File #1137: "CAPNews-May1975.pdf"

CAPNews-May1975.pdf

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Text

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M AY, 1 9 7 5

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MAXWELL AFB, Ala.--Civll Air Patrol's National Board
Meeting/Convention is less than six months away! With this in
mind, it is time you began making your plans to attend.
The convention will center in America's heartland at St.
Louii¢ Stouffer's Riveffront Towers. October 3 and 4 are the
dates for the formal business sessions. The 241 and 5th have been
designated as arrival and departure dates.
The hotel has alloted 700 rooms 40 year veteran with the Boy
to Civil Air Patrol at $18 for a Scouts of America where he
single and $21 for a double. (~t received the Silver Beaver
room reservation form is printed Award in 1954.
on Page 16 for your conAirlift to the convention will
venience. )
present even greater problems
In planning the board
than in years past due to the loss
meeting/conventien this year,
(See Convention, Page 2)
every effort has been made to
keep our registration and banquet fees to an absolute
minimum. We feel that we have
been successful in attaining that
objective. The registration fee for
the entire range of convention activities including the banquet on
Saturday night, is only $19.00.
This is less than last year's
registration fee of $19.50. If you
MAXWELL AFB, Ala. -- Civil
want to attend the banquet only it
Air Patrol pilots and ground
will cost $15 while registration
teams from Colorado. New Mexico and Oregon received credit
alone will be $5.
You can also pre-register in adfor saving the lives of 10 people
vance by sending in the Pre-. in late March and early April
registration Form which appears through their volunteer search
on Page 2.
and rescue (SAR) missions.
You should pre-register only ff
Pilots from Colorado and New
you are certain you will be going
Mexico flew 11 sorties on Mar.
to the convention. No re'funds
21st in search of a PA-28 Cherokee
will be made until 30 days after aircraft with three persons on
the convention.
board which had crashed in
The key-note speaker for this Colorado.
year's banquet will be
The three were on a flight
"America's humorist with a from Colorado Springs, Colo., to
message,"
Newt Hielscher.
Grand Canyon. Ariz.. via
He has more than 20 years ex- Durango, N.M.. at the time of
perience on the banquet and
the accident.
meeting trail as a speaker for
The wreckage was located
conventions and has developed a near Alamosa, Colo.. by CAP
unique style that makes old pilots 2nd Lt. Cleo V. Tillman
friends out of strangers and and 2nd Lt. James C. Buffington
breaks the ice of formality.
of the Monarch Pass Senior
M r. H i e l s c h e r i s a f o r m e r Squadron. Gunnison. Colo.
public school teacher and
The two CAP pilots homed-in
professor and assistant to the on voice signals from the surDean of Engineering at Texas vivors to pin-point their location.
A&M University. Married with T h e a i r c r a f t ' s E m e r g e n c y
two children, the resident of
Locator Transmitter (ELT) had
Shreveport, La., is a Deacon and
been damaged upon impact of
Sunday School teacher in the the aircraft.
First Baptist Church. He is also a
An Army helicopter from Ft.
Carson. Colo.. was diverted from
a mission to pick up the survivors who were reported to be
uninjured but had prepared to spend a cold night at the 11,000
foot level of the wreckage.
A CAP search aircraft from
pointed in 1954. Her promotion to
the Colorado Wing and a law enthe grade of CAP colonel at that
time highlighted a career which forcement rescue team from
Aspen, Colo.. went into action
began in 1942 when she joined the
Match 28th when a pair of skiers
organization as an instructor.
were reported overdue while on
During her progress through
an outing in the Rocky Mounthe enlisted and officer ranks
Colonel Morse held positions, tin- tains. (See Saves Page 2)
cluding instructor, training,
supply and finance officer. She
was one of the CAP members of
the Delaware Wing to receive a
War Department Certificate of
Appreciation for her CAP service.
In 1969 she was named CAP's
Wing Commander of the Year.
Her decorations include the
CAP Distinguished Service
Medal. the Exceptional Service
Award with three bronze clasps
and many others.
She is a rated observer with
more than 180 hours of flying
time. Colonel Morse and her husband Albert reside in WilColonel Morse mK~i
mington, Del.

