full stop. As it was a
bumpy day to fly, Cadet Busch wanted Maj. Goodrich to do 95% of the flying that day – it took a lot of work to
keep the wings level and for everyone to feel OK. The moderate turbulence on the way home took away the
desire to fly any more that day. But the cadets were heroes – they didn’t get sick! Cadet Kochutin didn’t get to
have another O-ride that day as planned, but he got a ride in the back seat.

CADET BUSCH

CADET KOCHUTIN

8

SIOUX FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-050, SIOUX FALLS)
(Items by Lt. Espeland and Capt. Schmid, photo submitted by Lt. Espeland)
 SDANG WINGS ‘N WHEELS: Capt. Matt Meert represented the squadron at the SD Air National Guard’s
annual “Wings ’n Wheels” gala on 2 August. The event, a display of Air Guard member’s cars and aircraft, was
well attended by Air Guard personnel and their families. The squadron displayed two CAP aircraft, our Cessna172 and our G1000 “glass cockpit” Cessna-182. The G1000 display was activated using the ground power unit
and Capt. Meert explained some of the capabilities to Air Guard members and their children. This display made
for an impressive show and wowed many who viewed cockpit display and moving maps. In addition, our CAP
van, affectionately known as the “Ghost Buster’s Van” was on display. Several individuals expressed interest in
joining CAP as potential Senior Members and potential Cadets.
 SIOUX EMPIRE FAIR SAFETY EXPOSITION: Lt. Karen Espeland, the
squadron Drug Demand Reduction Officer, was at the Sioux Empire Fair in Sioux
Falls in August promoting Civil Air Patrol and CAP's Drug Demand Reduction
program. The squadron had been asked to participate in the fair’s safety exposition.
Lt. Espeland was at the CAP table on the 2nd, 3rd and 7th of August while Lt. Vinnie
Brown manned the table on the 6th of August.

 SUPPORT TO LIFELIGHT FESTIVAL: Lt. Col. Rick Larson, Capt. Neil Schmid and Maj. Todd Epp
flew a sortie Saturday evening, 30 August, in support of the LifeLight Festival taking place east of Worthing.
The main mission was support for the event, monitoring area vehicular traffic and testing radio interoperability
with the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office. In addition a number of training tasks were accomplished; surveying,
aerial photography, and four different search pattern techniques; line, parallel, expanding and sector. Experience
was gained using Spidertracks, an in-flight, near-real-time aircraft tracking system. Aerial support had
originally been scheduled for the three days of the festival. However, poor weather on Friday, 29 August, did
not permit the flight to take place. On Sunday, 31 August, Lt. Kurt Johnson, Capt. Karla West and Lt. Jerald
Hayden flew a sortie in support of LifeLight during which much of the same activity took place.

PHOTO CAPTIONS:
LEFT – AIRCRAFT NAVIGATION DISPLAY SHOWS THE CITY TOWN OF WORTHING, THE LIFELIGHT FESTIVAL GROUNDS AND THE PLOT
OF AN EXPANDING SQUARE SEARCH PATTERN
RIGHT – THE LIFELIGHT FESTIVAL GROUNDS NEAR WORTHING

9

HH

PROMOTIONS

HH

Senior Member Promotions
Congratulations to David Small III of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron on his promotion to the
rank of First Lieutenant! David received accelerated promotion to this grade on the merit of his Earhart
Award earned as a cadet

Congratulations to Justin Bierwirth of Crazy Horse Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank
of Second Lieutenant!
Cadet Noncommissioned Officer Promotions
Congratulations to Levi Woodard of the Rushmore Composite Squadron, to Josiah Huntington of the
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron, and to Justin Harris of the Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron
on their promotion to the rank of Cadet Senior Master Sergeant and receipt of the General Jimmy
Doolittle Award!

Congratulations to Joseph Jagodzinski of Rushmore Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank
of Cadet Technical Sergeant and receipt of the Captain Eddie Rickenbacker Award!

Congratulations to Ivan Kreger, to Kyle Kreger, and to Julia Lair, all of the Sioux Falls Composite
Squadron, and to Peter Iverson of the Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron on promotion to the
rank of Cadet Staff Sergeant and receipt of the Wright Brothers Award!

Cadet Airman Promotions
Congratulations to Nicholas Kochutin of Rushmore Composite Squadron, to Kyle Clement of Sioux
Falls Composite Squadron, and to Nathaniel Fleet of Big Sioux Composite Squadron on promotion to
the rank of Cadet Airman First Class and receipt of the General Hap Arnold Award!

Congratulations to Noah Misselt of Rushmore Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank of
Cadet Airman and receipt of the Curry Award! Amazingly, within a week of getting his membership,
he completed his Curry Award and GES so he could participate in the August SAREX.

10

HH

CAP TRIBUTE

HH

By Jean P. Moore, blog for the Greenwich Library Oral History
Project [Edited]: In February 2012, Oral History Project
volunteer Suzanne M. Seton sat down with Molly Cook (1917-)
for an interview about her and her mother, Marian Cummings,
(1891-1984).
When Marian Cummings was as a young girl, she was such a
challenge to her parents that she was sent east from her home
in Seattle to a finishing school in Middlebury, Conn. After
graduating with honors and returning to Seattle for her
coming-out party, she met Wilbur Cummings, a young New
York lawyer out west on assignment. It was love at first sight.
Their romance culminated in marriage, and a few years later,
with two young children in tow, the couple returned to New
York where Mr. Cummings resumed his career, finally settling
in Greenwich and buying an old farmhouse.
Life in Greenwich proved too uneventful for Mrs. Cummings,
who began taking flying lessons at North Beach, now
LaGuardia Airport. After earning her pilot's license, she went
on to become the first woman to hold a commercial license.
Cook describes one maneuver involving a roll of toilet paper being thrown out of the plane at three or four
thousand feet creating a streamer effect. "The trick was how long it took you to cut that strip twice," with
your plane. She also describes an event called a spot landing, having to land your plane neatly and
precisely within a circle made of flour.
In 1942, with the advent of war, the fun and games ended. During this time, Molly Cook and her mother
Marian Cummings joined the Civil Air Patrol.

RIGHT: MARIAN CUMMINGS BEGAN TAKING FLYING LESSONS
AT NEW YORK’S NORTH BEACH, NOW LAGUARDIA AIRPORT

Source: www.greenwichtime.com/local/article/The-Flying-Family-of-Greenwich-5571292.php, accessed 22 June 2014

11

“THE SKYCHASER”
South Dakota Wing Electronic Newsletter for September 2014
Official Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force - Citizens Serving Communities: Above and Beyond
Publishers: Wing Commander Colonel John Seten / Wing Vice Commander Lieutenant Colonel Richard Larson
Editor: Major Bruce Kipp  Wing Public Affairs Officer  (605) 261-4507  paa.sdwg@gmail.com

Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SDWingCAP and Like us on Twitter at @SDWingCAP

WING TIPS
REMINDER: A Split SAREX will take place 10-12 October with ICPs at Spearfish and Sioux Falls. Everyone

is encouraged to participate to the maximum extent possible. Hopefully the weather will be good and we can get
in a lot of flying, ground search team missions and incident command post personnel training.
 THE NEW WMIRS IS UPON US: WMIRS 2.0 went online 1 October. It moves as much of the paperwork
as possible to the digital realm. Signing in personnel, equipment, aircraft, et cetera, have moved online. Other
features include a live view of current sorties along with a live stream of the comms log. Training for the new
WMIRS will occur at the upcoming Split SAREX 10-12 October. The old WMIRS is still available for archival
purposes. Old missions can be accessed but no new missions added. Maj. Gengler provided this information.
 CAP GLIDER DAY AT HOT SPRINGS: 1 September 2014 was Glider Day at the Hot Springs Municipal
Airport. Despite a pause for lightning and rain, cadets got orientation rides and cadets and a senior member got
glider rides. A CAP Cessna-182 was used for the o-rides.
A CAP Cessna 182 tow-plane and Schleicher K7 glider
owned by the Black Hills Soaring Club were used for
gliding. There were a total of ten o-rides and nine glider
rides. It was a wonderful day for everyone, lots of
excitement and fun. The activity was coordinated by Maj.
Craig Goodrich. Senior members and parents coordinated
the schedule of events, driving vans, and serving as
supervisors. Thanks to Col. Mike Beason, Lt. Jamie Nowlin, Capt. Patrick Nowlin, Lt. Ron Lenz, Lt. Kris
Bierwirth, SM Roy Weller, Capt. Richard Geeting, and SM Melissa Weller. Capt. Nowlin flew to recertify as a
CAP glider tow-pilot under the eye of tow-pilot instructor Lt. Col. Gary Hewett. Lt. Marty Larson was the
CFIG in the glider. Compiled from input from Lt. Col. Hewett and Lt. K. Bierwirth.
1

CADETS PREPARE FOR GLIDER FLIGHTS

 SDWG VISITS SDEMA CONFERENCE: On 9 September, SDWG’s top two officers, Col. John Seten and
Lt. Col. Rick Larson, visited the annual South Dakota Emergency Management Association (SDEMA)
Conference at Watertown. They mixed, mingled and spoke with attendees and examined vendor displays of
emergency services gear. The people to whom they spoke were uniformly interested in better incorporating
CAP into their emergency management options. Col. Seten urges all SDWG units to meet your local emergency
managers, sheriffs, fire chiefs etc. Tell our story and provide information about SDWG capabilities.

 LOW-LEVEL ROUTE SURVEY – WEST RIVER: Ellsworth AFB’s 28th Bomb Wing requested a low-level
route survey on a specific military training route (MTR) in the West River area. The purpose of this LLRS was
to look for uncharted obstacles, environmentally sensitive areas and potential safety hazards to military aircraft
operating at high speed at a low level in that area. This task was assigned to a crew from Rushmore Composite
Squadron consisting of Capt. Joshua Hall (Mission Pilot), Capt. Ryan Jones (Mission Observer), and Lt.
Christina Voll (Mission Scanner Trainee). On 14 September, the aircrew flew a Cessna-182T on three sorties
surveying the MTR from Rapid City into Wyoming for a total of 9.3 flying hours during the course of which
several new towers were photographed and charted.
 BUFFS AND BONES: Ellsworth AFB asked CAP to take
a photographer from Air Force Magazine up for shots of the base
flight line from the air. B-52 aircraft from Minot AFB were
parked on the ramp due to runway repair at Minot. It’s not often
you get to see B-52 “Stratofortress” (nicknamed Buff) and B-1
“Lancer” aircraft (nicknamed Bone) together! The sortie took
place on 23 September. Col. Mike Beason flew the CAP Cessna182 where he met the photographer for a 30 minute flight over
the flight line. Col. Beason flew over Ellsworth AFB at traffic
pattern altitude, using steep turns to put the Cessna directly overhead B-1 and B-52 aircraft for the
photographer. Col. Beason was assisted in the pattern by Ellsworth AFB tower, which was manned by CAP
member Lt. Ron Lenz. Ron is a senior controller at Ellsworth AFB and he jumped in to help make the flight a
success Article by Lt. Col. Larson and Col. Beason.
2



FEMA SHELTER TRAINING: By Col. Mary Donley. [Edited] As many of you may be aware, FEMA

and the CAP are working to expand our interaction when responding to disasters. Maj. Nancy McKenney and I
attended the Field Shelter Guide Training and Point of Distribution
(POD) workshops in Salt Lake City, 6/7 September. Saturday was the
shelter workshop - how to manage and operate a field shelter. The POD
workshop on Sunday was how to plan, operate, and demobilize a POD
mission. The class also had lessons on safety, equipment, and resource
accountability. The FEMA instructors were knowledgeable and made
the training enjoyable by getting us up and around planning our shelters
and PODs. We’re back and prepared to train SDWG as assets in making
sure people and property are protected during a natural disaster that may
strike our state or communities.
 2015 SUMMER ENCAMPMENT HEADS-UP: The 2015 Joint Dakota Encampment will be held at Camp
Rapid in Rapid City from Saturday, 11 July through Sunday, 19 July 2015. Camp Rapid has been used several
times for encampment with great success. Cadets - Interested in becoming Cadet Commander? Applications for
Cadet Commander will be accepted until 1 December 2014. Email Maj. Gengler at nick_gengler@hotmail.com
on how to apply. Those interested in Deputy Cadet Commander and Cadet Executive Officer can also contact
Maj. Gengler. His goal is to have senior cadet staff filled by the first of the year to allow time for planning and
other cadre selection. Seniors - Maj. Gengler is looking for help with encampment. Specifically, he would like
to select a Commandant of Cadets as soon as possible. If you’re interested in that position, or willing to help in
another capacity please contact him.
 SDANG WINS SPAATZ TROPHY: South Dakota Air National Guard's 114th Fighter Wing was presented
the Spaatz Trophy at the 2014 National Guard Association of the U.S. (NGAUS) conference in Chicago on 25
August. The trophy is presented to the most outstanding flying unit
in the Air National Guard each year. This is the fourth time the114th
Fighter Wing has won the prestigious award; the last time was in
1988. Selection is based on overall combat readiness and the unit's
performance with respect to all Air National Guard flying units.
Factors included in the evaluation are flying safety, aircraft
operation readiness, weapons firing, unit alerts, unit manning, skill
level qualifications, retention, drill attendance, operational readiness
inspections, outstanding accomplishments and special missions and
exercises. In the photo USAF Brig. Gen. Matthew Jamison, second
from left, Assistant Adjutant General for the SDANG and Col. Russ Walz, 114th Fighter Wing Commander,
accept the trophy from Lt. Gen. Stanley Clarke III, Director of the Air National Guard (left) and Maj. Gen.
Donald Dunbar, NGAUS vice chair for Air and Adjutant General of the Wisconsin National Guard (right).

STAFF NOTES
WING COMMANDER
Col. John Seten, CAP

 I am pleased to announce that Maj. Nick Gengler has accepted the position of Encampment Commander
for the 2015 Joint Dakota Encampment. Encampment will be held at Camp Rapid in Rapid City from Saturday,
11 July through Sunday, 19 July 2015.
3

WING VICE COMMANDER
Lt. Col. Rick Larson, CAP

 NORTH CENTRAL REGION CONFERENCE: Des Moines, IA was the site for this year’s North Central
Region CAP Conference. It kicked off 20 September, as NCR Wing Commanders and their representatives
presented yearly overviews of each of the seven Wings’ activities and accomplishments. Col. Larry Ragland,
CAP NHQ Chief of Staff, addressed the group on behalf of National Commander Maj. Gen. Joe Vasquez. Col.
Ragland said the new leadership team is looking to decrease the regulatory footprint in CAP, increase recruiting
and retention and develop new CAP missions for America. Wing staff attending included SDWG Commander,
Col. John Seten, his wife and SDWG Personnel Officer, Lt. Lori Seten, SDWG Professional Development
Officer and past CC, Col. Mary Donley, SDWG Vice Commander, Lt. Col. Rick Larson, and SDWG Cadet
Programs Director Lt. Col. Linda Buechler. Cadet members from across the region held a Cadet Advisory
Council meeting. C/Maj Joshua Klosterman represented SDWG CAC. At the Saturday evening awards banquet
a POW-MIA ceremony was held and Col. Todd paid tribute to long serving CAP members. Receiving awards
were SDWG PAO Maj. Bruce Kipp (NCR PAO of the Year) and SDWG Aerospace Education Officer Lt. Col.
Buck DeWeese (NCR Frank G. Brewer Memorial Aerospace Lifetime Achievement Award). Col. Seten
commented "it's a real testament to the dedication of SDWG’s members when we can brief being the top flying
hour wing in NCR, have the top national CAP CyberPatriot team and gain top NCR SAR wing honors!"
 SKYHAWK TO GLASSHAWK: SD Wing Maintenance Officer, Capt. E.W. Filler got some exciting news
this month. After several years of requests, approval was given by NHQ to receive a complete upgrade for one
of our Cessna-172 aircraft to the Technologically Advanced Aircraft (TAA) Standard. On 17 September, Capt.
Josh Hall and Lt. Ryan Jones, both of Rushmore Composite Squadron, took off in CAP4047, headed to Carson
City, NV to drop off the airplane at the upgrade depot. After dealing with a surprise runway closure, the two
delivered the aircraft. It's going to be a real leap forward for the Skyhawk. The
Garmin G500, much like its big brother G1000 avionics found in our C182s,
feature primary and multifunction displays, coupled with a new Garmin GTN650 GPS/NavCom allows for more exacting navigation, complex IFR
procedures, autopilot linkage and increased situational awareness for crews.
The upgrade will also include interior and exterior treatments. It's expected to
take up to a year to complete. In the interim, SDWG is working to obtain a
spare aircraft from a neighboring North Central Region Wing. The TAA
upgrade will mean more training for CAP aircrew. Thanks to Capt. Filler for
his tenacity for the project and the dedication and professionalism of the RAP
crew for safely delivering the aircraft!

WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER
Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP

 I am pleased to announce that Lt. David Stockinger of the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron has joined
the Wing Public Affairs staff as an Assistant Public Affairs Officer. His primary areas of responsibility will be
to manage the wing public affairs photography program and to manage the wing Flickr account.
4

 I am also pleased to announce that Capt. Lisa Collum of the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron has been
appointed as the squadron’s Public Affairs Officer.

WING DIRECTOR OF CADET PROGRAMS
Lt. Col. Linda Buechler, CAP



KENNEDY SPACE CENTER TOUR: On 13 September, while in Orlando, FL, to attend my son's college

graduation, my husband and I toured the Kennedy Space Center. We lunched with Astronaut Susan Kilrain and
listened to her experiences as an astronaut. I was able to talk with her about CAP and particularly about the
Cadet Program and Drug Demand Reduction Program. She was very interested in the programs and asked that I
pass on to the cadets that she encourages you to continue in the programs and strive for the best in their lives
and careers. Highlights of our tour included the new Atlantis Shuttle display, close views of the launch Viewing
Assembly Building, shuttle vehicle transport, landing field, Saturn 5 museum, and view of the Space X launch
pad. I successfully landed the space shuttle simulator on my sixth try (I won’t mention what happened on the
previous five tries).

 NATIONAL CHARACTER DAY: SDWG’s National Character Day (NCD) program was on 27 September
in Pierre. Cadets and seniors arrived from Custer, Pierre, Sioux Falls and Rapid City (11 cadets and 10 seniors).
NCD has two main goals: to motivate cadets to take issues of character and honor seriously, and commit to the
drug-free ethic; and, to further integrate the Drug Demand Reduction program into CAP’s overall Cadet
Program. Activities for the event included speakers and a variety of activities. Speakers included Lt. Col. Linda
Buechler, Division of Criminal Investigation Officer Don McCrea, and Lt. Col. (Dr.) Mark Huntington.

Those in attendance included:
SD 001: Lt. Col. Linda Buechler, Lt. Col. Mark Huntington, Maj. Nancy McKenney
SD 031: C/Amn Malia Goodrich, C/TSgt Joseph Jagodzinski, C/Amn Noah Misselt, C/MSgt Travis Tenold,
C/AB Caleb Weller, C/AB Isaak Weller, Maj. Craig Goodrich, and SM (Capt) Douglas Robbins
SD 038: C/TSgt Hannah Becker, Lt. Col. Myra Christensen, Lt. Jonathan Becker
SD 050: C/SMSgt Josiah Huntington, C/Amn Dylan Purkapile, C/ SMSgt Roblewsky, and Lt. Karen Espeland
SD 068: C/CMSgt Jason Parry, and Lt. V. Bierwirth

5

LT. COL. HUNTINGTON DISCUSSES MAKING GOOD CHOICES

CADET NATIONAL CHARACTER DAY ATTENDEES

SQUADRON HIGHLIGHTS
BIG SIOUX COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-058, BROOKINGS)
(Item submitted by Maj. Gengler)
 SDWG CYBER-WARRIORS PREPARE FOR BATTLE: Competition will soon begin in CyberPatriot-VII,
the premier national cyber-security competition for high school age youth. Once again a cyber-security team
from Big Sioux Composite Squadron in Brookings will take part. They compete in the “All Services Division”
which is open to CAP teams, Junior ROTC units from the Army, Air Force and Marine Corps and Navy’s Sea
Cadets. Last year, in CyberPatriot-VI, the Brookings team came in first of the 320 CAP teams that competed.
This year’s Big Sioux CyberPatriot-VII team members are: C/Maj Joshua Klosterman (Team Captain), C/AB
Andrew Toft, C/CMSgt Chris Dinnel, C/CMSgt Laura Rudnik, C/MSgt Jaden Petersen, and C/A1C Nathaniel
Fleet,. They are coached by Capt. Shannon Hofer and mentored by C/1Lt Tyler Gross. Since June the team has
been practicing and is ready for the first round of competition to be held October 24-26. For the past three years
Big Sioux’s cyber-security team made it through the three preliminary qualification rounds to reach the national
finals. They hope to make it to nationals yet again.
CRAZY HORSE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-068, CUSTER)
(Items submitted by Lt. K Bierwirth, photo by Ms. Joy Parry)
 AEROSPACE EDUCATIONS AWARDS: On 4 September our squadron received a unit award for
excellence in Aerospace Education and C/SMSgt Jason Parry and C/TSgt Thomas Dillon each received
individual awards for achievements in Aerospace
Education. The squadron earned these awards by conducting six
hands-on aviation and space-related activities during the school
year which included: building rockets out of trash/recyclable
materials; building various types of model rockets; studied the
effects of meteoroids and space debris at the ISS; studied the
protective equipment needed to be worn at the ISS and the
difficulties of doing tasks in this protective gear; and completed
a two-hour field event by launching Alpha and Tomahawk
model rockets. Lt. Vicki Bierwirth was the Aerospace
Education instructor for these activities. In the photo: Back: Lt.
James Dillon, Lt. Kris Bierwirth, Lt. Col. Doug Westerlund and Maj. Sharon Moad. Front: C/TSgt Thomas
Dillon, Lt. Vicki Bierwirth (holding the unit AE Award) and C/SMSgt Jason Dillon.
6

 UNITED WAY KICK OFF: 23 Sept C/SMSgt Jason Parry, C/TSgt Thomas Dillon and Capt. Richard
Geeting attended and performed in the United Way Kick off. Our team did well in their performance and our
professionalism shined.
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-063, SPEARFISH)
(Item and photos submitted by Lt. Col. Hopewell)
 OPEN HOUSE: The squadron held an Open House Saturday, 6
September 2014, at the squadron headquarters building at Spearfish
airport. The goal was to boost public awareness of the squadron. Two
CAP aircraft were on static display. Lt Col Buck DeWeese was on
hand to explain the ins and outs of the aircraft to the guests.
The cadets put together several displays such as search and rescue
gear, emergency beacon locating equipment, and outdoor living
implements. They also displayed radio controlled airplanes and model
rockets which they have been working on as squadron aerospace
education projects. In preparation for the Open House Capt. Collister
repainted the CAP logo on the building and Lt. Col. DeWeese planted
flowers.
Former TXWG Mr. Orlan Scott was at the airfield and was attracted to
the Open House scenario. He regaled cadets and senior members with
numerous stories about CAP and flying from yesteryear. Mr. Scott was
so impressed with the demeanor, appearance and enthusiasm of the cadets that just prior to departing he
presented Capt. Bill Collister with a generous contribution for the squadron’s cadet programs.

LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN OPEN HOUSE ACTIVITIES / MR. ORLAN SCOTT PRESENTS A DONATION TO CAPT. COLLISTER

PIERRE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-38, PIERRE)
(Item and photo submitted by Lt. Col. Christensen)
 MOBRIDGE FLY-IN: The city of Mobridge hosted an open
house and “fly-in” on 27 September to show off their airport’s
recently completed large hanger. Members from the Pierre
Composite Squadron, Lt. Col. Myra Christensen and Lt. Jon Becker,
flew their CAP Cessna-172 to Mobridge for a static display. There
were 18 different aircraft that flew in for the festivities. Included
was a pair of RV4’s flying in tandem from Madison, a Stearman
from Aberdeen, and an Avera medical helicopter. Several
individuals stopped by to discuss the purposes of CAP and to see the
technology that we are currently using.

7

RUSHMORE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-031, RAPID CITY)
(Item and photos submitted by Lt. Black)
 DISASTER AWARENESS AND SAFETY DAY: On 6 September, Rushmore Composite Squadron senior
members and cadets participated in the 6th annual Disaster Awareness and Safety Day, which was organized by
Rapid City/Pennington County Emergency Management. The squadron had an information booth and reached
out to potential members. There were also games, coloring sheets, and candy for the younger attendees. In the
morning of the event, cadets also had a chance to fly the squadron's AE Stem Kit RC aircraft nearby.

LEFT: CAPT. PATRICK NOWLIN AND LT. JAMIE NOWLIN EXPLAIN CAP'S MISSION AND OPPORTUNITIES TO GUESTS.
RIGHT: LT. RACHEL KUECKER PLAYING GAMES AND SPEAKING WITH YOUNG GUESTS AT DISASTER AWARENESS AND SAFETY DAY.

SIOUX FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-050, SIOUX FALLS)
(Items by Lt. Col. Larson, Lt. Espeland, Capt. Schmid, photos by Lt. Espeland)
 MOULAGE: Six squadron members took part in an attack response exercise at the 114th Fighter Wing of
the South Dakota Air National Guard. Playing the part of injured airmen, they were “moulaged” as victims,
simulating injuries sustained as participants in the exercise. Led by Capt. Jerry Foy, himself an ANG veteran,
the CAP crew underwent an extreme makeover by ANG medics from the 114th Medical Group. ANG Lt. Col.
Larry DeBuhr and his staff were tasked with assessing Guard member's ability to perform self-aid and buddy
care throughout the event, held on Saturday, 6 September. That's where the CAP crew came in.
The CAP crew arrived on base and was moulaged with various simulated injuries, ranging from minor to major;
burns, lacerations, amputations - all the trappings of a disaster. The crew then broke up into groups led by
inspectors who traveled with the "wounded" throughout the base during exercise incidents. The teams presented
the "victims" in various work centers, gauging the response to the casualties, and assessing proper procedures to
address the injuries. The CAP “victims” were treated by ANG members who learned hands-on procedures.
Fortunately, after expert treatment, everyone survived the exercise!

8

During the day-long event, the CAP crew was treated to a pizza lunch provided by Lt. Col. DeBuhr and a tour
of the SDANG Emergency Operations Center, where they saw how complex responses by air assets are
managed. Lt. Col. DeBuhr commented that the professionalism of the CAP members aided greatly in the
exercise evaluation, and thanked each member for their involvement.

SIOUX FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON MOULAGE CREW VISITS THE SDANG EMERGENCY CENTER

 SIDEWALK ARTS FESTIVAL: the squadron provided supported
the Sioux Falls Sidewalk Arts Festival held downtown on 6 September.
Arriving at 0430, while still dark members set up tents, tables and chairs,
and placed garbage and recycling cans throughout the event area.
The one-day festival, a fundraiser for the Visual arts Center of the
Washington Pavilion, featured over 225 vendors from more than 10
states, a large food court and live entertainment. 40,000 were expected to
attend this annual event.
 ORIENTATION FLIGHTS: 6 September was the first flight for Cadet Oscar Holmberg. In fact, this was
his first flight in a small aircraft. Under the watchful eye of Capt. Neil Schmid, he successfully piloted the plane
from Sioux Falls to Vermillion and landed at Yankton. He’s looking forward to future flights in the program.
C/SSgt Kyle Kreger flew his fourth powered flight and learned the use of instruments while airborne. After a
brief tour of Gavin’s Point Dam and sail boat races, he skillfully piloted the Cessna-172 back to Sioux Falls.

C/AB HOLMBERG, CAPT. SCHMID, C/SSGT KREGER

C/SSGT KREGER, CADET HOLMBERG, CAPT. SCHMID

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 SIOUX FALLS REGIONAL AIRPORT 75TH ANNIVERSARY: The Sioux Falls Regional Airport (FAA
Designator “FSD” celebrated its 75th Anniversary on Saturday, 13 September. The airport, opened in 1939, was
a major part of the war effort in WWII. At one point there were more troops passing through Sioux Falls than
there were residents. So as not to disrupt airport operations the celebration was held at Maverick Air Center.
Eight cadets and eight senior members supported the event in two ways. We taxied our two aircraft (Cessna-172
and Cessna-182) to the flight line at Maverick for static display. We also assisted the host, Commemorative Air
Forces’ Joe Foss Squadron, with personnel for flight line security and traffic control. It was quite an event. The
EAA’s Young Eagles gave free airplane rides to local children. A 1940s’ themed evening hangar dance was
held. A variety of WWII-era and current aircraft
were on display as were various pieces of WWII
reenactment gear and vehicles. Several state and
local VIPs were in attendance as was U.S. Senator
John Thune who found time to stop by to chat and
pose with C/CMSgt Nicholas Nash, C/SMSgt Jaden
Roblewsky and Lt. Scott Kuzinsky. Photos by Lt.
Karen Espeland.

