File #1249: "2014 Asheville (NC) Composite Squadron History"

2014 Asheville (NC) Composite Squadron History

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2014 Asheville (NC) Composite Squadron History

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CONFIDENTIAL BUT UNCLASSIFIED

RCS: AVL HO (CAP) 201

HISTORY
OF THE
ASHEVILLE COMPOSITE SQUADRON
1 January – 31 December 2014
Assigned to
North Carolina Wing, Civil Air Patrol

Stationed at
Asheville Regional Airport, North Carolina

JOSEPH E. MYERS
Maj, CAP
Squadron Historian

CHARLES C. PARKER, III
Maj, CAP
Commander

DATE SIGNED

26 February 2015

LOUIS V. TOMS
TSgt, CAP
Assistant Squadron Historian
OFFICE OF ORIGIN:
DERIVED FROM:

AVL CAP/HO
MULTIPLE SOURCES

If declassified, review document to ensure material is not CONFIDENTIAL and exempt under NCGS §1321.2 (2002), before making public release.

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SECURITY NOTICE AND ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROLS
(U) The overall classification of this document is CONFIDENTIAL BUT UNCLASSIFIED and derived from
multiple sources to reflect the classifications given the information derived from source documents.
(U) This document contains information protected under NCGS §15A-16.05, Limitations on use of
membership lists. CONFIDENTIAL BUT UNCLASSIFIED information appears on pages iv, v, 7, 8, 9, 26, 27,
and 34.
(U) If declassified, review the document to ensure material is not CONFIDENTIAL BUT UNCLASSIFIED
as defined in NCGS §15A-16.1, Corporate Records, and 26 USC 61 §6104, Publicity of information
required from certain exempt organizations and certain trusts, before making a public release.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Security Notice and Administrative Controls ................................................................................. i
Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................... ii
List of Illustrations ........................................................................................................................ iii
Chronology .................................................................................................................................... iv
Aerospace Education ....................................................................................................................2
Cadet Programs ...........................................................................................................................6
Operations ...................................................................................................................................10
Aviation................................................................................................................................................. 11
Emergency Services .............................................................................................................................. 13

Personnel ......................................................................................................................................16
Outreach ......................................................................................................................................18
Special Events ..............................................................................................................................21
Resource Management ...............................................................................................................22
Facilities ................................................................................................................................................ 22
Finance ................................................................................................................................................. 25
Information Technology ....................................................................................................................... 28
Wrapping Up and Looking Forward .................................................................................................. 29

Appendices
A. General Squadron Information .................................................................................................32
B. Personnel Statistics ...................................................................................................................34
C. Cadet Achievement Awards .....................................................................................................35
D. Senior Achievement Awards ...................................................................................................37
E. Aircraft Data Sheets .................................................................................................................38
F. Asheville Regional Airport Diagram ........................................................................................40
Glossary of References and Supporting Information ..............................................................41
References ............................................................................................................................................ 41
Abbreviations and Acronyms ............................................................................................................... 41
Terms .................................................................................................................................................... 42
Gazetteer .............................................................................................................................................. 43

Works Cited ..................................................................................................................................45
Distribution List ............................................................................................................................48

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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Tables
Table 1: Cadet Achievements for 2014 ...........................................................................................6
Table 2: Encampment Attendance for 2014 ....................................................................................7
Table 3: Cadet Command Staff........................................................................................................8
Table 4: Largest Squadrons within Civil Air Patrol .....................................................................16
Photos
Photo 1 17th century relief of the story of Icarus (Musée Antoine Vivenel) .....................................2
Photo 2 Partial eclipse viewing .......................................................................................................4
Photo 3 C/2Lt Katherine Houston Solo Flight Badge Pinning Ceremony ......................................9
Photo 4 Mountain Fury Marshalling Team and Aircrew ...............................................................12
Photo 5 MADCAP Simulated Aircraft Crash Site .........................................................................14
Photo 6 C/2Lt Eli Boothe MADCAP MRO ..................................................................................15
Photo 7 Senior Change of Command Ceremony ...........................................................................17
Photo 8 Ardenwoods Retirement Community Sign.......................................................................20
Photo 9 Auger Center Renovations................................................................................................22
Photo 10 Auger Center Renovations..............................................................................................24
Photo 11 Asheville Composite Squadron Web Homepage ...........................................................28
Photo 12 Asheville Composite Squadron Facebook Homepage ...................................................29
Photo 13 Approved Emblem ..........................................................................................................32
Photo 14 Functional Emblem ........................................................................................................33
Photo 15 Functional Emblem ........................................................................................................33
Photo 16 Challenge Coin ...............................................................................................................33
Photo 17 Cessna 172 ......................................................................................................................38
Photo 18 Cessna 182 ......................................................................................................................39
Illustrations

Illustration 1: Asheville Regional Airport Schematic ...................................................................40

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CHRONOLOGY
Asheville Composite Squadron
1 January – 31 December 2014
Date
January
9
16
17-19
23
30

Event
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Group 1 Search and Rescue Exercise (SAREx)
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Senior Change of Command Ceremony

February
6
13
20
24
27

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Weaverville Town Council Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting

March
6
7-9
13
15
20
21-23
27

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) NC Wing Cadet Competition
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Boeing Flight Simulator and NC Flight Museum Event
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Madison County / CAP Search and Rescue Exercise
(U) Squadron Meeting

April
3
10
17
18
24
25-27

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(CBU/DECL 20201231) Wing Training Mission 14-T-5477
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Wing Search and Rescue Exercise

May
1
8
15
16-18
22
29

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Rocketry Weekend
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting

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June
5
7
8-9
12
14
15
18
19
21-28
26

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Move Squadron Equipment and Materials Out of Trailer
(U) Tennessee Wing Search and Rescue Exercise
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Pancake Breakfast Fundraiser
(U) Squadron Relinquish Trailer Custody to Airport Authority
(CBU/DECL 20201231) Wing Training Mission 14-T-5238
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training – Familiarization Course
(U) Squadron Meeting

July
3
10
17
20-27
24
26

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Middle East Region Honor Guard Academy
(U) Squadron Meeting
(CBU/DECL 20201231) Wing Training Mission 14-T-6955

August
2
7
14
15-17
21
28
30

(U) Town of Woodfin 2014 Public Safety and Community Night
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Mountain Fury 8.0
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Pilots for Christ Recruiting Event

September
4
11
16
18
25
27
28

October
2
3-4
5
9
16
23

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Aircraft Wash
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(CBU/DECL 20201231) Wing Mission 14-M-0431
(U) Boiling Springs Baptist Church Event
(U) Lt Col Robert Bauer achieved 40 years in the Civil Air Patrol

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Rocketry Weekend
(U) Cadet Emergency Services Activity
(U) Squadron Dining Out
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Heather Glenn at Ardenwoods Assisted Living Event
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30

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting

November
1
6
14-16
13
20
21

(U) SkyWarn Training [Cancelled]
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) DuPont Experience
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Clean Out of Supply Connex

December
4
11
13
18
20

(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Wreaths Across America
(U) Squadron Meeting
(U) Squadron Christmas Party [Cancelled]

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THIS PAGE LEFT BLANK INTENTIONALLY

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(U) What are the ties that bind us to the past? Within a family unit, historians refer to this
connectivity from present to past as a genealogy. Organizations do not have genealogies but do have
pedigrees. Historians refer to organizational pedigrees as a lineage. A lineage serves as an organizational
fabric to link the present to the past. The squadron’s roots provides understanding into organizational
customs, courtesies and hallmarks. Civil Air Patrol heredity begins prior to the Second World War.
Seeing a lack of military aviators for the upcoming engagement in Europe, influential civil aviators
petitioned the United States government to establish a civilian air force. Their persistence and foresight
would lead would lead to the Director of the Office of Civil Defense, Fiorello H. LaGuardia, to create the
Civil Air Patrol (CAP) on 1 December 1941.1 Throughout World War II, CAP aviators crossed the skies to
provide conduct “air guard” missions.2 Born out of a national emergency, “air guard” units worked in
harmony with military and civil defense to serve America. The sacrifices of these founding citizen airmen
and airwomen facilitated congressional recognition of the CAP as a non-profit auxiliary of the United
States Air Force (USAF) in 1948 (10 USC 909 §9441).3 We draw upon their achievements to inspire and
build esprit d ‘corps and altruism within our organization. With over seventy years of heritage,
preservation of historical knowledge is important role of the Squadron historian. Through these
activities, current and future members can follow in the footsteps of the founding members.
(U) Since the organization’s inception, western North Carolinians have faithfully served with pride in
Coastal Patrol and CAP squadrons. This is evident by looking at today’s North Carolina Wing Structure.
Group 1 represents the five active western North Carolina squadrons (Asheville, Boone, Gastonia,
Hickory and Shelby). Of these valuable resources, the Asheville Composite Squadron can trace its roots
to 1942. Since its wartime beginning, Buncombe County has had an active CAP squadron for over sixtynine years. There are very few squadrons within the organization who can claim such honors. We owe
the success of the unit’s longevity and pedigree from the efforts of prior members. These individuals set
a bar that instills a sense of active community engagement. This principle is very much in keeping with
the traditions one often associates with mountain culture. Though this chronicle, the Historian’s Office
hopes to demonstrate how the Asheville Composite Squadron is dedicated to the principles of the Civil
Air Patrol while preserving a cultural standard. Annual chronicles, like this one, enable future CAP
generations to emulate past leaders while forging their own historical markers. This document should
also enable professional historians gain greater insight into the martial history of western North
Carolina. It is for these few reasons that the squadron historian works diligently to provide a precise and
unbiased account of the unit’s chronology.
(U) This narrative seeks to preserve the historical facts for the Asheville Composite Squadron
spanning the period of 1 January through 31 December 2014. Information within this history provides an
orderly catalog of facts by functional area. The document combines requirements outlined in CAP
Pamphlet 5, Civil Air Patrol Written History Self-Study Guide and AFI 84-101, Historical Products, Services
and Requirements. The Asheville Composite Squadron annual history is a two volume enterprise. First,
the document contains three distinctive components. These sections include the narrative, supporting
information, and references. The narrative explores aerospace education, cadet programs, and
operations. Within this element, historians will also recognize the achievements of Squadron personnel,
community outreach and resource management. As the researcher delves deeper into the material,
Wikipedia, s.v. “Civil Air Patrol,” last modified February 10, 2015: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Air_Patrol,
(accessed on February 26, 2015).
2
Kit Benson and Organ Benson, “Lieut Gill Robb Wilson,” Find a Grave, 15 May 2006,
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=14291740, (accessed on 10 February 2010).
3
Ibid.
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they will notice the supporting materials section. These one to two sheet appendices provide support to
the content contained within the narrative. Finally, the document concludes with a listing of references
and distribution record. The second volume features a collection of emails, photographs and supporting
materials in electronic form. These multi-media materials provide further historical value to understand
Squadron operation during 2014. Squadron historians believe that the chosen format provides a logical
exploration of unit accomplishments while allowing ease of understanding.