3 Missions
Raise Save
Total To 26

IN APPRECIATION--Brig. Gen. Leslie J. Westberg, USAF, national commander, (right),
presents a portrait to Graver Loening, the first aeronautical engineer, in appreciation of his
presentation to the National Congress on Aeroepace Education held in New Orleans in April.
See page 8 for story and additional photos. (Photo by MSgt. Russ Brown)

Supply Bill (5828) Reintroduced
By Alaska's Congressman Young
MAXWELL AFB, Ala. -- On
April 9th, Congressman Don
Young of Alaska introduced the
Civil Air Patrol supply Bill, H.R.
5828, which will broaden the base
of support and ease the financial
burden on the Civil Air Patrol.
Citing the 12 lives saved in
Alaska, and the invaluable
emergency assistance rendered
throughout the nation,
Congressman Young urged congress to guarantee the strength
and efficiency of the Patrol for
the future.
The bill Young introduced is

End Of Monthl)
ime you will receive your
monthly Civil Air Patrol
N E W S . To s a v e m o n e y,
the National Executive
Committee has directed
that your newspaper will
only be published every
other month. Future issues
w i l l b e p u b ~ e d i n J u l y,
S e p t e m b e r i N o v e m b e r,
January, March and May.

identical to H.R. 13884, the bill
Congressman F. Edward Hebert
(D. La.) introduced in the last
Congress, and it has been requested by CAP since 1968. It
will allow the Air Force to supply CAP not only with military excess. but with property excess to
other Federal Departments and
Agencies. It will allow the Air
Force to arrange for the CAP to
use the services and facilities of
the other military departments,
Federal Departments and Agencies. Also, the bill authorizes the
appropriation of funds for uniforms, for fuel and lubricants,
for a per flying hour payment to
member for aircraft
maintenance costs, and for
travel and subsistence
allowances for members on
authorized missions.
Congressman Young obtained
the co-sponsorship of II other
Congressman. of both parties.
He hopes that with this support.
the bill will pass. The other
Congressman were Floyd Hicks
of Washington, Joshua Eilberg of
Pennsylvania, Tom Bevill of
Alabama, Richard Fulton and
Harold Ford of Tennessee.
Lester Wolff and Donald
Mitchell of New York. William
Broomfield and Philip Ruppe of
Michigan, Gene Snyder of Kent u c k y a n d D a v i d Tr e e n o f

Louisiana. Congressman Young
urged members of CAP to write
their representatives to request
support for H.R. 5828.

Embry-Riddle University Cites
Delaware's Col. I uisa Morse
MAXWELL AFB, Ala. -- CAP
Col. Louisa S. Morse. commander of the Delaware Wing,
was honored late last month at
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical
University's graduation exercise
at Daytona Beach Fla., where
she was presented the Gill Robb
Wilson Award.
The award is presented annually to an outstanding aviation
educator of the previous year.
This presentation marked the
second time that Colonel Morse
has received an award which
bears the name of the late Gill
Robb Wilson. aviation giant who
was a leader in the formation of
Civil Air Patrol.
In 1972 she received a Gill
Robb Wilson award from CAP
for her work in the senior
member training program in
Delaware.
Colonel Morse was the first
female to become a CAP wing
commander when she was up-

M AY, 1 9 7 5

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

PAGE TWO

Dr. Scharlemann

To Keynote Chaplain Meeting
MAX'~/E-LL AFB, Ala. -Chaplain (Col.) Ralph R. Pace,
National Chaplain, recently announced the selection of Dr.
Martin B. Scharlemann, M.
D i v. , M . A . , P h . D . , T h . D . ,
Professor of New Testament
Interpretation and Chairman of
Exegetical Theology, Concordia
Seminary, St., Louis, Mo., as
guest speaker of the annual
chaplain meeting this year. His
keynote address will be
presented at the Friday noon
luncheon, held in conjunction
with Civil Air Patrol's National
Board Meeting, October 2-5 in
St. Louis.
Reverend Scharlemann has
earned a Doctor of Philosophy
D e g r e e f r o m Wa s h i n g t o n
University (1938), and a Doctor
of Theology from the Union
heological Seminary, New
ork (1964). He assumed his
position with the Lutheran Concordia Theological Seminary
after serving twelve years as an
active duty Army and Air Force
Chaplain (1941-1952). He retained his chaplaincy commission,
and in 1966 became the first Air
Force Reserve chaplain to hold
the rank of a General Officer.
He is a native of Nashville,
Ill., the son of a Lutheran pastor,
attended the parochial school

systems of the Lutheran Church,
and received his A.A. and M. Div
degrees from Concordia universities. He belonged to the first
class that was required to serve
a year of internship before completing seminary work and ordination.
He served in various pastoral
and administrative positions in
the Church, and in 1965 was an
ecumenical guest to the Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome,
and became the first Lutheran to
study there. During his stay in
Rome, he also taught at the
Waldensian Seminary in that
city.
Be is the author of many ar=
ticles and books, his major work
being a book entitled "Stephen:
That Singular Saint". Be is best