FLIGHT LINE SECURITY BRIEFING

SEN. THUNE WITH CADETS NASH, ROBLEWSKI & LT. KUZINSKY

 COLOR GUARD ACTIVITY: (1) National POW/MIA Remembrance Day was held at Veterans Park on
Friday 19 September. This ceremony is held every year to remember all POW/MIA persons. The color guard
presented, posted and retired the colors for a crowd of around 150 veterans, family members, friends and guests.
After the event I was approached by at least 15 veterans and congratulated on how professional the cadets were
and what a good job they did. This was our second year doing this event. (2) National Special Olympics Truck
Convoy is a fund raising event held every year at the W. H. Lyons Fair Grounds. The color guard presented the
colors at the opening of the event. This was our third year doing this event.

POW/MIA DAY CEREMONY

NATIONAL SPECIAL OLYMPICS TRUCK CONVOY

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HH

PROMOTIONS

HH

Cadet Noncommissioned Officer Promotions
Congratulations to Jaden Petersen of Big Sioux Composite Squadron on his promotion to their rank of
Cadet Master Sergeant and receipt of the Lindbergh Award!

Congratulations to Steven Diaconu of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron and to Zebadiah Nelson of Big
Sioux Composite Squadron on their promotion to the rank of Cadet Technical Sergeant and receipt of
the Captain Eddie Rickenbacker Award!

Cadet Airman Promotions
Congratulations to Graham Dinnel of Big Sioux Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank of
Cadet Airman First Class and receipt of the General Hap Arnold Award!

Congratulations to Salem Pleasants of Big Sioux Composite Squadron and to Oscar Holmberg of
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on their promotion to the rank of Cadet Airman and receipt of the
Curry Award!

HH

KUDOS

HH

Congratulations to Wing Aerospace Education Officer Lt. Col. Rodney “Buck” DeWeese on receiving
the 2013 North Central Region’s Frank G. Brewer Memorial Aerospace Lifetime Achievement award!
Congratulations to Wing Public Affairs Officer Maj. Bruce Kipp on receiving the North Central
Region’s Public Affairs Officer of the Year award for 2013!
Congratulations to Capt. James W Speirs who has been assigned Character Development Instructor for
the Rushmore Composite Squadron!
Congratulations to SM Melissa K Weller assigned Assistant Professional Development Officer of the
Rushmore Composite Squadron. She also completed Level 1 and earned her Membership Ribbon!
Congratulations to Maj. Nick Gengler and wife Hannah on the birth of their son Eli Michael Gengler
on 8 September! Mother and Baby Eli are home and doing well.
Congratulations to Lt. Col. Deryl Miles and wife Jamie on the birth of their daughter Faith on 20
September! Mother and Baby Faith are home and doing well.
Congratulations to Cadet Major Joshua Klosterman on his appointment to the Big Sioux Composite
Squadron cadet staff as Operations officer!
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Congratulations to Lt. Sarah Hill and to Lt. David Small III, both of Lookout Mountain Composite
Squadron, who recently transitioned from cadets to senior members and received advanced promotion
to the rank of 1st Lt and were awarded “Technician” rating in Specialty Track - Cadet Programs on the
strength of them both having been cadet captains and having earned the Amelia Earhart Award.
Congratulations to CAP Lt. Col. Greg Lair, of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron, on his promotion to
USAF Colonel (O-6) and appointment as commander of the SDANG’s 114th Fighter Wing Operations
Group. Col. Lair is a former CAP cadet.
Here’s a picture of Cadet Airman Lair at his first encampment at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center in
Aurora, CO. The photo was taken during a tour of Buckley ANGB. Colonel Lair “claims” he doesn’t
remember what year this was. [Editor: analysis indicates the photo is likely circa late 1970s]

HH

NEW TECHNOLOGY

HH

 FIRE PHASERS: [Edited] Boeing’s High Energy
Laser Mobile Demonstrator (HEL-MD), a tactical military
vehicle carrying a directed-energy weapon system, engaged
more than 150 aerial targets including mortar rounds, artillery
shells, small rockets and remotely piloted aircraft in recent
tests at Eglin AFB, Fla. Under windy, rainy, and foggy
weather conditions these engagements were the most
challenging to date with a 10-kilowatt laser. As proven at
White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico in 2013 and at
Eglin Air Force Base this spring, HEL-MD is reliable and
capable of consistently acquiring, tracking, and engaging a
variety of targets in different environments, demonstrating the potential military utility of directed-energy
systems. The next step is to install a 50- or 60-kw laser on the demonstrator to validate its capability at a higher
power level.
Source: Air Force Magazine Online for Tuesday 9 September 2014.

12

“THE SKYCHASER”
South Dakota Wing Electronic Newsletter for October 2014
Official Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force - Citizens Serving Communities: Above and Beyond
Publishers: Wing Commander Colonel John Seten / Wing Vice Commander Lieutenant Colonel Richard Larson
Editor: Major Bruce Kipp  Wing Public Affairs Officer  (605) 261-4507  paa.sdwg@gmail.com

Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SDWingCAP and Like us on Twitter at @SDWingCAP

WING TIPS
 REDCAP 14-M-0517: Late into the evening hours of 9 October, the South Dakota Wing (SDWG) of
the Civil Air Patrol searched for an aircraft emergency beacon reportedly in northwest South Dakota. The Air
Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) at Tyndall AFB in Florida alerted SDWG at 3:30pm local time
that a satellite picked up an aircraft emergency locator beacon (EPIRB) in the general area of northern Ziebach
County. In addition, the Minneapolis Air Traffic Control Center reported that passing aircraft has also picked up
an ELT signal. However, the FAA reported no general aviation aircraft were listed as overdue or missing. A
Cessna-182T from the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron was dispatched to the area to participate in the search.
In addition, a second aircraft, a Cessna-182T departed from the Rushmore Composite Squadron in Rapid City to
join in the search. Unable to find the ELT signal both aircraft were recalled to their bases at approximately
9:30pm local time. Two aircraft from CAP’s North Dakota Wing (NDWG) also assisted in the search. One of
the aircraft flew “high-bird” acting as a communications relay while the other aircraft conducted a “sniffing”
search for an ELT signal in the general area. Incident Commander Lt. Col. Rick Larson controlled the search
from a mobile command post and was in continuous contact with the aircraft and local authorities.
 OPERATION WINDMILL: Towards the end of October, field tests were conducted in the vicinity of the
Tyler Minnesota Common Air Route Surveillance radar site near Brookings. The tests were part of an
interagency effort to assess wind turbine radar interference mitigation technologies, radar systems calibration,
and how wind farms hamper the ability to detect objects in the area. The tests were conducted by Sandia
National Laboratories and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Lincoln Laboratory. The test operations
included the use of SDWG aviation assets for approximately 48 flight hours. CAP aircraft and crews flew flight
operations daily during each field test. Essentially, the CAP aircraft flew around at an assigned altitude and
pattern for eight hours a day. SDWG did this mission once before, in 2012. This year Capt. Neil Schmid of
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron was project officer.
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 OCTOBER SPLIT SAREX: SDWG held one of its best search and rescue exercises ever on 11 October.
Over 50 Wing members participated in the Split SAREX, either at the Mission Base in Sioux Falls or the
Staging Area in Spearfish. Several air sorties were flown and several ground search team missions were
conducted. A great deal of training was successfully accomplished for aircrews, mission staff and ground
support personnel. The multiple scenarios included air and ground searches for missing aircraft, air and ground
searches for missing people, and aerial photography of potential flood areas on a reservoir, a lake, and rivers
and creeks. All in all a very successful Saturday. During the course of the SAREX ten air sorties were flown
and four ground search sorties were dispatched.

COL. SETEN’S EXERCISE BRIEFING

PREPARING FOR AN AIR SEARCH SORTIE

GROUND SEARCH TEAM IN ACTION

 JOINT DAKOTAS SLS/CLC IN CUSTER: On October 18, 2014 Crazy Horse Composite Squadron hosted
the Corporate Learning Course (CLC) and Squadron Leadership School (SLS) for members of North and South
Dakota Wings. Major Sharon Moad, of the Crazy Horse Composite Squadron, directed the SLS for Lt. Ruth
Carley of the Pierre Composite Squadron, and Graham Frost, Daniel Villas and Ashley Ehret of the NDWG’s
119th Fargo Cadet Squadron. The SLS is part of the Level II program for senior members in CAP. It focuses on
training members of a squadron on things like leadership, communication, professionalism and the workings of
a squadron. All senior members need this course to complete Level II and be eligible for promotion and awards.
Col. Mary Donley, SDWG Professional Development Officer, directed the CLC with the help of Col. Mike
Beason who taught some of the modules. The CLC was attended by Lt. Kris Bierwirth, Lt. Victoria Bierwirth,
Capt. Richard Geeting of the Crazy Horse Composite Squadron and Capt. John Hoeck, Squadron Commander
of the 119th Fargo Cadet squadron. The CLC is part of the Level III program for senior members of CAP. The
course discusses the relationship of the CAP squadron has with the next major echelon of command -- the
wing. Specifically, CLC discusses how wing-level operations help to accomplish CAP's three missions of
aerospace education, emergency services, and cadet
programs. It describes the working relationships wing staff
officers have with each other and their squadron level
counterparts. All seniors need this course to complete Level
III and be eligible for promotions and awards. If any senior
members have questions about Professional Development do
not hesitate to contact me at: mfdonley@gmail.com. My
goal is to see senior members progress in the areas of their
specialty tracks, and get the awards and promotions they
deserve. Article submitted by Col. Mary Donley.
 AERIAL WILDLIFE SURVEYS: SDWG flew aerial surveys of terrestrial wildlife on 4 days in September
and on 6 days in October in support of the state Department of Game, Fish & Parks and the South Dakota State
University. GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and elk while SDSU surveyed elk and bobcats. The
resulted in 13.6 flight hours in September and 24.91flight hours in October for a total of 38.51 flying hours
over western South Dakota and the Black Hills. CAP pilots for the flights were Lt. Col. Buck DeWeese and Lt.
Col. Gary Hewett. Depending on whom the sortie supported they were accompanied by either Mr. Brandon
Tycz from SDSU or by Ms. Paige Mueggenberg or Ms. Lauren Wiechman from GF&P.
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 CAP VOLUNTEER MAGAZINE: The October-December issue of Civil Air Patrol Volunteer, CAP’s
premier quarterly magazine, is available in digital format at http://www.capvolunteernow.com/cap_volunteer/.
In addition to the cover story about CAP’s hot air balloon program, there is coverage from the 2014 National
Conference in Las Vegas, as well as features on two search and rescue missions – one earlier this year in
California and another 70 years ago in Vermont. Be sure to check out the Mary Feik Cadet Officer School video
on page 13 and the balloon chase crew video on page 45.
 WMIRS 2.0 UPDATE: WMIRS 2.0 is getting better every day. The National Staff keeps working on it
and is updating us weekly on the progress. I am sure by the time of our next SAREX in January we will have a
fully operational WMIRS to utilize. Submitted by Maj. Gengler.
 CAP AT SANFORD HEALTH/FAMILY SAFETY FESTIVAL: On 11 October, Lt. Karen Espeland and Lt.
Col. Linda Buechler had a booth at the Sanford Health/Safety Family Festival held at First Presbyterian Church
in Sioux Falls. Over 200 children and their parents stopped at the booth to participate in the activities of “Walk
the Line” and “Dart Board” while wearing Fatal Vision (aka drunk) goggles. The children received red ribbons
as well as bookmarks and pencils. Designated Driver stickers were handed out to adults. Numerous pamphlets
were available for parents to take as information about drug awareness. A drug paraphernalia display case was
available for parents to see the types of drugs available to their children. Parent comments included: "I didn't
know there was this many drugs in communities". Of particular interest was how a 5 year old kindergartener
could be the youngest dealer if their parents are involved in meth and how they would dip a candy necklace or
bracelet in meth and the child would take it to school to share with their friends. Thanks to Lt. Espeland for
reaching out to the community and offering CAP as one of the booth participants. This was a highly successful
activity. Recruitment was also done and CAP brochures handed out to those interested in the program.

STAFF NOTES
WING COMMANDER
Col. John Seten, CAP

Congratulations to Rushmore Composite Squadron and Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron on being
named to CAP’s list of “Quality Cadet Unit” for 2013-2014! On 10 October Mr. Steven Trupp, Program
Manager for Cadet Programs at NHQ announced that 299 units had earned the title "Quality Cadet Unit". The
squadrons will receive award certificates in the next few weeks.
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WING RECRUITING/RETENTION OFFICER
Col. Mary Donley, CAP

Greetings from your Wing Recruiting and Retention Officer! I hope to be more vocal, visible and available to
all the units and members in this position. South Dakota Wing as well as units and wings throughout the nation
are seeing a downward trend in membership in recent years. We here in South Dakota have also see the closure
of former units that were once active and thriving! What’s the answer to changing this downslide into an
upside? In the last few months we were given some insight by NHQ of the responses in out-briefings from
members who chose not to renew. With cadets it was things like transitioning to college, change of interests,
jobs, etc. But there were also comments like: meetings were boring, not organized, no activities and cliques
with some bullying involved (I hope the last is not true in SDWG)! For senior members most reasons given
were things like: I got too busy, too much responsibility given without proper guidance, too little responsibility
given, I was ignored, too many hoops to jump through, etc. Does any of this relate to your squadron?? Do you
see a trend of people joining then disappearing? Take a look at what you are doing to attract new members and
then take a really hard look at what you are doing to KEEP those members. It’s time for each squadron to sit
down and come up with a plan for Recruiting and Retention! I have tool to help you to do that. NHQ has put out
a new pamphlet for units to do just that. As we near the end of 2014 this is the perfect time to start the planning
for 2015. The link to How to Create a Recruiting Plan is: www.capmembers.com/recruiting. This is the blog
page for recruiting and you will see a pdf symbol on the right hand side called: How to Create a Recruiting
Plan. This has a well laid out month by month plan for your squadron to follow starting with an assessment of
where you are now and where you want to be a year from now! Try it out and don’t hesitate to contact me with
questions, concerns and ideas! Together we can stop the downslide and grow!

SQUADRON HIGHLIGHTS
BIG SIOUX COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-058, BROOKINGS)
(Item submitted by Capt. Hofer and Maj. Gengler)
CyberPatriot-VII competition Round One was the weekend of 24-26 October. Of the
1,007 teams competing in the All Services Division our cyber-warriors scored in the top
five teams. The competition is getting tougher and tougher each year! CAP competes in
the “All Services Division” (Army, Air Force, Navy Marine Corps JROTC, Naval Sea
Cadet Corps, and CAP). This year there are 400 teams from CAP alone. Round Two will
be held 14-16 November.
CRAZY HORSE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-068, CUSTER)
(Items submitted by Lt. K. Bierwirth)


We gained one new cadet this month, Welcome Aboard to Anthony Dillon!

 Our squadron is getting tongue-tied with all the duplicate and triplicate last names, but as a commander
that really comes in handy. I only have to call four different last names and I get all of my squadron’s attention.
Check out senior member promotions for this month.

4

HH

PROMOTIONS

HH

Senior Member Promotions
Congratulations to Joyce Jeffries of the Rushmore Composite Squadron and to Nancy McKenney of
the Wing Staff on their promotion to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel!
Congratulations to David Small III of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron on his promotion to the
rank of First Lieutenant! David received accelerated promotion to this grade on the merit of his Earhart
Award earned as a cadet
Congratulations to Justin Bierwirth of Crazy Horse Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank
of Second Lieutenant!
Cadet Officer Promotions
Congratulations to Nicholas Nash of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron, to Chris Dinnel of Big Sioux
Composite Squadron, and to Bradley Blansett of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron on their
promotion to the rank of Cadet Second Lieutenant and receipt of the milestone Billy Mitchell Award!

Cadet Noncommissioned Officer Promotions
Congratulations to Levi Woodard of the Rushmore Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank
of Cadet Chief Master Sergeant and receipt of the Goddard Award!

Cadet Airman Promotions
Congratulations to Nicholas Kochutin of the Rushmore Composite Squadron on his promotion to the
rank of Cadet Senior Airman and receipt of the Mary Feik Award!

Congratulations to Caleb Weller and Isaak Weller, both of Rushmore Composite Squadron, to Margot
Pearson of the Pierre Composite Squadron, and to Andrew Toft of the Big Sioux Composite Squadron
on their promotion to the rank of Cadet Airman and receipt of the Curry Award!

HH

KUDOS

HH

Congratulations to Capt. Neil Schmid of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on attaining a significant aviation
achievement on 29 October! Neil, flying a SDWG aircraft, completed his “Passport South Dakota Gold Level
Award”. The program, which began in 2010, is sponsored by the South Dakota Pilots Association to promote
general aviation within the state. The program involves attendance at aviation safety seminars, visiting South
Dakota museums with aviation displays and to land at SD public airports. Neil completed that requirement with
5

stops at Belle Fourche, Spearfish, Sturgis, Philip, Kadoka and Presho. The Gold Level Award requires the Neil
have landed at all 74 of the public-use airports in the state, attend four air safety seminars and visit four South
Dakota museums with aviation-related displays. The Passport South Dakota Award consists of an “I Flew South
Dakota” patch and, for the gold level, a “74 Airports” tab for wear on his flight gear.

LEFT: CAPT. SCHMID IN THE COMMAND SEAT OF THE CAP AIRCRAFT IN WHICH HE COMPLETED HIS GOLD LEVEL AWARD
CENTER: MAP OF ALL SEVENTY-FOUR S.D. AIRPORTS AT WHICH CAPT. SCHMID LANDED TO EARN THE GOLD LEVEL AWARD
RIGHT: THE FLY SOUTH DAKOTA GOLD LEVEL AWARD PATCH AND TAB FOR WEAR ON CIVILIAN FLIGHT JACKET

Congratulations to Lt. Col. Greg Lair and Lt. Jerry Hayden, both of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron,
on achieving the status of CAP Mission Pilot. As Mission Pilots they are now authorized to fly all Air
Force assigned missions, all CAP corporate missions and missions for CAP requested by an external
agency. To achieve this status they had to accomplish over 80 tasks such as number of flying hours and types of
flights, complete all mission scanner tasks and tasks for search and rescue and drug demand reduction pilots.

Maj. Sharon Moad of Crazy Horse Composite Squadron has been selected as one of 60 National Red
Cross Shelter Prototype Evaluators, the only one in South Dakota. Her duties encompass evaluating
the services and processes offered in a Red Cross shelter. She will also evaluate procedures for Red
Cross Service Center workers and clients in determining the need for financial assistance. Maj. Moad views her
new responsibilities as an opportunity with honor and pride to represent South Dakota and Civil Air Patrol.

HH

CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL UPDATE

HH

October 9, 2014. By Michael Zielinski [Edited]: At a recent meeting the Commission of Fine Arts reviewed
designs for the Congressional Gold Medal to be issued honoring the World War II members of the Civil Air
Patrol and provided their recommendations. The United States Mint provided a total of 16 different obverse
design candidates and 15 different reverse design candidates for the medal.
From the candidates, the CFA recommended obverse design alternative #15 as
the most elegant composition and most illustrative of the range of duties and
people involved in the Civil Air Patrol. The design features the CAP roundel at
center, dividing the space into three equal segments which represent the pilots,
the support crews, and the CAP mission itself. At the left are two CAP pilots in
profile. To the right, a ground support crew prepares a plane for its mission. At
the bottom is a depiction of one of the many important missions undertaken by
the CAP.

6

For the reverse, the CFA recommended design alternative #4, which contains a
laurel wreath representing honor and service, surrounding CAP insignias. The
inscriptions read “Honor Civilian Volunteers Who Flew Combat &
Humanitarian Missions” and “Act of Congress 2014″. The CFA suggested
careful consideration of typefaces so the pairing of the obverse and reverse result
in a well-composed medal.

At a separate meeting, the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC) was also given the opportunity to
review the same slate of design candidates for the WWII CAP CGM. The CCAC had recommended design
alternative #14 for the obverse, which depicts two CAP pilots with the CAP roundel shown above. At the base
of the design, an armed single-engine CAP aircraft is shown lifting off from the runway. For the reverse, the
CCAC recommended alternative #3, which features the CAP insignia with inscriptions ‘Eyes of the Home
Skies” and “Act of Congress 2014”.

The responsibility to select the final designs for the medal rests with the Secretary of the Treasury.
Source: http://news.coinupdate.com/cfa-recommends-designs-for-wwii-civil-air-patrol-congressional-gold-medal-4511/, accessed 9 October 2014

.

7

“THE SKYCHASER”
South Dakota Wing Electronic Newsletter for November 2014
Official Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force - Citizens Serving Communities: Above and Beyond
Publishers: Wing Commander Colonel John Seten / Wing Vice Commander Lieutenant Colonel Richard Larson
Editor: Major Bruce Kipp  Wing Public Affairs Officer  (605) 261-4507  paa.sdwg@gmail.com

Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SDWingCAP and Like us on Twitter at @SDWingCAP

WING TIPS
CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL PRESENTATION: The Speaker of the U.S. House, the Hon. John

Boehner, announced that the presentation ceremony for the CAP Congressional Gold Medal will be on 10
December at 3:00 pm in the Statuary Hall of the U.S. Capitol. During the bipartisan, bicameral ceremony
presided over by Speaker Boehner, Senate Majority Leader Reid, Senate Republican Leader McConnell, and
House Democratic Leader Pelosi, the Civil Air Patrol will be presented with a Congressional Gold Medal to
collectively honor CAP’s founding members, whose valor and dedication during World War II helped thwart
the enemy and save lives. There will be a gala dinner celebration that evening for veterans, family members,
CAP members and distinguished guests at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in nearby Crystal City. A bronze replica
medal will be presented to each CAP WWII veteran or to a member of the family if the veteran is deceased,
during the dinner. South Dakota has three individuals who will receive the bronze replica medal posthumously.
REDCAP ON 30 NOVEMBER 2014: Late in the evening of 29 November the Air Force Rescue
Coordination Center at Tyndall AFB, Florida notified the South Dakota Wing and the Wyoming Wing of the
Civil Air Patrol that an aircraft was overdue to return to Spearfish, SD. Poor weather conditions prevented the
launch of an immediate search that night. Around 6:00am on Sunday a ground search team was dispatched from
CAP’s Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron (Spearfish) to Colony, WY which cell phone forensics
indicated as a possible search site. Later that morning three aircraft; two from South Dakota Wing and one from
Wyoming Wing, were launched to conduct an aerial search for the missing aircraft’s emergency beacon (ELT).
Using special onboard sensors the CAP aircraft began picking up the ELT signal and worked to refine the
location. About one hour later, using aerial triangulation, a Wyoming Wing aircraft sighted the missing aircraft
on the ground in a snow-covered high desert area near the tiny town of Alzada, MT. The ground search team
was re-directed from Colony to Alzada where they linked up with officers from the Carter County Sheriff’s
Office. While the ground team was en route, WYWG and SDWG aircraft took turns orbiting the crash site to
direct the ground team to the location. Once Carter County Sheriff Office personnel were at the crash site the
1

SDWG ground team and both wing’s aircraft returned to their bases. The outstanding support for the REDCAP
was provided by personnel from Rushmore Composite Squadron, Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron and
Wing Staff members throughout the state.

IN THE PHOTOS THE CAP GROUND SEARCH TEAM WORKS TO SECURE THE CRASH SITE. PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE CARTER COUNTY
SHERIFF’S OFFICE

 AERIAL WILDLIFE SURVEYS: SDWG flew aerial surveys of terrestrial wildlife on 5 days in November
in support of the Department of Game, Fish & Parks and South Dakota State University. GF&P surveyed deer,
goats, mountain lions, and elk while SDSU surveyed elk and bobcats. The result was 15.7 hours flying over
western South Dakota and the Black Hills. CAP pilot for the flights was Lt. Col. Gary Hewett. Depending on
whom the sortie supported they were accompanied by either Mr. Brandon Tycz from SDSU (6 flying hours) or
by Ms. Lauren Wiechman from GF&P (9.7 flying hours).
 UPCOMING SPLIT SAREX: SDWG Director of Operations Maj. Nicholas Gengler advises that 23-25
January there will be another Split SAREX across the Wing. Not sure on exact locations yet.
 NCR AEROSPACE EDUCATION WEEKEND: On the weekend of 22-23 November, the North Dakota
Wing’s 119th Air National Guard Cadet Squadron in Fargo hosted a North Central Region Aerospace Education
Weekend. Cadets and senior members from NDWG, SDWG and MNWG
participated. The weekend went fairly well and the cadets had a great
time. NDWG provided presentations by NDSU students in Aerospace
fields. Among the highlights were a tour to the Aerospace Museum in
Fargo and the Ronald Reagan Minuteman Missile Site. The cadets also
had the opportunity to try out flight simulators. O-rides also took place
although there were some delays due to icing and flat tires. Most cadets
got to go up but, unfortunately not everyone. The eight SDWG cadets got
one o-ride each. Many thanks to Maj. Gengler for heading up the SDWG
contingent. In the photo provided by Lt. Col. Larson a museum docent
briefs the cadets of the WWII-era P-51 Mustang fighter aircraft.
 SDWG OUTSTANDING RED CROSS VOLUNTEER: On 12 November, Wing staff member Lt. Col.
Nancy McKenney was called out by the Red Cross to support shelter operations for victims of a hotel fire in
Pierre. Some 35 families and individuals lost their homes, their belongings, and some their jobs. Leaving behind
everything but what they were wearing they ran out into 10 degree weather and blowing wind. The Red Cross
opened a warming center at a local middle school. When it was decided that the event was going to require
longer term care a shelter was set up at the First United Methodist Church of Pierre. Over the next several days
the Red Cross worked with several agencies and found everyone an apartment. The shelter closed the following
2

Saturday. She commented, “We returned home Saturday tired but happy with what we accomplished.” On 23
November, she was again called out by the Red Cross, this time to go to Buffalo, in upstate New York in the
aftermath of the monster snow storm and, as the temperatures warmed up, with possible flooding. Her job was
to keep track of all the shelters to make sure they had everything needed like cots, blankets, food and staff.
McKenney said. "When you go into a disaster, you never know when you get
there what you are going to have left standing.” Over the weekend, 65 people
spent the night at the shelter. She originally expected to be there for 2 to 3 weeks
with the possibility of a longer stay. However, by the 28th the news was great.
Everyone was back in their homes or in a hotel and the flooding had not
materialized to the extent that the people would need sheltering. The Red Cross
continues to help the families but her job was done so she came home. She
commented, “I was glad to go to help but glad to be home.”

STAFF NOTES
WING COMMANDER
Col. John Seten, CAP

 SDWG has signed up for a survey/poll web service. Question Pro is at www.questionpro.com/. Once
there you can log in with the credentials that have been disseminated. Thanks to Lt. Col. Miles for suggesting
this website. As a non-profit we received a free upgrade to the pro version. Please put this to use as this is a
great way to obtain feedback from our members and help us to improve our wing.
 On 17 November, Col. Seten gave a presentation on the Civil Air Patrol to the Sioux Falls Rotary Club.
He was accompanied by Lt. Col. Rick Larson, Capt. Jason Erickson and Capt. Neil Schmid who helped answer
questions following the presentation. Later that day Col. Seten and Lt. Col. Larson met with members of the
Sioux Falls chapter of the American Red Cross.
 I’m pleased to announce Wing Historian Maj. Todd Epp has agreed to take on the added responsibility
as the Wing's Government Relations Advisor.


I’m also pleased to announce that Maj. Bruce Kipp has been appointed Assistant Wing Historian.

WING DIRECTOR OF AEROSPACE EDUCATION
Lt. Col. Rodney “Buck” DeWeese, CAP

 Attention all pilots, Aerospace Education Officers and squadron commanders! The Teacher Orientation
Program (TOP), formerly the "Fly-a-Teacher Program," is alive and well with new funding for FY 2015. TOP
provides the opportunity for teachers to experience orientation flights in CAP aircraft. Teachers can receive
these orientation flights following optional workshops at local area airports and can then share their experiences
with their students. Sign them up as an Aerospace Education Member (AEM) and they get one free hour of
flying. This is a great recruiting tool as well for Middle School teachers and their students.
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WING DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS
Capt. Jerry Gabert, CAP

 For those of you that do not know me allow me to introduce myself. I am Captain Jerry Gabert and have
recently taken over as the SDWG Director of Communications. I have been a member of CAP since August of
2011. I have been in the radio communications industry for 34 years with 22 of that being with the State of SD.
My goals for the SDWG communications program are to to improve it wherever we can. In recent months and
years we have replaced antennas and made repairs on CAP repeaters at Sioux Falls, Turkey Ridge and White.
We are working on replacing the antenna for the Pierre CAP repeater. I want to continue this work where
needed in other parts of the state as time permits. I also would like to see every squadron have at least one VHF
base radio and preferably two.
Recently we’ve had a welcome increase of SDWG members involved in the CAP HF radio program. Until
recently Lt. Col. David Jefferies (Callsign: Grasslands-44) was our only active HF station. Lt. Col. Jefferies
travels south in the winter but still participates from his mobile HF radio when he can. On a recent National
CAP HF Net we had five SDWG stations involved. Those involved were Captain Collister (Callsign:
Grasslands-631) of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron, Lt. Col. Jefferies (Grasslands-44), and Major
Craig Goodrich (Callsign: Grasslands-311) of the Rushmore Composite Squadron, Lt. Dravland (Callsign:
Grasslands-386) of the Pierre Composite Squadron and myself Callsign: Grasslands-4 from Sioux Falls
Composite Squadron. I look forward to continuing to work with all of you in the future. I have set up a new and
hopefully easy to remember email address for wing communications, it is sdwingcomm@gmail.com.
Hope you all have a wonderful holiday season and a happy new year.