AEROSPACE EDUCATION

(U) Since recorded time, people have examined the heavens and marveled at birds in flight. In ancient
times, people would tell cautionary or feats of flight tales as a means entertainment spanning the genres
from history to mythology. In understanding aerospace education, Greek history is an excellent place to
start. In Ancient Greece, stories were told about the pros and cons of flight in the tale of Daedalus and
Icarus. According to the tale, Daedalus his son were held captive by the Minoans on the island of Crete.
Creator of the Labyrinth, King Minos did not want Daedalus to divulge the secrets of the maze. With no
desire to stay on the island, Daedalus fashioned two pairs of wings held together by wax. These
instruments of flight would allow the father-son team to escape their imprisonment. Before taking
flight, Daedalus warned Icarus about flying. The first was not to fly too close to the water as it would
dampen the wings and the added weight would bring him down. Secondly, flying too close to the sun
would melt the wings and the young aviator would plummet to earth. Icarus failed to heed his father’s
warning and flew too close to the sun before plunging into the sea and drowned. This tale was told to
warn people about the pitfalls of complacency and hubris.
(U) One might say that this is mythology and very little to do with modern aerospace education (AE)
or principles of flight. This historian would argue that this cautionary tale is important to our collective
appreciation of aviation heritage. The concept of escaping earthly bonds began as an instrument of the
bards to stir the imagination of audiences. From this humble foundation, others gazed at the heavens
and pondered the possibilities. Centuries of trial and error led to tethered and free floating flight via
lighter than air craft in the 1700s. Since those beginning steps, dreamers built upon the sciences to
create powered flight. The ability fly has enabled America to put teams of astronauts on the moon. As
the new century is still in its infancy, there is discussion to place habitats on other planets while making
space travel a possibility for everyone. To meet tomorrow’s challenges, Civil Air Patrol’s aerospace
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education program hopes to inspire young and old to explore the possibilities. Under the leadership of
Maj. James R. McNab, the Asheville Composite Squadron’s aerospace educators are committed to this
premise. This section seeks to highlight key achievements demonstrated by the unit’s aerospace
educators.
(U) One of the great things about the Civil Air Patrol organization is that it fills its ranks with
experienced aviators. These senior members are able to instill their life lessons to provide a valued
resource for operations and AE. Their knowledge and capabilities open pathways for increased
understanding of the aeronautical sciences. Before retiring, Maj. McNab had worked as a U.S. Airways’
Captain. His professional association afforded Squadron members to experience simulated commercial
flight. One such opportunity occurred during the weekend of March 15. Maj. James McNab took a
contingent of thirty cadets and eight seniors to the US Airways Flight Training Center at the CharlotteDouglas International Airport.4 This 72,000 square foot facility houses five simulator bays where
commercial aviators can hone skills flying a Boeing 737.5 Maj. McNab instructed the participants on the
importance of using simulators as a training instrument. Those who desired were allowed to manipulate
the controls on the Boeing 737-300 full motion flight simulator. The simulator incorporates state-of-theart graphics and visual presentation to provide a realistic training environment for aircrews without
leaving the ground. U.S. Airways supported this activity by having two Captains “impart their skills to the
participants.”6 Based on informal feedback, the daylong event was enjoyed by all who participated.
Every generation has the obligation to free men’s minds for a look at
new worlds… to look out from a higher plateau than the last generation.
Lt Col Ellison E. Onizuka
Challenger Mission Specialist7
(U) Tomorrow’s innovators will be those who pursue opportunities in the science, technology,
engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. A component of the aerospace education is to investigate
opportunities within the STEM arena. Incorporating several aspects of STEM is the CAP rocketry
program. Cadets learn the principles of aerodynamics and propulsion with this block of study. The
program begins with cadets building hand launched balsa wood gliders. Acquiring the basic
understanding of flight, cadets move to constructing model rockets. There are three stages of difficulty
in rocket designs one must create and launch to successfully complete the program. Each level of
rocketry development signifies the stages in America’s rocket development. During 2014, the Asheville
Composite Squadron conducted a total of two rocketry program activities. These were held at the Auger
Farm in Barnardsville during the weekends of May 16 and October 3.8 Senior members supervised cadet
model construction and rocket launching. Cadets used everything from Alka-Seltzer to commercial grade
rocket motors to demonstrate the fundamentals of propulsion. Successful completion of the program
enables cadets to receive the CAP rocketry badge. Of the various activities offered through the AE

Jim McNab, “Re: Request for Information – Squadron Simulator Visit,” message to the author, January 26, 2015,
email.
5
Holder Construction Group, LLC. “U.S. Airways Training Center,” Projects, last modified unknown,
http://www.holderconstruction.com/projects/Pages/USAirwaysTrainingCenter.aspx, (accessed on January 21, 2015).
6
Jim McNab, “Re: Request for Information – Squadron Simulator Visit.”
7
Sea and Sky, “Space Quotes,” last modified unknown, http://www.seasky.org/quotes/space-quotes-spacetravel.html, (accessed on January 28, 2015).
8
William Wallace, “Re: Asheville CAP Updates,” message to Squadron, October 5, 2014, email, and William
Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes–24 April 2014,” message to Squadron, April 25, 2014, email.
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program, the rocketry weekend serves as the hallmark because it lays a foundation for further
exploration of science.
(U) The key to aerospace education is the educational component. This aspect is often hidden within
the various programs offered by the Civil Air Patrol program. Speaking from personal experience, hands
on training always trumps classroom. Therefore, actively pursuing traditional instruction to gain greater
understanding of aeronautical and space exploration is a pretty impressive feat. During 2014, a core
group of cadets actively pursued the CAP’s Aerospace Education program. This National activity requires
students to work with a mentor to complete various assignments. Upon completion of the program,
cadets receive a certificate recognizing their commitment to advancing aerospace education. On 25
September 2015, Assistant AE Officer Capt. Sharon Waltman presented awards to seven cadets and one
senior.9 Certificate Aerospace Education Excellence award recipients were C/CMSgt Molly Boothe,
C/CMSgt Timothy Kantner, C/SSgt Josiah Bilbrey, C/SrA Robert Lewis, C/SrA Joshua McGlinsky, C/SrA
Matthew McGlinsky and C/SrA Ryan Santiago. Maj. Clint Parker received the Aerospace Education
Excellence plaque for facilitating the cadet’s AE education.10 Though their achievement, the Squadron
hopes that more cadets will pursue the Aerospace Education Excellence achievement.
(U) Over the twelve month period, there are several activities that fall outside the traditional
educational model. These ad hoc AE events however provide teachable moments. During the calendar
year, there were two major events that seniors used to expand the Squadron’s aerospace program. The
first teachable moment occurred April 23. Unit personnel received a tour of a Boeing AH-64 Apache.
Over the years, military and law enforcement agencies exploit the mountainous terrain to gain
proficiencies in mountain flying and navigation. Parked near Landmark Aviation, the helicopter’s aircrew
was supportive of the unit’s request to look at the bird.11 The second major spontaneous event of 2014
had nothing to do with aircraft or flying. On October 23, the southeastern United States experienced a
partial eclipse. Members of the unit prepared cut outs necessary to view the event. These cutouts were
then reflected onto the wall of the squadron hanger facility.12 Cadets and seniors were also provided
with insight into the reason for not observing the event by direct sight. The next partial eclipse viewable
in the Asheville area is expected in April of 2015. Squadron aerospace educators hope to exploit more of
these teachable moments in the coming year.
(U) Aerospace education is not strictly a cadet
program. The reality is that Civil Air Patrol desires
for all members to appreciate America’s rich
aviation heritage. With the traditional focus on
cadet programs, it is easy to understand how one
may overlook senior aerospace education. To
facilitate senior aerospace education, CAP
National Headquarters established the Brigadier
General Charles E. Yeager Aerospace Education
Achievement Award. Seniors earn this distinction
by studying various topic related to aerospace heritage, basic principles of avionics, and meteorology.
William Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes for 25 September 2014,” message to Squadron, September 27, 2014,
email.
10
Ibid.
11
William Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes–24 April 2014.”
12
Asheville Composite Squadron’s Facebook page, accessed on February 15, 2015,
http://www.facebook.com/AshevilleCAP.
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When the senior member feels knowledgeable of the subject matter, they can complete an online
examination available through CAP eServices. Upon successful completion of the exam, senior member
receives a ribbon signifying the member’s commitment of CAP’s aerospace mission. During 2014, Lt Col
Harold P. Fiedler and 1Lt James M. Farrey were awarded the Brigadier General Charles E. Yeager
Aerospace Education Achievement Award.13 Their commitment brought the unit to a 43% of the senior
membership holding this distinction.14 This is an inspirational benchmark but Squadron aerospace
educators hope to increase the senior participation levels to around 50% or greater for the upcoming
year. With a higher percentage rate of award, senior members will be setting an example to cadets that
speaks to the unit’s commitment to aerospace education.
(U) Education is never an easy endeavor. Teachers must identify individual motivators and use that
quality to inspire someone to learn. Add to the mix, the instruction of STEM programs and most find
themselves lost. Effective teachers are able to make instruction understandable without overwhelming
the student. The Asheville Composite Squadron’s AE Officers provide a health balance of instruction and
fun to inspire cadets and seniors to want to learn more. There hard work is often overlooked. On a
weekly basis, these officers research and present the Squadron with an understanding of aerospace
achievements. They post news articles and hunt down speakers to provide a more informative
instructional program. Within this corps, one educator announced their move out of the area.
Professional educator, Capt. Sharon Waltman will be leaving the Squadron in January 2015. During 2014,
she worked closely with the cadet programs officer to provide meaningful instruction and activities. Her
efforts did not go unappreciated. Cadets and seniors enjoyed having classes where PowerPoint
presentations were the exception rather than the rule. Capt. Waltman’s enthusiasm and knowledge will
be missed by the Squadron and more importantly the aerospace program as we begin a new year.

CADET PROGRAMS
(U) Too often, older generations feel that today’s youth have lost their way. The elderly often cite
popular culture to justify their viewpoint. Admittedly, media does not help with how most people view
younger generations. Television and movies go out of their way to portray today’s youth as tech savvy,
self-absorbed and moody. These may be applicable for some but it does us a disservice to paint
everyone with the same brush. As we experience with our Squadron’s cadets, there are some youth who
actively engage the community with the desire to help others while growing mentally and physically.
These young adults may engage in programs sponsored by the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Boys and Girls
Clubs and Heritage Girls just to name a few. Organized youth activities provide an avenue for children to
become responsible adults by mitigating external pressures to become a detriment to the community.15
The Asheville Composite Squadron cadet activities program is dedicated to shaping individuals into
becoming tomorrow’s leaders. These young adults acquire the personal skills needed to manage many
of life’s challenges. With these tools, cadets can excel as an individual and as a team. The Asheville
Component Squadron’s cadet education team understands the many external challenges faced by
today’s youth and provides them with a healthy alternative. This section of the unit’s historiography will
demonstrate that perceptions of today’s youth is not a universal truth.
Achievement

Number

13

Data compiled from CAP e-Services.
Ibid.
15
Frank F. Furstenberg, Jr. and Mary Elizabeth Hughes. “Social Capital and Successful Development among AtRisk Youth,” Journal of Marriage and the Family 57, no. 3 (August, 1995): 581.
14

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General J. F. Curry
General H. H. “Hap” Arnold
Mary Feik
Wright Brothers
Captain Eddie Rickenbacker
Charles A. Lindbergh
General Jimmy Doolittle
Dr. Robert H. Goddard
Neil Armstrong
General Billy Mitchell
Amelia Earhart
General Ira C. Eaker
General Carl A. Spaatz

19
11
9
9
5
3
1
6
3
2
0
1
0

(U) Table 1: Cadet Achievements for 201416
(U) Regardless of the squadron, senior and cadet leadership engages in a yeoman’s pursuit to provide
an exceptional program. Their effort provides a successful measure to increase personal growth while
facilitating teamwork. Civil Air Patrol recognizes leadership qualities by bestowing military-style rank to
illustrate a cadet’s mastery of core program objectives and values. Junior members begin their career as
a cadet basic. Much like the term pickle describes someone who goes off to basic training without any
service stripes, a cadet basic represents someone who is new to the Civil Air Patrol program. From this
foundation, the cadet journey’s through various levels of achievement. At the very beginning of the CAP
career, a cadet receives the Airman rank. This signifies that the cadet has a basic understanding of core
principles of the program. At the opposite end, the awarding of Cadet Colonel signifies the wearer is
highly proficient as a leader of cadets. Very few are able to achieve this level of expertise before aging
out. During 2014, Squadron Cadet Programs Commander acknowledged leadership and skills by
promoting 55% of the cadet corps (see appendix C). These promotions signify the cadet corps desires to
become active in local, state and national activity as is evident by the catalog of activities reflected in
this chronicle.
(U) Civil Air Patrol cadet success owes much to the dedication of the individual. These junior members
balance a personal life that all vie for competition. Like most adults, the cadet struggles to prioritize CAP
activities with family, friends, school and other interests. In many respects, their juggle these competing
priorities is more difficult than those faced by an adult. As adults, we have learned to assess these
internal and external life requirements to determine which ones must go by the wayside. Not all young
adults have developed this filtering mechanism to say no or ask for help before engaging these forces.
Squadron leaders understand the conflicts facing cadets and actively seek to provide an environment
where personal grow can occur with minimal stress. National headquarters also understands these
complexities. This is why the adult leadership schedule encampments and other in-depth programming
for periods when school is not in session. These activities are highly competitive and seek to advance
skills in aerospace education, emergency services, and leadership. As with previous years, the Asheville
Composite Squadron’s cadet corps have demonstrated their commitment to personal and professional
growth. The proof of their obligation is evident by a cadet’s achievements and promotion history. Their
commitment reflects greatly upon themselves and their families.
16

Data compiled from CAP e-Services.