~

Dr. Scharlemann

known in the military chaplaincy
as author of the Moral
Leadership and Character
Guidance materials which he
wrote from 1941-1951. He also
wrote the curriculum for the
thirteen-volume ECI Course "The
Air Force Chaplain".
As a reserve officer he has
conducted many retreats, conferences and preaching missions
for the Army and Air Force. In
November 1963 he spoke to more
than 100,000 troops in the Pacific
on the "Ethics Of War", in the
summer of 1964 he took the same
message to Europe and the
Middle-East. He has lectured on
the ethics of warfare and the
moral aspects of the cold war to
every class of the Air Force
Squadron Officer School, Maxwell AFB. Ala.. from 1954 to
1973. For this work he received
the Air University Medal.
Re received an honorary
membership to Civil Air Patrol
in 1970, following continued service to the CAP chaplaincy. CAP
,members will remember him
for an outstanding presentation
at the CAP National Ministry to
Youth Laboratory in 1969, and
again for his contribution to the
1970 annual chaplain meeting,
held at the National Headquarters in Alabama.

Convention Time Nears

(Continued from Page 1)

of all T-29 aircraft-in the Air
Force inventory. Region and
wing commanders are urged to

Mr. Hielscher

be thinking of arranging either and an arch.
group affinity or charter flights
A couple of the many tourist at-~
for their people as alternate tractions are:
The world's largest brewery,
means of transportation. Another
Anheuser-Busch. Naturally,
possibility is the "no-frills"
flights offered by several airguided tours are available all
lines. Check to see if there are
year round that include three
any such flights originating in
National Historic Landmarks:
your area which fly to St. Louis.
the Brew House, Administration
Building and the Clydesdale
But whatever you do, don't wait
until the last minute to make the horse stables.
The symbol of St. Louis--the
necessary arrangements.
Gateway Arch. It is a 630-foot
St. Louis is a "City with
high stainless steel structure
everything." There are parks
with the shape of an inverted
and museums and rivers and
catenary curve. It was designed
homes and universities and
to memorialize the spirit of the
shrines and historical sites and
churches and bridges and
pioneers who settled the West. It
is open to visitors each day of the
breweries and exhibits and
year.
galleries and shopping centers
and amusement parks and conYour support is needed to
servatories and gardens and
make this another memorable
sporting events and caves and a
Civil Air Patrol National Board
planetarium and concerts and Meeting/Convention. Make your
opera and jazz and legitimate plans now, don't wait until it's
theatre and riverboats and a zoo too late.

ON DISPLAY--CAP Maj. Edward G. Kelley, (center), and
Cadet Sgt. James McGown of the National Capital Wing's
Potomac Composite SquadrOn, explain one of CAP's missions to a visitor at the exhibit the squadron recently displayed at the Pentagon Mall. The display, depicting the missions of CAP, was constructed by CAP Maj. Steven Gillis of
the Wheaton-Silver Springs Cadet Squadron.

Save Total Now 26
(Continued from Page I)
The aircraft, piloted by SM
Keith Serkes along with SM
Claude Porter field acting as
observer located the missing
pair after one hour of aerial
searching and notified the
ground team who moved in with
snowmobiles to make the
rescue.
A ground rescue team was instrumental on Apr. 7th in saving
the lives of five young hikers
who were stranded on
Neahkahnie Mountain, near the
town of Nehalem in the
northwestern tip of Oregon.
No CAP air searches were involved in the rescue as the

location of the hikers was known
but members of the Hood River
Composite Squadron were
credited with saving their lives.
The team, assisted by local
mountain rescue personnel and
the Tillamook County Sheriff Department, used a power winch
to rescue the five from the moantain.
A Coast Guard helicopter airlifted the hikers to a local
hospital for observation.
These 10 saves brings to 26 the
number of lives CAP has saved
in 1975 through its air search and
other emergency services missions.

A Reminder!
PORTLAND, Ore. -- The 1975 Pacific Region Staff College will
be held in Portland, Ore., July 27 through August 2.
Cost will be $70 per person (double occupancy of rooms) and includes housing and all meals.
It will be possible to bring your family and have them oncampus
with you. Anyone interested in bringing their family should write
Col. O. A. Donaldson, CAP, 3501 NE Marine Drive, Portland, Ore.
97211, for additional details.
Applications should be submitted on Form 17 and go through your
unit and wing commander. (See story in January Civil Air Patrol
NEWS for additional information.)

~mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmI

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1975 CAP National Convention

i

(Pre-registration Form)
for

Enclosed is $

registrations at $19.00 each.