SQUADRON HIGHLIGHTS
BIG SIOUX COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-058, BROOKINGS)
(Item by Lt. Hofer and Maj. Gengler)
 CYBERPATRIOT-VII ROUND TWO: Team “Big Sioux” made it through Round Two and into the State
Round and Platinum Tier. All CyberPatriot teams participate in the State Round but only the Platinum Tier can
advance to the national finals. After talking with other team’s coaches we agreed that this year’s Round Two
was more difficult than the previous year’s Round Three (the round that used to get you into the national
finals). Only the top third of teams move into the Platinum Tier. The top six teams move from the State Round
to the Regional Round and from there only the top two teams in each category (CAP/ROTC) go to the national
finals. We had our hands full and forgot to get pictures again. The State Round runs 5-7 December.
 VETERAN’S DAY: On 11 November, the Big Sioux Color Guard
presented Flags representing each branch of service for the Veteran's Day
Ceremony put on by the Brookings VFW and the American Legion at the
Swiftel Center. Those involved are C/Maj Joshua Klosterman, C/Capt
Tyler Gross, C/Lt Chris Dinnel, C/SrA Nathaniel Fleet, C/MSgt Jaden
Petersen, and C/SrA Graham Dinnel.
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CRAZY HORSE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-068, CUSTER)
(Items and photos by Lt. K. Bierwirth)
 CADET THESPIAN HITS THE BOARDS: C/CMSgt Jason Parry performed in Custer High School’s play
"The Beatles Slept Here" in the role of Detective Johnny B. Goode. The squadron attended the play to support
our cadet thespian and do some recruiting. We were in the audience wearing gray CAP tee-shirts and cheering
on our Cadet Commander!
 WELCOME ABOARD: We are pleased to welcome our Hunter Rice as our newest cadet! We are pleased
that you have joined Civil Air Patrol and proud you are a member of our squadron.
 WREATHS ACROSS AMERICA: Our squadron has been active around Custer and Hot Springs selling
sponsorships for the Wreaths Across America program.
 SQUADRON OUTREACH: Lt. Kris Bierwirth did a presentation about CAP for the Zonta International
Group in Custer.

 WINTER SURVIVAL TRAINING: Our cadets worked on their winter survival skills
during our recent snow storm and made pine branch snow shoes and built a fire to keep warm.
In the photo Cadet Airman Anthony Dillon wears field expedient snowshoes he constructed.

LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-063, SPEARFISH)
(Item by Maj D. Small)
 See the Wing Tips item above on the squadron’s ground search team participation in the REDCAP on
30 November. Our ground search team was first at the crash site arriving ahead of the members of the Clark
County Sheriff’s Office. We are very proud of the dedication and the professionalism displayed by the members
of this eight-man team operating under very trying weather conditions in very rugged terrain.
PIERRE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-38, PIERRE)
(Item and photos by Lt. Col. Gatje)
 CHRISTMAS AT THE CAPITOL: Members of the squadron met at the state capitol building on Saturday,
22 November to decorate a Civil Air Patrol Christmas tree for the “Christmas at the Capitol” display held each
year in the South Dakota Capitol Building. This year’s theme commemorates the 125th
Anniversary of statehood for South Dakota. Although the number of trees is limited, this
year’s display includes over 90 trees decorated by individuals and organizations from across
the state. The Grand Lighting Ceremony took place on 25 November after a welcome,
introduction and Christmas wishes from Governor Dennis Daugaard and First Lady Linda
Daugaard. It is prestigious to be allowed to place a tree in the capitol and the display will be
visited by thousands of people during the open house dates. This year the public can view the
trees daily from 26 November through 27 December between from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
This is the 34th Annual Christmas at the Capitol. Admission is free. It is handicap accessible.
Members helping to decorate the tree included Lt. Col. Myra Christensen, Lt. Col. Tam Gatje,
Capt. Richard Helton, Maj. Lee Vaughan, Lt. Roberta Vaughan, Lt. Ruth Carley, Lt. Jonathan
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Becker and C/Amn Margot Pearson. The Pierre Composite Squadron invites all members and families and
friends to tour Christmas at the Capitol and see the squadron tree. It is toward the west end on the second floor.

LEFT: MAJ. LEE VAUGHAN AND LT. COL. MYRA CHRISTENSEN MAKE FINAL ADJUSTMENTS TO DECORATIONS ON THE CAP TREE
RIGHT: A HALLWAY IN THE CAPITOL BUILDING WITH TEAMS STILL DECORATING THEIR TREES, THE CAP TREE IS AT FAR LEFT

RUSHMORE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-031, RAPID CITY)
(Item by Maj. Goodrich & Lt. Kuecker)
 WREATHS ACROSS AMERICA: Our big fundraiser for this year is off to a good
start. A big thanks to Cadets Noah Misslet, Nick Kochutin, Jonathan Busch, and Jamie
Nowlin for making it to Cabela’s on the 8th. We sold 41 wreaths, took orders online for
another 5 and received several cash donations. We hope to have several more wreath sales
before the end of November. On the 22nd we sold 40 wreaths at Scheels. Thanks to Col.
Mike Beason, SM Andy Weathers and his wife Trish (she sold six on the phone while
making copies of order forms) and to Cadets Errol Kelly, Jonathan Busch, Dalton Mann,
Samuel Lawrence, and Noah Misselt. On the 29th we had about 10 people show up to sell wreath sponsorships
at Black Hills Bagels, West Side Family Thrift Center, and Boyd’s Drug in Rapid City. On 13 December we
will lay the wreaths at the Black Hills National Cemetery.

PHOTO-1: SM ROY WELLER AND C/AMN CALEB WELLER
PHOTO-2: C/AMN MALIA GOODRICH, C/AMN CALEB WELLER
PHOTO-3: C/AMN ISAAK WELLER AND C/CMSGT LEVI WOODARD
PHOTO-4: C/AMN ISAAK WELLER, C/CMSGT LEVI AND SM TRAVIS WOODARD

SIOUX FALLS COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-050, SIOUX FALLS)
(Items and photos by Capt. Erickson)
 SCOUTS VISIT THE SQUADRON: Cub Scouts from Dell Rapids had an aerospace adventure in Sioux
Falls the evening of 24 November. Some 13 boys and their parents made the trip to the Sioux Falls airport in the
cold and dark where Capt. Jason Erickson showed the scouts and their parents the squadron’s Cessna-182
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aircraft. Fortunately they had a well-lit, heated hangar to learn about CAP. Capt. Erickson powered up the
G1000 avionics suite before the group arrived and programed a search pattern over Dell Rapids on the aircraft
display. After giving a brief demonstration of how the control surfaces of an aircraft work and what they do, the
real fun began. The scouts got to take turns in the “driver seat” inside the aircraft. With so many, and an
airplane that only seats four, they had to work in shifts. Although not entirely orderly at times, Capt. Erickson
managed to herd all of them through and explain how that search pattern may look over top of their hometown.
The parents asked a lot of great questions about the aircraft and CAP. While these scouts were all 6 to 8 years
old, Capt. Erickson didn’t miss the opportunity to plant the “future member” seed with all present. Hopefully
he stirred the aviation bug in some of them and we look forward to their joining CAP when they turn 12!

 AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL TOWER TOUR: On 15 November, the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron took
part in a unique Aerospace Education outing. Over 30 cadets and seniors toured the Sioux Falls Air Traffic
Control facility. This was great opportunity to see “behind the curtain”. The
morning of the tour Sioux Falls experienced its first significant snow of the
season; ceilings were low, visibility short, and both our beloved CAP vans
needed a jumpstart. Who said we don’t overcome adversity? Vans
jumpstarted, heaters ablaze, we piled in for three shifts, the top of each hour
starting at 0900.
ATC Tower Director Mr. Robert Huggins and his crew were awesome tour
guides. We were briefed on the main floor of the facility about many air
traffic control workings within the building. In addition to the control tower
“cab” up top, our facility in Sioux Falls contains a radar room, called a
TRACON, and many offices for FAA staff that work in our area. Next stop
on the tour the climb to the top to see the controllers in action. It was a great
day to tour because we got to see all facets of their job with the snow and
low visibility: directing snow plowing equipment, handling ground ops for
departing and arriving planes, dealing with IFR spacing for incoming and
outgoing traffic, and keeping track of overfly traffic at the flight levels. It can get very busy, very quickly for
the controllers especially when the weather is rough. Our thanks to the gracious crew at the Sioux Falls Air
Traffic Control Facility for their time on a Saturday. We look forward to doing it again in a few years with a
new group of cadets.
 ORIENTATION FLIGHT: The cold weather on 22 November finally took a break, which turned out to be
a great day for an o-ride piloted by Capt. Neil Schmid. This day was the first flight in any kind of airplane for
C/AB Eric Ortega (left) and he enjoyed every minute of the one hour flight from Sioux Falls to Yankton. After
a rest stop in Yankton, C/A1C Chris Schuppan (right) flew the Cessna-172 from Yankton airport to the Gavin’s
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Point Dam and around the lake. There were hundreds of geese floating in the
lake, enjoying the warm sunshine. On the return leg to Sioux Falls, Chris
flew the advanced flight maneuvers described in syllabus 8/3rd powered
orientation flight. These maneuvers demonstrated slow flight, steep turns, sturns, and search patterns used in SAR. There was a discussion of stalls,
steep spirals, spins and load factors affecting the aircraft.
 PARADE OF LIGHTS: On 28 November, 22 members of the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron and the
Big Sioux Composite Squadron jointly supported the annual holiday Parade of Lights held in downtown Sioux
Falls. They emplaced and recovered do-not-park signs along the nine-block parade route, provided control and
assistance at the disabled/handicapped parking lot, manned a warm room where disabled/handicapped were able
to view the parade, provided crowd control along the parade route, and helped clean up afterwards.

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PROMOTIONS

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Senior Member Promotions
Congratulations to James Dillon of Crazy Horse Composite Squadron on promotion to the rank of
Captain! He is active in the squadron as the Deputy Commander for Seniors, IT Officer, Recruiting
and Retention Officer, Testing Officer, Assistant AE Officer and Assistant Communications Officer.
Cadet Officer Promotion
Congratulations to Tyler Gross of Big Sioux Composite Squadron on his promotion to the
rank of Cadet Captain and receipt of the milestone Amelia Earhart Award!

Cadet Noncommissioned Officer Promotions
Congratulations to Blake Hayden of the Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank
of Cadet Senior Master Sergeant and receipt of the General Jimmy Doolittle Award!

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Cadet Airman Promotions
Congratulations to Graham Dinnel of the Big Sioux Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank
of Cadet Senior Airman and receipt of the Mary Feik Award!

Congratulations to Christopher Schuppan of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on his promotion to the
rank of Cadet Airman First Class and receipt of the General Hap Arnold Award!

Congratulations to Anthony Dillon, Crazy Horse Composite Squadron, to Jonathan Busch and Samuel
Lawrence, Rushmore Composite Squadron, and Robert Boecker and Kristin Lerdal of the Sioux Falls
Composite Squadron on their promotion to the rank of Cadet Airman and receipt of the Curry Award!

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KUDOS

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Congratulations to Maj. Sharon Moad of Crazy Horse Composite Squadron on earning “Senior”
level rating in the Specialty Track – Public Affairs!

Congratulations to Capt. Richard Geeting of the Crazy Horse Composite Squadron on earning
Technician level in specialty track - Finance in the Senior Member Professional Development
Program!

Congratulations to SM Travis Woodard on completing Level-1 of the Senior Member Professional
Development Program and on his assignment as Information technology Officer for the Rushmore
Composite Squadron!
Congratulations to SM Tim Shannon on completing Level-1 of the Senior Member Professional
Development Program and on his assignment as Aerospace Education Officer for the Rushmore
Composite Squadron!
Congratulations to SM Roy Weller on completing Level-1 of the Senior Member Professional
Development Program and on his assignment as assistant Deputy Commander for Cadets for the
Rushmore Composite Squadron!

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WWII-ERA CAP CAPTAIN ZACK MOSLEY

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Zack Mosley (1906-1993) was an American comic strip artist best known for the aviation adventures in his
long-running The adventures of Smilin’ Jack which ran in more than 300 newspapers from 1933 to 1973. But,
did you know Zack Mosley was also one of the founding members of the Civil Air Patrol, a highly decorated
one as well? He was one of the heroic pilots who flew anti-submarine patrols on the U.S. east coast.
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CITATION FOR THE AWARD OF THE AIR MEDAL PRESENTED CAP CAPTAIN ZACK MOSLEY BY PRESIDENT HARRY TRUMAN

ONE OF SEVERAL COMICS ZACK MOSLEY DREW WITH A CAP THEME

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“THE SKYCHASER”
South Dakota Wing Electronic Newsletter for December 2014
Official Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force - Citizens Serving Communities: Above and Beyond
Publishers: Wing Commander Colonel John Seten / Wing Vice Commander Lieutenant Colonel Richard Larson
Editor: Major Bruce Kipp  Wing Public Affairs Officer  (605) 261-4507  paa.sdwg@gmail.com

Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/SDWingCAP and Like us on Twitter at @SDWingCAP

WING TIPS

CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL PRESENTATION: On 10 December, at a ceremony in Statuary Hall

at the U.S. Capitol a Congressional Gold Medal (CGM) was presented to collectively honor World War II
members of the Civil Air Patrol whose valor and dedication during the war helped thwart the enemy submarine
attacks against our vital shipping lines, saved lives, secured our nation’s borders, conducted missions to support
the war effort, and helped train members of the armed forces.
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Presided over by House Speaker Boehner, Senate Majority Leader Reid, Senate Republican Leader McConnell,
and House Democratic Leader Pelosi, the CGM was accepted by Col. Lester Wolff, a WWII CAP subchaser
and former U.S. representative from New York and by CAP National Commander Maj. Gen. Joe Vazquez. The
gold medal will be placed on permanent display in the Smithsonian Institution.
Later that evening at a gala dinner celebration was held for surviving veterans, families of deceased members,
CAP members and distinguished guests in nearby Crystal City. Maj. Gen. Vazquez personally presented a
bronze replica medal to each CAP WWII veteran or to a member of the family of a deceased veteran.
South Dakota has four who will receive the bronze replica medal;
Mrs. Sylvia Henkin, a resident of Sioux Falls, and three deceased
individuals – Luverne “Vern” Kraemer, Vernon Jeffries, and Earl
Wilkinson. Mrs. Henkin and a member of Jeffries and Wilkinson
families will receive the bronze replica medal at ceremonies to be
held in South Dakota. Mrs. Norma Kraemer, widow of Vern
Kraemer, travelled to Washington, D.C. for the ceremony and was
presented her husband’s bronze replica medal by Gen. Vazquez.
In the photo Mrs. Norma Kraemer is presented with her husband’s
medal by CAP National Commander Gen. Vazquez at the evening
dinner celebration. North Central Region Commander Col. Robert
Todd is in the foreground.

THE CIVIL AIR PATROL CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDAL

 2015 JOINT DAKOTAS ENCAMPMENT: Encampment Commander Maj. Nick Gengler sends: “I am
pleased to announce that C/Maj. Joshua Klosterman has accepted the role of Cadet Commander for the 2015
Joint Dakota Encampment. I know Joshua is as excited as I am and together we will strive for excellence at the
encampment at Camp Rapid. He will be reviewing applications for cadet executive staff in the coming days.
After cadet executive staff positions are filled applications will opened up for Line and Support Staff. I am still
looking for Seniors to join me at this Encampment so if any Seniors would like to participate please email me.”
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 AERIAL WILDLIFE SURVEYS: SDWG flew aerial surveys of terrestrial wildlife on the 3rd, 5th, 10th, 19th,
30 and 31st of December in support of the state Department of Game, Fish & Parks and South Dakota State
University. GF&P surveyed deer, goats, mountain lions, and elk while SDSU surveyed elk and bobcats. The
result was 18.5 hours for GF&P and 7.2 hours for SDSU for a total of 25.7 hours flying over western South
Dakota and the Black Hills. CAP pilot for the flights was Lt. Col. Gary Hewett. Depending on whom the sortie
supported he was accompanied by Ms. Lauren Wiechman from GF&P or Mr. Brandon Tycz of SDSU.
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 SPLIT SAREX 23-25 JANUARY: Director of Operations Maj. Nicholas Gengler reminds everyone that
there will be another Split SAREX on 23-25 January. Mission bases will be at Big Sioux Composite Squadron
HQ in Brookings and Rushmore Composite Squadron HQ in Rapid City.
 WEST RIVER CHRISTMAS PARTY: Nearly fifty CAP members and family gathered in Piedmont for a
Christmas party on Saturday, 20 December. Though most in attendance came from the Black Hills squadrons,
Capt. Marsha Sumpter and Maj. Lee Vaughan came all the way from Philip. Maj. Craig Goodrich started things
off by playing familiar holiday tunes on the piano. Later Col. Mike Beason and 2nd Lt. Jack Jensen added to
the festive spirit with a hand-bell serenade. SM Melissa Weller and C/2nd Lt Jared Doyle kept the piano music
going throughout the evening. Food was abundant and fellowship spirited. Lt. Col. Gary Hewett challenged
C/Col William Small to a game of pool and succeeded in pulling off a narrow win. Cadets enjoyed the warm
outdoor weather. All in all it was a relaxing evening renewing friendships and celebrating the holidays.

STAFF NOTES
WING VICE COMMANDER
Lt. Col. Richard Larson, CAP
Ideas For Your 2015 Civil Air Patrol Resolutions…
1. Be More Active In Your Squadron
2. Keep Up With Training
3. Bring A Potential Recruit
4. Seek A Promotion Or Skill Level Advancement
5. Bring More Value To The Team
6. Fly Fly Fly
…as evidenced by our numerous taskings in 2014, SD Civil Air Patrol is a valued part of both the AF team and
local emergency responders. Whether we are searching for a missing aircraft, tracking a bobcat, presenting the
colors, serving our communities or on a training mission, you are our most important asset! Be ready for the
call. Thanks for a record setting 2014. Col Seten and I expect great things in 2015! HAPPY NEW YEAR!
Attached as the last page is SD OEM’s list of training courses for 1st Quarter 2015.

WING RECRUITING/RETENTION OFFICER
Col. Mike Mouw, CAP
I am Col. Mike Mouw. I just transferred back to SDWG from IAWG and have been assigned as the SDWG
Wing Recruiting/Retention Officer. I wanted to let you all know who I am, what my background is, and share
some insight into my role.
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Here is a little about me. I have been in CAP since March of 1991. I joined while stationed at Sheppard AFB in
Texas. I have been a member of many wings over the years, but this area is my home and it is great to be back. I
have served as a Squadron, Group, and Wing commander.
I am very passionate about CAP and what this organization offers the membership and the communities we
serve. We are unlike any other volunteer organization! There is a high level of expectation from our leadership
and the organizations we support in our three missions. Because we have such expectations and need to be
mission ready, thus we require a strong workforce in order to perform. That's where I come in. I am
responsible for attracting and retaining the most valuable resource CAP has, our people! We typically are the
first person new members interact with and sometimes, the last. Our jobs are never done and we span the
responsibility from the individual level to the large efforts in recruiting. With all that said, we have the
opportunity to meet new people and share the CAP story with them, what else can you ask for?! My role is to
assist you in recruiting and retention.
I have worked all these types of activities and have many ideas that are yours to use. However, geographical
areas can be different and may require a local awareness of what works and what may not. Together we work to
ensure that every opportunity we get, we make the most of. Any questions, ideas, or concerns, please let me
know. You can reach me on my cell at 712-324-1624.

WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER
Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP

 I am pleased to announce that SM Travis Woodard of the Rushmore Composite Squadron has joined the
Wing Public Affairs staff as an Assistant Public Affairs Officer. His primary area of responsibility will be to
manage the Wing’s public affairs social media program.

SQUADRON HIGHLIGHTS
BIG SIOUX COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-058, BROOKINGS)
(Items by Maj. Gengler, Capt. Hofer)
 CYBERPATRIOT-VII: The Big Sioux cyber-security team placed 6th overall in the
All Services Division and 2nd in CAP teams in the 3rd Round of Cyber Patriot-VII
competition held from 5-7 December. This means our crew of ace cyber-sleuths will move
on to the 4th Round (Semi-Finals) to be held 16-18 January. If they continue to do as well
as they have done so far they will qualify for the all-expenses-paid trip to Maryland where
they will compete in the Nationals for the final round.
 WREATHS ACROSS AMERICA: Five members of the squadron took part in laying decorative holiday
wreaths on veterans’ graves at the Greenwood Cemetery in Brookings. The local Veterans of Foreign Wars and
the local American Legion were also in attendance and participated in the ceremony and the laying of wreaths.
The squadron’s color guard, albeit a diminished one, presented and retired the colors adding an additional note
of solemnity to the occasion.

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CRAZY HORSE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-068, CUSTER)
(Items and photos by Lts. K. and V. Bierwirth)
 This was the first year that we had an entry in Custer's Parade of Lights. We may have be small but it
was good publicity for the squadron, for SDWG and for CAP.
 The squadron hosted a Christmas pot luck party and friends and family joined us for some awesome
food and entertainment.
 WREATHS ACROSS AMERICA: We were all ready for
the big day but much to our dismay our wreaths got lost in
transit. Fortunately, we were able to locate seven wreaths for
the ceremony and it went beautifully. Better late than never, we
finally received our shipment of wreaths on 13 December. The
squadron, the Hot Springs American Legion and people from
the Custer and Hot Springs communities helped to place the
wreaths at the Hot Springs National Cemetery. In the photo,
taken by Lt. V. Bierwirth, C/Amn Antony Dillon, C/MSgt
Thomas Dillon, and C/CMSgt Jason Parry salute honor our
fallen veterans.
LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-063, SPEARFISH)
(Item by Lt. Col. Hopewell, Maj D. Small Jr., photos by Capt. Collister)
 PUBLIC OUTREACH: Capt. Sylvia Small gave a brief presentation about Civil Air Patrol at the Seventh
Day Adventist church in Spearfish on 6 December.
 GROUND TEAM TRAINING: On Monday, 22 December, six cadets and two senior members took
advantage of the Holiday break to hone their ground team skills. Cadets Austin and Keyvin Rauscher, Justin
and Ryan Harris, Jared Doyle and William Small filled in needed items for their ground team SQTR
qualifications. Cadets practiced extinguishing small fires to counting paces and map topography reading.
Instruction was by Maj. David Small Jr.
 HOLIDAZZLE: Saturday, 6 December, was the night of the annual winter Spearfish parade down Main
Street. The Spearfish Holidazzle Light Parade, with its theme of the seasonal holidays, followed the two mile
route, was led by the Color Guard and cadets of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron. Carrying and
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guarding the colors in their blues were Cadet Squadron Commander C/SMSgt Justin Harris, C/MSgt Ryan
Harris, C/Lt Jared Doyle, and C/TSgt Keyvin Rauscher. C/CMSgt Connor Caneva, C/AB Katie Spruill, C/TSgt
Austin Rauscher directly followed the Color Guard wearing BDU’s and safety vests. They handed out candy to
the crowd lining the sidewalks and distributed recruiting pamphlets to spectators that appeared to be of eligible
age for joining CAP. Squadron Commander Capt. Bill Collister and Lt. Col. James Hopewell provided ballast
for the CAP van that closely followed the cadet contingent. The impressive, disciplined, and precise display by
the squadron at the head of the procession elicited attention and applause from parade-goers along the route.

PIERRE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-38, PIERRE)
(Item by Lt. Col. Gatje)
 PIERRE SQUADRON CELEBRATES CHRISTMAS AT THE CAPITOL: The
annual Capitol Christmas Tree display ended at the capitol the weekend after
Christmas. This was the 34th anniversary for “Christmas at the Capitol” and
included almost 100 decorated trees throughout the building. As the number of trees
allowed is limited a group has to apply for and be selected for one of the coveted
spots. To be included in the capitol display is an honor. Pierre Squadron applied and
was selected to display a tree. The squadron tree was located on the second
floor. Thousands of people tour the Capitol Christmas Trees each year. Many come
just to view the trees. CAP received excellent visibility.
Ms. Barb Bjorneberg, who co-chairs the display, says there were about 30,000
signatures in this year's guest book. Many visitors do not bother to sign the guest
book so there were likely many more visitors. She says it's estimated that at least 47
states were represented in the guest book. She says out-of-state visitors are always
wowed with the display.
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RUSHMORE COMPOSITE SQUADRON (SD-031, RAPID CITY)
(Item by Capt. Josh Hall)
 IT’S NOT TOO COLD TO FLY: Rushmore cadets took to the
sky over Christmas break. Near-zero temperature, clear skies, and low
winds were a perfect formula for a great day to fly. C/Amn Samuel
Lawrence, C/A1C Tyler Eberle, C/Amn Isaak Weller, and C/TSgt Joe
Jagodzinski each had the opportunity to sit at the aircraft’s controls.
The flights departed Rapid City and headed west over the city and
then over the northern Black Hills. Cadet Lawrence was first in the
front seat as it was his first o-flight. The cadets had opportunity to see
the entire Black Hills. The first stop was Spearfish then, flying IFR (I
Follow Roads), to Lead following Hwy 385 south to Pactola Reservoir
and Sheridan Lake. This was followed by a quick jaunt to the Mount Rushmore area, around Harney Peak,
Crazy Horse, again stopping at Custer County Airport. Sadly, a local favorite burger place did not deliver to the
airport and was closed for the holiday season. From Custer we flew south to Hot Springs for a view of the
southern hills before returning to Rapid City. Capt. Hall stated, "I'm still just as excited to go on an orientation
flight today as I was many years ago as a 12 year old cadet sitting on two phone books to look over the
dashboard." In the photo, front left is C/Amn Samuel Lawrence, front right is Capt. Josh Hall.

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PROMOTIONS

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Cadet Noncommissioned Officer Promotions
Although not a promotion per se, congratulations to C/CMSgt Jason Parry of Crazy Horse Composite
Squadron who earned his Neil Armstrong Award!

Congratulations to Thomas Dillon of Crazy Horse Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank
of Cadet Master Sergeant and receipt of the Lindbergh Award!

Congratulations to Ivan Kreger of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on his promotion to the rank of
Cadet Technical Sergeant and receipt of the Captain Eddie Rickenbacker Award!

Congratulations to Nathaniel Fleet of the Big Sioux Falls Composite Squadron on his promotion to the
rank of Cadet Staff Sergeant and receipt of the Wright Brothers Award!

Cadet Airman Promotions
Congratulations to Tyler Eberle of Rushmore Composite Squadron and to Andrew Toft of Big Sioux
Composite Squadron on their promotion to the rank of Cadet Airman First Class and receipt of the
General Hap Arnold Award!

7

HH

KUDOS

HH

Congratulations to C/2nd Lt Bradley Blansett of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron who
completed his Ground Team Leader requirements on this mission. In addition, Lt. David Small
III also of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron renewed his Emergency Services qualification
as GTL. In addition he also recertified as UDF.

Wing Director of Emergency Services Lt. Col. Daryl Miles sends a big Kudo to Wing Director of
Communications Capt. Jerry Gabert for getting the Big Sioux Composite Squadron base radios up
and running again. He spent several hours making sure we are mission ready.
Congratulations to Capt. Patrick Nowlin, the wing’s newest Mission Pilot! During his second flight of
the REDCAP mission on 30 November, Capt. Nowlin, Vice Squadron Commander and the Assistant
Communications Officer for the Rushmore Composite Squadron passed his Form 91 Check Ride.
Congratulations to Lt. Justin Bierwirth and to Lt. Kris Bierwirth, both of Crazy Horse Composite
Squadron who earned the Yeager Award!

Former commander of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron, Lt. Col. Robert “Keith’ Collins, 91, passed
away on 8 December in Billings. He had moved to Billings from Spearfish, in July 2012 with his wife to be
near family. He graduated from Belle Fourche High School in 1941, served in U.S. Army Engineers in North
Africa and India in World War II, and graduated from South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in 1949.
Keith enjoyed a long career as a mining engineer in Wyoming, the Dakotas and also worked in many countries
(Chile, Thailand, Malaysia, India). In 1981, he became director of mineral resource procurement for the Eastern
Hemisphere. Stationed in London he supervised mining operations in Europe, North Africa and Turkey.
He moved to Houston in 1985, retired in 1986, and moved to Spearfish Canyon in the Black Hills.
He married Lorraine Hill in 1958 and the couple had three children. He also had four grandchildren and three
great-grandchildren.

Cremation has taken place. The family plans a service in The Black Hills National
Cemetery in Sturgis, SD, at a later date. Condolences may be sent to the family
at www.cfgbillings.com through “Our Families.”