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Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training Familiarization Course
Columbus Air Force Base, MS
20 June 2014 – 28 June 2014
C/1Lt Jacob Davis
C/2Lt Morgan MacDonald
North Carolina Wing Encampment
Stanley County Air National Guard Base, NC
22 June 2014 – 28 June 2014
C/CMSgt Jarrett W. Poto
C/TSgt Benjamin S. Carpenter
Honor Guard Academy
Eastern North Carolina Justice Academy, NC
20 July 2014 – 27 July 2014
C/CMSgt Zachary W. Cannon
(CBU/DECL 20201231) Table 2: Encampment Attendance for 201417
(U) Within the Civil Air Patrol model, there are many cadet summer programs. Under the senior
leadership, these activities seek to promote individual and team responsibilities while preserving
physical and psychological safety of the participant. Unlike traditional squadron activities, summer
camps force cadets to get outside their comfort zones. Participants must interact with cadets from
different economic, ethnic/racial and social backgrounds. Through these exchanges, the participant
learns about themselves and others. More importantly, cadets build an understanding of one’s
capabilities, leadership and community. During 2014, the Asheville Composite Squadron had five cadets
attend summer programs (see table 2). Attendees participated in activities held at the Wing and
National level. Within the Wing, Squadron cadets attended the North Carolina Wing Summer
Encampment and Honor Guard Academy. These events were held at the Stanly County Airport and
Eastern North Carolina Justice Academy respectively. While on the national level, two cadets
participated in the Specialized Undergraduate Pilot Training Familiarization Course at Columbus AFB in
Mississippi. With the skills acquired, these cadets bring home valuable insight that will benefit them,
their community and the Civil Air Patrol organization.

(CBU/DECL 20201231) One cannot overemphasize the importance of being a leaders within
the Civil Air Patrol program. Cadet leadership represents a faith that a youth member has the
traits necessary to serve justly and in accordance with established practices. These qualities
sometimes bar many cadets and even seniors from occupying positions of authority. During
2014, the Asheville Composite Squadron experienced a twofer. Change of commands occurred
on both the cadet and senior side of the house. Within the cadet ranks, C/2Lt Logan M. Lueck
had served as an effective and respected Cadet Commander for almost a year. On 7 August 2014,
Cadet Lueck handed over the reins of leadership to C/2Lt Jacob Davis.18 The ceremony was held
at the Auger Center. Cadets and senior members stood to recognize the significance of the
ceremony. Senior cadet leadership identified cadets assuming the roles as flight commanders,
deputy commander, first sergeants and executive officers under C/2Lt Davis (see table 3). These
17
18

Data compiled from CAP e-Services.
William Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes-7 August 2014,” message to Squadron, August 8, 2014, email.

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individuals will be responsible for providing guidance to the cadets. Senior leadership charged
the new cadet leadership to become a model for younger cadets in the Squadron. As the 554th
Engineer Battalion’s motto states, Haec Lucra Laborum… These are the profits of industry.
C/2Lt Jacob Davis
C/2Lt Morgan MacDonald
C/2Lt Eli Booth
C/2Lt Jared Carpenter
C/SMSgt Molly Boothe
C/CMSgt Zachery Cannon
C/SSgt Nolan Middlemas
C/2Lt Angela Waltman
C/MSgt Ethan Reynolds

Commander
Deputy Commander
Executive Officer
Assistant Executive Officer
First Sergeant
Delta Flight Commander
Delta Flight Sergeant
Zulu Flight Commander
Zulu Flight Sergeant

(CBU/DECL 20201231) Table 3: Cadet Command Staff 19

(CBU/DECL 20201231) Aviation activities form a cornerstone of Civil Air Patrol programs. Concepts of
flying to actual flight span lessons learned under aerospace education, emergency services and cadet
activities. Fortunately, the Asheville Composite Squadron maintains a deep bench of licensed pilots for
two assigned aircraft. This equation enables the Squadron to conduct orientation flights with some
regularity. Over the past year, thirty-seven percent of the cadets assigned to the Squadron had their first
orientation flight.20 Following the cadet’s initial flight, Squadron operations leaders present a certificate
to each young aviator. During 2014, the unit awarded nineteen orientation flight certificates to cadets.
Those receiving recognition were C/MSgt Nathan Bernhardt, C/MSgt Nolan Middlemas, C/TSgt Josiah
Bilbrey, C/TSgt Robert Lewis, C/TSgt Joshua McGlinsky, C/TSgt Matthew McGlinsky, C/SSgt Ryan
Santiago, C/A1C Benjamin Bridges, C/A1C Bryce Jackson, C/A1C Cameron King, C/A1C Jacob Mcintosh,
C/Amn Luke Bridges, C/Amn Seairra Davis, C/Amn Amber Gay, C/Amn Kyle Jacobs, C/Amn Anderson
Lawler, C/Amn Abigail Walton and Cadet Corin Lueck.21 With these expeditions, Squadron mentors hope
the cadet aviator achieves a level of self-confidence and inspires to become interested in the principles
of flight.

William Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes-7 August 2014.”
Data compiled from CAP e-services.
21
Data compiled from CAP e-services.
19
20

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(U) With interest established in the orientation flight program, cadets can pursue the coveted solo
flight badge. This is no simple achievement and requires hours of study. With few exceptions, the
education component is held at a flight academy. Asheville Composite Squadron has successfully
conducted an annual flight academy since 2008.22 The activity invites cadets from around western North
Carolina to partake in classroom and hands on flight instruction. The rigorous course and external
commitments often collide to impede a cadet’s successfully completion of all instructional phases.
Cadets spend a couple of years working towards the day when they can take over the controls. There
are times when the commitment becomes too much and the cadet must drop out of the program. For
the few who are able to balance these often competing obligations, successful course completion means
receiving the Civil Air Patrol solo flight badge. Over the past twelve months, the Asheville Composite
Squadron had three cadets to achieve this distinction. These cadets include C/2Lt Caleb Freeman, C/2Lt
Katherine Houston and C/2 Lt Angela Waltman.23 With this recognition, cadets can continue their
instruction and go on to receive their civil aviation license from the Federal Aviation Administration.
(U) Just as in years past, the cadet cadre began
the year with a laundry list of expectations for
growth. As the year wore on, priorities shifted and
new adventures took the lead for attention. Those
earlier aspirations sometimes fall by the wayside.
Through these shifts and expectations, the cadet
corps demonstrated a professional dedication to
the missions of the Squadron and CAP. Their
achievements captured within this document not
only inspire but demonstrate the quality of
America’s youth. Civil Air Patrol does not pay
people to participate, young adults must want to
be involved. Over the past year, the Squadron’s
cadet cadre actively engaged in all aspects of the CAP mission. This was demonstrated by promotions,
awards and special designations presented to them. These accomplishments reflect great credit upon
the leadership and dedication of the cadets to strive to be the best. I mention this as it is important to
view cadet achievements as the sum of all its parts. Regardless of status, these young people worked
together to meet and overcome challenges. Without this collaborative teamwork, there is little doubt
that the Asheville Composite Squadron could survive. Their dedication disproves the perspective that all
of today’s youth are more self than selflessness. As the year concludes, the Squadron’s cadet program
will continue to inspire today’s and tomorrow’s leaders.

OPERATIONS
Above the planet on a wing and a prayer,
My grubby halo, a vapor trail in empty air,
Across the clouds I see my shadow fly,
Out of the corner of my watering eye,
“Asheville area students and staffers earn awards and honors,” Asheville Citizen Times, November 10, 2014,
http://www.citizen-times.com/story/life/2014/11/09/asheville-area-students-staffers-earn-awards-honors/18778169/,
(accessed on November 15, 2014).
23
Rich Auger, “Re: Request for Information – Squadron Annual History (Final Request),” message to author,
February 8, 2015, email.
22

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A dream unthreatened by the morning light,
Could blow this soul right through the roof of the night.
Learning to Fly, Pink Floyd
(U) When examining Civil Air Patrol operations, novice researchers should understand we are
discussing two distinct programs. These functions being aviation and emergency services. The
intertwining of these two undertakings reach deeply into the Patrol’s three CAP mission objectives
(aerospace education, cadet activities, and emergency services). In order to appreciate the scope of
operations, one should have a basic grasp of the organization’s founding charter. During America’s
interwar years, several military service aviators established flying clubs to sustain their passion for
aviation. A couple of these aviators understood the long-term implications of the U.S. Army Air Corps’
reduction in force. For America to become a world leader, military aviation would need to take a front
seat. Right up until the America’s entry into the Second World War, the U.S. War Department brass was
reluctant to bankroll what it felt was an experimental combat instrument. In their minds, pilots did not
win the deadlock along the Western Front. Soldiers charging across no man’s land in the face of enemy
fire had won the day. Rather than fighting the U.S. War Department directly, these returning aviators
made their argument with to the Office of Civil Defense. This side effort lead to the establishment of the
Civil Air Patrol on the eve of United States entry into World War II.
(U) Between 1941 and 1945, the Civil Air Patrol augmented military and civilian defense operations.
These founding members took to the skies towing targets for the Army Air Forces, identified fires for the
Forestry Service, and protected shipping for the Merchant Marine. These activities plus the adoption of
aviation instruction meant that the government could focus their efforts on winning the war. When the
war finally ended, military commanders and government officials felt that CAP proved its value to
national defense. To demonstrate their appreciation, government leaders established the CAP as an
auxiliary of the United States Air Force. Since its founding, America gave witness to more than seven
decades of Civil Air Patrol members providing service to their country. Squadrons and flights prepare for
the protection of America’s skies much as they did in 1941. Many state and local governmental entities
embrace the value provided by CAP resources in augmenting professional emergency response
activities. This national reliance on CAP means Squadron leaders cannot afford to become complacent in
maintaining personnel and equipment readiness. Over the past year, Asheville Composite Squadron
members undertook an aggressive holistic operations training program. This section provides two subsections. These sub-sections focus on the achievements gained by the Squadron’s aviation and
emergency services programs. Collectively, this section should strengthen a researchers understanding
of how the unit met or exceeded local, state and national response objectives.

Aviation
(U) In keeping with the spirit of the founding organization, Asheville’s composite squadron is ready
when called to duty. The first aviation achievement of the year actually owes its existence to an event
that occurred in 2012. During the 2012 hurricane season, a tropical cyclone traveled up the eastern
seaboard. This storm caused millions of dollars of damage the Carolinas to the northeast.24 Americans
would know the cyclone as Hurricane Sandy. According to National’s statistics, twenty Civil Air Patrol

Wikipedia, s.v. “Hurricane Sandy,” last modified February 9, 2015:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Sandy#Mid-Atlantic_2, (accessed on February 20, 2015).
24

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Wings participated in the response effort.25 In October and November 2012, Asheville Composite
Squadron aviators would respond to recovery efforts by providing photographic reconnaissance of
storm impact areas. These aviators were Lt Col Wallace Courtney, Maj Arnie Andresen and Maj Rheta
Perkins. Their efforts would enable emergency managers to allocate limited resources to address
community concerns. On 28 February 2014, the three received the National Commander’s
Commendation for their support of the largest civil incident response since Hurricane Katrina.26 This
recognition marks one in many accolades received through the years by the Squadron’s aviators in
support of incident response. The National Commander’s Commendation would mark the first of two
decorations awarded to Squadron pilots and scanners over the year.
(U) Squadron aviation operations has had the luxury of leadership consistency over the years. Lt Col
Ray Davis, Lt Col Wally Courtney, Maj Arnie Andresen and Maj Rheta Perkins often serve comprise that
foundation. Within this group of volunteer professionals, Maj Perkins would achieve two benchmarks in
her aviation career over 2014. The first of these achievements occurred on March 27. During a formal
ceremony, Lt Col Courtney pinned master observer wings on Maj Perkins. The badge represents at least
300 flight hours as an observer.27 Although an accomplishment, this feat pales in comparison to the one
achieved in the spring. On 6 May 2014, Maj Perkins became the newest private pilot for the North
Carolina Wing. She achieved this milestone by certifying with the Federal Aviation Administration only
after completing the license prerequisites.28 These two accomplishments bookend nicely with the many
other recognitions she has received over the years. The fortitude she demonstrates speaks to Maj Rheta
Perkin’s character, knowledge and dedication. Congratulations!
(U) Except for 2011, the Asheville Composite Squadron hosted a Mountain Fury flying clinic
successfully since 2005. These clinics provide CAP aviation crews with practical flying experience in
navigating the topography of southern Appalachia. Success depends upon the paring of experienced
aviation mentors with less experienced air crews. Mountain Fury course instruction provides
opportunities for novice aviators to land on primitive mountain airstrips and locate simulated downed
aircraft. The program’s goal seeks to provide an understanding of how to fly a mountain range. For
many of the aviators attending the clinic, this will be the first time they have experienced mountainous
terrain. This type of training is important as there are few Squadrons based in western North Carolina.
During the weekend of August fifteenth, the Asheville Composite Squadron hosted six corporate aircraft
and their crews. Including ground operations, there were fifty-six seniors and four cadets present.29 The
professionalism of the ground and aircrews lead to a zero safety violation event. Through these clinics,
regional aviators bring true value to the Civil Air Patrol’s program and its ability to respond to natural
and man-made incidents regardless of location.