Check One:
(Rank)

(Name)

USAF
CAP
Other

(Street)
(City)

(State)

(Zip)

,t4~b
Pteaw make check payable to "National Headquarters CAP" and mail to HQ CAP-USAF/
~z~ct1.4FB. Ala. ~112.
i
~ I L

. . . . . . . . ;,.~ -;.'='-=~<:~ ~o,m must be received by HQ CAP USAF/AC no later than Sept. 15, 1975)
. . . .

~ ~ v ~ ~ m ~ p~llSe include mimes and ranks of all illdividuals,
m
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmma~

SPAATZ WINNER--Cadet Col. Charles M. Link, (right), of
North Carolina's Winston-Salem Composite Squadron
receives Civil Air Patrol's highest achievement for a
cadet--the Gen. Carl A. Spaatz Award, from CAP Col. Ivey
M. Cook Jr., North Carolina Wing commander. Link, a rated
private pilot, has served the squadron in most cadet
positions including cadet commander. (Photo by CAP It.
Col. Hoili Nelson)

PAGE THI! IT

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

M ~ Y, 1 9 7 5

iili~

OUTLOOK

America At 2 00
by Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Reuben 1~. Katz, CAP
Northeast Region Chaplain
This past month we began officially to make
preparations for the observance of our country's bicentennial. At first blush, it would seem that we
couldn't have chosen a more inappropriate time to
celebrate 200 years of America. The political life
of our country is in ferment, our economic life is
sorely strained and the general morale of our people is at its nadir. Harried by its enemies, misunderstood by its "friends", its most recent
leaders guilty of several sins, both great and
small, its youth "turned off", its populace wary of
every new step, maligned, mistrusted, and indecisive, our country stands at one of the great
crossroads of its history.
Perhaps, on second thought, this year might be
an excellent time for us to rediscover Anlerica, to
recall the unique quality of the American promise
and the essence of the American experiment.
Perhaps, this is as good a time as any for us to
appreciate, not with childish naivete, but with a
maturity, bearing the scars of growing up, that
which is outstanding and great about America. The
bicentennial year may well serve to remind us that
our American way of life is still worthy of our
profoundest loyalty and that our country's flag is
worthy of our deepest respect.
At the heart of America is the dream of creating
a society in which people will be accepted as
people; where the castes and the conflicts, the
stratifications and the ghettos and the cruel and
senseless boundaries between people and races
and relationships would be repudiated. America is
not merely the past, but a vision of a society still to
be, in which human beings will be judged by their
ability and their character rather than by the accidents of their native geography, color or creed.
It is that aspect of the American spirit to which
Washington referred in his letter to the Hebrew
Congregation in Newport, Rhode Island in 1790,
when he wrote: "Happily, the Government of the
.... ~iilINL~Sia~S, Wll~h~v~lf< iO bigotry M san~n,

to persecution no assistance, requires only that
they who live under its protection demean
themselves as citizens..." It is this understanding

of America's dream which permeates the
deathless words of Martin Luther King and
represents the American promise at its noblest
and wisest manifestation.
Furthermore, the greatness of America is
reflected in the fundamental acceptance of the
dignity of the individual. The Psalmist speaks of
man as being "a little lower than the angels." To
the American spirit, the individual is neither serf
nor slave nor beast, but he is endowed by his
Creator with inalienable rights and these entitle
him to opportunity, liberty and equality. It took
years before this basic view of man was extended
to include the disenfranchised, the Blacks, and 1
truly believe that it will, in time, include the
woman as well.
The greatness of America is still to be, and its
measure will be found not in the behavior of small
men who have misused great power, but rather in
those statements of moral passion and religious
conscience which are at the heart of the great
historic documents of our country: the Declaration
of Independence; the Addresses of Washington;
the Inaugural Addresses of Abraham Lincoln and
his Gettysburg Address among many other immortal utterances of great Americans.
When our collective conscience is challenged, as
it has been in our own time, by those who would
reduce the moral and ethical qualities of our
country by misusing their high office, part of our
nation's greatness lies in the fact that they cannot
continue to desecrate America's image un.
challenged.
The founding fathers, 200 years ago, dared to
dream, to sacrifice, to build a nation whose
greatness was primarily in the realm of the spirit.
It is that spirit that we celebrate and that hope that
we share.
In an imperfect world, amidst a selfish
humanity, and a materialistic society, America
still stands raising the banner for liberty and
human dignity for the generations still to come.
The American dream is our, challenge.+ The
American promise is our commitment.
Isn't it time that we had the courage to say, "I'm
proud to be an American?"