According to Maj. Daryl Hayes of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron, “Just off hand, I do know Keith
was one of the charter members of the squadron in August of 1987. I joined one month later. I know he was a
8

Mission Coordinator, Mission Pilot, Squadron Commander, Wing Safety Officer, Operations Director, Ground
Team Ops, Ground Team Leader, Air Ops, Supply Officer and many other offices. He did indeed get Senior
Member of the Year but I don't know which year. While he was Squadron Commander the squadron got
Squadron of the Year at least twice times if not three times. He almost single handedly arranged to get the
current squadron building moved in from Ellsworth and made the arrangements to get the septic system,
electrical service and water for the building. … He coordinated at least two wing conferences that were held in
Spearfish. He put out targets and made up scenarios for practice missions and coordinated with Air Force
Liaison during the missions. He flew on many REDCAPS but I can't tell the names of them without looking at
the records. I know there was one that went down just south of McIntosh, one just north of Isabel, one that went
down north of Deadwood and two southeast of Rapid City. I'm sure there were more but without records I can't
say how many or which ones.”

HAPPY 2015!
FROM THE EDITOR OF THE SKYCHASER

9

https://dps.sd.gov/emergency_services/emergency_management/training_schedule.aspx

CIVIL AIR PATROL • WINTER 2014 • UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AUXILIARY

In This Issue . . .
2013 JDESE Encampment and
SAREX
Commander’s Column
Commander
Col. John Seten
Address
Editor, “Wing Roundup”
4275 Airport Road, Suite A
Rapid City, SD 57703

3
5

AirVenture 2013 Air Show

6

The Birth and Growth of the SD
Wing of the Civil Air Patrol, Part 1

9

My Experiences at National Blue
Beret 2013

16

Labor Day Sunday 2013 ELT
Search

21

Wing Communications Challenge

22

Maj. Epp Receives Balsem Award

23

All letters and/or articles submitted are the opinions expresses by
the authors and are not necessarily those of the editor/publisher.

Mickelson Trail Rescue

25

Changes of address:
Members: Magazines are posted with the current address
on file with CAP NHQ/DDP. Therefore, changes of address
for members should be e-mailed to dpp@capnhq.gov

SDWG Expands External Outreach 26

Phone Number
(605) 393-4215
Fax: (605) 393-4216
The Wing Roundup is published for members and friends of
the South Dakota Wing Civil Air Patrol, the official U.S. Air
Force Auxiliary.
The opinions expressed herein are those of the editor/publisher
and are not necessarily those of the Department of Defense,
U.S. Air Force, Civil Air Patrol or the South Dakota Wing.

All photos are CAP photos unless otherwise indicated.

Round-up Staff
Publishers
Col. John Seten, South Dakota Wing (SDWG)
Commander
Lt. Col. Richard Larson, SDWG Vice Commander

SDWG Receives Award at National
Conference
27
SDWG Locates Missing Man

29

The Aftermath of Winter
Storm Atlas

30

Editor
Maj. Bruce Kipp, SDWG Public Affairs Officer
Contributors: Col. John Seten, SDWG; Maj. Bruce Kipp;
Maj. Todd Epp; Cadet Staff Sgt. Justin Harris, Lookout
Mountain Composite Squadron (LMCS); Cadet Capt.
Brandon West, Sioux Falls Composite Squadron; Col.
Lester W. Snyder, Jr, SDWG Holding Squadron; Lt. Col.
Buck DeWeese and Capt. David Small, LMCS; Capt. Bill
Collister, Wing Staff
For information on advertising rates and space
please call 1-800-635-6036



COVER PHOTO:
During the Split SAREX in January 2014,
members of Ground Team-1 in the East River
area search for an aircraft emergency beacon
using hand-held radio-directing-finding
equipment.



2013 JDESE Encampment and SAREX
By Maj. Todd Epp and Maj. Bruce Kipp

Bivouacking during one of the largest search
and rescue exercises (SAREX) in recent South
Dakota Wing history, a successful pass-in-review
ceremony and a formal military dining experience
at an Air Force base welcomed cadet graduates of
the Joint Dakota Emergency Services Encampment
held at Camp Rapid, S.D. in July 2013.
The 2013 encampment, which switches
between locations in the Dakotas each year, featured emergency services training, primarily for
ground search and rescue team skills. Initially, the
cadets spent over a week learning how to use an
orienteering compass, how to read a map, how to
operate hand-held radio-direction finding equipment and wilderness safety.
Then, some of the cadets and senior members

moved to the Custer County Airport where they
set up camp by pitching medium sized, generalpurpose tents provided by the South Dakota Army
National Guard. Heavy rain and thunderstorms did
not dampen the enthusiasm of the participants as
they went out on ground search and rescue sorties.
The first of the sorties consisted of looking for
a missing fisherman and his brother in the Black
Hills in and near Custer State Park. Another search
involved looking for an actual S.D. Army Guard
Blackhawk helicopter that had “crashed” in the
Black Hills.
Senior members staffed the incident command
post at the Crazy Horse Composite Squadron
headquarters at the Custer County Airport. CAP
aircraft flew as part of the search missions and

7 Wings and 70 personnel participated in the 2013 JDESE.





JDESE SAREX participants erect a troop billet tent.

JDESE “Crashed” SDANG Blackhawk Helicopter.
Continued on page 7 . . .





Commander’s Column
By Col. John Seten
South Dakota Wing Commander

As I write this I am finding it hard to believe we are
transitioning into a new year.
I’m not sure where the past year
went but it was a busy one for
the wing. One of the highlights
was the wing hosted a breakout
session at the South Dakota
Emergency Management
Association’s annual conference. This is our target audience for Search and Rescue
missions. We answered a lot of
questions and we are already
working on a potential new
mission for Hanson County.
Our wing completed the
Compliance Inspection back in
May conducted by US Air Force
personnel and CAP personnel
from around the country. We
received a successful rating and
I personally want to thank all of
my wing staffers as well as all
wing members for assisting with
the inspection.
Last July we hosted the Joint
Dakotas Emergency Services
Encampment at Camp Rapid in
Rapid City, SD. The encampment
wrapped up with a SAREX with
the mission base at the Custer
County Airport. The SAREX


had the largest attendance that
anyone could remember in
South Dakota. Many trainees
were able to gain experience
in areas that were new to them
which will greatly enhance our
mission capabilities.
In August we had nine members attend events during the
CAP National Conference in
Denver, CO. Some attended the
pre-conference learning labs
while others attended the conference and took part in the numerous learning labs and the banquet.
South Dakota Wing received
the North Central Region
Emergency Services Award.
Also the wing is proud to have
Cadet Col. William Small represent the North Central Region
as the advisor to the National
Cadet Advisory Council. This
is a great opportunity for Cadet
Col. Small. He will do a great
job for the region.
Over the Labor Day weekend
we were tasked by the Air Force
Rescue and Coordination Center
to locate an Emergency Locator
Transmitter beacon. The Sioux
Falls and Brookings Squadrons
teamed up and launched two

ground teams and one aircraft. Shortly after the aircraft
launched it started tracking the
beacon which ended up being
an aircraft in a hangar on the
Madison Airport. The aircraft
led the ground teams to the site
and with law enforcement officials were able to get permission
for our teams to silence the beacon. Great job and all involved
with the search are credited with
a “Find” ribbon.
Many other cadet training
events as well as professional
development events took place
throughout the months of 2013
to include Training Leadership
of Cadets classes, a Corporate
Learning Course, and the IG
Senior Course. There were
also numerous community
service events all around the
state that we either took part
in or supported.
As we go forward into the
winter months we will anxiously
await to see what our FY-14 Air
Force training budget will be.
We will be gearing our training
efforts towards preparing for
our Evaluated Exercise in April.
Continued on page 23 . . .



AirVenture 2013 Air Show
By Maj. Buck DeWeese with comments from Capt. David Small

Trip Report (31 July – 5 August)
to the Experimental Aircraft
Association’s “AirVenture
2013” air show/exposition held
annually in Oshkosh, WI.
Phase 1, the gathering of
eagles, began Wednesday, 31
July for the start of a long,
arduous journey that crossed
three states via CAP van and
chartered bus. After picking-up
attendees in Sturgis, Piedmont,
and Rapid City, the West River
group of eight arrived in Tea,
SD. Capt. Joseph Oye of Sioux SDWG contingent to the “AirVenture 2013” airshow in Oshkosh, WI.
Falls Composite Squadron cormorning we met up with nine other CAP members
dially provided billeting for the night; some slept
and several non-CAP family members at the
in his house, some in his camper and some in Col.
Seten’s camper (which he graciously parked in Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) headthe driveway and allowed us to use).  The next quarters hangar at the Tea Airport where Capt.

Static display area overview.





AirVenture

Continued . . .

Joe Oye (SFCS) introduced the Tea EAA to Maj.
DeWeese who had been successful in securing
state funding that significantly helped defray the
cost of this trip.  The Tea EAA also provided $50
“scholarships” to each cadet.
Phase 2, the departure for Oshkosh. The 17person contingent (nine seniors and eight cadets)
from SDWG loaded onto a 50-passenger touring
bus along with 28 EAA members for the 10 hour
ride to Oshkosh, WI, the home of the famous
annual Oshkosh Air Show “AirVenture” sponsored by the EAA.
Phase 3 began with check in at the University
of Wisconsin dormitory for billeting assignments.
Busses provided transportation to and from the
airshow. For safety and security there was a bed
check at 11pm each night. We attended three glorious days of aviation history in the air and on the
ground. There were daily airshows and a special
night air show on Saturday night. Hundreds of
warbirds from all eras including the historic B-29
Superfortress bomber “FiFi”, aerobatic helicopters

and RV7 (homebuilt aircraft kit) demonstration
teams kept the crowd entertained each day as
did thousands of non-military aircraft from all
eras on static display. There even was a semitractor powered by three turbojet engines with
afterburner. One night the new animated film
“Airplanes” was shown at the outdoor theatre. Our
cadets got to meet with Cadet Capt. Brandon West
of Sioux Falls Composite Squadron who was there
participating in the National Cadet Activity “Blue
Beret” which supports the AirVenture air show.
He gave them a tour of their facility and they
chatted with Blue Berets from around the country.
There was plenty to eat, drink and explore for three
wonderful days.  Everyone had a favorite event,
but everyone agreed the night air show was one of
the highlights. Despite sunburned faces and sore
feet a good time was had by all.
Phase 4, the return home, began at 1500 on
Sunday, 4 August as we all packed back onto the bus
for a 10 hour drive back to Tea arriving about 0100.
Those from West River continued on taking turns
driving. Those from East River caught a few hours of
sleep before reporting to work later that morning.

JDESE Encampment/SAREX
Continued from page 4 . . .

helped guide ground search teams to their targets.
Cadet Maj. Hunter Stonehouse from the 119th
ANG Cadet Squadron in Fargo, N.D., even flew a
sortie as a mission pilot trainee.
On the second to the last day of encampment, cadets struck camp and returned to Camp
Rapid, the S.D. National Guard’s headquarters
and encampment site. They quickly changed from
BDUs to dress blue uniforms, rehearsed, and then
performed a perfect pass-in-review ceremony just
prior to a major hailstorm.
That evening, the cadets were treated to the
Dakotas Club at nearby Ellsworth Air Force Base for
a formal military dinner and awards ceremony held
before distinguished guests, family and friends.
Approximately 70 cadets from seven wings
and 20 senior members from the North and South
Dakota Wings participated in the encampment with
approximately 20 additional members participating


SAREX Commanders Col. John Seten and Lt. Col.
Randy Borton control the JDESE SAREX.

in the SAREX. Besides the S.D. Army Guard’s
participation, the Salvation Army and Red Cross
provided several meals at the SAREX and the
Custer County Search and Rescue Team provided a
liaison in the search for the “missing” men.
The 2014 joint encampment is currently scheduled for the summer at Camp Grafton, N.D., where
the emphasis will be on teaching the leadership
skills to the cadets.


The Birth and Growth of the South
Dakota Wing of the Civil Air Patrol
(Part 1)
By Col. Lester W. Snyder, Jr.

In order to explain the origin
of the Civil Air Patrol and how
it developed in South Dakota,
we need to think back to 1941
and the months just prior to
the United States involvement
in World War II. The international situation was getting
extremely tense. The German
“war machine” seemed unstoppable. Under that perceived
threat many Americans were
considering what should be done
to minimize any danger to the
United States. Many in the aviation community were convinced
Planes such as this provided valuable civilian wartime service to the
that the nation’s 25,000 civilian
nation.
aircraft could in some way, be
of help to the hopelessly undermanned Army Air Forces. Thus it was that the
THE BEGINNING
Civil Air Patrol was born of the desire of patriotic
Coincidently Gill Robb Wilson also had been
civilians who believed that a civil air organization designated the State Director of Aviation in New
was needed to support the United States.
Jersey. In that capacity he was able to convince

One of those patriotic civilians was a man
named Gill Robb Wilson, an aviation writer for the
New York Herald Tribune, who vividly remembered an experience he had in Bavaria in 1936.
He had been researching a story on German civil
aviation, and was attending an official party. In a
conversation with a Nazi officer, the officer made
the remark, “Your East Coast is the best submarine
hunting ground in the world”. Supposedly he was
only reminiscing about World War I, but Wilson
realized that what the Nazi had said was still true,
and they both knew it.


the Governor to authorize the organization of the
New Jersey Air Defense Services. Mr. Wilson
was not completely satisfied with that, however. He felt strongly that a state organization
really was not adequate, so he enlisted the help
of two newspaper publishers (Guy P. Gannet
and Thomas H. Beck) in order to acquire more
influence. Through them he was able to gain
the confidence of Gen. Henry “Hap” Arnold,
Chief of the Army Air Forces, and a man named
Fiorello Laguardia. The latter was the Head of
the recently formed Office of Civil Defense.


Mr. Laguardia was sufficiently
convinced of the need for a
civil air organization to support the United States, and
he issued a formal Order on
December 1, 1941, creating the
Civil Air Patrol (CAP), under
the Office of Civil Defense.
Thus we acquired the insignia
containing a white circle with
an inscribed triangle.
Of course, leaders were
needed for the new organization. For that reason, the first
order of business was to assign
Wing (State) Commanders.
That act was accomplished
in all 48 states on December
1, 1941, with the issue of the
Order. South Dakota was no
exception, and the first comm a n d e r o f W i n g 77 w a s a
newspaperman by the name of
Thomas B. Roberts, Jr., who
lived in Pierre, S.D. (On May
30, 1955, the Wing 77 designation was changed to Wing
40000, and in 1999 it again was
changed, to Wing SDOOO).
Subsequently eight Area
Group Commanders also were
assigned. They were Clyde
Ice, Spearfish; Floyd Barlow,
Rapid City; Franklin Hyde,
Pierre; Ken Neville, Huron;
WWII-Era Civil Defense poster with CAP emblem at top right.
Dwight Campbell, Aberdeen;
Ralph Hubbard, Watertown;
Cecil Shuoe, Brookings; and Knapp Brown, new organization. “The Civil Air Patrol is a
Sioux Falls. The Area Group Commanders branch of the Office of Civil Defense, organized
immediately began the task of trying to sign up on a nationwide basis for cooperation with the
new members. Verne Kraemer, Nemo, S.D., was Army, Navy, and Civil Aeronautics Authority
in mobilizing small planes for war work, and in
one of the first, joining on December 3, 1941.
Fortuitously, this activity was occurring just South Dakota to handle other Civilian Defense
activity.” The earliest physical evidence of CAP
prior to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor,
in South Dakota that has been found, is a letter
on December 7, 1941, which precipitated the
dated January 12, 1942. That letter has a Spearfish
United States entry into WWII.
letterhead and was signed by Clyde W. Ice, one of
The January 7, 1942, issue of the Rapid City
Journal carried the following description of the the Group Commanders of the Civil Air Patrol in
11

11

South Dakota. Clyde Ice was a well-known aviation pioneer in the area.
THE COASTAL PATROL
Gill Robb Wilson’s fears had become reality,
for at the beginning of 1942 the U.S. Navy was
stretched extremely thin. Soon German submarines were sinking 50 large ships per month along
our East Coast alone. Of course, to avoid panic
that fact was not publicized. Determined to make a
difference, members of the CAP activated Coastal
Patrol Base #1 at Atlantic City, N.J., on February
28, 1942. The operation was strictly volunteer; it
was completely funded from the members’ own
resources with no government assistance. The
value of the operation was immediately evident,
and consequently, the CAP was allowed to establish a Coastal Patrol, which they did officially on
March 5, 1942. The operation grew from Base #1
to 21 bases along the East and Gulf Coasts. The
Coastal Patrol was a very successful activity. It
operated for 18 months, during which time its
members flew cover for almost 6,000 convoys for
the U.S. Navy, aided 91 ships in distress and 865
shipwreck survivors. The members also located
17 floating mines, sighted and reported 173 submarines, hit 10 with bombs, and are even credited
with sinking at least one.
You may wonder what South Dakota had to do
with the Coastal Patrol, if anything? Well, some
members from South Dakota went to the East
Coast to take part in the operation. As of 2010,
one of those members, Verne Kraemer, is living
in Deadwood, here in South Dakota. There were
many members who took part in other CAP activities, or took an active part in other on-going wartime projects. One CAP project in the Black Hills
area was rather unique. Members organized coyote
hunts. They sold the pelts, and the money was
used to help finance the Coastal Patrol, because
its members were experiencing many delays in
receiving government assistance.
THE BORDER PATROL
It should be mentioned that there was a
CAP Border Patrol as well as a Coastal Patrol,
12

but apparently there was not any South Dakota
involvement in that activity. The Border Patrol
was operated by CAP, from July 1942 to April
1944. Members operating in that activity were
able to detect a few saboteurs, and also managed
to discover a spy radio station.
OTHER WWII-ERA CAP MISSIONS
Other activities which were performed by
the CAP for the military included Target Towing
and Searchlight Tracking, both of which could
be hazardous to one’s health. Target sleeves were
towed by CAP aircraft to provide gunnery practice
for the artillery. For the CAP pilots, the tow cables
on the sleeves never seemed to be long enough.
Also, CAP pilots flew missions to give practice
to searchlight crews. The pilots of those planes
learned quickly that a searchlight, viewed inadvertently, could blind a pilot for a considerable length
of time.
THE COURIER SERVICE IN SOUTH
DAKOTA
There was still a different wartime activity for
CAP pilots. In those early days of the War, the
Army Air Corps was having difficulty performing
just its basic functions. It was critically short of
both military pilots and aircraft, and found itself
desperately in need of a means to rapidly transport
critical items between bases. To fill that need, a
CAP Courier Service was organized under the
Second Air Force. One of the several locations that
units operated from was in South Dakota. CAP
pilots started flying courier routes out of the Rapid
City Army Air Base on November 2, 1942. The
routes that were flown were triangular, and the
first was to subordinate Bases in Pierre, SD, and
Ainsworth, NE. With their low horsepower aircraft, the total route could not easily be completed
in one day. A pilot might fly to Pierre, deliver his
cargo, then go on to Ainsworth and stay the night.
He then would return to Rapid City the following
day. Another pilot might start at the same time
as the first one, and fly the route in reverse order
spending the night in Pierre. One of the pilots met
his future wife during a stopover at Pierre. When

12

they remained overnight at satellite Bases, the
pilots stayed at the BOQ’s, ate at the mess halls,
and were welcomed at Officers Clubs. They had
high praise for the way they were treated by military personnel.
Later other routes were added for the Rapid
City unit. One was to Alliance, NE, and Scottsbluff,
NE. Another was to Cheyenne, WY, and Casper,
WY. When the pilots returned to Rapid City, most
often they picked up another load, possibly the
next day, and continued to the next destination.
The cargo that the Courier Service transported was
quite varied, and might include: rifles, parachutes,
high priority mail, emergency parts, instruments
and even Base payrolls. Most likely because of the
latter, all the pilots were issued 45 caliber pistols
and had to qualify on the firing range. In some
cases, a part of the cargo might be picked up at the
delivery point by courier pilots from other Wings,
in a relay. There evidently were two other satellite
Bases in South Dakota. There is evidence that one
was located at Watertown and another at Mitchell,
but they evidently were serviced by pilots from
another unit, probably one at the Sioux City Army
Air Field, in Iowa, or possibly one in Omaha.
THE COURIER SERVICE PERSONNEL
Most of those who joined the CAP were pilots
who had been greatly disappointed when, six days
after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, all small aircraft were grounded. Most of those pilots were too
old for military service or were 4-F (not qualified
for military service due to medical reasons) in the
draft categories. However, they wanted to fly, and
as with most civilians at that time, they especially
wanted to do something for the war effort. In the
South Dakota Courier unit there were only seven
regular pilots, who had their personal airplanes.
There were four other members in the unit: two
“alternate” pilots, a mechanic, and a dispatcher.
The regular pilots were John Moodie, Ed Anderson,
Carl Baker, Jack Davis, Chuck Keown, Max
Kuehn, and Martin Schroeder. The two alternate
pilots, who actually flew a great deal, but did not
have their own planes, were Cecil Urban and Ross
Wiehe. Leo Weber was the mechanic and Roger
L’Esperance was the dispatcher. Each individual
13

received some pay for his services but the regular
pilots received better compensation for the use of
their planes. To qualify for the Courier Service,
the pilots were required to have at least 150 hours
of cross-country flying time. None of them were
instrument-rated, which makes it seem even more
miraculous that they flew almost every day. They
would even fly in weather when the Army Air
Forces would not launch their B-17s. They would
take off with ceilings as low as 150 feet. By 1943
they were on a schedule of seven routes per day,
and their completion rate was phenomenal. In most
months it was 100 percent, and they kept up that
pace for about 14 months.
The Rapid City unit pilots flew out of what
was the Rapid City Municipal Airport. At that time
the airport was adjacent to the southwest side of
the Rapid City Army Air Base, which eventually
became Ellsworth Air Force Base. The airport had
a paved runway and the Inland Airline’s hangar
which the CAP was allowed to use. Inland Airline
was absorbed later by Western Airlines. The
hangar was made of stone, with a concrete floor. It
was heated and also was occupied by the Weather
Bureau office. The courier routine was to telephone the Air Base Tower for permission to land
at the base. Then the pilot would take off from the
small municipal runway and fly into the adjacent
base, to pick up his cargo for the day. When the
cargo had been loaded in his plane, he would take
off from the base, on the assigned courier route.
THE COURIER SERVICE AIRCRAFT
The planes the courier pilots flew were small,
with about 65 to 75 horsepower engines, and they
had only very basic instruments. Only one had a
radio transmitter, although some had receivers.
Most of the aircraft had a range of about three
hours, except for that of the commander. Captain
Moodie had installed an extra tank in place of the
passenger seat with a wobble pump to aid in the
transfer of fuel. Periodically the planes would have
to be grounded for service, and when they did, they
would get out of sequence. However, about every
ten days to two weeks a pilot would catch up with
his own airplane. Even with their limited range,
the low airspeeds and the constant and repetitive
13

nature of the routes created another danger. That
danger was from lack of sleep and from monotony
and boredom. To counter that while flying their
routes, some pilots read books, others buzzed
farmhouses, dropped notes, shot at coyotes, or did
flight maneuvers to entertain kids along the way.
There were instances when the courier pilots
encountered winds with not much less velocity
than the airspeed of the aircraft. At least once a
plane ran out of fuel, but fortunately, the pilot
was able to land and get a small quantity of fuel
from a farmer. In another case the wind at the
landing site was so strong that the pilot had to
set his brakes on landing and “rev” up the engine
with the tail off the ground, until “wing walkers”
could come out and help secure the aircraft. John
Moodie flew into Casper in a snowstorm so bad
that he could not tell that the ground, to which
he was keeping wings parallel, was actually the
side of a hill. Fortunately, he soon glanced at the
needle-ball instrument and was able to reorient
himself in time. Shortly thereafter he was lucky
enough to locate a railroad track that led him to the
airport. Captain Moodie also was the first person
to land an airplane on the airport at Ainsworth,
NE. He was able to land his small plane safely
even though only a short portion of one, of the
eventual three runways, was completed.
COURIER SERVICE MISHAPS
With the many hours and all the dangers to
which the courier pilots were subjected, there
were only three incidents in which an aircraft
was damaged, and none in which the pilot
was seriously injured. One happened when Lt.
Martin Schroeder landed in a high wind back
in Rapid City. When he tried to taxi, the wind
tipped the Supercub up on its nose. A second
incident happened when the aircraft that Lt. Ed
Anderson was flying caught on fire in the air,
near Newcastle, WY. He was able to land in a
pasture and get out with his cargo, although he
did burn the sheepskin collar of his jacket getting
the mail bags out. The third incident involved Lt.
Cecil Urban who flipped a Luscombe over on a
taxiway at Ainsworth. In that instance word had
been received that the runway was being cleared
15

of heavy snow. When Lt. Urban arrived, only
a taxiway had been cleared because the plow
broke down at the end. The banks on each side
of the taxiway were up to four to five feet high.
He set the plane down without any problem, but
a snow bank collapsed part way down the taxiway and it turned the plane into the snow bank
and upside down.
THE END OF MILITARY SERVICE
As the Army Air Corps was able to develop its
own resources, the commanders understandably
tended to rely on their own. That meant that they
requested fewer services from CAP. However,
the CAP had furnished a needed service and had
earned a good reputation in doing it. In fact, they
had achieved so much success that by April 1943
the CAP already had been transferred to the War
Department. By the end of the war, members of
the CAP had earned 825 Air Medals and 25 other
military decorations. Unfortunately, 64 members
had given their lives, serving their country in the
CAP. Another fact that is not generally known is
that during the war the CAP owned or operated
215 airports. It also was able to keep 403 other
airfields operating despite the reduced traffic, due
to restrictions on flying. When the war ended in
May 1945, the military missions of the CAP ended
with it. However, within a year, in July 1946, the
U.S. Congress passed Public Law 476, which
incorporated the Civil Air Patrol as a benevolent,
non-profit organization to promote aviation. Then,
on September 26, 1947, the Army Air Forces
became the U.S. Air Force, a separate service.
Eight months following that, Public Law 557 was
enacted, making the Civil Air Patrol the official
civilian Auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force.

15

My Experiences at National
Blue Beret 2013
By Cadet Capt. Brandon West
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron

It all started in 2011 when a couple of my
friends came back from a National Cadet Special
Activity called National Blue Beret (NBB). The
excitement they came home with and all of the
cool stories they had to share ignited my interest in
this prestigious event. The NBB provides support
for the Experimental Aircraft Association’s (EAA)
annual fly-in and airshow at Oshkosh, Wisconsin.
The Blue Berets (CAP cadets attending NBB
wear a distinctive blue beret) flight line marshal
the aircraft arriving and departing Oshkosh, provide flight line security and crowd control for the
military aircraft, guard the active ultralight aircraft
runway, search for emergency locater transmitters
(ELT radio beacons) in aircraft that have had rough
landings, log the arrival of all aircraft, and do other
odd-jobs for the EAA.

NBB pocket patch.

After finding out about it from my two friends,
I instantly wanted to go. I was selected to attend
National Blue Beret 2013! Not only that, once I
was assigned to Bravo Flight, I was chosen to be
the Flight Commander.
The first day of NBB we lined up outside
the dining facility for in-processing. During inprocessing we turned in our cell phones and other
electronics, were issued NBB t-shirts, took photos
for our IDs, and were assigned to our bunks.
Throughout the day my other flight members
arrived and we started to get to know each other.
I didn’t know exactly what to expect of this unfamiliar place, but I learned to call it home, and to
call my flight and other berets my family.
The next few days consisted of staff training,
emergency services training and training in flight

Oshkosh Blue Beret Honor Cordon-1.

16

16

Oshkosh Blue Beret Command Post.

line marshaling to prepare us for the airshow. A
few days prior to the beginning of the airshow we
went operational and began working the flight line
handling the arrival of the 20,000 plus aircraft that
would be at the Oshkosh event. It was quite the
experience to be up close and personal with the
planes and directing them to where they needed to
go. Knowing they depended on you to keep them
from colliding with other planes and making sure
they get where they are supposed to be made us all
feel very proud. As a flight commander, my job
was to patrol up and down the flight line checking
on each of my cadets, but I also got to do my fair
share of marshaling.
On July 29, the airshow began. Each day, our
flight was assigned three different shifts from
the following: flight line south, flight line north,
guarding military aircraft, emergency services
operations or guarding the ultralight runway. My
personal favorite was guarding the military aircraft
because I got to see many awesome airplanes, and
it was the busiest of all the exhibit areas. During
17

Cadet Capt. Brandon West at the NBB in Oshkosh, WI.

17

the activity, our flight earned a “find” ribbon during emergency services operations for locating
an ELT that had become active in an aircraft that
landed hard.
My favorite event of NBB was not part of the
airshow though; it was standing in the cordon for
the Honor Flight of Vietnam veterans returning
from Washington D.C. This was an emotional
experience for me. Vietnam veterans were never
really given a pleasant and respectful welcome
home after the war, and to be able to give that
to them that was such a powerful and humbling
experience. Many of them were in tears as they
walked past us as we rendered them salutes, and
this touched me in a way that I will never forget.
I have to say that this one special event was
one of the most amazing in my entire Civil Air
Patrol career.
A couple days prior to this, Bravo flight earned
our blue berets. It took a lot of hard work to do so,
but we did it. Then, the night of the Honor Flight,
we earned our St. Alban’s pins, which are the most
important part of the berets; it takes a lot of dedica-

tion to get to that point. In addition to the coveted
blue beret with pin we also earned the privilege
of wearing the blue beret patch on the pocket of
our BDU uniform. Those who complete the NBB
activity are entitled to wear the beret and patch for
the rest of their cadet career.
Toward the end of the airshow everyone got to
see the amazing night airshows where the aircraft
did aerobatics and launched fireworks. The coolest part of the night airshow was when the wall
of fire was set off. Also, the last few nights the
NBB flights got to have a “flight night out.” On
our flight night out we got to explore the airshow
on our own for a few hours. Then, to wrap up our
night, we went out to a place called Ardy and Ed’s,
a drive-in restaurant. This is one of the many NBB
traditions. All of the other NBB traditions you
must learn about when you get there!
All in all, National Blue Beret was an amazing experience, and one that I will never forget. I
highly recommend that you apply to attend. Blue
Berets are among the best of the best in CAP and I
am proud to call myself one of the family.