Paul F. South, “Hurricane Sandy Response Marked by Technology, Dedication,” Civil Air Patrol Volunteer
(January-March, 2013): 30.
26
Rheta Perkins, “FW: 2014 Squadron History Report – Rough Draft,” message to the author, February 15, 2015,
email.
27
William Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes-20140327,” message to Squadron, March 29, 2014, email.
28
W.C. Courtney, “Re: New Private Pilot,” message to Wing, May 6, 2014, email.
29
Facebook, Inc.
25

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(U) On October 18, the Asheville Composite Squadron received national recognition by the United
States Marine Corps. Lt Col Wallace Courtney and Maj Rheta Perkins received the Meritorious Service
Award from the CAP National Commander for their participation in the Unmanned Aircraft Systems
(UAS) - Airspace Integration Joint Exercise.30 Conducted in late summer 2013, the test demonstrated
that the Marine Corps could operate an unmanned aerial vehicle within a civil aviation environment
safely.31 Participants to this activity included North Carolina Wing, South Carolina Wing, 1st Air
Force/Northern Command (1st AF/NORTHCOM), and FAA.32 The vehicle originated from MCAS Cherry
Point. Air and ground elements tracked and escorted the UAS while coordinating activities with
partnering entities. Per the citation received by the Wing, the task was made more difficult by the speed
and size of the UAS. North Carolina and South Carolina wings received the 1st AF/NORTHCOM
Commander’s Award for Excellence.33 This was a remarkable achievement for both states given that the
award is available to one CAP activity per year.34
(U) The history of aviation is very rich and complex. Historians credit the first glided flight to Abbas
ibn Firnas. In medieval Spain, Abbas ibn Firnas jumped from a tower in the town of Cordoba. Stories
indicate that he covered his body in vulture feathers and attached homemade wings to his arms. Period
chroniclers state Firnas flew for some distance but hurt his back upon landing.35 From this experimental
and highly dangerous start, the world would see individuals travel to the moon and send probes to the
farthest corners of space. No longer are people bound by the limitations of flight. This is a significant
30

Rheta Perkins, “FW: 2014 Squadron History Report – Rough Draft.”

31

David E. Crawford, “NC and SC Receive AFNORTH Commanders Award – Most Meritorious Civil Air
Patrol Mission in 2013,” WingSpan, August 26, 2014,
https://www.ncwgcap.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=article.display&articleID=457&page=2, (accessed on
February 15, 2015).
Rheta Perkins, “FW: 2014 Squadron History Report – Rough Draft.”
Crawford.
34
Rheta Perkins, “FW: 2014 Squadron History Report – Rough Draft.”
35
Wikipedia, v.s. “Abbas ibn Firnas,” last modified February 5, 2015,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abbas_ibn_Firnas (accessed on February 5, 2015).
32
33

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achievement given that powered flight has only been around for little over a hundred years. Within Civil
Air Patrol, aviation serves a multifaceted and
significant role. Asheville Composite
Squadron aircrews educate and inspire
cadets to become tomorrow’s aerospace
leaders while also serving the public during
times of emergencies. These efforts often
require aircrews to dedicate personal time
and resources to keep the unit operational.
Technology precludes the need for our pilots
covering themselves in feathers but their
contributions to aviation’s heritage must not
be overlooked. Semper Vigilans!

Emergency Services
(U) With air operations explored, it is now time to shift the conversation to the opposite end of the
operations spectrum. Unit personnel began the year by participating in a North Carolina Group 1 search
and rescue exercise during the weekend of January seventeenth.36 The event was held at the DuPont
State Forest nestled in the mountains of western North Carolina. Twenty-four participants represented
members of Asheville, Boone, Gastonia, Hickory and Shelby squadrons. Individuals began the event by
staging at the Asheville Regional Airport for convoy deployment to DuPont on Friday morning. Upon
arrival at the SAREx sandbox, leaders established emergency service operations and training
commenced. Lt Col Merlin Phillips managed incident command while Lt Col Richard Auger served as a
mentor to the ground teams.37 Asheville aircrews launched both morning and evening operations over
the exercise. Participating ground teams learned land navigation, mission staff assistant, vectoring,
geocaching, simulated lost hiker drills and other important response skills.38 With missions complete,
the Group 1 SAREx concluded on Sunday when participants redeployed to the Asheville Regional Airport
before returning to their home of record. To all who participated, we say… Cargoneek Guyoxim!39
(U) With the Group exercise completed, the emergency services officers turned their attention to a
collaborative engagement with local response entities. In planning since late 2013, Capt. James
Matthews began reaching out to local professional responders. The concept of this collaborative pursuit
was to engage in a joint search and rescue exercise. Participants would incorporate principles of
conducting a ground search for a downed aircraft then transitioning to a lost aviator scenario. His
planning firmed up commitments from the American Red Cross, Buncombe County Rescue Squad and
Spring Creek Fire Department.40 With a plan in place, the group agreed to engage in the joint exercise
during the weekend of March 21st. All parties would use the time between planning and exercise
execution to prepare their personnel to effectively respond to proposed activities. Asheville Composite
Squadron personnel received some additional preparatory work with their participation in the Group 1
William Wallace, “Civil Air Patrol, North Carolina Wing NCWG Group 1 Conducts weekend SAREx Farmhouse Services as Mission Base,” WingSpan, January 27, 2014,
http://www.ncwgcap.org/index.cmf?fuseaction=article.display&articleID=413, (accessed on February 6, 2015).
37
Ibid.
38
Ibid.
39
Chippewa dialect motto belonging to the 147th Armor Regiment meaning “Always Ready.”
40
Asheville Composite Squadron, Emergency Services Office, After Action Report – Madison County SAREX, by
James C. Matthews (Asheville, NC: Self: 2014), [2-3]
36

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SAREx. With all these pre-exercise activities, there comes a time where the operation must occur and
time for training ends.
(U) Operating under mission number 14-T-4164, MADCAP exercise activities began at 1500 hours on
21 March.41 Scenario activities began with the activation of an ELT in the Mill Ridge area of Madison
County. Mission evaluators simulated the national and Wing level activation of participating responders.
Upon mission activation, each entity would need to mobilize their assets and converge on a preestablished rally point. Asheville Composite Squadron members would stage at the Asheville Regional
Airport. After receiving the mission and safety briefings, the Asheville team deployed to the Madison
County rally point. Upon arrival, controllers
briefed team leaders that local residents
witnessed a distressed aircraft between the
Big Laurel River and French Broad River.
Squadron teams began the search activities
at 2110 hours.42 While ground teams hit the
woods, Asheville would launch one if its
aviation assets to support activities. At 0003
on March 22, ground teams located the
simulated crash site. Team leaders reported
the find and indicated that one aviator died
at the crash site. They also indicated that a
second appeared to have walked away from
the scene.43 Operations concluded for the
evening with plans to search for the lost aviator later in the morning.
(U) With the sun rising from the east, Asheville Composite Squadron would launch another aircraft to
support ground missions. The air resource would provide high bird services to enable ground teams to
communicate more effectively in the mountainous terrain.44 Trainees were able to use the high bird to
practice communications relays between ground teams, aircraft and mission base. Experienced team
leaders provided instruction on clue discovery techniques to determine the location of the lost aviator.
Missions took the teams into the late afternoon before the controllers called a safety halt around 1619
hours.45 After the brief pause, teams continued their operational activities. At 2255 hours, ground teams
located the remaining aviator in good condition along the Appalachian Trail.46 Participating team
personnel returned to the staging area upon completion of the exercise. The day’s events concluded at
2345 on March 22 with all teams reporting to the staging area safely.47
(U) On the morning of March 23, all deploying resources returned to their home stations for
deactivation. Personnel received a briefing from the controllers and given a chance to understand the
scenarios successes and shortcomings. The briefing noted that Squadron personnel require additional
training to meet the needs of the professional search community. These additional competencies will
make the Civil Air Patrol more marketable. By making slight program tweaks, CAP assets would have
41

After Action Report, [7]
After Action Report, [7]
43
After Action Report, [7]
44
After Action Report, [7]
45
After Action Report, [7]
46
After Action Report, [7]
47
After Action Report, [7].
42

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smoother integrative operations with their civilian counterparts.48 On the flip side, local response
agencies need to understand how to integrate their efforts with that of CAP’s air assets. Too many
times, the professional crews failed to exploit the use of air branch to direct search management.49 With
that stated, everyone played well together. This inter-agency activity is not only good for the players but
also western North Carolina. By understanding each agency’s requirements, all parties can support the
mission goals while building a stronger bond of collaboration. Hats off to Capt. James Matthews and his
emergency services team for making this dream come to life.
(U) Over the last couple of years, the Civil Air Patrol program has undergone an operational
transformation. There are statistically less aviation and traditional Civil Air Patrol related response
activities.50 Current mission priorities are geared toward the field of disaster preparedness and
response. The transition seems to indicate that it is due to many external and internal variables. These
factors have muted the organization’s primary operational mission to respond to downed aircraft.
Realizing the shift, the North Carolina Wing has actively pursued alternatives to the traditional CAP
emergency services mission. The goal being to assist North Carolinians in incident preparedness and
response. Asheville Composite Squadron’s leadership have embraced this new directional concept. In
upcoming months, Squadron leadership will institute a program to certify more members in programs
like aerial photography, Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT), Points of Distribution (POD)
and Incident Management Team. With these additional skill sets, the Asheville Composite Squadron can
continue being a valuable emergency services resource for local and state-wide emergency managers.
Combining the old direction with the new will enable Squadron personnel to respond proficiently and
professionally to most operational incidents facing western North Carolina.

PERSONNEL
(U) Cadet activities and operations cannot exist without willing individuals volunteering to serve.
Membership composition within a particular Civil Air Patrol element varies based on that element’s
function. Without examining command hierarchy, there are three foundational categorizations within
the Civil Air Patrol organization. Our first element focuses on cadet activities while holding a small
supervisory contingent of seniors. Secondly, there are a couple of squadrons where the membership is
comprised solely of adults. Then we have the composite elements. These are units where cadets and
seniors simultaneously conduct activities for both membership classes. No one format better or worse
than the other except when attempting to provide a holistic understanding of all unit achievements
within a history. Unlike a cadet or senior only squadron, composite unit historians must develop a
formula that recognizes the achievements of both cadets and seniors. Asheville Composite Squadron
historians accomplish this feat by capturing cadet triumphs separately while focusing on seniors within
this section. This general rule does not apply to Squadron personnel statistical data which is provided
under this heading. Readers seeking to understand the unit’s cadet programs and successes should
review the chapter entitled Cadet Activities.
Identifier
IN-803
GA-116
AK-015

Designation
Anderson Preparatory Academy Cadet Squadron
Peachtree City Falcon Field Composite Squadron
Anchorage Polaris Composite Squadron

Membership
335
156
153

48

After Action Report, [10-11]
After Action Report, [10-11]
50
Kristi Car, “Statistics Indicate a Shifting SAR Landscape,” Civil Air Patrol Volunteer (January-March, 2013): 11.
49

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NH-016
VA-102
TX-808
VA-117
TX-802
FL-051
NC-019

Greater Nashua Composite Squadron
Prince William Composite Squadron
East Houston Cadet Squadron
Leesburg Composite Squadron
Sheldon Cadet Squadron
Charlotte County Composite Squadron
Asheville Composite Squadron