PROSPECTIVE MEMBER-Cadet Lt. Pete
Kurdziel (right), of Florida's Pompano Beach
Cadet Squadron, explains
the Civil Air Patrol cadet
program to an interested
visitor during a recent
Miami Boat Show. Cadets
and Seniors from Florida
Groups I, I0, 16 and 18 had
an information booth at the
s h o w i n a n e ff o r t t o r e cruit new members into
the CAP program. (Photo
b y C A P L t . C o l . To m
Welch)

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COVETED AWARD--CAP Maj. Michael J. Gallo (right), of
New York Wing's Rockland County Group, receives the Gill
Robb Wilson award and congratulations from CAP Col. Paul
C. Halstead, New York wing commander. Gallo has been affiliated with CAP since 1949 when he first joined the
organization as a cadet. He was recently appointed as Group
Commander of the Rockland County Unit.

Nine Tour Air Control Center
BARTONVILLE, II1--A group of nine CAP members from Group IV
recently traveled to Aurora, Ill., and toured the Chicago Air Route
Traffic Control Center there.
The purpose of the trip was to acquaint the members with the operations of the center and the efforts of the radar controllers in effecting a
smooth flow of air traffic.
This visit also assisted the CAP group in their efforts in promoting
the concept that searches for Emergency Locater Transmitter (ELT)
equipped aircraft may in the future be undertaken even in instrument
conditions through the coordination of efforts of the radar controllers
and search pilots.

Radio Program Features CAP
GADSDEN, Ala. -- Five members from the Alabama Wing's
Gadsden Composite Squadron were guests recently on a 30-minute talk
show aired by Radio Station WAAX in Gadsden.
During the show, the CAP group, which included Ist Lt. Dottis F.
Elliott, Cadet Capt. Marian D. George, Capt. Mark C. Cardwell, 2nd
Lt. Kelly Cardwell and 2nd Lt. Max Cannon, discussed their
organization's role in search and rescue missions and the cadet
program.
Following the program they were given a tour of the 50,000 watt
station.

BOX SCORE
Cadets ................................................ 26,003
Seniors ............................................... 34,488 ~
GAM ...................................................... 404
Total .................................................. 60,895
(As of Mar. 3i, 1975)
(221 increase since Jan. 1, 1974)

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Courtesy of Zack Mosley and Chicago Tribune--N.Y. Newel Syndicated

M AY, 1 9 7 5

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

PAGE FOUR

From The Commander

'People Power'
by Brig. Gen. Leslie J. Westberg, USAF,
National Commander

Like Gulliver I've traveled some
since coming on board as your
National Commander in 1972. I've
logged many hours of air time, and
w o r n o u t s e v e r a l pairs of shoes.
Nevertheless, I
deeply appreciate
the warm hospitality extended to
me by thousands
of dedicated members of Civil Air
Patrol.
All of this could
happen only in an
organization such as CAP!
Why? Because CAP is people
oriented. It was founded on a

patriotic need to help America. During my travels, I am always pleased
and comforted by the honest
enthusiasm and pride of membership
exhibited by CAP members
everywhere.
I still don't fully understand why
the membership is turned on the way
it is, but I have stopped asking why
and gratefully accept the fact that
this dedication and professionalism
has always been there and will continue to exist long after I have left the
scene.
I believe that a volunteer
organization's worth can be
measured in terms of contribution.
What have they done to make our
country just a little bit better place in
which to live? The Civil Air Patrol

record is clear for all to see.
From a relatively small band of
volunteer citizens in 1941, Civil Air
Patrol has grown into a highly
professional, meaningful and productive organization in 1975.
However, while available revenue
and resources seem to be continually
dwindling, the mission of CAP and
the efforts of its devoted members
have not diminished. And in this connection, it occurs to me that in this
time of universal uncertainty and
spiraling inflation, there is one important American commodity that
has maintained its poise and stability
-- the voluntary people power
donated by the thousands of patriotic
members of Civil Air Patrol.
After nearly three years in office, I

am more convinced now than ever
before that CAP is a one.of-a-kind
organization with a continuing opportunity to render a valuable service to
our great nation. While the
challenges and responsibilities ahead
of us are sobering, I have utmost confidence that Civil Air Patrol will
meet these challenges with a powerful resource of dedicated volunteer
members united for a common cause
-- to help those in need: anyone,
anywhere, anytime !
It is with the greatest sense of pride
that I salute each of you -- the men
and women of Civil Air Patrol -- for
your past contributions and to
challenge you to even greater
achievements in the future.
People power--a powerful product!