Oshkosh Blue Beret HQ.

19

19

Labor Day Sunday 2013 ELT Search
By Maj. Todd Epp

A quiet Labor Day Sunday was interrupted by
a search for a private aircraft’s electronic emergency beacon in eastern South Dakota.
SDWG aircrews and ground search teams
based out of Brookings and Sioux Falls were able
to pinpoint the location of the radio beacon to the
Madison Airport that evening, where repairs on an
aircraft triggered the signal. Fortunately, no one
was hurt.
The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center
contacted the South Dakota Wing about 6 p.m.
on 1 September 2013 and reported that an aircraft
passing overhead had detected an Emergency
Locator Transmitter (ELT) broadcasting from
somewhere north of Sioux Falls.
The Incident Commander for such events,
Wing Vice Commander Lt. Col. Rick Larson,
quickly organized and dispatched SDWG aircraft
and ground search teams from Brookings and
Sioux Falls to hunt for the ELT.
Early information indicated the ELT might
have been in the Dell Rapids area. With that initial information, the aircrew flew a Cessna-182
towards, over and around the Dell Rapids area.
Based on the aircraft’s onboard radio-direction-finding systems the aircrew determined
the signal was coming from the north and west
of Dell Rapids. Meanwhile the ground search
teams searched a small airstrip south and east of
Dell Rapids.
About 9 p.m., the aircrew was able to isolate
the signal as coming from the Madison Airport.
The aircrew contacted the Incident Commander,
who in turn contacted the Lake County Sheriff’s
Office, which quickly mobilized to investigate.
Lt. Col. Larson then dispatched the ground teams
from Dell Rapids to the Madison Airport.
The SDWG aircraft orbited overhead and
vectored the ground search teams to the airport
where they began their search. At the airport, with
the help of the Lake County Sheriff’s Office, the
21

ground teams located the ELT to a Cessna-172
in a hangar that had just undergone its annual
inspection which had inadvertently triggered the
beacon. The aircraft’s owner was notified and
gave permission to silence the beacon. As the
SDWG aircraft returned to base the ground teams
remained to deactivate the ELT and then waited to
make sure that it did not reactivate.

“The aircrew assisted the
ground teams to the airport
and orbited overhead until
the ground team started
searching.”

After being debriefed the flight crews and
ground search teams were released from duty at
approximately 11:50 p.m.
Participants in the mission included:
Aircrew - Capt. Joe Oye, mission pilot; Maj.
Todd Epp, mission observer; and Capt. Jerry Foy,
mission scanner.
Ground teams: Maj. Justin Johnson, ground team
leader; Maj. Nick Gengler, ground team leader;
Capt. Karla West, and ground team members
Cadets Camille and Brianna Lynn, Christopher
Dinnel, Josiah Huntington, Brandon West, Matias
Kowang and Devon Brown.
Mission base: Lt. Col. Rick Larson, incident
commander; Maj. Bruce Kipp, public information officer; 1st Lt. Vinnie Brown and 1st Lt. Dan
Schneider, mission radio operators.
Mission participants will receive a find ribbon
for their efforts, according to South Dakota Wing
commander Col. John Seten.
21

Wing Communications Challenge
By Capt. William Collister

Some of us are used to
the convenience of calling or
emailing someone as soon as
we have a thought, question
or directive. What we forget is
the infrastructure that supports
this convenience isn’t infallible!
Just as much of our writing skill
has weakened, we get frustrated
when we don’t have a signal
or the internet connection is
down. When the lack of service
is longer term frustration grows
exponentially. When we cannot
even call the service provider,
we actually become angry! We
have evolved into a gotta have
it now society. How do we deal
with this loss and cause of frustration? When we are forced to
wait our connections out, we
prioritize the contacts we have
to make and find work-arounds.
The missions we perform for
CAP are no different. But, we
have old radio technology for
use today.
With the radio equipment
we have at our disposal we have
the means to communicate sufficiently well within and outside the Wing without having
to depend on the “pay as you
go” infrastructure. We use these
communications during our
training and our real missions.
The term “sufficiently”, however, is kind of a flat expression.
We could, as we have done in
the past, use our radio equipment as expertly as we do our
other tasks within CAP.
22

Capt. Bill Collister establishes HF
radio communications.

Our local capabilities
supplement communications
assets at the Wing, Region and
National, but only if we perfect their use through practice.
CAP’s National Commander
has directed that units must
regain the expertise of the past
by re-instituting regular radio
networks. As Wing Director of
Communications, I want to start
using the local radio nets we
have in place now and then grow
those local nets into a robust
and total intra-communications
network in our Wing.
I propose that we begin to
hold a coordinated and participative net for a few minutes
during each Squadron’s meeting. We can establish a radio net
with other Squadrons that share
the same or overlapping meeting
times. Initially, we will use this

communications training net
to verify equipment operation,
either on our own channels or
using the South Dakota State
Radio Trunking System.
By the time you read this,
this first step should be being
exercised. I also propose that we
allow, with guidance, our cadets
the opportunity to demonstrate
the enthusiasm that I have witnessed from some of them at
SAREXs. The communications
training nets should be run by
all hands, Cadets and Seniors
alike, so the training experience
is shared. Training communications nets can even be practiced
in the local squadron area going
from room to room or spread out
on a field, also using ISRs.
Squadrons can assign each
of their members an Air Force
Voice Call Sign (AFVCS)
“Grasslands” since they all have
a list of calls beginning with
their respective unit charter
number. For example: The Sioux
Falls Composite Squadron is
SD-050. Their AFVCS would
be Grasslands (GL) 50X to
5XX. The first six callsigns are
identified for specific positions:
Grasslands-500 for Squadron
HQ, GL-501 for the Squadron
Commander, GL-502 for
Squadron Vice Commander, GL503 for Squadron Chief of Staff,
GL-504 for Communications
Officer and lastly GL-505 for
Squadron Chaplain. GL-506
Continued . . .

22

Wing Communications
Continued . . .

through GL-599 could be specifically designated
for a person (Senior or Cadet). Notification of the
assignment of personal callsigns must be sent to
the Wing Director of Communications. Training
communications nets should utilize AFVCS callsigns instead of the functional designators we use
on missions; i.e. Ground Team One or Mission
Base. Vehicles that check in to a net could use
GL-4XX, with the last two digits being the last two
digits of the vehicle’s CAPID or the radio operator
could use his/her own assigned call sign.
With the pride of each member having a personally assigned radio callsign and participation
in training communications nets, we can show
the CAP National Commander that South Dakota
Wing can not only take ownership in providing
some of the best Cyber Warriors, but the best
communicators that the nation has. I issue this as
a challenge to all South Dakota Wing members to
make this happen.

Commander’s Comments
Continued from page 5 . . .

This will be held in Sioux Falls with tasking
starting on 21 April and the main exercise on
25 April.
In 2014 we will concentrate our efforts on
not only recruiting new cadet and senior members but more importantly retaining the wonderful members we currently have. Let’s band
together, get involved with our organization,
involve our newer members, give them something meaningful and purposeful to accomplish.
Our members have many, many talents and
skills. Some of the skills that come to mind
are lawyers, doctors, emergency managers,
members of the clergy, IT professionals, professional photographers, airline pilots, firefighters,
school teachers etc. etc. etc. Reach out to them;
find out what they are capable of and willing to
bring to the table. Get them involved!

23

Maj. Epp Receives
Balsem Award
By Maj. Bruce Kipp

Maj. Todd Epp, recipient of a CAP Public Affairs
Exceptional Achievement Award.

Maj. Todd Epp, formerly the SD Wing Public
Affairs Officer, received a high honor at the
CAP National Convention held in Denver 15-17
August 2013.
Maj. Epp received a Certificate of Merit in
the prestigious Maj. Howell Balsem CAP Public
Affairs Exceptional Achievement Awards. The
Wing’s winning entry involved tracking the results
of media coverage of a split search and rescue
mission exercise (SAREX) held in Sioux Falls and
Rapid City in 2012.
“It’s sometimes said that CAP is the best
kept secret in America,” Wing Commander Col.
John Seten said. “However, with the efforts of
our public affairs officers like Maj. Epp, we
are getting the word out about the CAP here in
South Dakota.”

23

Mickelson Trail Rescue
By Cadet Staff Sgt. Justin Harris
Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron

Th e M ickelson Trail
meanders through the Black
Hills of South Dakota,
along 108 miles of an
abandoned railroad line. In
June each year a 26.2-mile
marathon race is held over
part of the trail with the
finish line in Deadwood.
Four officers and five
cadets from the squadron
travelled from Spearfish to
Deadwood, SD on Sunday,
2 June 2013 to provide trail
support to the runners at the
“Mickelson Trail Marathon.”
They had volunteered to man
and operate an aid station
CAP aids stricken Mickelson Trail marathoner.
along the route of the marathon and to provide water and
snacks to the participants.
Towards the end of the marathon the CAP
he was further treated then transported within
officers set up a practice injury, triage and transminutes by ambulance to the Deadwood hospital.
port training event for the cadets. But just minLater it was learned that the 22 year-old man had
utes from starting the exercise a marathon runner responded to treatment and was released from the
who had backtracked 3/4 of a mile on the course hospital within a couple of days.
to alert our team of a downed runner in distress
What started as a simple community service
about ½ mile away.
transformed quickly into a real “Search and
Immediately Maj. Deryl Miles (who is himself Rescue.” While the “Search” was relatively brief,
a qualified EMT) and the cadets set off with their
the “Rescue” was from a real, life-threatening
first aid packs down the trail toward the reported
situation. Their execution of the impromptu
location of the stricken athlete. They found him
mission was a credit to the squadron members’
lying on the ground in serious distress; vomiting, training and skill.
cramping, disoriented and confused, the classic
Squadron members who took part in the event
signs of heat stroke. A combination of heat, dehywere cadets Cadet Capt. Sam Earl, Cadet Chief
Master Sgt. Steven Burns, Cadet Senior Master
dration and 20 miles into his first marathon had
taken a toll on the young man.
Sgt. Connor Caneva, Cadet Airman First Class
Maj. Miles and the cadets moved the indiKeyvin Rauscher, and Cadet Airman First Class
vidual into the shade and gave immediate first aid Austin Rauscher. The seniors were Maj. Buck
then assisted moving him three-quarters of a mile
DeWeese, Maj. Deryl Miles, Capt. Bill Collister,
up a steep, muddy, slippery hill to their site where and 1st Lt. Brandon Caneva.
25

25

SDWG Expands External Outreach
By Maj. Bruce Kipp

The Public Affairs staff of the South Dakota
Wing (SDWG) has inaugurated a dynamic program to boost public awareness of Civil Air Patrol,
increase SDWG’s name recognition within the state
and enhance our brand marketing to a broad-based
external audience. This is accomplished through
three informal publications: the “Skychaser Executive Summary”, the “Skychaser –Community
Edition” and the “Skychaser – JROTC Editon” and
the South Dakota Wing “Roundup”, the Wing’s
one formal publication.
Beginning in April 2013, the Wing launched
the “Skychaser”, a monthly electronic newsletter
distributed to all Wing members. Each month’s
issue of the Skychaser is posted on the Wing’s web
page where it can be viewed by the general public.
Excerpts of the Skychaser are posted on the Wing
Facebook, a dynamic, interactive social media
venue with a broad audience.
The Skychaser, an informal document intended
for our internal audience, reports on news and
information of interest to our members gleaned
from a variety of sources. There are also articles on
the Wing’s and subordinate units’ events, activities and training. Input is solicited from the Public
Affairs Officers of the squadrons. Individual members are encouraged to submit their own articles for
publication. The Skychaser is colorful. Each issue
includes lots of photos as well as maps, charts,
graphs and graphics. In addition, the “Kudos” section recognizes promotions and the achievements
and attainments of our members.
For our external audience a shorter “Executive
Summary” of each issue of the Skychaser is sent
electronically to a growing number of recipients.
The Executive Summary, which focuses on the
Emergency Services aspects of SDWG activity, is
distributed to local, county, tribal, state and federal
elected and appointed officials, law enforcement
agencies, first responders, military officials, nongovernmental organizations, service organizations,
and organizations and members of the general
aviation community. From time to time articles
from the Executive Summary are picked up by other
organizations in the state and published in their
26

own journals which greatly expands our outreach.
This past fall two new versions of the Skychaser
were initiated. The Skychaser – Community
Edition is sent to the state’s many local and community newspapers. It focuses on our emergency
services activities as well as on the training, activity,
achievements, successes and community service of
our individual members. The Skychaser – JROTC
Edition is sent to the high school Junior Reserve
Officers Corps programs of the four services in the
state. It is focused on the emergency services activities, training, achievements, successes and on the
community service of our cadet members.
Also for our external audience, the South
Dakota Wing, in collaboration with Denison
Brothers Publishing Company, produces and
distributes three times a year a formal, hardcopy
magazine, the “South Dakota Wing Roundup.”
A traditional type periodical the Roundup has a
more formal tone and reports on a larger scale.
The Roundup has a carefully selected audience of
key local, county, state and military officials. The
Roundup is also a colorful publication with photos,
maps, charts graphs and graphics.
The Wing Public Affairs staff does not rely
solely on these three publications for its public
outreach program. They also maintain a solid
working relationship with the state’s print and
broadcast media. When SDWG has news that is
either time-sensitive or of special significance we
issue media releases either to a targeted local audience or statewide. In addition, the Public Affairs
staff sends news items about SDWG to CAP
National headquarters for incorporation into its
own hardcopy and electronic house journals that
are distributed nationwide.
The SDWG Public Affairs staff is ever on the
alert for new, different, unusual opportunities to
enhance and expand its public outreach program.
Just as President Herbert Hoover allegedly promised in his 1928 presidential campaign to put “a
chicken in every pot and a car in every garage,”
the SDWG Public Affairs staff’s plan is to make
Civil Air Patrol a name recognized and respected
throughout the state.
26

SDWG Receives Award at
National Conference
By Maj. Bruce Kipp

The South Dakota Civil Air Patrol received a
major award at the CAP National Convention held
in Denver 15-17 August 2013.
The award was for excellence in disaster relief
operations. The South Dakota Wing received the
2013 CAP Disaster Relief Award for the North
Central Region (NCR). Wings from North Dakota,
Iowa, Minnesota, Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri and
South Dakota compose the NCR.
The award is given to a wing in each region
with the best disaster relief program. The selection criteria includes evaluation results, the
quality and quantity of training activities during

the year, performance during actual missions and
cooperation between the CAP wing and state and
local agencies.
“The South Dakota Wing prides itself on its
preparedness and the results it delivers for federal,
state, local and tribal governments,” said Col. John
Seten, S.D. Wing commander. “To be recognized
by our regional and national organization is a
major compliment to the hard work and dedication
of our South Dakota members.”
Col. Seten also noted that with the hard work of
its members he is confident there are more awards
on the horizon for the South Dakota Wing.

National Commander Maj. Gen. Charles Carr presents the NCR Disaster Relief Award to SD Wing Commander
Col. John Seten.

27

27

SDWG Locates Missing Man
By Maj. Bruce Kipp

On 20 May, the Air Force Rescue
Coordination Center, Tyndall AFB,
Florida notified the South Dakota
Wing (SDWG) that the Hand County
Sheriff’s Office, in coordination with
the Hand County Office of Emergency
Management, requested assistance in
the search for a man missing in central
South Dakota. Mr. Leroy Nye, an 82
year-old man suffering from dementia,
had been reported missing by his family
Flight paths of the SDWG aircraft involved in the search for Mr.
on 19 May.
On 20 May, South Dakota Wing Nye.
Commander Col. John Seten led a crew in a Kurt Johnson, Observer, and Capt. Karla West,
Mission Scanner.
CAP aircraft from Sioux Falls and carried out
Hand County Sheriff Doug DeBoer and Mr.
an initial search of the area where Mr. Nye
was thought to be. Unfortunately, further flight Nehemia Volquardsen, Emergency Manager for
Hand County, were the overall incident commandactivity that day had to be cancelled due to deteers during the search. Volquardsen commented,
riorating weather conditions.
On 21 May, SDWG aircraft from Pierre and “The use of CAP aircraft was a significant asset
in the search. Without them the search would
Sioux Falls were on standby; however, bad weather
have gone on longer and much more manpower
prevented the aerial search operation from resumintensive as the area where the vehicle and missing. Also that day arrangements were made to bring
ing person were found could not be seen from the
in a CAP aircraft from Minnesota Wing specially
road.” The South Dakota Wing incident command
equipped with hyperspectral imaging sensors.
team included Wing Commander Col. John Seten,
The weather improved early on 22 May and
Wing Vice-Commander Lt. Col. Rick Larson and
three aircraft conducted numerous flights over the
Maj. Nick Gengler, Wing Director of Operations.
search area. That evening weather conditions deteCol. Seten praised the cooperation throughout
riorated and the Sioux Falls-based CAP aircraft,
piloted by 1st Lt. Neil Schmid, radioed that they North Central Region and thanks all for their
response. We appreciate Col. Bob Todd’s assistance
were going to make a last pass over the area. At
approximately 9:00pm, just as the aircraft turned from the CAP Wings under his leadership. It really
to return to base, the flight crew reported seeing a helped to have the assets we needed a phone call
vehicle. The crew had spotted a car matching the away! Col. Seten added, “I am intensely proud of all
description of the missing vehicle, northwest of those who responded or supported the effort.”
In all, over 20 SDWG personnel assisted with
Wessington Springs. The sighting was radioed to
the three day mission at five different locations.
the mission base and relayed to the Hand County
Sheriff’s Office. The CAP aircraft continued to Four SDWG aircraft flew 19 sorties, for 41.8 hours
circle overhead until law enforcement and medical in support of the effort, covering all or parts of 12
counties in South Dakota.
personnel arrived at the location.
The use of CAP aircraft in this search mission
Mission Pilot, 1st Lt. Neil Schmid commented,
was funded by the U.S. Air Force as part of their
“My crew did an outstanding job due to their
mission to provide search and rescue operations
training, dedication to the mission and attention to
within the continental United States.
detail.” The South Dakota crew included 2nd Lt.
29

29

The Aftermath of Winter Storm Atlas
By Maj. Todd Epp and Maj. Bruce Kipp

You won’t find “front end
loader operator” on the list of
Civil Air Patrol’s mission pilot
qualifications. But mission
comes first.
When an early autumn blizzard of historic proportions hits
your area and the state of South
Dakota has requested assistance
in locating elk hunters who may
be missing, you do what Lt.
Col. Rodney “Buck” DeWeese
from the Lookout Mountain
Composite Squadron did—get
your skid loader and clear the

30

tarmac in front of the hangar to
get to the aircraft. Even if the
drifts are four to 5 feet high.
Even if it is not your job.
An hour and a half later,
thanks to Lt. Col. DeWeese, the
aircrew could only now get to the
Cessna-182 and begin its mission.
Meanwhile, Maj. Craig
Goodrich, a mission pilot and
commander of the Rushmore
Composite Squadron in Rapid
City, flew one of three sorties
on the first day. He left his own
home, which would be in the

dark for six days from the storm.
While not causing the loss
of human life of a Hurricane
Sandy, Winter Storm Atlas
roared across the northern
plains in Oct. 4-6, 2013 hitting
western South Dakota and the
Black Hills with more than 3
feet of snow and near hurricane
strength winds. Livestock were
still in their summer pastures
and hadn’t developed their thick
coats of hair yet.
The combination of Atlas,
the early season and the federal
government shutdown, which
closed U.S. Department of
Agriculture offices at a critical
time, created a “perfect” storm.
An estimated 15,000 to
30,000 livestock and unknown
numbers of wildlife in the western
third of South Dakota died, often
“drifting” into ravines, creeks,
rivers, roads and right of ways.
While urbanites might wonder
what the big deal is, livestock
is a $21 billion industry in S.D.
and the state’s largest economic
engine, according to the South

30

Dakota governor’s office.
The Monday following the
weekend blizzard, the state of
South Dakota Department of
Game, Fish and Parks called
on the S.D. Wing to conduct an
air search for elk hunters who
may have been stranded in the
Black Hills region, an area hit
by some of the heaviest snowfall
with wind-blown drifts up to
six feet deep. CAP aircraft from
Rapid City, Spearfish and Sioux
Falls responded and flew several sorties over the search area.
Fortunately, as it turned out all
the hunters were accounted for.
Then Tuesday, Oct. 7, the state
office of Emergency Management
(OEM), and later Pennington and

31

Meade Counties OEM officials,
requested the S.D. Wing to fly
state highways and right of ways
and Interstate 90 and note the
location of dead or stranded livestock. Later in the week, the two
large western counties’ emergency managers requested that the
wing also fly their county roads
and rights of ways and waterways, again with the grim task of
locating dead livestock.
With so much real estate to
cover, the S.D. Wing ended up
flying some of the longest sorties in its history, even longer
than Missouri River flooding
sorties in 2011, where crews
often flew over half of the river
documenting flooding losses.

Capt. David Small, commander of the Lookout Mountain
Composite Squadron and an airborne photographer, received the
call-up notice 20 minutes after he
had returned from a 10-day business trip. He grabbed his photo
gear and was off to the Spearfish
airport to join Lt. Col. DeWeese
and other crewmembers.
Meanwhile, Capt. Small left
his own family and home to go
help others—like a number of
other S.D. Wing members.
“We were without power for
40 hours,” Capt. Small said. “We
were running on generators.  We
had a little over 3 feet of snow plus
drifts. No one could get out of our
house until Monday morning.”

31

Once on the mission, Capt.
Small spent 50-60 hours over
the next five days flying, taking photos and processing the
geotagged images in the North
Central Region’s ARGUS
system where they could be
accessed by state and county
OEM officials.
He couldn’t believe the animal carnage he was witnessing.
“It kept going (the dead
livestock),” Capt. Small said.
“There’s more upstream,
then more upstream. It just
kept going.”
South Dakota Wing commander, mission pilot and one
of the incident commanders
Col. John Seten -- also a professional firefighter --flew
out of Sioux Falls to Pierre
then west to pilot some of the
sorties. The experienced first
responder was also shocked by
what he saw. Wing vice commander Lt. Col. Rick Larson
also served as incident commander for several missions.
“Seeing so many dead cattle
piled up in a creek that you

32

could not even possibly count
was unbelievable to me,” Col.
Seten said.
“Our members stepped up
and professionally handled these
missions with a high degree of
excellence,” Col. Seten noted.
“We delivered the product that
our customer’s desire and they
were appreciative of it. Our
pilots, photographers, public
information officers and command staff did a great job an I
am extremely proud of them.”
One sortie in particular bears
noting. 1st Lt. Neil Schmid, a
mission pilot from the Sioux
Falls Composite Squadron
and his crew, flew from Sioux
Falls—near the Minnesota border—to the Wyoming border,
then along I-90 then to Buffalo,
S.D. in the extreme northwest
corner of the state—then back to
Sioux Falls.
As one
of the last
“cleanup”
sorties, Lt.
Schmid and
his crew saw

some dead cattle and stormdamaged buildings in Sturgis,
home of the famous motorcycle
rally. But he also saw hope.
“We saw thousands of cattle
happily grazing and apparently
in good shape,” he said.
Similarly, during a different sortie, Capt. Small took
a dramatic photograph of a
nearly snowless Bear Butte,
an isolated outcropping in the
northern Black Hills that has
significant religious and cultural significance to the region’s
Native American peoples.
The photo suggests that
the snows come, the snows
go. But South Dakotans—and
the S.D. Wing of the Civil Air
Patrol—persevere through it
all—even over a strong winter
storm named Atlas.

32

South Dakota
Wing Roundup
CIVIL AIR PATROL • SUMMER 2014 • UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AUXILIARY

South Dakota Wing CAP-USAF Operational Evaluation

In This Issue . . .
SDWG Legislative Day at the State Capitol 3
South Dakota Wing, Civil Air Patrol
4275 Airport Rd., Ste. A, Rapid City, SD 57703
Office: 605-393-4215, Fax: 605-393-4216
Email: southdakotawa@gmail.com
Website: http://sdcap.us, Facebook: www.facebook.com/
SDWingCAP
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/102270464@N02/
Col. John N. Seten
Commander, South Dakota Wing
Civil Air Patrol
South Dakota Wing Roundup Staff
Publishers
Col. John Seten, South Dakota Wing Commander
Lt. Col. Richard Larson, South Dakota Wing Vice
Commander
Editor
Maj. Bruce Kipp
South Dakota Wing Public Affairs Officer
Email: paa.sdwg@gmail.com, Cell: 605-261-4507
The South Dakota Wing Roundup is an authorized
journal of the South Dakota Wing of the Civil Air Patrol, the
official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force. It is published by a
private firm in no way connected to the U.S. Air Force or the
Civil Air Patrol Corporation. The comments and opinions
expressed in the articles are those of the contributors and do
not reflect the position of the U.S. Government, the U.S. Air
Force, the Civil Air Patrol Corporation, or the South Dakota
Wing. The appearance of advertisements, supplements or
inserts, does not constitute an endorsement by CAP or the
U.S. Air Force of the products and services advertised.
The South Dakota Wing Roundup encourages
contributions from CAP members, the military, related
agencies and the general public. Articles must be original and
free of copyright constraint. The Roundup magazine reserves
the right to approve, reject, edit, abridge or expand any
submission. Articles must be in Associated Press style. Do
not embed photos or graphics in the article - send them as
attachments in jpeg format and provide complete captions.
Photos must be a minimum of 1 Megabyte resolution or
higher. Always include contact information at the top of your
submission. Email articles to paa.sdwg@gmail.com. Other
material should be sent to South Dakota Wing Public Affairs,
Attn: Roundup, 6016 S. Bremerton Place, Sioux Falls,
SD 57106. Ideas for future articles should be discussed in
advance with the Editor, Maj. Bruce Kipp.
The Civil Air Patrol is a non-profit volunteer
organization federally chartered by Congress under
36 U.S.C. §§201-28, which is dedicated to emergency
services, aerospace education and motivation of America’s
youth to the highest ideals of leadership and public
service. Funds received by the advertising sales are used
to support this publication and to support various CAP
activities throughout the state of South Dakota.
For information on advertising rates and space,
please call: 1-800-635-6036



Governor Proclaims “Civil Air Patrol Day” 5
CAP-USAF Operational Evaluation

7

Commander’s Column

9

Alerting System

11

CyberPatriot-VI

12

Operations Security

13

Agency Partner Spotlight

15

2014 Conference and Awards Banquet

16

Newest Pilot in South Dakota Wing

19

House approves Congressional Gold
Medal for Civil Air Patrol

23

Winter Survival Skills

26

Low-Level Route Survey

27

South Dakota’s Joe Foss Honored
in Arizona

29

Spidertracks

30

First Flight

32

COVER PHOTO:
View of the flight line at the June state-wide
Search and Rescue Exercise.



SDWG Legislative Day at the
State Capitol
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP, South Dakota Wing PAO,
with contributions from Col. John Seten, CAP, and Lt. Col. Jim Hopewell, CAP

On Thursday, 20 February members of the
Wing from across the state converged on the state
Capitol in Pierre to meet with legislators to thank
them for their support. Over 40 members representing all six squadrons made the trip.
Col. Seten commented, “The purpose is to tell
state policymakers the story of Civil Air Patrol in
South Dakota, of the many volunteer hours spent
on air and ground missions for local, county, tribal,
state and federal government, law enforcement
agencies and first responder organizations. We
also want them to know of our cadet program that
prepares young people not just for careers in the
military, but to be good citizens. He added, “It is
important that the public understands in a time

Wing Vice Commander Lt. Col. Rick Larson (left) and
Wing Commander Col. John Seten (right) in the senate
gallery observing the session. Photo by Lt. Vincent
Brown, SDWG

Gov. Daugaard poses with SDWG members on the Grand Staircase of the Capitol Rotunda. Photo by member of
Gov. Daugaard’s staff





of limited budgets how SDWG helps stretch the
resources of the state and saves money by using
well-trained, professional volunteers, volunteers
who are held to the same level of performance and
knowledge as their paid colleagues.
At the opening of their respective sessions, the
state Senate and House of Representatives recognized the many contributions of the South Dakota
Wing with a prolonged standing ovation. In
the Senate, Lieutenant Governor Matt Michels,
who was presiding, specifically commended our
involvement in the state’s flood response efforts in
2011 and our support in state recovery efforts from

SDWG provided a mid-afternoon snack including
cleverly decorated cupcakes. Photo by Lt. Vincent
Brown, SDWG

SDWG Senior Members in the senate gallery observing the session. Photo
by Lt. Vincent Brown, SDWG

2013’s Winter Storm Atlas.
Uniformed members of
Wing served a light snack in the
lobbies off the Senate and House
chambers for legislators, lobbyists, staff and others. Thanks
to Lieutenant Rachel Kuecker
the cupcakes all had CAP and
SDWG insignia on them as did
the water bottles on the table.
Our personnel briefed senators
and representatives on the latest enhancements and advancements to the Wing’s abilities and
capabilities, answered questions
and handed out copies of CAP’s
annual financial report and
SDWG’s legislative brochure.
A pleasant surprise for a



small group of our members
was an impromptu chat with
U.S. Senator John Thune (RSD) who was in the Capitol
building on other business. He
stopped his scheduled itinerary
and spent several minutes shaking hands and talking with us.
Later that afternoon Governor
Dennis Daugaard met the nearly
40 members representing all six
squadrons and the wing staff
on the Grand Staircase of the
Capitol Rotunda for a brief visit
and group picture.