151
151
149
145
143
136
136

(U) Table 4: Largest Squadrons within
Civil Air Patrol51
(U) Before diving into personal
achievements, let’s first examine the
statistical composition of the Asheville
Composite Squadron while also taking a
moment to recognize the individual
responsible for its growth. The heart of a
Squadron is its membership. Insuring the
heart still pumps is the duty of the
recruiting and retention officer. For the
Asheville Composite Squadron, Capt.
William Wallace works diligently each week to preserve the rolls. The fruits of his labor are evident in
the Squadron’s statistical breakout. Beginning the year, active unit rolls identified fifty-one cadets and
seventy-seven seniors for a total of 128 associates.52 With these baseline figures, Capt. Wallace set the
recruiting wheels turning. This effort resulted in the Asheville Composite Squadron becoming the tenth
largest squadron nationally in April (see table 4).53 Membership since this milestone would fluctuate but
the organization remains within the top ten nationally which identifies 1,459 chartered elements. As the
year concluded, the organization would increase its starting figure by five members. According to CAP
eServices, the Squadron’s enrollment features forty-nine cadets and eighty-four seniors.54 Expectations
are that the Squadron will continue to experience growth in 2015 under the diligence of Capt. William
Wallace.
(U) Unless you’re are an accountant, the statistical breakout means very little. Interest of individual
achievement goes beyond number crunching. One of the largest triumphs for a member is becoming a
commander. Holding position of leadership is significant as it represents a faith that leadership has in
your abilities. At the squadron level, the highest of these orders is the commander. Held for a period of
three year, a unit commander must transfer leadership to someone new when that tenure expires. On
William Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes–24 April 2014.”
Data compiled from CAP e-Services.
53
William Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes–24 April 2014.”
54
William Wallace, “Re: Monthly Attendance Report as of 1 December 2014,” message to the author, January 20,
2015, email.
51
52

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January 30, the Asheville Composite Squadron formally recognized the unit’s change of command from
Lt Col Joseph Weinflash to Maj Clint Parker. The event was held at the Lacy Griffith Building at the
Asheville Regional Airport as part of the regular meeting.55 Before conducting the event, Lt Col Joseph
Weinflash conducted his final act as the Squadron commander by presenting several members with
awards and promotions. Following these presentations, the ceremony began. C/1Sgt Caleb Freeman
served as the unit standard guardian for the ceremony.56 Lt Col Robert Bauer, Group 1 Commander,
provided some comments regarding Lt Col Weinflash’s tenure while challenging Maj Clint Parker to
exceed those achievements. Following the ceremony, personnel celebrated the outgoing and incoming
commanders.
(U) With a new command in place, the Asheville Composite Squadron entered the month of February
with recognition from the North Carolina Wing. Annually, the Wing presents various awards to members
who go above and beyond in their commitment to service to the Civil Air Patrol. This year would serve as
a hallmark as three seniors would receive top honors. Lt Col Wallace “Wally” Courtney would lead the
pack by receiving the Frank G. Brewer Lifetime Achievement Award. The honor recognizing Lt Col
Courtney’s work with orientation flights, flight academies, and other cadet aerospace education
activities.57 In addition to Wally Courtney, command recognized the contributions of Lt Col Merlin
“Butch” Phillips with Communications Officer of the Year. Over the years, Lt Col Butch Phillips has served
as the Wing and Squadron Communications Officer. During his tenure, he promoted state-wide
communication practices and training in order for the Wing to response more effectively during realworld and training incidents.58 Finally, the North Carolina Wing awarded the Public Affairs Officer of the
Year Award to Maj Clint Parker.59 His professional knowledge lead to published article locally, state-wide
and nationally. This effort translated into prospective becoming new members for the Squadron and
Wing. The recognition falls short in the many contributions these three individual have dedicated to the
Asheville Composite Squadron. Hats off to these leaders!
(U) With the year winding down, family and friends prepare for the holiday season. The Squadron
Christmas party is the last event of the year. Held the first or second week in December, this event seeks
to bring family and friends of cadets and seniors together to have a good time. In previous years, the
Squadron holiday party has drawn between 50 and 100 celebrants. Squadron leadership scheduled the
event for December twentieth.60 As in years past, Trinity Baptist Church on Shelburne Road would serve
as host. Unlike those years, the Asheville Composite Squadron would cancel its party.61 Primarily, this
year the party lacked a coordinator. In previous years, Maj Barbara Bow’s diligence and hard work led to
a successful party. She was unavailable to coordinate the event this year. In addition, there was also the
party’s late date. The command staff determined that time had run out to successfully hold a
celebration the Squadron was traditionally accustomed. Leadership promised unit members that a
Christmas party would be held in 2015.

OUTREACH
William Wallace, “Re: Part II: Special Minutes of the Meeting for 30 January 2014,” message to Squadron,
January 31, 2014, email.
56
Ibid.
57
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting for 6 February 2014,” message to Squadron, February 8, 2014, email.
58
Ibid.
59
Ibid.
60
William Wallace, “Re: not mentioned in minutes of 20 Nov,” message to Squadron, November 21, 2014, email.
61
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting-4 December 2014,” message to Squadron, December 5, 2014, email.
55

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(U) Outreach is a necessary component of squadron survivability. This may appear to be a bit
overreaching but public awareness is just as critical as aerospace education, cadet programs and
emergency services missions. Compared to these elements, outreach does not contain the same luster
felt by flying or executing a ground team search but it is no less important. Public engagement provides
the unit with an understanding of their connection to the community the3y serve. These activities serve
to bolster unit morale, recruitment or public awareness just to name a few. Outreach can also require
more attention and time than the traditional duties associated with the Civil Air Patrol mission. Possibly,
these additional skill sets deter many squadrons from pursuing an active outreach program. Whatever
the reason, successful organizations will always find a way to promote community enrichment activities.
Although there is always room for improvement, this section addresses the active engagement by the
Asheville Composite Squadron over the course of the past year.
(U) Emergency services is one of those activities that often make or break reputations in the
professional response community. Volunteer response entities can quickly lose their clout with
community responders. Far too often, volunteer organizations and some professional are unable to
respond in a manner advertised. On the other hand, demonstration of professional capabilities is widely
heralded within the profession. Within western North Carolina, the Asheville Composite Squadron is
seen as an emergency services partner. This appreciation was evident when the Town of Woodfin
invited the Squadron to participate in the 2014 Public Safety and Community Night. Held on August 2,
the public safety event was open to the community. Agencies set up displays at the Avery’s Little Corner
Park.62 This activity provided demonstrations and static displays by local fire department, police
department and emergency medical services agencies. Maj Clint Parker and Capt William Wallace were
present to inform Woodfin residents of the Civil Air Patrol’s mission while fielding questions.63 According
to attendees, the Squadron’s presence was well received by the community.
(U) Through the years, community organizations have pursued the Squadron’s engagement in various
events and activities. Juggling these requests against unit requirements can pose a level of difficulty to
manage. Every once and a while, there emerges an event that begs the members attention. This was the
case regarding a Pilots for Christ event held at the Asheville Regional Airport. This organization provides
free airlift transportation to children with long term illnesses in order that they may seek comprehensive
medical treatment unavailable in the local community. On August 30, Pilots for Christ held a public
awareness event for western North Carolina. This activity provided free familiarization flights for area
kids.64 Unit leadership viewed this activity as a perfect opportunity to support the local community while
affording our recruiting team an opportunity to solicit new cadet members. Squadron facilities were
provided along with flight line access, safety monitoring and directory support during the occasion.65
Capt William Wallace reported that the recruiting team fielded a dozen inquiries about the Civil Air
Patrol.66 By all accounts, the event was a success and the Pilots for Christ organization appreciated the
performance of the Asheville Composite Squadron.
(U) Since 11 September 2001, communities across the nation hold annual events to recognize the
sacrifices of emergency services workers. These activities range in scope and grandeur depending on the
community holding the activity. Over the years, Squadron leadership has made it a point to provide
Woodfin Police Department’s Facebook page, accessed on January 21, 2015,
http://www.facebook.com/woodfinpolice/photos_stream?tab=photos_albums.
63
William Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes-7 August 2014.”
64
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting-28 August 2014,” message to Squadron, August 29, 2014, email.
65
Ibid.
66
William Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes for 4 September 2014,” message to Squadron, September 5, 2014, email.
62

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representation when invited. Boiling Springs Baptist Church held their event on September 28.67 The
unit has several members who belong to the church’s congregation. This connection was enough to
sway the leadership into committing to Boiling Springs Baptist Church’s emergency services
commemoration ceremonies. Maj James McNab, Capt
William Wallace, C/SrA Robert Lewis and C/SrA Ryan
Santiago were present during the celebration.68 Being a
congregation member, Cadet Lewis joined in the musical
performances by playing a guitar and piano at various times
throughout the service. Following the service, Church
leadership invited the attendees to lunch.69 From feedback
from the participants, Squadron personnel felt “it was a
great day on many levels.”70
(U) Nationally, Civil Air Patrol programming provides immense flexibility to allow community
engagement. When engaging STEM education, traditional focus is targeted toward grade school
children. Every once and a while, an opportunity arises where one can inspire those who lived full lives.
A chance to speak to a group outside the Squadron’s target audience arose on October 23.71
Representatives of Heather Glen at Ardenwoods Retirement Community invited unit personnel to give a
presentation to their residents. Unit personnel felt that this request was important. Maj Michael West,
Capt William Wallace, SM Carlisle Lincoln and C/SSgt Ryan Santiago would represent the Squadron to
engage the residents.72 Around 1530 hours, SM Lincoln began PowerPoint presentation exploring the
history of the Civil Air Patrol.73 The squadron contingent listened intently as several residents recalled
life during World War II. At the conclusion of the program, Ardenwood representatives and residents
invited Squadron members to return.74 Unit personnel look forward to participating in similar events in
the future.
(U) As the year was wrapping up, the final activity is one the Squadron has committed to for several
years. Wreaths Across America is an organization that creates wreaths to be laid at veteran’s cemeteries
around the nation. Civil Air Patrol participates in the program by raising money and laying the wreaths.
Starting in June, unit personnel solicit family and friends for the purchase of a wreath to be laid at the
veterans’ cemetery in Swannanoa. Around October / November timeframe, orders are made to the
Wreaths organization. This year Squadron personnel raised enough money for 495 wreaths. On
December 13, seniors and cadets met at the Western North Carolina Veterans Cemetery.75 The event
included participants from local JROTC units, Patriot Riders Motorcycle Club, Blue Star Mothers, and the
Buncombe County Fire and Sherriff’s Honor Guard. In total, the participating organizations raised funds
for 1,500 wreaths. This dedication ceremony was one of the largest wreath laying events held attended
by the Squadron.76 Hats off to an excellent effort!
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting – 2 October 2014,” message to Squadron, October 3, 2014, email.
Ibid.
69
Ibid.
70
Ibid.
71
Ibid.
72
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting – 30 October,” message to Squadron, October 31, 2014, email.
73
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting – 2 October 2014.”
74
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting – 30 October.”
75
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting – 18 December 2014,” message to Squadron, December 19, 2014,
email.
76
Ibid.
67
68

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(U) As indicated earlier, community engagement is a challenging labor intensive activity. The intensity
compounded by the fact that Squadron volunteers must juggle work and family along with their unit
obligations. These responsibilities become even more complex when figuring in the requirements of
Wing, Region and National. Within these conflicting priorities, the Asheville Composite Squadron
actively connected with the community over the past twelve months. These activities ranged from
meeting local leaders to attending church recognition events to giving talks to the elderly. Through these
events, unit personnel gain valuable insight into their communities. In return, the public gains insight
into the mission and values of the Civil Air Patrol program. Collectively, all parties learn to build stronger
connections. Asheville Composite Squadron members anticipate an active outreach program for 2015.

SPECIAL EVENTS
(U) There are roughly fifty two meetings conducted annually by the Asheville Composite Squadron
barring unforeseen events and circumstances. Traditionally, these meetings follow a strict regimen in
order to meet cadet, aviation and emergency services training requirements. Accompany this formal
meeting schedule, the various activities require a dedicated day or two to demonstrate competencies in
the lessons learned. Combined, these events may require members to spend an entire month of
weekends to meet the unit’s proficiency goals. Looking from space, one may ask…. where is the fun? The
command understands that all work and no play makes Jack and Jill a dull boy and girl. Therefore,
Squadron leaders actively promote alternative events as a means of relaxing. These special activities do
not fit within the Civil Air Patrol’s traditional mission but are vital to preserve esprit d’ corps while
allowing members to decompress. This section explores those types of events and other activities where
members reached a significant life goal.
(U) One of the noteworthy special events of 2014 was the first annual Mini Golf Tournament. On July
31, unit personnel along with family and friends gathered at Tropical Gardens Mini Golf on Patton
Avenue in Asheville.77 Participants competed for best cadet and overall golf scores. Tropical Gardens
features a mini golf course, batting cage and video games. The variety in pursuits allowed everyone in
attendance to enjoy themselves. Those pursuing mini golf played the hill side course dotted with various
natural features including several life size statues of animals. When everything was said and done, SM
Jason Nadle had the highest points for the Squadron. C/2 Lt Morgan MacDonald would hold the cadet
record. He would miss being the top player by two points.78 Celebrated by family and friends, the
Asheville Composite Squadron looks forward to a rematch in 2015.
(U) There are activities and then there are ACTIVITIES. For most senior members, career retirement is
a significant achievement. Working or playing on your own terms is something most of us can only
dream about. Within this past year, one of the Asheville Composite Squadron would hand over the yoke
to a younger generation. On September 1, Maj. James McNab retired from U.S. Airways.79 After decades
of commercial piloting, Maj McNab concluded his career with a flight from Rome to Charlotte. Upon
arriving at Charlotte-Douglas International Airport, his aircraft was greeted with a water arch created by
fire trucks spraying over the aircraft.80 His civil and military experiences have made Maj. James R. McNab

William Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes—7 August 2014.”
Ibid.
79
Facebook, Inc.
80
Facebook, Inc.
77
78

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a valuable Squadron asset. Unit personnel send their congratulations Maj McNab on achieving this
milestone in life.
(U) There are many activities that occur within the Squadron over the period of a year. Recognizing
and properly cataloging them is a bit more difficult to achieve even for the most effective chronicler.
Unfortunately, many of these remarkable events go uncovered. There are occasions when someone
goes out of their way to maintain a decent record of events. Much of what is in this historiography is
due to one such individual. Almost without exception, Capt William Wallace goes out of his way to
provide meticulous notes of the weekly meetings. These notes serve as the historical record for the
majority of information presented in this annual. His reporting has meant that the Asheville Composite
Squadron is one of a handful of unit’s providing a narrative of important activities to National.
Therefore, I would like conclude this segment by recognizing Capt William Wallace’s dedication to the
preservation of Unit heritage. Semper Vigilans!

RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
(U) Logistics is a necessary and vital component to the daily operations of the Civil Air Patrol. Flying,
personnel management, emergency services, cadet activities and the host of other engagements require
resources to make them successful. A broken fuel gage on an aircraft will prevent a plane from flying but
has secondary implications. Without a functioning aircraft, Squadron search and rescue missions may
have to be reassigned to other operational units. While waiting for parts, cadets are unable to
participate in O-Flights. This inactivity prevents the awarding of emergency services, cadet and aviation
proficiencies. Therefore, those engaged in resource management have a heavy responsibility while
engaging in a yeoman’s level of work. Over the past twelve months, these leaders made sure that
meetings and missions were achievable. This section of the annual history provides an understanding
into the accomplishments of the Squadron’s logistical managers in relation to facilities, finance and
information technology.

Facilities
(U) The story of our unit’s current facility arrangement began a little over a year ago. On 11 April
2013, the Asheville Composite Squadron dedicated Hanger 4 as the Lt Col Robert E. Auger Center.
Squadron leadership held the dedication
ceremony on the parking apron in the presence
of the hanger’s namesake and cadet programs
patron. Acquisition of the property would end
four years of living a nomadic life by unit
personnel. Now Squadron personnel had a
permanent place to conduct meetings and
operations. Procuring the facility would mean
new challenges for the organization. Anyone
who has been around an airport can tell you
that hanger facilities tend to be on the Spartan
side when one thinks of amenities. This was
very much the case facing leaders upon moving
into the Center. There were limited office and bathroom spaces while walls were uninsulated. Facilities
did not have wireless connections and radio transmission capability. Immediately, leadership began to
map and prioritize efforts to refurbish the Center to meet unit requirements. Weaverville’s Mercer
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Design Group provided architectural design assistance in order for the Squadron to acquire a building
permit to pursue construction / remodeling activities.81 Before submitting the plans for permits,
Squadron leaders received approval from the hanger’s owner in December.
(U) With the hanger renovation plans in hand, leadership submitted the materials to the airport
authorities for approval to proceed. On January 9, Landmark Aviation and the Asheville Regional Airport
Authority approved the proposed design. Their endorsement marked the first hurdle in the approval
process. Documents needed to be submitted to the Building Permit Office in Buncombe County. With Lt
Col Ray Davis serving a project manager, permit number 2013-01400 was issued on 22 January 2014.82
Remodeling efforts could now commence. With the paperwork in place, the first thing on the docket
was addressing the electrical concerns. The end of January saw Ted Dippy of Ted’s Electrical Service
changed out power panel number one. Mr. Dippy’s efforts would now allow the Unit to expand
electrical wiring into the main meeting and new second floor operations areas.83 Throughout the
renovation effort, Ted’s Electrical Service continually supervised wire installation while advising project
management of concerns and remedies for the new fitting.84
(U) One of the most dangerous elements of the renovation effort was that of the second floor
construction. This space needed to hold the weight of at least 200 individuals working and training. In
order to hold the projected weight, renovation crews needed to install a steal I-beam. On the first of
February, the Squadron’s volunteer construction team hoisted the beam into place. Until it being
permanently fixed into place, work teams stabilized the joist with three temporary jack screws and
cinderblocks.85 This effort was complicated and dangerous work. The crews would not have to wait long.
On the seventh, the work crew installed the permanent supports and removed the temporary jacks.
Buncombe County building inspectors came to the Center in mid-February to approve the Electrical
Panel 1 and beam installations. Inspectors would give their approval for work done a couple days
following their initial review. With forward momentum working in their favor, the Squadron crews
transitioned to the next phase of the project’s remodeling effort.86
(U) With electrical and I-beam tackled, the team could shift their focus to the interior walls and
flooring. On the ground level, a core group of individuals would address casing the interior walls of the
training room. This effort required the installation of fire rated gypsum boards over the previously
constructed wooden frames affixed to the interior metal hanger walls.87 Once the gypsum was hung, the
team mudded joints and primed the surface for painting. While this was going on downstairs, crews
working the second floor had to first install the joists. They achieved the undertaking by laying down 30
trusses in order to hold 4 foot by 8 foot plywood sheeting.88 The second floor crew would also install
stairs leading from the first floor training room to the second floor operational areas. This new stairway
egress would supplement one already in place at the front of the hanger facility. Overall, hanging and
finishing the wallboard up and down stairs would last well into the summer months. On March 24,

81

Asheville Composite Squadron, Renovation Project Manager, CAP Hanger 4 Construction Log, by Ray Davis
(Asheville, NC: Self, nd): [1].
82
Ibid.
83
Ibid.
84
Ibid, [1-2].
85
Ibid, [1].
86
Ibid.
87
Ibid.
88
Ibid, [2].

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Buncombe County building inspectors conducted their third inspection of the remodeling effort.89 A
third inspection would occur in May. Each review resulted in the continuation of the Squadron’s permit
and work.

(U)
Meanwhile,
the Asheville
Regional
Airport
Authority
had
requested
the return of
a modular
home
provided to
the
Squadron in
2010. As indicated earlier, the organization was living a nomadic life for many years. Beginning in 2009,
airport authorities sought to increase revenue in the facilities located on their property. This direction
lead to the unit relinquishing the Lacy Griffith Building in 2010. Asheville Regional Airport Authority and
Landmark Aviation understood the need for operational office space for air and ground missions. Their
solution was to provide the organization with a construction trailer. This temporary housing would
enable flight and ground operations to continue unabated while a more permanent home could be
found. With the unit’s move to the hanger, airport authorities requested the return of their trailer. On 7
June 2014, a contingent of 15 seniors and several cadets officially moved out of the mobile office
building or MOB.90 Lt Col Ray Davis led the effort which relocated computers, office furniture, supplies,
and other miscellaneous items into the Squadron’s hanger complex and storage connex.91 The daylong
event enabled unit leaders to meet the Airport’s deadline of 15 June for receipt of the property. With
the trailer’s transfer, the Squadron officially becomes a true resident at the Asheville Regional Airport.
(U) With the MOB returned and renovations moving along, installation of communication’s
equipment had become a priority. Civil Air Patrol maintains its own communication system to enable
ground and air crews to talk back and forth during training and real-world missions. In early June, the
second floor renovation team finished the Squadron’s communications room. This meant that
communications’ specialist would now have to uninstall equipment from its temporary operational area
89

Ibid, [3].
Facebook, Inc.
91
William Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes – 1 May 2014,” message to Squadron, May 3, 2014, email.
90

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and permanently install it within the Center.92 Within their office area, they installed radios and other
communication’s equipment. They also mounted video security systems around the hanger.93 With
interior complete, they focused on erecting the antennas. On 8 August 2014, communication team
members affixed the antennas to the hanger’s roof.94 The only remaining thing to do was ground them.
Between August 14-16, teams installed the antenna grounding rods. Their successful efforts would
enable the Center to become a fully operational command post for Squadron training and contingency
events.
(U) As the year ticked down, the all-volunteer construction / renovation work force did a remarkable
job. This was in part due to the project management of Lt Col Davis. No longer was the hanger just a
hulking metal shell, the new renovated space provided usable area for most CAP and Squadron missions.
The results of their effort was achieved without major difficulty. However, there was one item of
anecdotal importance to our story. In November, unit members mounted three large letters (i.e., C, A, P)
on the exterior of the hanger. These large letters face the runway and are bright red.95 Initially, there
were concerns raised by Landmark and airport authorities regarding the installation. They felt that the
unit made a modification to the original plans without their authority. The Squadron’s project team
approached the authorities with the preapproval documentation showing prior approval had been
given. Through these discussions, all parties recognized the issue and agreed to allow the Squadron to
continue displaying the lettering. With the installation, the Asheville Composite Squadron recognizes
that the Auger Center is a home for the Civil Air Patrol for years to come.

Finance
(U) Rarely, does one seek to understand the challenges of financial operations until it directly impacts
your pursuits. Cadet activities, emergency services, flight operations and weekly meeting all provide a
value but also cost something. The finance officer is charged with managing funds and identifying
shortfalls within the unit’s budget. With these shortfalls, squadron leadership look toward sources of
revenue to support programmatic and organizational requirements. Sponsorships provide the squadron
with flexibility to supplement cadet activities, repair equipment, and acquire resources. These
contributions make programs more affordable for cadets who may not otherwise have the resources
necessary to engage in CAP activities. Fund seeking requires a commitment by the unit’s leadership to
prioritize requirements and solicit funding from external sources. Over the past twelve months, the
Asheville Composite Squadron launched a two prong business model designed to seek sponsorships
from internal and external benefactors. Within this section, researchers will gain insight into the
Squadron’s fundraising efforts. This data does not address monetary funds held by the organization or
funds received as part of the Civil Air Patrol’s budgetary allocation for operational activities.
(CBU/DECL 20201231) Within the development community, there are very few not-for-profit
organizations where their reputation precedes them. These reputations may be skewed based on a
potential sponsor’s perception of the requestor. One only has to examine the Boy Scout and Girl Scout
organizations to understand the potential concerns. In order to diminish any preconceptions, provide
the prospective entity with an understanding of what your agency does for the community. On 24
February 2014, Maj Charles Parker with a couple of cadets gave a brief presentation to the Weaverville
92

CAP Hanger 4 Construction Log, [6].
Ibid.
94
Ibid.
95
Facebook, Inc.
93

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Town Council.96 This session would provide a catalyst to request funds from the town in order to finish
construction at the squadron hanger complex. Cadet’s Eli and Molly Booth would assist with the
presentation. The engagement took place at 1900 hour in the Council Chambers at 30 South Main Street
in Weaverville.97 Maj Parker provided a briefing and discussed the need for $20,000 for construction
efforts. Following the presentation, Vice Mayor John Penley moved to provide funds for the Asheville
Composite Squadron. This was not seconded and the motion did not carry. Council Member Doug
Jackson felt that the fund request should be part of the town’s budgetary process.98 The Squadron failed
to acquire funds for its construction efforts but the presentation resulted in a couple of new members
and opened the doors to potential future sponsors.
(CBU/DECL 20201231) I believe that every squadron commander has wrestled with the idea of
membership dues. There are various pros and cons with any decision to internally raise money.
Squadron leaders juggled these opposing forces for a couple of years. Luckily, the unit was able to
identify external funding to supplement operational costs and the need to institute dues never came to
light. This would come to an end on 1 January 2014. With the facility construction costs mounting,
leaders were left no other course but to institute a membership fee.99 Senior members could pay $5 per
month, $20 per quarter or $60 per year.100 Funds raised would primarily support construction efforts
while residue monies would augment unit programs. The new policy would not impact the costs
associated with cadet memberships. Within this new policy, there were a couple of exemptions
recognized by the unit. Individuals unable to afford the additional costs were able to donate their time
and effort to Squadron activities. While omitting cadets from the program, the new policy also
welcomed monetary donations made by parents of cadets.101 Annually, unit leadership will determine if
fee schedule needs adjustment.
(CBU/DECL 20201231) The Squadron’s fundraising effort sometimes overlooks toward angel donors.
These are individuals who give an organization because they believe in the program. Traditionally, angel
donations are smaller but no less appreciated. Over the years, the Asheville Composite Squadron has
seen its share of these patrons and we appreciate them for their support. During 2014, Phillip Kerr
donated $250.00 to the unit. On the outside looking in, this may not appear to be much money.
However, the story behind the donation serves as a testament to Mr. Kerr’s character. A former cadet,
Mr. Kerr received $250.00 from their employer.102 The employer sought to recognize Kerr’s outstanding
performance on the job. Rather than pocketing the stipend, Phillip requested that his employer donate
the monies to the Asheville Composite Squadron. During April, Kerr’s employer sent a $250.00 check to
the unit.103 Considering the nation is still clambering out of an economic recession, this selfless
dedication to the Squadron long after leaving the organization is deeply appreciated by all.
(CBU/DECL 20201231) Innovation and imagination are often the best resources one has to finding
new revenue streams. With the hanger remodeling effort requiring resources, the unit leadership
focused on alternative methods to raising funds. Glad handing works well but there are other methods
Town of Weaverville, “Mayor and Town Council Regular Meeting,” February 24, 2014,
http://weavervilletownnc.iqm2.com/Citizens/Detail_Meeting.aspx?ID=1001, (accessed on December 1, 2014).
97
Ibid.
98
Ibid.
99
Clint Parker, “Re: Squadron Dues,” message to Squadron, February 8, 2014, email.
100
Ibid.
101
Ibid.
102
William Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes - 10 April 2014,” message to Squadron, April 15, 2014, email.
103
Ibid.
96