Chairman's Comments

Safety First
by Brig. Gen. William M. Patterson, CAP
National Board Chairman

There is an old cliche, "Records
are made to be broken." This is particularly applicable to the sports
scene for it seems that each day a
record established by Jesse Owens,
Bob Seagren ............
Mark Spitz, Babe
Ruth or Bob Hayes
is
literally
shattered by some
young, modern
sports hero. The
headlines blare
out their accomplishments
and pay homage to them and their
achievement. It has ever been this
way and will continue so long as man
competes and so long as he continues
to be the dominant force in the world
in which he lives.
On the flip side of the coin,
however, the converse might well be
said to hold true. That is, there are
records that will not or should not be
broken. These are one-of-a-kind or
once-in-a-lifetime things. Let's look
at a few firsts that will stand out in
history.
How about Sir Edmund Hillary's
conquest of Mt. Everest or
Lindberg's spectacular, unbelievable
transatlantic flight to Paris in 1927 or
Orville and Wilbur's short but
historical flight at Kitty Hawk in 1903
or Nell Armstrong's first step onto
the surface of the moon in 1969.
These are monumental feats that
stagger the imagination and, because
they are firsts, can never be
repeated. Man will continue to fly
higher and faster and spend more
time on the other planets but nothing
he will ever do can detract from the
greatness or the significance of
achievements put into the record
books by the Lindberghs, Wrights,

Last A nd A Iwa ys

Hillarys and Armstrongs.
CivilAir Patrol also has a record of
sorts that we fervently hope will not
be broken. That is our flying safety
record for the first four months of
1975. As this column is being written
the statistics that Lt. Col. Ed
Harrison has furnished jump out at
me. They tell me that you have been
working harder and longer at acci,
dent prevention than at any time in
the past five years.
Although the record isn't
perfect,--and I'm enough of a realist
to recognize that as long as man flies
there will be accidents--it does point
out quite clearly that true accident
prevention is an achievable and
realistic goal. Elimination may never

AIR
PAT R O L

be the proper word in this flying
business but reduction and minimizing certainly fit into our plan of
operation and our lexicon.
As of April 10, Civil Air Patrol has
experienced only three aircraft accidents. This compares most
favorably with previous year
statistics which reveal that by this
time in 1972 there were six accidents,
in 1973 we had eleven and last year
there were seven by April 10.
In the dugout baseball players have
an unwritten yet highly respected
tradition. It has been called
everything from a superstition to a
myth. Nonetheless it is time honored
and inviolate. No one--but no
one--ever mentions the words "no-

NEWS

. k ~ ~ ~ "k USAF AUXILIARY .k "~ "~ "~ *
N a t i o n a l C o m m a n d e r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brig. Gen. Leslie J. Westberg, USAF
N a t i o n a l B o a r d C h a i r m a n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Brig. Gen. William M. Patterson, CAP
.
D i r e c t o r o f I n f o r m a t i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lt. Col. Win. Capers III, USAF
C h i e f o f I n t e r n a l I n f o r m a t i o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Capt. J. H. Ragan, USAF
.
SMSgt. Don Bowes, USAF
Editor .................................................................
TSgt. Don ThwaatL USAF
Assistant Editor .......................................................
The Civil Air Patrol News is an official publication of Civil Air Patrol, a private benevolent corporation and auxiliary of the United~tates Air Force, published monthly at Headquarters CAP-USAF (OI),
B u i l d i n g 7 1 4 , M a x w e l l A i r F o r c e B a s e , A l a b a m a 3 6 11 2 .
Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily represent those of the Air Force or any of its
departments. Editorial copy should be addressed to Editor, CAP News, National Headquarters (el),
M a x w e l l A F B , A l a b a m a 3 6 11 2 .

All requests for advertising rates and information should be directed to:
Cunningham, Black & Farley, Inc., 33 South Perry Street, Montgomery,
Alabama 36104. Telephone (205) 264-3459.
The appearance of advertising in the publication with the exception of
the CAP Education Materials Center (Bookstore) and the CAP Supply Depot
does not constitute an endorsement by the Civil Air Patrol Corporation of
the products or services advertised.
Published by mail subscription (Civil &it Patrol membership dues Include subscription), $2.00 per
y e a r.
S e c o n d c l a s s p o s t a g e p a i d a t M o n t g o m e r y, t l U a . 3 6 1 0 4 .
P o s t m a s t e r : P l e a s e s e n d f o r m s 3 5 7 9 t o H e a d q u a r t e r s , C A P ( D P D ) , M a x w e l l A F B , A l a . 3 6 11 2