SDWG cadets in the senate gallery observing the session. Photo by Lt.
Vincent Brown, SDWG



Governor Proclaims 20 February “Civil Air
Patrol Day” in South Dakota
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP
South Dakota Wing PAO

“Civil Air Patrol Day” was
celebrated in South Dakota on
20 February 2014. Earlier in
the month, Governor Dennis
Daugaard signed a proclamation
establishing the day.
Part of the governor’s proclamation noted “Whereas, we
are grateful for the remarkable
volunteers who make up the
South Dakota Wing of Civil
Air Patrol, and provide invaluable service to the great state of
South Dakota and its people.”
Col. John Seten, commander
of the South Dakota Wing commented, “The idea is to tell the
story of Civil Air Patrol in South
Dakota, of the many volunteer
hours spent in the air and on
the ground performing missions
for local, county, tribal, state
and federal governments.” He
added, “We also want them to
know about our cadet program
that prepares young people not
just for careers in the military,
but to be good citizens.”
Seten also said it is important
the public understands in a time
of limited budgets, the CAP
helps stretch the resources of the
state of South Dakota and saves
money by using well-trained,
professional volunteers.



2014 CAP Day Proclamation

“Whereas, we are grateful for the remarkable
volunteers who make up the South Dakota Wing of
Civil Air Patrol, and provide invaluable service to
the great state of South Dakota and its people.”


South Dakota
Wing CAP-USAF
Operational
Evaluation
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP
South Dakota Wing PAO

The South Dakota Wing took part in a weeklong graded mission readiness exercise from 21
to 26 April. The official name for this type of
biennial exercise is an “Operations Evaluation”.
Each of the 50 Civil Air Patrol Wings across the
country undergoes an operational evaluation by
the USAF every two years to evaluate the capability and effectiveness of each wing’s personnel,
equipment, vehicles and aircraft to successfully
carry out a variety of potential real-world emergency situations. Typical scenarios include missing/crashed aircraft, missing persons, floods, and
humanitarian assistance.
Beginning early on Monday, 21 April, the South
Dakota Wing was placed on alert to commence the
week-long emergency services evaluation. During

the week the USAF Evaluation Team issued noprior-notice emergency services mission tasks. The
operational evaluation culminated on Saturday, 26
April, with a major “all hands” effort at the Sioux
Falls Regional Airport/Joe Foss Field.
Specially equipped Civil Air Patrol aircraft,
vehicles and approximately 80 incident command
staff, mission support personnel and aircrew
members had gathered from across the state. The
Mission Base at the airport planned and conducted
a variety of missions in response to scenarios

The incident command staff and evaluators brief participants on what to expect.





of potential real-world emergency situations provided by
the USAF Evaluation Team.
The Evaluation Team observed
the activity and evaluated the
various staff functions involved
in the planning and execution of
the assigned missions.
Several of the cadets present worked as mission support
assistants in the Mission Base’s
operations areas, others operated
radios on the various command
and control nets, and a number
of them formed ground search
The incident command staff discusses one of the search and rescue scenario
teams that used radio-directionfinding equipment to hunt for exercises.
practice aircraft emergency beacons that had been placed around the countryside.
who was also the Incident Commander, praised the
Maj. Bruce Kipp, Wing Public Affairs Officer
professionalism of the members, their ability to
commented, “We train continuously in order to work together as a team, and their determination to
prepare for these real-world missions that affect
see a mission through to its successful conclusion.
peoples’ lives and impact the health and welfare of
Col. Seten added, “The rating of highly successour communities. We are ready to respond in the
ful is a true testament to the hard work of our top
event of an actual incident.”
notch, dedicated professional volunteers.”
The South Dakota Wing received the rarely
The Wing expresses its gratitude to Landmark
awarded rating of “Highly Successful” from the
Aviation for the use of its facilities and also thanks
Air Force for its performance during its Operations
the Sioux Empire Chapter of the American Red
Evaluation. Several staff sections received the covCross for providing meals for the 80 plus people
eted rating of “Excellent”. In addition, there was who took part in the activity. In addition, the Wing
not a single “Finding”, an area which requires corthanks the South Dakota Air National Guard’s
rective action. Wing Commander, Col. John Seten,
114th Fighter Wing for providing their Mobile
and Wing Vice Commander Lt. Col. Rick Larson,
Emergency Operations Center.

The flight line; five of the six wing aircraft were present for the operational evaluation.





Commander’s Column
By Col. John Seten
South Dakota Wing Commander

The South Dakota Wing has been extremely
busy over the past few months. The new fiscal
year found us covering thousands of miles of state
highways and waterways in Western South Dakota
following the devastating Winter Storm Atlas. The
storm hit during the hunting season in the Black
Hills of Western SD and we were first tasked
by the SD Department of Game, Fish and Parks
to fly over the Black Hills and look for stranded
hunters. Fortunately, we did not locate any hunters
seeking help. We then transitioned into our next
request which was to assist Pennington and Meade
counties in assessing livestock losses from the
storm. Shortly thereafter the State of SD Office
of Emergency Management called upon us to fly
every mile of state highway from just west of
Pierre to the Wyoming border and from the North
Dakota border to the Nebraska border looking
for dead livestock in the highway rights of way.
We surveyed nearly the entire western half of the
state! CAP photographs of the devastation were
used at the county and state level and made their
way to Washington D.C. where they were used in
numerous briefings. Eventually the portions of the
state that were affected received a federal disaster
declaration which led to millions of dollars getting
sent to SD for relief.
Since our last issue we have also received
“Find” ribbons for successfully locating two
aircraft distress beacons. We have also been supporting the SD Air National Guard with their air
defense mission and are in the planning stages for
conducting low-level route surveys for them.
I am extremely proud of our members as


we just completed a USAF evaluated exercise
which we received the grade of “highly successful”. Our hard working members handled
everything they were tasked with and did it with
a high degree of effectiveness and professionalism. We always stand prepared and this rating
was no surprise to me.
Our wing conference was held in Sioux Falls,
SD in April and we were honored to have two
members of our newly formed state legislative
squadron present. We look forward to growing
our legislative squadron on the state level and we
are very proud to announce that we are one of
three states in the nation that have all of our U.S.
Congressional delegation as members of the CAP
Congressional Squadron. During the conference
many well-deserved awards were presented to our
members and several breakout sessions were held
to assist our members going forward.
Our cadet programs are strong in SD and many
cadets are heavily involved in planning for our
upcoming Joint Dakotas Encampment which will
be held at Camp Grafton, ND. Cadet Col. William
Small is the encampment cadet commander and
has been busy putting together his staff. He is
doing all of this from China where he has been
since the first part of March where he is learning
Mandarin Chinese. Many cadets from the SD
Wing are on his staff.
The SD Wing is also proud to announce that
Cadet Maj. Elizabeth Foy has been accepted into
two US service academies, West Point Military
Academy and the US Air Force Academy. Wow,
Continued on page 13 . . .



The Civil Air Patrol Alerting System
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP, South Dakota Wing PAO
In the United States, from 2002-2011, the Department of Homeland Security’s
Advisory System was a color-coded scale intended to reflect the potential
degree of threat of a terrorist attack. This scale, consisting of five color-coded
threat levels, was phased out by Homeland Security in April 2011.
As a federally chartered organization the Civil Air Patrol adopted the DHS
chart and expanded it to encompass disaster operations. Despite it being
phased out by the Department of Homeland Security, CAP continues to use
this system to ensure that its personnel, aircraft, vehicles and equipment are
ready if needed.
The current CAP Alerting System scale consists of five color-coded levels
that spell out actions to be taken.
 red ( severe ) - severe risk of a terrorist attack or disaster
operations

Action: Place CAP resources on Red Alert status. CAP resources will be
placed in secure locations under close control. Selected staff personnel,
rapid response teams, and selected mission aircrews and ground teams will
be placed on Red Alert status and should prepare for expected deployment.
People will not report for duty unless directed by the National Commander,
Region Commander, Wing Commander, or the National Operations center
Pre-2011 Department of Homeland
(NOC). If directed to report for duty, mission bases may be occupied
Security Advisory System chart on
with staff and Incident Command system (ICS) liaison CAP personnel.
which the CAP Alerting System
is based. Photo Credit: http://
Communications nets, particularly HF-SSB nets, between Wing HQs,
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeland_
Region HQs and National HQ will be conducted at least once every six (6)
Security_Advisory_System, accessed
hours during Red Level Operations. Selected aircrews and ground teams
23 February 2014
will be directed to report to designated locations to await orders to deploy.
Report status as directed.
 orange (high) - high risk of a terrorist attack or disaster operations
Action: CAP resources will be placed on Orange Alert status. Selected staff personnel, rapid response teams, and
selected mission aircrews and ground teams will be placed on Telephone Alert and should prepare for possible
deployment. CAP resources including emergency operations centers, aircraft and ground vehicles will be inspected
to determine operational status. Communications nets, particularly HF-SSB nets, between Wing HQs, Region HQs
and National HQ will be conducted at least once daily during Orange Level Operations. Security of resources shall
be checked. Report status as directed.
 yellow (elevated) - significant risk of a terrorist attack or disaster operations
Action: Coordinate emergency plans with nearby local authorities. Put contingency plans into action if necessary. CAP emergency services personnel and resources including CAP emergency operations centers, aircraft
and ground vehicles will be checked to determine operational status. Communications nets, particularly HF-SSB
nets, between Wing HQs, Region HQs and National HQ will be conducted at least weekly during Yellow Level
Operations. Report status as directed.
 blue (guarded) - general risk of a terrorist attack or disaster operations
Action: Check to ensure communications links with emergency response teams work. Increase training and
preparation for the staff, air and ground teams. Review and update emergency procedures. Coordinate, maintain
and update current Memorandums of Understanding with partner agencies. Provide CAP personnel with whatever
information is necessary.
 green (low) – low risk of a terrorist attack or disaster operations
Action: Refine plans for emergencies. Train staff on emergency plans and capabilities. Maintain resource capability. Meet with external organizations to present CAP support capabilities and to develop new Memorandums of
Understanding with them.
11

11

CyberPatriot-VI
By Cadet 2nd Lt. Tyler Gross, CAP
Big Sioux Composite Squadron (Brookings)
For the third year in a row, the CyberPatriot
team from the Big Sioux Composite Squadron
in Brookings, SD returned to the Washington,
D.C. area 26 - 30 March 2014, to compete in the
national championship round of CyberPatriot-VI,
the Air Force Association’s national high school
cyber-defense competition.
CyberPatriot is a unique educational competition that challenges students to resolve reallife cybersecurity situations faced by industry
professionals. Created in 2009 by the Air Force
Association, the CyberPatriot competition provides
students with hands-on learning about securing
computer networks while educating, and motivating them toward careers in science, technology,
engineering, and mathematics, disciplines critical
to the nation’s future.
The Big Sioux Composite Squadron’s
CyberPatriot team consisted of Cadet Capt. Joshua
Klosterman, Cadet Chief Master Sgt. Chris Dinnel,
Cadet Chief Master Sgt. Laura Rudnik, and Cadet
Senior Airman Zebadiah Nelson. They were
coached by Cadet Lt. Tyler Gross and mentored by
Lt. Michael Klosterman and Capt. Shannon Hofer.
The CyberPatriot competition has historically consisted of two high school divisions, with
public, private, and home schools competing in
the Open Division and Junior ROTC units, Naval
Sea Cadet Corps, and Civil Air Patrol squadrons
competing in the All Service Division. Between
the two divisions a record 1,537 teams from all 50
states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and
Canada, as well as U.S. Department of Defense
Dependent Schools in Japan, South Korea and
Germany registered to compete in the competition
that began on 15 November 2013.
During two online qualification rounds the
Big Sioux team faced realistic computer network
threats at their home location seeking out weaknesses in simulated online networks and working
to defend those networks from threat scenarios. A
12

Left to right: Cadet Airman 1st Class Zebadiah Nelson,
Cadet Capt. Joshua Klosterman (Team Captain), Cadet
Chief Master Sgt. Chris Dinnel, Cadet Chief Master Sgt.
Laura Rudnik, Cadet 2nd Lt. Tyler D. Gross (Coach)

Cisco networking challenge was also a part of the
competition. The team was scored according to
how quickly and effectively they established and
maintained the secure networks. The Big Sioux
team was one of only 44 teams to advance to the
semifinals held in January 2014. In the semifinals they faced similar but more complex and
sophisticated computer network threats. After an
exceptional performance in the semifinals, the Big
Sioux Composite Squadron team was named one
of 14 All Service Division national finalists and
received an all-expenses-paid trip to the National
Finals competition in Maryland.
At the National Finals, the only in-person
round, the Big Sioux team competed to defend
virtual networks and mobile devices from a professional aggressor team. The National Finalists
also faced-off in three additional competition
components: the Digital Cyber Crime Scene
Challenge and the Cisco Networking Challenge,
both of which return from previous seasons, and
the Digital Forensics Challenge. These extra challenges broaden the cybersecurity experience and
expose teams to new elements of the many career
opportunities available to them.
The Air Force Association (AFA), the sponsoring organization, is a non-profit, independent,
12

CyberPatriot
Continued . . .

professional military and aerospace education
association. Its mission is to promote a dominant
United States Air Force and a strong national
defense, and to honor Airmen and our Air Force
Heritage. AFA has 200 chapters nationally and
internationally representing more than 100,000
members. Visit AFA at www.afa.org.
The annual CyberPatriot competition greatly
benefits from the support and technical expertise
of its presenting sponsor, the Northrop Grumman
Foundation. Other sponsors include Cyber Diamond
Sponsors, AT&T Federal, Cisco, Microsoft,
Raytheon, USA Today, the Department of Homeland
Security, the Office of the Secretary of Defense,
Cyber Gold Sponsors URS, Splunk, Symantec
Corporation, Cyber Silver Sponsors Air Force
Research Laboratory, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical
University, Leidos, MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory, and
University College of the University of Maryland.
For more information about CyberPatriot, go to
www.uscyberpatriot.org.

Commander’s Column
Continued from page 9 . . .

what an honor to have had one of our own
accepted to not only one but to two service
academies. After a great deal of thought, Cadet
Maj. Foy has decided to attend the US Air Force
Academy in Colorado Springs, CO. We are
confident that this amazing young woman has a
great future ahead of her. Congratulations from
the entire wing!
The South Dakota Wing continues to excel in
all that we do. Although we are not a large wing,
we are one of the most progressive wings in the
nation. We have embraced cutting edge technologies and have invested in technology that allows
us to track our aircraft in flight in real time. This
makes us a safer and more efficient force and
provides accountability to our customers. Our
members continue to step up when called upon
and we get the job done.
Let’s continue to press forward and make
this our best year ever!
13

Operations Security
(OPSEC)
John W. Desmarais, Sr.
Director of Operations
Civil Air Patrol National Headquarters

We know you and your key staff are all aware
of the OPSEC issues and restrictions with posting
our frequency assignments and other sensitive
mission data openly online. Some well-intentioned
personnel continue to post inappropriate information publicly though, and we address those on a
case by case basis. Unfortunately, there have also
been some cases of members being requested by
people outside of CAP to blatantly violate our
rules and federal policies with the stated intention
of posting restricted information like our communications frequency assignments and coverage
maps publicly as well. Please remind your personnel that this is not authorized.
- CAPR 100-1, paragraph 1-9 clearly
notes our frequencies provided by the Air
Force as sensitive, requiring them to be
protected from unauthorized release, and
designates them as UNCLASSIFIED//FOR
OFFICIAL USE ONLY. It goes on to outline procedures for appropriate release.
- CAPR 110-1, paragraph 9, outlines
Prohibited CAP Internet Operations.
Paragraph 9d prohibits communication
that “…violates any local, state, national
or international law or regulation.” This
applies in the case of posting sensitive information like our frequency assignments.
Thanks for your attention to this matter, and
reminding your subordinates of CAP policies in
this area.
Reprinted from “Wyoming Wings”, August 2013, and
“Alaska Wing Tips”, Winter 2014.

13

Agency Partner
Spotlight
By Lt. Col. Rick Larson, CAP
Vice Commander, SDWG
SD Certified Emergency Manager

South Dakota CAP is a vital part of our state’s
integrated response to disasters and events. Whether
we are assisting local law enforcement, keeping
an eye from the sky on large planned events like
LIFELIGHT, conducting damage assessment
which may result in public assistance, helping out
with ground security at air shows, flying needed
supplies in support of a flood, SDCAP is the “go
to” agency of choice for partner agencies. Let me
name a few. County Sheriff’s Offices and County
Emergency Managers, State Agencies such as
Game, Fish and Parks, Emergency Management,
Adjutant General, Homeland Security or Federal
Agencies such as FEMA, National Weather
Service and Department of Defense, or NonGovernmental Organizations like Salvation Army
and Red Cross, CAP is on the go!
All of this cooperation requires we have liaison
with each of the named entities. It also requires
even more emphasis on us. We in CAP need staff
members for liaisons that are of the highest caliber,
embody a high degree of professionalism and
self-confidence, and possess knowledge of how
we can assist within the scope of our capabilities. When we fly in support of the Air Force, as
Region Liaison Commander Lt. Col. Paul Peterson
said, we need to sit at the table as peers. As an
Emergency Manager in my paid profession, I can
vouch for the fact that these are critical relationships that take years to develop. They can, however
devolve in minutes should we not deliver, lack
corporate integrity, or over promise. Coordination
and honest brokering set the foundation.
Even if we’ve not worked with a partner agency in
some time, we need to maintain a healthy relation15

ship through a well-timed phone call, an invitation
to participate in a local exercise, or by forming a
joint effort in the community. It is also important
to know the names of their key personnel and their
particular areas of expertise. Equally important
is to keep them “in the loop” and attempt to
assist them whenever and wherever possible. The
Civil Air Patrol is often their “force multiplier”,
providing critical, cost-effective, augmentation
with support personnel and specialized capability,
especially communications and transportation.
What can those of us in the Wing that are
involved in emergency services do to enhance our
agency partnerships? Get to know your county
sheriff and those of the counties surrounding
yours. Establish strong working relationships with
your county’s key staff and management people.
Engage with local agencies to inform them of the
multitude of CAP capabilities, and then be ready
to deliver when the call comes for support. The
requests may amaze you, so be ready and trained.
Create and innovate training from our key
capabilities such as air and ground search and
rescue, radio communications, staffing and operating a shelter, etc. If your organization is already
undertaking some of these practices, let us know
so we can pass along your work as an example and
a starting point for others. Let the Wing leadership
know how we can support your effort. We strongly
support local ties that make South Dakota Civil
Air Patrol ready, relevant and respected in the
community, state and Nation!
Thanks for all YOU do to make SDCAP reach
new heights!

15

South Dakota Wing 2014
Conference and Awards
Banquet
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP, SDWG PAO
Photos by 2nd Lt. David Stockinger, CAP, SDWG

After the end of the Wing’s CAP-USAF Operational Evaluation on
Saturday, 26 April, participants swiftly changed from duty uniforms into
their dress uniforms to attend the 2014 Wing Conference and Awards
Banquet. This year it was held at the impressive Holiday Inn-City Centre in
downtown Sioux Falls.
At the opening ceremonies cadets of the Sioux Falls Composite
Squadron provided the Color Guard to post and retire the colors. Maj.
Craig Goodrich led the singing of the national anthem. Wing Chaplain
(Lt. Col.) Gary Rae conducted the invocation. The Wing expresses its
Banquet POW-MIA: A table
thanks to Lt. Col. Linda Buechler and to Cadet Capt. Silas Busch for was set in solemn honor of our
preparing the solemn POW/MIA memorial table.
nation’s POWs and MIAs.
In addition to the SDWG senior members and cadets attending there
were several distinguished guests: the members of U.S. Air Force Evaluation Team; Col. Robert Todd,
commander of CAP’s North Central Region (which includes South Dakota Wing); and USAF Lt. Col. Paul
Peterson, commander of the CAP-USAF North Central Liaison Region (who was the keynote speaker).
Representing CAP National Headquarters were Assistant Deputy Chief, CAP Legal Officer Corps Lt.
Col. James Garlough, Director of
Logistics Mr. Gary Schneider, and
NHQ Photographer Ms. Susan
Schneider. Also present as honored guests were South Dakota
State Representatives Manny
Steele and Jim Stalzer, both members of the state’s CAP Legislative
Squadron.
After the meal and featured
speakers it was time for the presentation of awards. First, squadron
SD Wing Commander Col. John
NCR CC: Col. Robert Todd,
level awards were presented by
Seten provides the opening
commander of the CAP North
remarks.
the unit commanders. Then it was
Central Region, addresses the
guests.
time for the Wing level awards.
These coveted awards were presented by Wing Commander Col.
Seten. They consisted of:
Cadet of the Year
Cadet Maj. Brandon West
Col. Bud Payton Public Affairs
Officer of the Year
Maj. Bruce Kipp
Banquet Head Table: Wing leaders, distinguished visitors and honored
guest at the head table.

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Banquet Room View: The large crowd filled the hotel banquet room.

Communicator of the Year
Lt. Col. Richard Larson
John V. “Jack” Sorenson Cadet Programs Officer of the Year
Maj. Justin Johnson
Operations Officer of the Year
Capt. Neil Schmid
Cadet Programs Officer of the Year
Capt. Shannon Hofer
Drug Demand Reduction Member of the Year
Capt. Sharon Moad
Aerospace Education Officer of the Year
Capt. David Small
One of the highlights of the banquet was the “year-in-review”
slideshow which highlighted
some of the more serious aspects
of what SDWG does, but also
included some of the lighter
moments as well. The Wing
thanks Cadet 1st Lt. Sullivan
Busch for preparing this year’s
entertaining look back at SDWG
activities during 2013.
Sunday, 27 April, was set Maj. Justin Johnson, Sioux Falls
aside for workshops and breakout Composite Squadron, receives the
sessions for the senior members SDWG Cadet Programs Officer of
on a variety of key aspects of the Year Award.
Wing operations and administration. A special program had also
been set up to keep the cadets
active and engaged. It was a long
and busy weekend for all the
attendees but at the end the universal comment was that it had
all been enjoyable, worthwhile,
informative and instructive.
Capt. David Small, Lookout
Planning has already begun Mountain Composite Squadron,
for the 2015 Wing Conference receives the SDWG Aerospace
Education Officer of the Year
and Awards Banquet.
Award.

17

Cadet Maj. Brandon West, Sioux
Falls Composite Squadron, receives
the SDWG Cadet of the Year
Award.

Maj. Bruce Kipp, Wing Staff,
receives the SDWG Public Affairs
Officer of the Year Award.

Capt. Neil Schmid, Sioux Falls
Composite Squadron, receives the
SDWG Operations Officer of the
Year Award.

Lt. Col. Rick Larson, Wing
vice commander, receives the
Communicator of the Year Award.

17

Newest Pilot in South Dakota Wing;
My Flight Training in Civil Air Patrol
By Cadet Col. William Small, CAP
Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron (Spearfish)
with input from CAP Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP; Col. John Seten, CAP;
Lt. Col. Gary Hewett, CAP; and Capt. David Small, CAP

South Dakota Wing has a brand new pilot,
Cadet Col. William Small. On 5 February, he
traveled from his home in Spearfish to Brookings
in a CAP aircraft. In Brookings he met with FAA
Designated Pilot Examiner John Barney who
administered his practical and oral tests and the
flight checkride for a private pilot’s certificate.
William flew to Brookings as a student pilot but
returned to Rapid City as “pilot-in-command” of
the CAP aircraft.
William was accompanied to Brookings by
his chief flight instructor, CAP Lt. Col. Gary
Hewett, himself a Certified Flight Instructor
(CFI), who spent many hours closely working
with William on the entire process. William also
received training and advice from CFIs (and CAP
members) Marty Larson, Jerry Densmore and
Maj. Craig Goodrich.

This is
the story in
William’s own
words:
Up until the
second half of
the year 2012,
I never truly
considered
the possibility
of getting my
Private Pilot’s
certificate.
Even when my
brother (Cadet
C a p t . D a v i d Cadet Colonel William Small
Small) got his
Private Pilot’s certificate, I did not plan to pursue
one myself. Multiple events in
2012 slowly made me change
my mind. A lot of it had to do
with my situation in Civil Air
Patrol. After the summer of 2012,
I had attained the Spaatz Award
and completed multiple summer
activities. It was in this slight
down time that I thought, hesitantly, it might be interesting to
give flying a shot. I had the time
and opportunity, so why not.
My first step was asking my
parents, somewhat timidly, if
they would mind if I asked Lt.
Col. Gary Hewett (my brother’s
primary flight instructor) about
the possibility of flight training.
My parents, who like flying too,
William as pilot-in-command of a CAP aircraft. Left Seat – Photo by Capt.
unsurprisingly said, “Yes.” So, I
David Small
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went ahead and met with Hewett
to discuss the process, requirements, etc., to get my Private
Pilot’s certificate. Going into that
meeting, I was unsure and nervous. I came out realizing that the
process involved more than I had
thought. However, I concluded
that I could do it. This article
describes the experience.
I got my medical/student
pilot certificate on November 12,
2012. My first instruction flight
was on December 12 (which was
my only flight in a Cessna-182,
not a Cessna-172). Flight training
progressed with a couple flights
a month, until a trip or activity
would disrupt it, and then back CAP Lt. Col. Gary Hewett, William’s chief flying instructor, congratulates
to a couple flights a month. This SD’s newest private pilot. Photo by Paul Hanusa, FBO manager at
was the pattern of most of my Brookings Airport
flight training.
get airsick in small airplanes, even if I am in the
Early on in my training there were two problems I had to work around. The first was that I am pilot’s seat. This caused me some discomfort in
colorblind. This caused me to have restrictions on my early training, but luckily it went away.
The second half of 2013 saw an increase
my medical certificate. I did manage to get them
in my training activity. Mostly notably, on
removed later by demonstrating I could see different colors. The second difficulty was that I often September 3rd, I made my first solo flight.
This was a significant development in my flight training and
for me. Although only a short
flight, it changed my outlook
and gave me new motivation.
Up until then I had told myself
that I could stop at any point if I
wanted to. However, during that
flight, I found that flying was
just fun! It made all the training
worth it and I decided resolutely
to finish the process.
Even though I’d soloed, there
was still more to do, such as taking the FAA written examination.
Finding and getting to a testing
center for the test was interesting.
There aren’t any nearby, so in the
end I took the test in Greensboro,
Designated Pilot Examiner John Barney congratulates William after his
North Carolina. Then there was
successful checkride. Photo by Lt. Col. Gary Hewett

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the Private Pilot Practical test.
Towards the end of 2013 serious
talk started about when I would
take the practical. Now, even
though that was a positive sign,
it made me nervous. This was
because I felt I did not know
enough. This was not a new feeling for me. Before my first solo
flight, and again before my longest solo cross country, I was
nervous and unsure. However,
all these times it turned out I was
ready. So I had confidence that
the practical would be the same.
Come February 2014, I was
getting tired. Therefore, it was
with some relief when February
5 was set as the date for me to Designated Pilot Examiner John Barney administers the private pilot exams
take the practical. However, as to William. Photo by Lt. Col. Gary Hewett
I mentioned before, nervousness also came. Now, taking the practical was
Once again, I proved I was ready despite being
more complicated than originally planned. Long nervous, as I successfully passed both the oral and
story short, there was no one available in westflight portions of the Private Pilot Practical test.
ern South Dakota to administer the test during Needless to say, once I knew I passed I was happy
the time period I needed to take it, so I had to and relieved although it didn’t sink in right then
go to Brookings. Lt. Col. Hewett and I flew to that I had successfully completed my flight trainBrookings the day before the practical in order to ing process and had become a Private Pilot. The
give me more experience with various procedures, rest of the day was a simple process of paperwork,
navigation, etc., during my last training flight. Lt. calling my parents with the good news, and flying
Col. Hewett had me visit several different airback to Rapid City. The flight back was my first
ports on the way. When we arrived in Brookings flight as a certified pilot, and that felt good!
we had to put the plane in a heated hangar since it
Now, after the flight back and during the
next couple days various people found out I was
was 19o below zero Fahrenheit.
a pilot. A question I got asked multiple times
Thursday, February 6, 2014 was the big day.
My goal was to come into it well rested and
was, “What are you going to do to celebrate?”
relaxed. Unfortunately, that didn’t work out as
The answer was, first thing the next week I get
planned. The excitement kept me awake later
my wisdom teeth removed. That is not the best
Wednesday night than was ideal, and during “celebration” I have ever had. My choice for
the night my mind kept going over my aviation celebration is to simply fly!
knowledge. So, come morning, I was not exactly
Another question I have been asked is why I
rested and relaxed. I was OK, though, and ready to
decided to pursue my Private Pilot certificate. This
go! But our transportation wasn’t. The loaner van
is a difficult question to answer. I can tell the story
from the airport did not want to start in the cold. of how I wasn’t planning on it at first, or give reaEventually someone at the airport came to pick
sons such as it looks good on my resume. Probably
us up so I could get to my appointment with the the truest answer though, is that I enjoy flying and
examiner on time.
look forwards to doing it for years to come.