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used effectively by schools and churches. Pancake breakfasts are relatively cheap to operate but have
the potential for a high return. This philosophy served as the catalyst for holding the Squadron’s first
pancake breakfast. 1st Lt Teresa Cannon would serve as project manager for the activity. Under her
leadership, the Squadron held this successful event on 14 June 2014 at the Applebee’s on Smokey Park
Highway in west Asheville.104 Unit personnel sold tickets to the general public, family and friends in the
weeks leading up to the breakfast. The unit’s efforts resulted in a total of 100 tickets being sold.105
Squadron personnel seated guests, cooked meals, cleaned facilities, and managed donations. Capt.
James Matthews’ family made a personal contribution to the funds raised.106 In total, the pancake
breakfast netted $827.00 for the Squadron. The event’s success inspired leadership to plan for a larger
activity in 2015.
(CBU/DECL 20201231) As earlier stated, reputation is a double edged sword when it comes to
soliciting. Within the professional response community, Civil Air Patrol is seen as a reliable volunteer
service. This reputation has grown in recent years as the organization has increased its footprint into
incident response. These new integrative emergency services missions provides a valuable asset to a
county’s ability to address all hazard incidents. Community emergency response teams (CERT), points of
distribution (PODs), search and rescue, and other CAP capabilities enable emergency managers to
properly allocate resources to address specific community concerns. There are sometimes occasions
where a Squadron’s capabilities and reputation combine to produce a sponsorship by county leaders. In
September, the Buncombe County Sheriff’s Department donated $2,000.00.107 These funds would
provide support to enhance training and capabilities within the Squadron’s emergency services
programs. Asheville Composite Squadron personnel expressed their thanks to Sheriff Van Duncan for his
Department’s continued support.108
(U) Financial does not always mean cold hard cash. There are items donated over the years that
provide a direct financial benefit to the Squadron. The largest donation received was that of its
personnel. They donated hundreds of hours of personal time, wear and tear of their tools, and use of
their vehicles to transport materials to the hanger. This was done with the understanding that the most
one could offer them was appreciation. Their in-kind sponsorship enabled the unit to shift financial
priorities from construction to mission and training priorities. In addition to the renovation effort, the
unit received headphones for use by our aircrew. These sets were donated by Pisgah Forest resident
Pete Wroblewski. In a previous life, he had worked as an air traffic control systems engineer. He now
tutors area students in math and science.109 The donations of Mr. Wroblewski and others over the past
year demonstrate the importance of community engagement. As we close out the year, we thank all
those who sponsored the Asheville Composite Squadron in order that we maintain our commitment to
the Civil Air Patrol’s mission. Thanks!

Information Technology
(U) Since the dawn of time, the ability to communicate with others has been a vital component of
human existence. This effort has had mixed outcomes depending on the historical event. Sending
William Wallace, Re: Minutes of Meeting – 12 June 2014,” message to Squadron, June 14, 2014, email.
Ibid.
106
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting – 19 June 2014,” message to Squadron, June 20, 1914, email.
107
William Wallace, “Re: Meeting Minutes for 25 September 2014.”
108
Ibid.
109
William Wallace, “Re: Minutes of Meeting – 6 November 2014,” message to Squadron, November 7, 2014,
email.
104
105

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messengers, deploying smoke signals, ringing bells, waving flags and calling on telephones demonstrate
a brief evolution of communicative instruments used throughout history. Within today’s society, there is
a need to address communication using a host of mediums (i.e., landline telephones, internet, cell
phones, etc.). These components require skilled personnel to manage the flow of information. Within
the Asheville Composite Squadron, the effort for managing information technology fell to 1st Lt Scott
Stevens. Since his arrival with the unit, Lt Stevens had begun to evaluate the way the Squadron and its
officers got the message out. This assessment identified several key concerns related to the unit’s web
presence. These alarms included but were not
limited to the complex coded website, outdated
information, and unmanaged social media.
Coordinating with Squadron leadership, Lt Stevens
established an action plan to address the
communication shortfalls while bringing the unit’s
online presence to within CAP standards.
(U) Beginning in 2013, Lt Stevens worked with
senior leadership to redesign the Squadron’s
website. This included a review of existing open source website design software programs. His research
brought him to adopt a package created by Drupal. Founded in 1999, Drupal has over 1,000,000
international customers of their software.110 Customers assist each other to improve the software
packet and identify concerns for Drupal to address. With advice from leadership, Lieutenant Stevens
created the Squadron’s website (http://www.ashevillecap.org). During 2014, the Asheville Composite
Squadron website had 4,000 visits. This figure represents 2,300 visitors from 60 countries.111 As a
component of the new website, the organization adopted Google applications. This enabled the unit to
unify its electronic calendar, email and information storage. With the standardization of email and
integration into the Squadron’s web
elements, 1st Lt Stevens and the
leadership are able to generate recall
rosters.112 In conjunction to the website
elements, the Asheville Composite
Squadron maintains a presence on
Facebook
(http://www.facebook.com/AshevilleCAP)
with 940 followers.113 These efforts have
increased the public’s knowledge of the
unit while complying with Civil Air Patrol’s
web requirements.
(U) While addressing the organization’s web presence, there were the traditional responsibilities that
had to be addressed. This required troubleshooting technology concerns while managing resources.
Traditionally, these are not complicated undertakings but made difficult by construction and moving.
Over the past three years, Squadron meetings and operations were held in five different locations
Drupal. “About Drupal.” nd, http://www.drupal.org/about, (accessed on January 13, 2015).
Scott Stevens, “RE: Request for Assistance – Information Technology Section of Unit History,” message to the
author, January 13, 2015, email.
112
Ibid.
113
Ibid.
110
111

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spanning two counties. Since summer 2013, the unit took up permanent residence within a hangar at
the Asheville Regional Airport. Lieutenant Stevens had the responsibility to troubleshoot internet
connectivity while installing the unit’s technological resources. With all these moves, he was able to
maintain control of Squadron property. Over 2014 period, 1st Lt Stevens’ ensured that cadets and
seniors had workable machines and internet to conduct training and operations. The results of his
commitment is reflected in the pages of this historical record. Echo loud!

WRAPPING UP AND LOOKING FORWARD
(U) This historical document chronicles the activities and accomplishments of the squadron and its
personnel over a twelve month period. As historians know, the effort can be quite daunting at times. In
our case, the effort was made much easier by the quality of work being done by others in the unit. For
example, Capt William Wallace writes the meeting minutes and provides copies of these to each
member of the Squadron via email. His effort provided the backbone to create the historical timeline.
There are many others whose work has made life for the historical chroniclers easier. With everyone’s
support, the research team had difficulty identifying every event held by Squadron personnel. These
holes in the historical fabric may have prevented a full understanding of events and/or achievements. It
is our hope that future researchers can appreciate the work done while forgiving us to that which we
have missed. While not perfect, we believe that this historical annual preserves the spirit of the
Asheville Composite Squadron’s activities for 2014.
(U) Over the past twelve months, squadron personnel made great strides in maintaining mission
readiness. Aircrew instructors and ground team leaders train personnel to the highest caliber. This is
evident in the squadron’s response capabilities during training and real world contingency activities. The
squadron has become a leader in navigating in the mountains that it conducts an annual flying clinic for
the region and wing. Ground team leaders work to provide training that meets acceptable practices of
civilian emergency services practitioners by having them conduct training for squadron personnel. This
means that cadets and seniors are able to integrate with the operations of local recovery efforts.
Aviation and emergency services is only a small component of the past year. Squadron personnel gave
back to the community and built unit esprit d ‘corps. Because of the quality and dedication of unit
personnel, the historical team is able to present their outcomes in this document.
(U) Two-thousand and fifteen promises to be an exciting year for the squadron. As we begin a new
year, the Asheville Composite Squadron begins National Weather Service StormSpotter training,
Mountain Fury and Wing SAREx. Seniors and cadets will hone their skills in emergency services and
aerospace education efforts over the spring. Members will continue volunteering manpower and
resources to bring the Squadron offices up to standard. June and July will bring national and regional
events such as summer camps and other events provide cadets and seniors with activities involving
hands on missions. When the cadets return to school in August, the unit will turn to continued
community engagement and unit proficiencies. Then comes winter when the squadron historian
prepares to collect and write about the achievements of the squadron and its personnel. As these
events and others occur, the unit remains ever vigilant to meet the goals of searching for downed
aircraft in the mountains of Western North Carolina.

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APPENDIX A
GENERAL SQUADRON INFORMATION
As of 31 December 2014
Unit Designation

Asheville Composite Squadron (MER-NC-019)

Previous Designations

Asheville Senior Squadron (1957-1976)
Asheville Squadron (1945-1957)
Western Carolina Squadron (1942-1945)

Authority

Civil Air Patrol National Organization Charter

Higher Headquarters

North Carolina Wing (MER-NC-001)

Commander

Maj Charles C. Parker III (January 2014-Present)
Lt Col Joseph A. Weinflash (July 2009-January 2014)
Lt Col Robert Bauer (2001-July 2009)

Deputy Commander – Seniors

Lt Col William L. Fleming (December 2011-Present)

Deputy Commander – Cadets

1 Lt Dennis A. Fagnant (May 2012-Present)

Cadet Commander

C/2Lt Jacob B. Davis (August 2014-Present)
C/2Lt Logan M. Lueck (October 2013-August 2014)

Station

Asheville Regional Airport

Aircraft Flown

Cessna 172
Cessna 182

Awards and Decorations

Unit Citation (2011)

Approved Emblem
Significance: Traditional Air Force squadron type
design. Insignia features CAP aircraft flying over the
city of Asheville. Disc contains the Asheville
Composite Squadron’s designation NC-019 and Civil
Air Patrol. The outer scrolls identify the unit’s motto
Echo Loud and identify the city of Asheville. Insignia
size slightly larger than traditional Air Force
squadron emblem patterns. Approved emblem
approved in 2010.

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Functional Emblem
Significance: Rectangular insignia. Emblem presents
a cartoon image of the squadron’s aircraft in profile.
Presented on the side of the aircraft are “N99700”
and the CAP emblem. The figure of Gumby sits in
the pilot’s seat. Beneath the aircraft image, “NCO19
SEMPER GUMBY” is in quotes. This image
symbolizes the flexibility of the unit and its
personnel to accomplish the mission.

Significance: Disc face contains two OR bands used
to separate the key elements. Outer disc provides
the unit’s designation in AZURE on an ARGENT field.
The wording presented is “Civil Air Patrol” in the
Chief position while “Asheville Sq, NC 019” appears
in the base. Inner disc present a predominantly
ARGENT Cessna-type aircraft flying over a mountain
range. The mountains signify the predominant
terrain feature of western North Carolina and the
home of the Asheville Composite Squadron.
Challenge Coin
Significance: Blue disc face contains a white triangle
containing a red three blade propeller. Beneath the
lower blades appears the words “Asheville
Squadron.” External to the triangle the date “Feb
1942” and “U.S.” This signifies when the Asheville
Composite Squadron began its lineage. The obverse
side features a stylized propeller with the
Squadron’s motto “Echo Loud” presented. Designer:
Maj. Joseph Myers.