VOLUME 7, NO. 5

M A Y, 1 9 7 5

hitter" when a pitcher has held the
other team hitless and is moving
towards the most cherished oL~all
pitching goals--holding the other
team from getting a hit or a run. To
refer to this while it is happeningis to
court disaster and put a hex or a jinx
on the struggling pitcher.
Well, I'm defying this tradition in
my own way by talking about your
1975 safety record so far. I'll even
tempt fate by going one step further
and predicting that 1975 will be our
best accident prevention year ever. It
can be done and words are not going
to change the actions of the CAP
team or spoil our no-hitter. Just as
pitchers achieve their no-hitters by
control and perseverance so must we
continue our constant struggle to prevent accidents that injure and kill and
waste hard-to-come-by corporate
resources. This we cannot afford nor
tolerate! Only by conservation of
lives and assets can we hope to be
able to respond when we are called
upon.
It would be remiss of me if I did not
take this opportunity to recognize and
salute one gentleman who has made a
tremendous input to our accident
prevention program. He will soon
retire and both the Air Force and
CAP will be the worse for his leaving.
Colonel "Ed" Harrison's diligence,
knowledge and safety consciousness
have significantly contributed to a
greater safety awareness throughout
all of Civil Air Patrol. We will miss
him, his counsel and his expertise and
we wish him well in all future
endeavors. We welcome his
replacement, Lt. Col. Glen Atwell,
who comes to CAP with great credentials and a willingness to insure that
neither our aircraft or our safety
record will be broken. Let's try to
help him by not only Coming Alive in
'75 but by Staying Alive in '75.

M AY, 1 9 7 5

PAGE FIVE

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

SQDII

Two Record 'Find'
In Calif. Mission
SANTA BARBARA, Calif. -Two Civil Air Patrol members
were credited with a find recently when they located missing
DeHavilland DH-10 Dove aircraft which crashed on a flight
from Paso Robles to Los
Angeles.
The pilot of the aircraft, owned by Trans National Airlines.
had reported loss of both
generators and was lost on radar
some three minutes later.
The aircraft was carrying an
emergency locator transmitter

AIR/GROUND
SEARCH

Mugu, and guided it through the
clouds back to the wreck site.
The helicopter lowered two
Navy medical corpsmen to the
wreck and they determined that
the pilot was deceased.
A sheriff's rescue team cornpleted the recovery of the body
on the ground later. They were
assited by two CAP rescue
teams headed by Maj.Lou Dartanner and Lt. Joe Byrd.
P

R

Wing A i d s

LT, *n.*a, soaro e.o.s Dm'i Searc

Display Depicts CAP's Role

Display Viewed During Show
HARRISBURG, Pa.--A 20foot display depicting Civil
Air Patrol's efforts won considerable attention at the
Eastern States Sports and
Outdoors Show here recently.
Designed by CAP Maj.
Earl Yarlett and Maj. Robert
Shaw, commander and executive officer of Pennsylvania's Capital City Corn-

posite Squadron 302 respectively, the display was constructed by members of
Squadron 302.
It featured a 4 by 8 foot
topographic mountain scene
with a downed aircraft.
Above the craft were two

animated air search aircraft,
ground search teams and a
communications mobile unit
with "live" and simulated
communications on two frequencies demonstrating the
coordination necessary for a
search effort.

involved instrument flight rules
due to inclement weather conditions by Air Force and Coast
Guard aircraft and limited
visual search by Coast Guard
and Navy helicopters. Four CAP
ground teams with direction
finding gear also searched in the
continuing rain.
When the weather cleared two
days later. CAP was able to
launch one aircraft to search the
adjacent mountains. They
spotted the aircraft at the 3.500foot level on the north side of
Noon Peak. Maj. Bruce Gordon
was the pilot while Capt. Jim
Rand served as his observer,
Positive identification of the aircraft was obtained from the air
before bad weather forced the
search aircraft to the Santa
Pauia-Airport.
Major Gordon then got aboard
a Navy helicopter from Point

Pa. Unit Visits
InCl. Airport

DISASTER DRILL--Cadet WO Crystal Chaffin of the
Colorado Wing is the "victim" during a recent three-hour
disaster preparedness exercise in the Denver area. This
marked the second year that members of Colorado's Area I
had participated in the training exercise with local hospital
personnel. The "victim" is being attended by two unidentified emergency room nurses.

PHILADELPHIA -- Civil Air
Patrol cadets from Philadephia
Composite Squadron 104 were
recently given a tour of the
Philadelphia International Airport as guests of Eastern
Airlines and the Federal AviationAdministration,
The cadets toured the Eastern
operations area where pre-flight
briefing and planning take place.
They were shown how fuel and
cargo weights are calculated and
were given a walk thru tour of a
Boeing 727.
The FAA phase of the tour
took place during a lull in traffic,
which gave the cadets more opportunity to ask questions. All
controller positions were
described during a visit to the
radar room and the control
tower,
The tours were arranged by
SM Richard J. Luce.