22

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25

25

Winter Survival Skills:
Improvised Snowshoes For Walking In
Heavy Snow
By Capt. Sharon Moad, CAP
Crazy Horse Composite Squadron (Custer)

Winter Storm Atlas hammered South Dakota in early
October 2013 dumping over six
feet of snow in some areas of
the Black Hills. The possibility
of the squadron having to conduct a ground search and rescue
mission in such conditions was
the impetus for an emergency
services class on the techniques
for deep snow rescue.
The Crazy Horse Composite
Squadron in the town of Custer
in the southern Black Hills
asked the Custer County Search
and Rescue Team to teach a
class to squadron members on
the hazards of search and rescue in extreme temperatures
and heavy snow with emphasis
on ice rescue and how to make
improvised snowshoes.
Mr. Rick March and Mr. Jeff
Frisco of Custer County Search
and Rescue came to the squadron
headquarters where they presented a very informative video
on ice-on-water rescue and how
to survive if you fall through the
ice into deep water. They then
explained the signs, symptoms
and dangers of hypothermia.
The second part of their
presentation was a hands-on
class on how to make improvised snowshoes from pine tree
branches. Squadron members
were taught to use two small
branches for each foot. Place the
26

“bushy” ends over each other at a
slight angle leaving the stick end
to the back and using some type
of cord, string, or other material
tie the branches together. To use
the snowshoes you place your
foot onto the branches slightly
back of the middle and tie them
onto your boot using cord or
even the top end of your boot
laces (still partially laced in your
boot). These improvised snowshoes allow your weight to be
distributed over a larger area
so you do not sink as deeply
into the snow when you walk.
Depending on the distance to
be traveled it may be necessary
to periodically replace these
improvised snowshoes.
Like regular snowshoes there
is a special technique in using
this improvised type. As you

Jeff Frisco (left) and Rick March
(right) present their hypothermia
class to the squadron.

Jeff Frisco demonstrates how
to make a snowshoe out of pine
branches.

step forward drag the foot rather
than using a heel down step. This
shuffling motion is similar to that
used by cross-country skiers. In
addition, when you need to travel
downslope or downhill a side
step is used rather than a normal
walking step.
After learning how to make
improvised snowshoes the participants made survival bracelets
and lanyards from parachute
cord either to wear or to put in
their 24-hour packs. These items
have enough cord that, when
undone, they can be used to tie
the pine branches together and
onto your foot.
26

Low-Level Route Sur vey:
SDWG Flies in Suppor t of South
Dakota Air National Guard
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP
SDWG PAO

Each year since 1998, the South Dakota Air
National Guard (SDANG) requests South Dakota
Wing to conduct a Low-Level Route Survey
(LLRS) of certain military training air routes and
the aerial Military Operations Area (MOA). The
purpose of the LLRS missions is to identify, photograph and report uncharted obstructions, usually
antenna towers, and noise sensitive areas such as
farms, livestock pens and feedlots, which should
be avoided by SDANG pilots flying in these
areas. CAP LLRS flights are flown in the spring
and summer. The flight crew consists of a Mission
Pilot, a Mission Observer, and a Mission Scanner.
They fly along specific air routes at an altitude of
1,000 feet. 
In 2013, SDWG LLRS missions surveyed
nine air routes from South Dakota into Iowa and
Nebraska and several sectors of the O’Neill MOA
in northeast Nebraska. The missions required
a total of 46.6 hours of flight time and covered
nearly 5,000 miles.

(L-R): Lt. Col. Greg Lair, 175th Fighter Squadron
Commander, SDANG; SMSgt (Lt. Col., CAP) Rick
Larson, SDANG; Capt. Jerry Grotjohn, 175th Fighter
Squadron, SDANG; Capt. Neil Schmid, CAP. Photo by
SSgt Garret Gibbs, SDANG

Whenever SDWG flies LLRS a command post
is set up for command, control and communications
support for the aircraft. Wing vice commander
Lt. Col. Rick Larson serves as LLRS Incident
Commander. Capt. Neil Schmid of the Sioux Falls
Composite Squadron is the Project Officer and
Lead Planner for LLRS missions.
On 5 February 2014, CAP officers Capt. Schmid and Lt. Col.
Larson met with two officers of
the South Dakota Air National
Guard’s 114th Fighter Wing; Lt.
Col. Greg Lair, Commander of
the 175th Fighter Squadron (also
a CAP pilot) and Capt. Jerry
Grotjohn, 175th Fighter Squadron
Airspace Manager, to brief them
on the results of SDWG’s 2013
Low-Level Route Survey missions and to begin making plans for
LLRS missions in 2014.
SDWG’s first LLRS mission
of 2014 was flown in late April.

This cluster of antenna towers on Turkey Ridge could pose a hazard to
low-flying, fast-moving military aircraft. Photo by SDWG

27

27

South Dakota’s Joe Foss
Honored in Arizona
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP, South Dakota Wing PAO
Photos Credit CAP 1st Lt. Mark Watson, used with permission of the Arizona Wing

The South Dakota Wing of
the Civil Air Patrol is pleased to
report that South Dakota native
Joe Foss has been honored in
Arizona. Members and the
Color Guard of CAP’s Yuma
Composite Squadron 508 of
the Arizona Wing attended a
ceremony in which the honor
was bestowed.
Foss was honored by having
an aircraft hangar named for
him at a dedication ceremony
at the new Aviation Industrial
Center in the Defense Contractor
Complex at Yuma International
Airport in Yuma, Arizona.
Marine Corps (MCAS) Yuma
shares facilities with Yuma
International Airport in much
the same way as Joe Foss
Field/Air National Guard Base
shares facilities with Sioux Falls
Regional Airport. MCAS Yuma
is home to multiple squadrons of
Marine Corps aircraft.
The Aviation Industrial
Center, within the Defense
Contractor Complex at the airport is a single structure housing
a hangar plus space for offices
and engineering shops. The
huge, 24,000 square foot hangar
was dedicated as the “Joe Foss
Hangar” at the ceremony.
In the background of the
photo the Marine Corps variant
of the new F-35B “Lightning
29

II” Joint Strike Fighter
is partly visible. The
Aviation Industrial
Center will fill a vital
role in the research
and development of
advanced technologies for the military
and civilian aerospace
industry.
Joseph Jacob “Joe”
Foss (1915-2003) was
the leading fighter ace
of the Marine Corps
during World War II.
In 1943 he received
the Medal of Honor Arizona Wing CAP 1st Lt. Janet Watson holds
for his actions during a piece of the hangar dedication banner.
the Guadalcanal camSomewhat ironically, Foss
paign in the Pacific. After the
war, in 1946, Foss was appointed gave Arizona aviation officials
a lieutenant colonel in the South a bit of a black eye several years
ago. At Phoenix’s International
Dakota National Guard where he
Airport Joe, then 86, was
founded the state’s Air National
detained by airport security
Guard. Ultimately he rose to
the rank of Brigadier General. when screening detected his
In civilian life Foss served two Medal of Honor. Security offielected terms as a representative cers, not recognizing what is
in the South Dakota legislature was, wanted to confiscate and
destroy the medal and related
and, beginning in 1955, at age
memorabilia he was carrying.
39, he became the state’s 20th
(and youngest) governor. Joe Publicity of the incident embarrassed Arizona officials. In later
was also two time president of
years Foss and his wife lived in
the National Rifle Association,
Scottsdale, AZ. Joe Foss died
the first commissioner of the
on January 1, 2003 and is buried
American Football League,
in Arlington National Cemetery
and had a career as a television
in Virginia.
broadcaster as well.
29

Spidertracks: Where Were We, Anyway?
By Capt. Neil Schmid, CAP
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron (Sioux Falls)

This article is written from the perspective of HOW WE USE IT
one who has flown Civil Air Patrol search and
Once airborne, the Spider unit is switched
rescue missions and also served on the ground
on by simply plugging it into one of
as an Air Operations Branch Director and
the aircraft’s electrical outlets.
as an Incident Commander. While
The Spider unit sends out an
the Spidertracks unit can be
electronic ping every one or
used in virtually any type
two minutes. In that ping is data
of vehicle, this account
indicating the flight track, altitude,
is written from personal
airspeed, heading, and latitude & lonexperience in emergency
gitude coordinates. That ping is picked up
services missions with the unit
in real-time by the Iridium Satellite Network.
in an aircraft.
With 66 low earth orbit satellites Iridium
Spider S3 unit
WHERE IT COMES FROM
has complete global coverage with no blank
Spider units are manufactured by
spots. Even if the satellite hearing the ping
a company in New Zealand that was founded
does not “see” the ground control station, it will
on an idea of how to improve safety in aviation
pass the data on and it will be sent to the Spider
businesses and the aviation industry in general.
server and can be viewed on the “spidertracks”
The primary aim was to develop a better, more
website within seconds.
affordable electronic device that uses modern
On the ground, if you have an Internet conneccommunications technology to track an aircraft
tion all you need do is a log in to the spidertracks
while in flight and, when necessary, assist in locatwebsite to view the real time tracks your aircraft
ing a downed aircraft.
create. There is no need for any special software.
If desired, the flight(s) in progress
can be monitored in real time by
pressing the “watch” button. By
pressing the “mark” button, an
identifying icon is dropped onto
the track to distinguish between
multiple aircraft flying different tracks. These tracks can be
electronically overlaid on popular
mapping sites for an excellent
visual picture of the flight track.
A special feature sends an alert if
an aircraft’s track stops moving
and sends an SOS alert indicating
a possible problem with the flight.
Images of flight tracks can be can
be downloaded from a website.
INCIDENT COMMANDER’S
DREAM
The Civil Air Patrol uses
the Incident Command System,
Map of primary waterways in Butte and Meade Counties.

30

30

a standardized organizational
model developed by the Federal
Emergency Management Agency
(FEMA), to respond to emergency
situations. Incident Commanders
and Incident Command staff, or
anyone who needs to know, can
monitor the current position of
CAP aircraft in near real time. This
is an Incident Commander’s dream
– a near real time graphic display of
the activity of his Spider equipped
aircraft! This situational awareness
allows an Incident Commander to
order an alteration in search grid or
change a plan with minimum loss
of time which could be vital in a
lifesaving event.
Butte-Meade County waterways with partial Spidertracks overlay.
From an operational safety
In the flat lands of eastern South Dakota, many
standpoint, the Spider unit continues
times we use a standard grid search pattern to try to
to transmit data pings to the Iridium satellites
even if radio communications with the aircraft is locate the target. Spidertracks shows exactly where
we were and where we are going. In the final report,
lost. The Spidertracks real-time graphic display
reassures the Incident Commander that his out-of- we can show our customer these results graphically
radio-contact aircraft is still airborne and provides and account for the search area covered. If future
flights are required, the planning section can do a
flight tracking data.
much better job establishing new search areas.
ACCOUNTABLE TO OUR CUSTOMER
As a mission pilot in a fast moving situation, THE LOST IS FOUND
In April 2012, an elderly man was reported
there are many times when events unfold quickly
missing from a central South Dakota town. The
and all of the information needed is either abbrecounty sheriff’s office informed South Dakota
viated or not available at all. Once an aircrew is
Wing that the man, who had symptoms of demenstaffed and search areas are defined, there still can
tia, was lightly dressed and provided us the make,
be room for ambiguity and misinterpretation. If we
knew exactly where the target of the search was, we model and color of his vehicle.
Spring weather problems hampered aerial search
probably wouldn’t need to fly a search grid pattern.
activities for two days, but on the third day a threeperson aircrew was assembled and launched by midafternoon. The initial search area was approximately
one hour west of the aircrew’s home base. However,
after flying the first few legs of the search grid pattern, the crew was notified by the Mission Base that
they were in the wrong place. We were searching the
wrong county. After a quick adjustment to the flight
plan, the search continued for the next hour.
As darkness began to fall the flight crew radioed Mission Base and informed them that “we are
going to make one more pass and return to base.”
As the aircraft banked to return home the Mission
Spider S3 unit mounted on an aircraft’s cockpit dash.
Scanner said “I think that I see the car!” Sure
31

31

First
Flight
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP
South Dakota Wing PAO

Cadet Airman Malia enjoying her very first ride in a
CAP aircraft.

Cadet Airman Malia Goodrich experienced
her first flight in a Civil Air Patrol aircraft on
Saturday, February 1. At the aircraft’s controls
was her dad, Maj. Craig Goodrich, commander of
the Rushmore Composite Squadron in Rapid City.
The day dawned sunny, a bit windy and very, very
cold. The wind chill factor was well below zero.
Both the experienced airman and the eager young
aviatrix were very thankful that they were able to
do the preflight checks in a heated hangar. As can
be seen in the photo they both enjoyed the orientation ride.
32

Spidertracks
Continued . . .

enough, the car and the missing man were found
in a remote rural area near a pond on an abandoned
farmstead. The car was not visible from any road
so locating the subject by ground search could
have taken months to accomplish.
The graphic representation of the grid search
pattern being flown by the CAP aircraft on the spidertracks website alerted the Incident Commander
to the fact that it was searching in the wrong county.
As a result he was able to redirect the aircraft to
the correct county resulting in the “find”. Without
Spidertracks, the aircrew could have searched the
wrong county without tangible results.
LIVESTOCK DISASTER RECOVERY
A fluke, early-autumn blizzard began in western
South Dakota on 3 October 2013 with heavy rain that
quickly turned to snow. By the next day, as much as
four feet of snow had fallen which, combined with
70-mph winds, created monster drifts that paralyzed
much of the western half of the state and caught
livestock still in their summer grazing land.
South Dakota wing received a number of tasks
from the state and the affected counties to survey the
extent of the damage and losses in livestock. One of
the most challenging missions was received from
the Offices of Emergency Management in Butte
County and Meade County. They requested SDWG
conduct an aerial survey to pinpoint the locations of
dead livestock in their county’s major waterways.
This mission was unusually complex because
we were tasked by our customers to fly “named
waterways” in two counties in Western South
Dakota. This meant developing meandering
courses, which show up on the official State map
and documenting cattle losses. One SDWG aircraft
was assigned to each county for this mission and
with tasked with flying over the streams and rivers
within the assigned geographic area.
By using Spidertracks, a graphic depiction and
full accountability of the areas flown was presented
to the State of South Dakota and to Butte and Meade
County officials. The State was quite pleased with
the outcome and was rewarded with loss recovery
from Federal Agencies which helped relieve the
suffering endured by area ranchers.
32

South Dakota
Wing Roundup

CIVIL AIR PATROL • FALL 2014 • UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AUXILIARY

In This Issue . . .
Aerospace Education/Emergency Services
Workshop
South Dakota Wing, Civil Air Patrol
4275 Airport Rd., Ste. A, Rapid City, SD 57703
Office: 605-393-4215, Fax: 605-393-4216
Email: southdakotawa@gmail.com
Website: http://sdcap.us, Facebook: www.facebook.com/
SDWingCAP
Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/102270464@N02/
Col. John N. Seten
Commander, South Dakota Wing
Civil Air Patrol
South Dakota Wing Roundup Staff
Publishers
Col. John Seten, South Dakota Wing Commander
Lt. Col. Richard Larson, South Dakota Wing Vice
Commander
Editor
Maj. Bruce Kipp
South Dakota Wing Public Affairs Officer
Email: paa.sdwg@gmail.com, Cell: 605-261-4507
The South Dakota Wing Roundup is an authorized
journal of the South Dakota Wing of the Civil Air Patrol, the
official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force. It is published by a
private firm in no way connected to the U.S. Air Force or the
Civil Air Patrol Corporation. The comments and opinions
expressed in the articles are those of the contributors and do
not reflect the position of the U.S. Government, the U.S. Air
Force, the Civil Air Patrol Corporation, or the South Dakota
Wing. The appearance of advertisements, supplements or
inserts, does not constitute an endorsement by CAP or the
U.S. Air Force of the products and services advertised.
The South Dakota Wing Roundup encourages
contributions from CAP members, the military, related
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3

Commander’s Corner

5

AFA CyberPatriot Award

7

Aircraft Save at Spearfish

8

Big Sioux River Flooding Survey

9

Cadet Becker at NCR Joint Flight
Academy

11

CAP Congressional Gold Medal Update

12

CAP Supports 114th Fighter Wing Exercise 13
Exercise Falcon Keynote 2014

15

Wet Cadets

15

G400W Aircraft Navigation System

17

JDCLE Encampment 2014

18

National Blue Beret

23

New Top 3 at CAP

25

SDWG NCR SAR Award

25

SDWG-SDNG Museum Exhibit

31

Tornado Damage Surveys

33

Wing Changes of Command/Staff
Appointments

36

COVER PHOTO BACKGROUND: Lt. Vincent
Brown takes mission photos of areas of damage
for emergency management authorities.
Inset photos:LEFT: Flooding along the Big Sioux
River; CENTER: Black Hills tornado near Silver
City; RIGHT: Damage caused by the Wessington
Springs tornado.


Aerospace Education / Emergency
Services Workshop
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP, Wing PAO
Maj. David Small, Jr., CAP, Wing Chief of Staff
Lt. Col. Bill Collister, CAP, Wing Aerospace Education Officer

Twenty eight SDWG members took part in
a joint Aerospace Education (AE) – Emergency
Services (ES) workshop held in Pierre from
Thursday, 7 August, to Saturday, 9 August.
Maj. David Small supervised nine cadets in
CAP’s Model Rocketry Program at the Pierre
airport. Four cadets, Cadet Tech. Sgt. Austin
Rauscher, Cadet Airman Nick Kochutin, Cadet
2nd Lt. Jared Doyle and Cadet Master Sgt. Josiah
Huntington, completed all three phases of the model
rocketry program to earn the coveted CAP rocketry
badge. Rockets were launched near the airport on
Saturday with a single stage rocket constructed
and flown by Cadet Master Sgt. Josiah Huntington
reaching a measured altitude of 383.98 feet.

A model rocket launches into the sky during hands-on
aerospace education.

deployed for realistic training scenarios.
We had special guests fly in from the North
Dakota Wing in a FLIR-equipped CAP Cessna182. The Forward Looking Infrared Radar is excellent for locating the heat signature of individuals at
night or in heavy cover. NDWG pilots Capt. Dan
Villas and Lt. Graham Frost and FLIR operator

Winners of the CAP Model Rocketry Badge (L-R) Cadet
Master Sgt. Josiah Huntington, Cadet 2nd Lt. Jared
Doyle, Cadet Tech. Sgt. Austin Rauscher, Cadet Airman
Nick Kochutin.

Cadet 1st Lt. Sullivan Busch, under the supervision of Wing Director of Operations Maj. Nick
Gengler, led 16 Cadets and one Senior Member
in a field training exercise focused on the skills
employed by CAP ground search and rescue
teams. Search and rescue teams were formed and


The balsa wood and glider aviation crew with guest.



North Dakota Wing FLIR operator Capt. Daryl Billick
explains operation of the sensor to cadets.

A ground search team takes a break between training
scenarios.

Capt. Daryl Billick set up a static display of the
FLIR Cessna-182 at the Pierre airport and several
cadets got to operate the sensors.
On Friday and Saturday Capt. Gary Dettman
taught the intricacies of flight fundamentals and
control to a group of eight cadets. Utilizing STEM
kits sent by CAP National HQ the group built
rubber band powered balsa wood aircraft and
tested changing various aspects of flight dynamics and flight configurations. Capt. Dettman also
supervised the cadets as they assembled and, after
training on a remote control aircraft simulator,
flew a remote controlled powered glider with a
six foot wingspan. The model operated at a range
of nearly a quarter mile and performed loops and
other acrobatic maneuvers.
Also on Friday, cadets and seniors toured the
South Dakota National Guard Museum where
Wing Historian Maj. Todd Epp had just opened

the new SDWG exhibit. The opening of the
exhibit was further highlighted as Wing Aerospace
Education Officer Lt. Col. Buck DeWeese, with
the assistance of other SDWG members, manned
tables for airplane building, model rocketry and
parachuting to entertain and educate three groups
of Pierre Boys and Girls Club members from K4th Grade and their parents and teachers, approximately 60 people. Maj. Epp thrilled the crowd with
demonstration flights of his quadcopter.
The children loved making straw rockets,
parachutes and paper airplanes. Lt. Col. DeWeese
answered many aerospace questions from children
and adults. The highlight, however, may have
been when Lt. Col. DeWeese put a group of Boys
and Girls Club kids through close order drills and
marched them around the museum while they were
dressed in military garb. The children loved it. Lt.
Col. DeWeese had them whipped into shape in
short order.

Lt. Col. Collister musters the troops for some close
order drill.

Visiting “troops” render a hand salute.





Commander’s Corner
By Lt. Col. Rick Larson
South Dakota Wing Vice Commander

“This has to be a record!” I said to South
Dakota Wing Commander Col. John Seten. “In my
many years of CAP involvement, I’ve never seen
this level of commitment from so many members
in such a few months”. The boss agreed. If you
can’t believe it, just review the latest issues of our
monthly Skychaser electronic newsletter. During
the past several months, SDWG CAP members
provided critical situational awareness and assisted
other response agencies as tornados and flooding
hit the region. Another June tasking aided a missing person search in Butte County. SDCAP supported major USAF missions such as air defense
intercept, flown thousands of miles in seven
different states during low-level route surveys,
and conducted two search and rescue training
missions. Our aircrews continue to support state
wildlife tracking efforts with regular missions,
the latest in tracking bobcat and elk. We patrolled
the skies high above the largest Christian music
festival in the nation, assisting local authorities.
The Big Sioux cyber-security team in Brookings
earned top CAP team honors in the annual
CyberPatriot competition. Cadets proudly marched
in several community parades, attended the Joint
Dakota Encampment at Camp Grafton, ND; Our
Color Guards presented Old Glory at many events.
Several Cadets attended flight academies and those
at National Blue Beret activity earned the coveted
St. Albans pin for wear on their distinctive berets.
Other events such as supporting the114th
Fighter Wing Family Day “Wings and Wheels”
show and the recent attack response exercise


go far towards cementing the “One Force”
team. Our crews represented CAP at Ellsworth
AFB’s Open House, showing AF members
and their families CAP aircraft and capabilities, and at the Rapid City Regional Airport
Open House supporting the Hayward Air Rally.
Aerospace Education was busy too, with glider
operations and a record amount of powered orientation flying statewide. We handcrafted and
launched model rockets during the Aerospace
Weekend in Pierre. Maj. Todd Epp worked with
the state National Guard Museum in Pierre to
develop and present the first ever CAP display!
I’m sure I’ve missed other equally impressive
events and accomplishments!
The take always? For the second time in three
years SDWG received the North Central Region’s
award for excellence in Search and Rescue and
Disaster Response. A first ever “highly effective”
rating from the U.S. Air Force for our search and
rescue teams, and despite our small size earning
“top-ten” status in the nation for aircraft utilization! 
I challenge any other CAP member from any other
Wing to have that much to brag about in ten years....
and SDWG did all that in six months. Wow!
Our Wing members exemplify excellence in
all that they do, putting service before self and
integrity first. South Dakotans to the core. Your
continuing efforts and successes make South
Dakota Wing the best of the best! Col. Seten and
I are humbled to have the opportunity to lead such
outstanding Americans! Keep CAPing!



Tops in CAP
Cyber-Security
By Capt. Shannon Hofer, CAP
Commander, Big Sioux Composite Squadron

The evening of 26 June brought a special
honor to the Big Sioux Composite Squadron in
Brookings. We were pleased to have two guests
present representing the Air Force Association;
Mr. Ron Mielke, President of the Air Force
Association in South Dakota, and Mr. Ed Revell,
President of AFA’s Sioux Falls “Dacotah Chapter”
visit us. They came to present the “Civil Air Patrol
Champion Award” to the squadron’s CyberSecurity Team. The team earned this significant
honor by coming in first of the 320 CAP teams that
took part in CyberPatriot-VI.
CyberPatriot-VI, the annual Air Force
Association’s national cyber-defense competition
that challenges high-school students to resolve
real-life cyber-security situations began in midNovember 2013.

(L-R) Mr. Revell, Cadet Senior Airman Zebadiah
Nelson, Cadet Capt. Joshua Klosterman, Cadet Chief
Master Sgt. Chris Dinnel, Coach Cadet 2nd Lt. Tyler
Gross, Mr. Mielke

During two online qualification rounds the
Big Sioux team faced realistic computer network
threats at their home location seeking out weaknesses in simulated online networks and working
to defend those networks from threat scenarios. A
Cisco networking challenge was also a part of the
competition. The team was scored according to
how quickly and effectively they established and
maintained the secure networks. The Big Sioux
team was one of only 44 teams to advance to the
semifinals held in January 2014. In the semifinals they faced similar but more complex and


Members of the Big Sioux Composite Squadron CyberSecurity Team were (L-R) Cadet Amn Zebadiah Nelson,
Cadet Capt. Joshua Klosterman, Cadet Master Sgt.
Chris Dinnel, Cadet Master Sgt. Laura Rudnik and
team coach the then Cadet 2nd Lt. Tyler Gross. Not
shown are team member Cadet Airman Josiah Jorenby
and team mentor the then Lt. Shannon Hofer.

sophisticated computer network threats. After an
exceptional performance in the semifinals, the Big
Sioux Composite Squadron team was named one
of 14 All Service Division national finalists and
received an all-expenses-paid trip to the National
Finals competition in Maryland.
For the third year in a row, Big Sioux’s CyberSecurity Team returned to Washington, D.C. in
March 2014, to compete in the national championship round. At the National Finals, the only
in-person round, the Big Sioux team competed
to defend virtual networks and mobile devices
from a professional aggressor team. The National
Finalists also faced-off in three additional competition components: the Digital Cyber Crime Scene
Challenge and the Cisco Networking Challenge,
both of which returned from previous seasons, and
the Digital Forensics Challenge. These extra challenges broaden the cyber-security experience and
expose teams to new elements of the many career
opportunities available to them.
Within CyberPatriot-VI’s All Services Division
the squadron’s Cyber-Security team placed seventh
out of the 864 teams in the division.
The Air Force Association (AFA), the sponsoring organization, is a non-profit, independent,
professional military and aerospace education association. Its mission is to promote a dominant United
States Air Force and a strong national defense, and
to honor Airmen and our Air Force Heritage. AFA
has 200 chapters nationally and internationally
representing more than 100,000 members.


Aircraft “SAVE” at Spearfish
By Lt. Col. Rodney “Buck” DeWeese, CAP
Wing Director of Aerospace Education

Hurricanes don’t hap pen too often in the Black
Hills. However, on Thursday
evening, 26 June 2014, in
Spearfish, weather conditions
rivaled the storms usually seen
at lower latitudes. A line of
severe thunderstorms produced
peak winds of 69 mph at the The aircraft CAP “saved” at Spearfish.
Spearfish airport; with sustained gusts not much less than
that. Winds were clocked at 80 mph west of town pected and was not associated with a specific
mission as such, the CAP members were happy to
in the same weather event.
participate in this “save,” that prevented airplane
The Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron
and automobile owners from untold inconvenience
in Spearfish was in the midst of its regular meeting while the howling winds rattled the squadron and expense.
building. At one point Cadet Chief Master Sgt.
Connor Caneva stepped out onto the small porch
to peer at the angry skies. He noticed that a big,
“We’ll Take Care Of You.”
twin-engine Cessna-421 had come adrift and
was rolling backwards across the ramp toward a
605-339-2241
row of parked cars. The aircraft had been parked
across the direction of the wind. The force of the
wind weather-vaned the plane, putting the nose
into the wind, and caused it to jump the wooden
wheel chocks. The Cessna then began to be blown
backwards. The forecast had apparently under-predicted the storm’s intensity and the plane wasn’t
tied down.
Lt. Col. Buck DeWeese and Cadet Chief
Master Sgt. Rosby joined Cadet Caneva in running
over to the scene. Their combined efforts managed to bring the aircraft to a halt just short of the
parked cars. They re-chocked the aircraft’s wheels
300 S. Cleveland Ave., Sioux Falls
so it would not move, then the cadets took some
clothesline type cord and braided it into a strong
Thanks
tie-down ropes to help secure the aircraft from the marvsbodyshop.com
CAP for
high wind. As a result the very expensive aircraft marvsbody@quest.net
and some pricy automobiles were not damaged.
all your
After the aircraft had been secured the airport manhard work!
ager was called and the information passed along.
Though the Cessna-421 “rescue” was unex-

Marv’s Body Shop, Inc.