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APPENDIX B
PERSONNEL STATISTICS
As of 31 December 2014114
(CBU/DECL 20201231) Senior Members (81)
Enlisted
1

Officer
1%

63

78%

Cadet Sponsor
2
2%

Patron
15

19%

(CBU/DECL 20201231) Cadet Members (51)

34

Enlisted
66.7%

Officer
8

Cadet
15.7%

9

17.6%

(CBU/DECL 20201231)Gender (132)
Seniors
Male
Female
70
11

114

Cadets
Male
Female
42
9

Data compiled from CAP e-Services.

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APPENDIX C
CADET ACHIIEVMENT AWARDS
As of 31 December 2014115

General Ira C. Eaker
C/Lt Col Andrew J. Moore

General Billy Mitchell
C/2Lt Caleb A. Freeman

C/2Lt Rob G. Reeves

Neil Armstrong
C/2Lt Caleb A. Freeman
C/CMSgt Zachary W. Cannon

C/CMSgt Jarrett W. Poto

Dr. Robert H. Goddard
C/CMSgt Molly R. Boothe
C/CMSgt Zachary W. Cannon
C/CMSgt Jarrett W. Poto

C/SMSgt Ethan P. Reynolds
C/MSgt Alexander J. Hopkins
C/MSgt Timothy J. Kantner

General Jimmy Doolittle
C/CMSgt Molly R. Boothe

Charles A. Lindbergh
C/SMSgt Ethan P. Reynolds
C/MSgt Nathan A. Bernhardt

C/MSgt Nolan V. Middlemas

Captain Eddie Rickenbacker
C/MSgt Nathan A. Bernhardt
C/MSgt Nolan V. Middlemas
C/TSgt Josiah D. Bibrey

C/TSgt Benjamin S. Carpenter
C/TSgt Robert B. Lewis

Wright Brothers
C/MSgt Nathan A. Bernhardt
C/MSgt Nolan V. Middlemas
C/TSgt Josiah D. Bibrey
C/TSgt Benjamin S. Carpenter
C/TSgt Robert B. Lewis

115

C/SSgt Joshua M. McGlinsky
C/SSgt Matthew R. McGlinsky
C/SSgt Noah B. Phillips
C/SSgt Ryan T. Santiago

Data compiled from CAP e-Services.

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Mary Feik
C/MSgt Nathan A. Bernhardt
C/MSgt Nolan V. Middlemas
C/TSgt Josiah D. Bibrey
C/TSgt Benjamin S. Carpenter
C/TSgt Robert B. Lewis

C/SSgt Joshua M. McGlinsky
C/SSgt Matthew R. McGlinsky
C/SSgt Ryan T. Santiago
C/SrA Kayla S. Dutcher

General H. H. “Hap” Arnold
C/MSgt Nathan A. Bernhardt
C/MSgt Nolan V. Middlemas
C/TSgt Josiah D. Bibrey
C/TSgt Robert B. Lewis
C/SSgt Joshua M. McGlinsky
C/SSgt Matthew R. McGlinsky

C/SSgt Rayan T. Santiago
C/A1C Benjamin S. Bridges
C/A1C Alexandra D. Fagnant
C/A1C Bryce H. Jackson
C/A1C Jacob D. Mcintosh

General J. F. Curry
C/MSgt Nathan A. Bernhardt
C/TSgt Josiah D. Bibrey
C/TSgt Robert B. Lewis
C/SSgt Joshua M. McGlinsky
C/SSgt Matthew R. McGlinsky
C/SSgt Ryan T. Santiago
C/A1C Benjamin S. Bridges
C/A1C Bryce H. Jackson
C/A1C Jacob D. Mcintosh
C/Amn Luke A. Bridges

C/Amn Tiemo Dionne
C/Amn Joshua N. Garcia-Billings
C/Amn Amber L. Gay
C/Amn Kyle A. Jacobs
C/Amn Cameron D. King
C/Amn Anderson C. Lawler
C/Amn Dorian Samuel Miller
C/Amn Dylan R. Sasser
C/Amn Abigail B. Walton

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APPENDIX D
SENIOR ACHIIEVMENT AWARDS
As of 31 December 2014116

Grover Loening Aerospace Award
Maj Charles C. Parker III

Benjamin O. Davis , Jr. Award
Capt Evonna E. Myers
Capt Groce R. Robinson

Capt Sharon A. Waltman
1Lt William R. Cannon

General Charles Yeager Aerospace Education Award
Lt Col Harry P. Fiedler

1Lt James M. Farrey

Membership Award
1Lt James M. Farrey
2Lt William H. Moore
SM Scott A. Bridges
SM Daniel C. King

116

SM Gina S. King
SM Carlisle A. Lincoln
SM Virginia E. McGill
SM Earl R. Tilton

Data compiled from CAP e-Services.

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APPENDIX E
SQUADRON AIRCRAFT

CESSNA 172 SKYHAWK117

Type

Four seat light aircraft

Purpose

Search, reconnaissance, communications, transport.

Performance
General
Horsepower
Top Speed
Cruise Speed
Stall Speed (dirty)
Gross Weight
Empty Weight
Fuel Capacity
Range
Aircrew
Take Off
Ground Roll
Over 50 ft Obstacle
Rate of Climb
Ceiling
Landing
Ground Roll

150
122 knots
115 knots
43 knots
2300 pounds
1315 pounds
42.00 gallons
417 nautical miles
Pilot +3
865 feet
1525 feet
645 feet per minute
13100
520 feet

PilotFriend, “Cessna 172 I Skyhawk Performance and Specifications,” Aircraft Database, last modified
unknown, http://www.pilotfriend.com/aircraft%20performance/Cessna/1/15.htm, (accessed on December 31, 2009).
117

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Over 50 ft Obstacle

1250 feet

CESSNA 182 SKYLANE118

Type

High performance four seat light aircraft

Purpose

Search, reconnaissance, communications, transport.

Performance
General
Horsepower
Top Speed
Cruise Speed
Stall Speed (dirty)
Gross Weight
Empty Weight
Useful Load
Fuel Capacity
Range
Aircrew
Take Off
Ground Roll
Over 50 ft Obstacle
Rate of Climb
Ceiling
Landing
Ground Roll
Over 50 ft Obstacle

230
143 knots
135 knots
54 knots
2550 pounds
1540 pounds
1213 pounds
55.00 gallons
443 nautical miles
Pilot +3
620 feet
1020 feet
620 feet
1020
610 feet
1290 feet

PilotFriend, “Cessna 182 Performance and Specifications,” Aircraft Database, last modified unknown,
http://www.pilotfriend.com/aircraft%20performance/Cessna/3/3.htm, (accessed on December 31, 2009).
118

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APPENDIX F
ASHEVILLE REGIONAL AIRPORT DIAGRAM

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GLOSSARY OF REFERENCES AND SUPPORTING INFORMATION
References
AFI 84-101, Historical Products, Services, and Requirements
AFI 84-105, Organizational Lineage, Honors, and Heraldry
CAPP 5, Civil Air Patrol Written History Self-Study Guide
CAPR 210-1, The Civil Air Patrol Historical Program
Department of the Army. Organizational History. Washington, DC: Center for Military History, 1999.

Abbreviations and Acronyms
§
Section
1 AF/NORTHCOM
1st Air Force / North Command
AE
Aerospace Education
AFB
Air Force Base
AFI
Air Force Instruction
AK
Alaska
Asst
Assistant
AVL
Asheville or Asheville Regional Airport
C
Cadet
CAP
Civil Air Patrol
CAPP
Civil Air Patrol Pamphlet
CAPR
Civil Air Patrol Regulation
CBU
Confidential But Unclassified
CD ROM
Compact Disk – Read Only Memory
DECL
Declassify
ELT
Emergency Locator Transmitter
ES
Emergency Services
FAA
Federal Aviation Administration
FEMA
Federal Emergency Management Administration
FL
Florida
ft
Feet
GA
Georgia
HO
History Office
IT
Information Technology
JROTC
Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps
MADCAP
Madison County / Civil Air Patrol
MCAS
Marine Corps Air Station
MER
Middle East Region
MOB
Mobile Office Building
MS
Mississippi
NASA
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
NC
North Carolina
NCGS
North Carolina General Statutes
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NH
RCS
SAR
SAREx
STEM
TX
U
UAS
US
USAF
USC
VA

New Hampshire
Record Control Symbol
Search and Recovery
Search and Recovery Exercise
Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
Texas
Unclassified
Unmanned Aerial System
United States
United States Air Force
United States Code
Virginia

Terms
Argent (White or Silver) - Positive: daylight, innocence, perfection, purity, truth, and wisdom. Negative:
blank, cold, ghostly, spectral, and void.
Azure (Blue) – Positive (light blue): calm seas, charity, cold, constancy, daylight, devotion, innocence,
plant Jupiter, loyalty, piety, sincerity, sky, thinking, and truth. Negative (dark blue): doubt, discomfort,
night, and stormy seas.
Disc – Shape on which the heraldic devices, symbols, or elements of a unit emblem are displayed. The
disc of today originated with a roundel, which consisted of a white five-pointed star in a blue circle, with
a red disc in the center of the star. The roundel was displayed unofficially on early USA Signal Corps
airplanes, adopted officially in 1917 for airplanes, and later evolved into the national star and bar
aircraft marking of today. The US Air Force adopted the disc in the early 1950s as the official shape for
squadron emblems.
Element – In an emblem design, a symbol or group of symbols, such as a constellation or bundle of
arrows, portraying a single characteristic, trait, or concept.
Emblem – An officially approved symbolic design portraying the distinctive history, mission, and general
information of an organization. It is an important, abiding element of the organization’s heritage.
Functional Emblems – Unofficial, non-unit emblems locally designed, authorized, and displayed. These
are often referred to as “morale patches.”
Or (Yellow or Gold) – Positive: Constancy, dissemination, divinity, elevation of mind, excellence, highest
values, honor, illumination, intellect, intuition, justice, light, loyalty, magnanimity, riches, ripened grain,
sun, supreme wisdom, and wisdom. Negative: cowardice and treachery.
Unit – A Civil Air Patrol organization with no headquarters. Squadrons and numbered flights are units.

Gazetteer
Arden – A town in south Buncombe County, North Carolina.
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Asheville – A city in and the county seat of Buncombe County, North Carolina.
Asheville Regional Airport (FAA: AVL) – A class C airport in the town of Fletcher, 9 miles south of the city
of Asheville, in the state of North Carolina.
Barnardsville – A town in northern Buncombe County, North Carolina.
Boone – A city in and the county seat of Watauga County, North Carolina.
Buncombe County – A county located in western North Carolina, United States.
Burlington – A city in Alamance County, North Carolina.
Columbus AFB (FAA: CBM) – A United States Air Force Base located in Lowndes County, Mississippi. Base
assigned to the Air Education and Training Command.
Cordoba – A city in Andalusia, southern Spain.
Crete – The largest and most populated island in the European country of Greece.
Charlotte – A city in and the county seat of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina.
Charlotte-Douglas International Airport (FAA: CLT) – An airport outside the town of Charlotte in the
state of North Carolina. Charlotte-Douglas International Airport is the sixth busiest in the
world.
DuPont State Park – A 10,000 acre tract, located in Henderson and Transylvania counties in western
North Carolina.
Eastern North Carolina Justice Academy – A state operated police academy within the town of
Salemburg in Sampson County.
Gastonia – A city in and the county seat of Gaston County, North Carolina.
Hickory – A city in north-western Catawba County, North Carolina.
MCAS Cherry Point (FAA: NKT) – United States Marine Corps Air Station located in Craven County, North
Carolina. Base is home to the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing.
Rome – A city in and the capital of the European country of Italy.
Shelby – A city in and the county seat of Cleveland County, North Carolina.
Spain – A European country boarding the Mediterranean Sea, Portugal and France.
Stanly County Airport (FAA: VUJ) – Airport outside the town of Albemarle in the state of North Carolina.
The airport serves as a facility for the North Carolina National Guard.
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Swannanoa – A town in eastern Buncombe County, North Carolina.
Weaverville – A town in northern Buncombe County, North Carolina.
Western North Carolina State Veterans Cemetery – A cemetery outside Swannanoa in Buncombe
County for the internment of veterans.
Woodfin – A town in northern Buncombe County, North Carolina.

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WORKS CITED
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Sandy#Mid-Atlantic_2. Accessed on February 20, 2015.

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DISTRIBUTION LIST
OFFICE
AVL/CC
AVL/HO
NC WG/HO
MER/HO
CAP HQ/HO

COPY NUMBER
1
2
2
1
1

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