Big Sioux River Flooding Survey Mission
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP
Wing PAO

A week of severe weather in mid-June included
torrential rain that produced wide-spread flooding in the East River area. The state Office of
Emergency Management requested the Civil Air
Patrol’s South Dakota Wing conduct an aerial
photographic survey on 19 June along the Big
Sioux River from Sioux Falls to where it meets
the Missouri River. Later in the day the Federal
Emergency Management Agency requested that
the photos of the flooding also be sent to them.
What began as state tasking changed into a federal
disaster relief mission.
Prior to receipt of the official mission tasking, Wing Commander Col. John Seten and
Capt. Neil Schmid of the Sioux Falls Composite
Squadron flew a training flight over the Big Sioux
and Rock Rivers in South Dakota, Minnesota

and Iowa to assess the scope and parameters of
the official mission.
Once official tasking had been received a
Cessna-182T from the Sioux Falls Composite
Squadron was assigned the mission. The aircraft
departed Sioux Falls Regional Airport at approximately 9:00am for the two hour sortie. The CAP
aircrew consisted of Capt. Matt Meert (Mission
Pilot), Capt. Karla West (Mission Scanner) and Lt.
Robert Hinkhouse (Mission Observer). Capt. Neil
Schmid served as the SDWG Incident Commander
for the mission.
Over 250 photos were taken showing the flow,
the spread of the flood waters and the damage
caused. The photos were uploaded for federal and
state emergency management officials’ analysis and
assessment. Photo used with permission of FEMA.

View of a flooded area along the Big Sioux River near Sioux Falls.





Pierre Cadet Attends CAP Flight Academy
in Mankato, MN
By Lt. Col. Tam Gatje, CAP
Pierre Composite Squadron

Cadet Technical Sergeant Hannah Becker of
Pierre, a member of the South Dakota Wing’s
Pierre Composite Squadron, attended the North
Central Region Joint Flight Academy held near
Mankato, MN from 11-19 July. She was one of
a number of CAP cadets from the South Dakota,
Minnesota, Missouri, California and Florida
Wings who participated. 
The flight academy consisted of two schools,
one for powered flight and one for gliding. Both
schools provided students an excellent start to
becoming pilots licensed by the FAA.
Cadet Becker attended the powered flight
school. During the school the cadets experienced
two sessions of flying each day and two sessions
of ground school. Both are requirements to successfully complete the FAA’s written and flying
tests. Volunteer certified flight instructors taught
the knowledge and skills the cadets will need. In
addition, the instructors provided assistance in
obtaining a FAA Type 3 Medical Certificate.
Cadet Becker commented that the high points
of the academy were (especially) the flying and
talking to other cadets about flying and “other

Cadet Tech. Sgt.
Hannah Becker at
the controls during
flight training at the
joint flight academy.

stuff”. On the low end she thought the weather
delays were the worst - having to hurry up and
wait for good weather. Each of the ten cadets in the
powered flight school successfully completed their
supervised solo.
Cadets flying in the glider school received up
to 25 flights and 25 hours of ground school instruction. They also completed their supervised gliding
solo and two cadets completed their regular gliding solo.
When not actively flying or attending ground
school, the cadets received a
briefing and tour by one of
the pilots of Mayo Clinic’s
“Mayo One” emergency medical helicopter who described
their day-to-day operation. They
also had the opportunity to tour
two French Dassault Aviation
business jets, a Falcon-20 and a
Falcon-50, that are operated by
North Star Aviation in Mankato.
The flight academy participants stayed in the dormitories of Gustavus Adolphus
College in St. Peter, MN.
Meal service was provided by
Cadet Becker relaxes with some of her fellow cadet student pilots.
the college’s cafeteria.
11

11

WWII CAP Congressional Gold
Medal Update
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP
Wing PAO

On 30 May, President Obama signed Senate
Bill 309 into law. The bill awards a Congressional
Gold Medal to Civil Air Patrol for its service
during World War II. This marks the first major
recognition that CAP’s members have received
for their WWII service. The legislation recognizes the volunteer service of more than 120,000
men, women and teenagers who joined CAP
immediately before and during the war. Fewer
than 100 of these early members are believed to
be alive today.
CAP was founded December 1, 1941, a week
before the bombing of Pearl Harbor and the United
States’ entry into WWII. Within three months CAP
organizations formed along the Atlantic and Gulf
Coasts to carry out anti-submarine patrols to help
protect the nation by warding off German U-boat
attacks on American oil tankers bound for Allied
nations. Over the next 15 months, CAP members
used their own planes to watch for German subs.
Those patrols accounted for 86,685 missions that
involved 244,600 flight hours and over 24 million
air miles. They sighted 173 submarines, are credited with dropping bombs that sank two subs, and
located more than 300 survivors of U-boat attacks. 
In the interior of the US, CAP’s early members
also took to the skies to patrol the nation’s borders,
tow targets for military training, watch for forest
fires, conduct search and rescue missions, provide
disaster relief, transport people and parts and conduct orientation flights for future pilots.
Overall the members of the Civil Air Patrol
logged an estimated 750,000 hours of flight time
during the war, Sixty-four members died in service
during World War II.
More information about CAP’s World War II
service is available at CAP’s Congressional Gold
Medal website at: www.capgoldmedal.com.
A Congressional Gold Medal is to be awarded
collectively to CAP members in recognition of
their service and exemplary record during the
12

A CAP Aircraft closes in on a German submarine off
the U.S. coast during World War II.

WWII. After presentation the gold medal will go
to the Smithsonian Institution where it will be
available for display and research.
• The U.S. Mint, with CAP’s assistance, is working on several designs. Once these are complete
the best design will be selected. After that, the gold
CGM medal and bronze replicas will be struck. 
• Congress, the White House and CAP will agree
on an award ceremony date. A formal CGM
award ceremony is envisioned for early 2015 in
Washington, in the Rotunda of the Capitol with
a special presentation ceremony later that day
for veterans/families receiving the bronze replica
medals. Veterans/families of veterans (who have
already passed) not able to travel to Washington
can receive replica medals in their home state at a
later date.
To receive a replica medal a CAP veteran (or
families of those who’ve passed) must be listed
and validated as having been in CAP during
WWII. List new names at http://capmembers.
com/cap_national_hq/goldmedal/ on the link “Add
Gold Medal Candidate”. All entries must contain
current contact information for either the veteran
member or their family.
12

CAP Supports 114th Fighter Wing Exercise
By SDANG SMSgt Richard Larson, 114th Fighter Wing Emergency Manager,
(CAP Lt. Col., South Dakota Wing Vice Commander)

In keeping with one of CAP’s core missions,
support of the USAF, six members of the Sioux
Falls Composite Squadron recently played a critical role in a way that benefitted both CAP and the
airmen of the 114th Fighter Wing of the South
Dakota Air National Guard at Joe Foss Field in
Sioux Falls.
Playing the part of injured airmen, the CAP
members were made up as “moulage” victims,
simulating injuries sustained as participants in the
Guard’s attack response exercise. Led by CAP
Captain Jerry Foy, himself an ANG veteran, the
CAP crew underwent an extreme makeover by
ANG medics from the 114th Medical Group. ANG
Lieutenant Colonel Larry DeBuhr and his staff had
a mission to assess Guard member’s ability to perform self-aid and buddy care throughout the event,
held on Saturday, 6 September. That’s where the
CAP crew came in.
The CAP crew arrived on base and was moulaged with various simulated injuries, ranging
from minor to major; burns, lacerations, amputations - all the trappings of a disaster. The crew
then broke up into groups led by inspectors who
traveled with the “wounded” throughout the base
during exercise incidents.
The teams presented the “victims” in various
work centers, gauging the response to the casualties, and assessing proper procedures to address

Four CAP “casualties” in moulage for the exercise.

the injuries. In CAP’s
emergency services
role, the members also
benefited from experiencing the responses,
which can also be valuable in day-to-day life.
The CAP “victims”
were treated by ANG
members who learned
hands-on procedures.
Fortunately, after expert
treatment, everyone
survived the exercise!

Six Sioux Falls Composite Squadron members in the Fighter Wing’s
Emergency Operation Center prior to the exercise. In the photo (L-R)
CAP Lt. Melanie Schuppan, Cadet AAirman 1st Class Kyle Clement,
Cadet Airman Christopher Schuppan, Cadet Chief Master Sgt. Austin
Cole, Cadet Chief Master Sgt. Nicholas Nash, CAP Capt. Jerry Foy,
USANG SMSgt (CAP Lt. Col.) Rick Larson, EOC Manager, and
USANG Maj. Kevin Miller, EOC Director.

13

Cadet Christopher
Schuppan has rather
gruesome moulage applied
prior to the exercise.

During the day-long event, the
CAP crew was treated to a pizza
lunch provided by Lt. Col. DeBuhr
and a tour of the SDANG Emergency
Operations Center, where they saw
how complex responses by air
assets are managed.
Lt. Col. DeBuhr commented
that the dedication and professionalism of the CAP members aided
greatly in the exercise evaluation,
and thanked each member for their
involvement. 
13

Exercise Falcon Keynote 2014
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP, Wing PAO

SDWG continues to support
the South Dakota Air National
Guard by participating on three
occasions as a target aircraft in
SDANG Exercise Falcon Keynote
2014. The purpose of the exercises
was to provide Sioux Falls’ 114th
Fighter Wing’s alert aircrews The “hare” and the “hound.” SDANG F-16 pilots will practice
training in aerospace control alert intercepting the CAP target aircraft.
intercept procedures, a function of
that may have inadvertently strayed into restricted
its Homeland Security mission.
airspace. SDWG is pleased and proud to provide
A CAP Cessna-172P aircraft, based in Sioux
this cost effective support to SDANG by providing
Falls, acted as the target aircraft. The objective
target aircraft for them to practice air intercept
for the pilots of the F-16s of the 175th Fighter
techniques. CAP partners with the USAF helping
Squadron was to hone their skills in being able to
to provide a total force approach to readiness and
quickly and safely intercept and evaluate a slow
enhanced national security.
moving aircraft that could pose a security risk or

Pierre Cadets are All Wet
By Lt. Col. Tam Gatje, CAP
Pierre Composite Squadron

Several cadets and senior members of the Pierre Composite Squadron and a couple of guests participated in a six-hour raft trip down the Niobrara River in July. Lt. Col. Myra Christensen, Lt. Jon Becker,
Cadet Tech. Sgt. Hannah Becker, Cadet Airman Brant
Malfero, Cadet Margot Pearson, the parent of one of the
cadets and two former cadets floated down the river from
Berry Bridge to Stan’s Landing.
All was not just fun and frolic. The trip was also used to
practice CAP related training. For example, before leaving
Pierre everyone received a safety briefing on the possible
hazards of the trip. This included water hazards while on the
river, over exposure to the sun, the signs of heat exhaustion/
stroke, the techniques of hot weather first aid and the constant need for good hydration. While en route to the river the
cadets practiced map reading using an “old fashioned” paper
map and plotting their current location using the vehicle’s
onboard GPS navigation system.
All the “floaters” reported that the trip was great fun and
(L-R) Cadets Hannah Becker, Brant Malfero
they want to do it again in the future. It was very relaxing
and Margot Pearson cool off under a
without email or cell phones to worry about.
waterfall on the Niobrara River raft trip.
15

15

Garmin G400W Aircraft
Navigation System
By Maj. Craig Goodrich, CAP, Rushmore Composite Squadron and
Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP, Wing PAO

To date South Dakota Wing (SDWG) of the
Civil Air Patrol has equipped two of its three
Cessna-172 aircraft with the Garmin Company’s
G400W aircraft navigation system. Our third
Cessna-172 will leave soon for a complete refurbishment to include a complete Garmin G500
digital flight system. 
The G400W is the least expensive entry into
the use of Wide Area Augmentation (WAAS)
Global Positioning System (GPS) operation.
While the G400W lacks some of the functionality, bells and whistles of more expensive
Garmin systems, it offers significantly improved
capability over older aircraft navigation systems.
For example, the G400W offers faster position
calculations and screen updates (5x per second),
improved annunciation, dead reckoning (backup
if the GPS signal is lost) and more informative
status pages. With the G400W, a terrain database
is standard (for improved awareness and safety),
and it provides this information with greater resolution and precision.
So why is all this important to CAP? Well,
WAAS is a fundamental improvement to GPS

Close-up of the G400W panel and display.

17

A Civil Air Patrol Cessna-172.

Wide angle view of the aircraft instrument panel
showing the placement of the G400W.

accuracy. By adding a series of ground stations
and geostationary satellites, WAAS GPS is
typically five times more accurate than “regular”
GPS. This means it is now possible to fly from
point to point with greater accuracy, to more precisely conduct CAP search and rescue grid patterns, it makes instrument flying in low visibility
safer, and it allows an approach into an airport
with no local ground-based navigation aids; an
important aspect to consider in sparsely settled
South Dakota with less sophisticated airports,
airfields and airstrips. The bottom line is that the
Garmin G400W allows CAP pilots to fly with
greater precision and greater safety as we carry
out our emergency services missions.
17

2014 Joint Dakota Cadet
Leadership Encampment
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP, Wing PAO

Each year the South and North Dakota Wings
hold a joint summer encampment for their cadets.
This year the North Dakota Wing hosted the encampment from 12-20 July at Camp Grafton at Devil’s
Lake, ND about 90 miles west of Grand Forks.
At the encampment, senior ranking cadets
brought the skills learned at squadron, wing,
regional, and national level activities to teach the
younger cadets how to be better leaders. While
the senior member staff present generally let the
cadets run things, they were there as administrators, tutors and mentors.
Camp Grafton, ND. Site of the 2014 Joint Dakota Cadet
Leadership Encampment.

Ground search team training in tracking aircraft
emergency locator beacons.

Each annual encampment has a theme; for 2014
the theme was the Joint Dakota Cadet Leadership
Encampment (JDCLE). This encampment taught
the techniques of leadership and teamwork and
instilled the spirit of honor, courage, and determination in the attendees. In keeping with CAP’s
status as official auxiliary of the Air Force the
cadets also learned military customs and courtesies
and drill and ceremonies. In addition, the cadets
got a taste of military life by living in open bay

North Dakota and South Dakota Wings’ participants at the 2014 JDCLE.

18

18

barracks and eating in a military dining facility.
There were obstacle courses to run, repelling towers to traverse, leadership classes, physical fitness,
and moral leadership guidance. The encampment
ended with “the crucible” – a final test of endurance, and leadership.
Some of the highlights of the encampment were
the cadets flying in a UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter
courtesy of the North Dakota Army Guard, and the
use of the Guard’s high-tech small arms marksmanship simulator and Humvee operational trainer.
Lt. David Stockinger, of South Dakota Wing’s
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron said, “It was
amazing to watch cadets and senior members from
different parts of the Dakotas come together with
the same purpose to achieve a common objective”. Cadet Col. William Small, of SDWG’s
Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron, the Cadet
Commander of this year’s JDCLE, said, “It was a
great occasion for new cadets to learn leadership
and discipline.”

Attendees try out the ND National Guard’s high-tech
small arms marksmanship simulator.

Attendees negotiate the rappelling tower on the obstacle
course.

Cadets maneuver on the obstacle
course in a teamwork/problem
solving exercise.
Cadet descending the
rappelling tower.

JDCLE attendees ride in a North
Dakota Guard UH-60 Blackhawk
helicopter.

JDCLE attendees ride in a North Dakota
Guard UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter.

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Cadets practice egress
from the ND National
Guard’s Humvee
operational trainer.

JDCLE attendees ride in a North Dakota
Guard UH-60 Blackhawk helicopter.
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Physical training/group jog.

Cadets negotiate the rope slide on the obstacle
course.

Cadets negotiate the
rope crawl on the
obstacle course.

Physical training/volleyball.
Night maneuvers during the “the crucible”.

Barracks room inspection.

Camp Grafton dining facility,
a favorite place for hungry
teenagers.

ND Air Guard dining facility crew
kept JDCLE participants well fed.

Uniform inspection.

Barracks room inspection.

JDCLE graduation pass-in-review ceremony.

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National Blue Beret
By Capt. Karla West, CAP
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron

Imagine an aviation event with over 500,000
visitors and over 10,000 aircraft. This is the
Experimental Aircraft Association’s (EAA) annual
“AirVenture” airshow held in Oshkosh, WI.
Through a partnership with the EAA the Civil
Air Patrol provides a large contingent of cadets
and officers to help the EAA manage the airshow.
This contingent is called the “National Blue
Beret” (NBB), a two week long experience like no
other. CAP members are competitively selected
from wings across the nation to participate in this
prestigious event. As a result of their participation
the cadets are authorized to wear the coveted blue
beret with its prized St. Alban’s pin.
This year, South Dakota Wing had four cadets
receive the honor of representing our state at NBB.
First time NBB Cadets were Capt. Nicole Schneider
(Sioux Falls Composite Squadron), and 1st Lt.
Sullivan Busch and Chief Master Sgt. Christopher
Dinnel, both of Big Sioux Composite Squadron in
Brookings, and returning Blue Beret Maj. Brandon
West (Sioux Falls Composite Squadron).

The first and most important mission of the
NBB program is to assist the EAA with flight line
marshaling operations. Cadets are posted along
taxiways during the operational hours of the air
show to direct pilots to their parking destinations.
Cadets also staff two station towers to observe
aircraft landing on each runway to help keep track
of which aircraft are on the ground. The second
mission is crowd control at the ultra-light and
military aircraft areas. This includes one flight
of cadets dedicated to standing guard around the
clock for the aircraft of the “Thunderbirds”, the
USAF precision flying team. Cadet Chief Master
Sgt. Christopher Dinnel excitedly commented,
“Marshaling the Thunderbirds was one of the
most amazing experiences I have ever had.” The
third mission is emergency services. This entails
locating any lost or overdue aircraft by tracking its
emergency locator beacon (ELT).
NBB Operations are based out of “the compound,” as it is called. This compound includes a
hangar for sleeping, an open field for formations,

2014 Civil Air Patrol National Blue Beret contingent.

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a communications building
and, most important to every
teenage cadet, a mess hall. The
compound is run entirely by
CAP personnel. Daily responsibilities include everything
from kitchen duty to cleaning
bathrooms and doing laundry
for the 140 cadets and 42 senior
members. With the number of
cadets at NBB, you would think
that it would be hard to get to
know that many cadets, but at
the end of the two weeks, they
have all become one family.
“I felt like, by the end of
National Blue Beret, all of my
fellow berets and I became a
close knit family. It was great
working with such an awesome group of people”, said
Capt. Nicole Schneider. 1st
Lt. Sullivan Busch echoed the
sentiment, “At NBB, you don’t
make friends with the people
in your flight, you make family. After graduating the two
week activity, I found that I had
twelve new brothers and sisters,
and I didn’t want to leave them
to go home.”

NBB’s coveted blue beret with St. Alban’s pin.

South Dakota Wing cadets
at the 2014 NBB (L-R)
Schneider, West, Dinell,
Busch.

LEFT: Aircraft crowd the
taxiway at AirVenture 2014.

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NEW TOP 3 IN CAP
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP
Wing PAO

Civil Air Patrol has a new national commander
– Major General Joseph Vazquez, who was sworn
in on Friday, 15 August at the organization’s 2014
National Conference in Las Vegas. “It will be my
privilege to lead the team of national staff, wing
and region commanders who make CAP simply the
best nonprofit corporation in the country today,”
he said minutes after taking the guidon as national
commander in a time honored change of command
ceremony. Gen. Vazquez, who previously served
as CAP’s national vice commander for three years,
succeeds Major General Charles Carr.

As CAP’s 23rd national commander, Gen.
Vazquez will lead the organization’s 60,000
volunteers across the nation, in US territories and
at military bases overseas in fulfilling its three
congressionally chartered missions – emergency
services, cadet programs and aerospace education.
Brigadier General Larry Myrick, a past commander of CAP’s Pacific Region, was sworn in as
national vice commander during the same change
of command ceremony as was Colonel Larry
Ragland, the new national chief of staff.
Continued . . .

SDWG Wins North Central Region Search
and Rescue Missions Award
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP
Wing PAO

South Dakota’s Civil Air Patrol Wing was notified on 27 July by CAP’s National Headquarters that
it was selected to receive the North Central Region’s
Search and Rescue Missions Award. This marks the
second time in three years that South Dakota Wing
has received this high honor. North Central Region
commander, Col. Robert Todd, stated that the
award is well merited as the South Dakota Wing has
been both aggressive and innovative in finding new
missions for our aircraft and personnel. Despite its
small size the South Dakota Wing ranks 10th in the
nation (each state is a Wing) in aircraft utilization.
In addition, the South Dakota Wing received
the rarely awarded grade of “Highly Successful”
in its U.S. Air Force graded operational evaluation
in May of this year. Finally, Col. Todd noted that
the South Dakota Wing has been a good steward in
managing its portion of the U.S. Air Force training funds assigned to them by the North Central
Region and by National Headquarters.
The NCR Search and Rescue Missions Award
was presented to South Dakota Wing Commander
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Col. Seten holds the NCR SAR Missions Award.
He is flanked on the left by former CAP National
Commander Major General Charles Carr and on the
right by new CAP National Commander Major General
Joseph Vazquez.

Col. John Seten at CAP’s National Conference
held in Las Vegas on 14-16 August 2014.
CAP’s North Central Region consists of the
Wings in North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska,
Kansas, Iowa, Minnesota, and Missouri.
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South Dakota Wing Exhibit at State
National Guard Museum
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP, Wing PAO and
Maj. Todd Epp, CAP, Wing Historian

The South Dakota Wing (SDWG) of the Civil
Air Patrol opened an exhibit at the South Dakota
National Guard (SDNG) Museum in Pierre on
Friday, 8 August 2014. The joint SDWG/SDNG
exhibit, which runs into October, celebrated the
two organizations’ assistance to each other in
accomplishing their missions.
The exhibit featured current and former CAP
uniforms, insignia, patches, awards and copies of
the South Dakota Wing magazine. It also included
current and past equipment such as an aircraft
radio, a ground radio, a global positioning system
and a pilot’s kneeboard. There was a PowerPoint
slideshow with photos of South Dakota Wing and
South Dakota National Guard members and activities. All the items are identified with descriptions,
with the history of the CAP, cooperation between
the SDWG and the SDNG and other notable and
interesting facts about the SDWG and SDNG on
placards. The SDWG exhibit items are in two large
cases, three mannequins, and two easels.

Ms. Sonja Johnson, Director of the S.D. National
Guard Museum, poses in front of the museum.

Wing Historian Maj. Todd Epp spent a great
deal of time and effort gathering and preparing
materials and organizing the exhibit. The South
Dakota wing owes a debt of gratitude to SDNG
Museum Director Sonja Johnson, herself a sergeant in the South Dakota Army Guard, who made
the exhibit possible through her enthusiasm, hard
work and support.
Though it may not be on the usual
tour of South Dakota’s Capital City,
the S.D. National Guard Museum
just east of downtown Pierre is full of
the stuff of South Dakota’s military
history. The museum features the
history of the South Dakota Army
Guard since its formation in 1862 and
the South Dakota Air National Guard
since its founding by Medal of Honor
winner Joe Foss in 1946. The museum
is free and is open Monday through
Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Maj. Epp’s next project will be creating a Civil Air Patrol/South Dakota
Wing exhibit at the South Dakota Air
and Space Museum at Ellsworth AFB
South Dakota Wing Historian Maj. Todd Epp and South Dakota
in Rapid City.
National Guard director Ms. Sonja Johnson pose before the newly
opened SDWG exhibit at the museum.

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TORNADO DAMAGE SURVEY MISSIONS
By Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP, Wing PAO

Black Hills Tornado Damage Survey Mission
The Pennington County
Office of Emergency
Management requested South
Dakota Wing conduct a timesensitive mission to photograph
damage in the wake of the tornado that touched down in the
Silver City area of the Black
Hills on 27 May. The severe
storm system in the Black Hills
also produced hail up to the size
of golf balls near Keystone, Hill
City, the Pactola Reservoir and
Sheridan Lake. The mission
objective was to provide photographs with embedded geographic coordinates of the extent Black Hills tornado near Silver City.
of the tornado’s damage path.
Responding to the mission request, a SDWG Cessna-182T took off from the Rapid City Regional
Airport with Maj. Craig Goodrich and Lt. Col. Gary Hewett; both highly experienced Mission Pilots, on
board. Their survey mission lasted about 1.5 hours, during which they took nearly 100 high resolution
geo-tagged photos that were hand delivered to the Pennington EOM for analysis.

Wessington Springs Tornado Damage Survey
Mission
Photos used with permission
of FEMA.

On 19 June, the South
Dakota Office of Emergency
Management and FEMA tasked
the South Dakota Wing to fly
a photographic survey mission over the path of the EF-2
tornado (127 mph winds) that
struck Wessington Springs in
Jerauld County on the 18th.
Both organizations requested
photos showing the entire town
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Mission Observer Lt. Rob Hinkhouse and Mission Pilot Capt. Neil Schmidt
enter coordinates in the aircraft’s navigation system prior to takeoff.

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Path of the tornado through Wessington Springs (yellow box added by Maj. Kipp).

to see the path of destruction and
close-up photos of the damage.
A Cessna-182T from the
Sioux Falls Composite Squadron
was assigned the mission. The
aircraft departed Sioux Falls
Regional Airport in mid-afternoon for a sortie lasting about
2.5 hours. Special care and coordination had to be taken during the flight as South Dakota
National Guard aircraft were
also active in the area.
Wing Commander Col. Seten
served as the SDWG point-ofcontact for the mission. The CAP
aircrew consisted of Capt. Neil
Schmid (Mission Pilot), Maj.
Todd Epp (Mission Scanner)
and 1st Lt. Robert Hinkhouse
(Mission Observer). The mis35

Close-up of the damage caused by the Wessington Springs tornado.

sion photos were uploaded for
federal and state emergency

management officials’ analysis
and assessment.
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Wing Changes of Command and Staff
Appointments
By Col. John Seten, CAP, Wing Commander, and Maj. Bruce Kipp, CAP, Wing PAO

2014 has been a year of changes for South Dakota Wing. As is typical for an organization such as ours
there are what is in effect term limits on command positions. This is to provide opportunities for junior
Wing officers to rise through the various command positions as they gain experience and grow in rank and
seniority. The South Dakota Wing currently has six squadrons. Three of these squadrons changed commanders in 2014. In addition, in our mobile society there is a lot of coming and going in any given year.
As a result some of the Wing Staff positions have been reassigned and some new officers appointed.

Changes In Squadron Command

•On 4 March, the then First Lieutenant (now Captain) Shannon Hofer assumed the top
spot in the Big Sioux Composite Squadron in Brookings. He succeeds Capt. Travis Rup
who successfully led the squadron for nearly two years before moving out of the area.
Capt. Hofer is an amazing officer. In addition to his duties as the commander he also serves
as the unit’s Aerospace Education Officer, IT Officer, Logistics, Maintenance, Supply,
Transportation and Safety Officer. He is also the Wing Director of Information Technology.
This multi-talented administrator has even found the time to mentor the squadron’s award
winning cyber-security team that has so successfully competed in the annual national Capt. Shannon
Hofer, the new
CyberPatriot computer security competitions. There is no doubt the Big Sioux Composite commander of
Squadron will continue to grow and prosper under Capt. Hofer’s leadership.
the Big Sioux
•On 3 April, First Lieutenant Kris Bierwirth became the new commander of the Crazy Composite
Horse Composite Squadron in Custer. She assumed the Squadron in
Brookings.
position from the then Capt. (now Maj.) Sharon Moad
who we all know has led the squadron with dedication and distinction.
In addition to her duties as the commander this talented officer also
serves as the unit’s Assistant Activities Officer, Administrative Officer,
Alerting Officer, Personnel Officer, Public Affairs Officer and Assistant
Information Technologies Officer. As such Kris brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to her new position.  I’m confident that she will do a
Outgoing squadron commander, great job as the new squadron commander. 
Capt. (now Maj.) Sharon Moad
•On 28 June, over 30 CAP members and family attended the “Change
(L), presents the squadron guidon
to new squadron commander Lt. of Command Party” where the then Capt. (now
Kris Bierwirth (R).
Maj.) David Small, Jr. passed the reigns of leadership of Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron in Spearfish to Capt. William
Collister. Members from Crazy Horse Composite Squadron, Rushmore Composite
Squadron, Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron and the Air Force Reserve
were present. The squadron in Spearfish is one of our most active and participates
in a broad variety of activities. It has received several well-deserved awards in the
past four few years under Maj. Small. I expect many more good things to come in Capt. Bill Collister, new
the future for the Lookout Mountain Composite Squadron.
commander of Lookout

Wing Staff Appointments

Mountain Composite
In addition to the changes in squadron command I am also pleased to report that Squadron, trains on an
HF radio.

for the year to date the following appointments to the Wing Staff have been made.
Col. Mike Beason – Wing Inspector General; Capt. Jerry Gabert - Wing Director of Communications 
Capt. Collister - Wing Assistant Director of Communications; Capt. Sylvia Small - Wing Finance Officer;
Lt. David Stockinger – Wing Assistant Public Affairs Officer
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