SAN JUAN. Puerto Rico -The Puerto Rico Wing recently
joined the Coast Guard and
Navy in a search for an aircraft
enroute from San Juan to Saint
Vincent Island.
Although none of these agencies recorded a find the story
does have a happy ending. The
pilot, Michael C. Trobert, had
engine trouble and was forced to
ditch alongside the French sailing vessel Kantread. 80 miles
from Martinque. He and his
passenger, Charles Sarren were
able to step from the ditched aircraft to the Kantread.
Neither of the two suffered
any injury and both were taken
to safety. They were not able to
communicate with land forces
until they reached Aruba
because the sailing vessel had no
radio equipmentaboard'

EMT Certificates
Earned By Four
CASPER. Wyo. -- Four
members of Wyoming's Natrona
County Cadet Squadron recently
completed training for their
Emergency Medical Technician
certificates.
The training encompassed six
months and more than 80 hours
of advanced emergency care instruction, taught by personnel
and doctors from the county
hospital.
Completing the course were 2d
L t . R i c h P r o p e r, u n i t c o r n m a n d e r, 2 d L t. Wi llia m
Brimmer, testing officer, Capt.
Jerry Wellman. information o[ricer and Cadet Lt. Col. Mike
Street, communications ofificer.
These four CAP members are
registered through the State of
Wyoming and are recognized as
part of the nationwide program
to train EMT's by the American
Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons.

For the benefit of all
members of Civil Air Patrol,
the latest statistics of search
and rescue activities
throughout the organization
are shown below.
These are unofficial figures
compiled by Directorate of
Operations at CAP National
Headquarters.

(As of Apr. 13,1975)
Number of missions ........135
Number of aircraft ........ 1597
Number of sorties ..........3179
Flying hours ................. 5711
Personnel ....................7608
Mobile radios ................ 1574
Fixed radios ................. 228
1
Saves ............................ 26
Finds ................ . ........... 47

NEEDED AIRLIFT--Members of Alaska's Polaris
Group load donated food and clothing to be flown to
the William Howerton homestead on the Hoholitna
River in remote Alaska interior. The Howerton

family cabin burned down leaving the family to
forage for food and shelter for the remainder of the
winter months. Achorage residents donated
supplies and food to aid the seven-member family.

PAGE SIX

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

MAY, 1975

Miller School .Offers $15,600
In Scholarships For Cadets

ii+~;++~!ii'!!i!ili
~+ii!~/!!i!i!ili
++iii!i+i~++i!iii!,
!i~:;iiii~,"iiii!!i!

MILLER SCHOOL, Va.--Dr. . boating, fishing and swimming, ceremonies.
Robert J. Lawton, SuperintenThe school was established in
School catalogs and
1878 and offers grades 5 through applications are being forwarddent of Miller School, has announced a $15,600 scholarship
12. It offers a colPege prep
ed to each Wing to be passed on
offering to Civil Air Patrol
and/or vocational training
to the Squadrons. The school
program with a student-teacher applications must be completed
Cadets.
The offering consists of a $200
ratio of 7-1.
by the parents of the selected
schola/'ship toward Miller School
Miller School was formerly af- candidates and forwarded
tuition to be awarded a CAP
filiated with the U.S. Army
directly to the school with an accadet from each wing. The
JROTC. Their CAP charter was
companying letter from the
scholarship recipient will be
presented on March 10 by Col.
wing commander designating
selected by the Wing comRandolph C. Ritter, CAP, the
his $200 scholarship award plus a
Virginia Wing commander. The
m a n d e r. C a d e t s m u s t b e
letter from the Squadron Comcharter presentation was made
nominated initially by their
mander designating his $100
in the school's chapel before the
squadron commanders or cadet
award.
student body, faculty, staff and
program directors who are
Requests for additional
guests.
authorized to award a $100
catalogs, brochures, and
scholarship toward tuition on
Colonel Ritter presented the
applications should be directed
their own. The. school has a
charter to Dr. B. F. D. Runk,
to: The Miller School, CAP
boarding capacity of only 150 Miller School Board. with Dr.
Cadet Squadron 45122, Miller
boys, and therefore, applications
Lawton acting as master of
School, VA 22901.
should be screened and forwarded to the school by June 30. Final
acceptance by the school will be
announced promptly thereafter.
SOUTH MIAMI, Fla. -- The Cutler Cadet Squadron recently phyed
Miller School is the first and
host to fellow CAP members from six squadrons in the Florida Wing
only private boys prep school to
and held an encampment at their Everglades Survival School.
be affiliated with CAP on a fullEquipment was supplied by the Cutler unit to conduct the training
time basis. It is the Miller School
which included a communications van, two-way radios, vehicles and~
Cadet Squadron 45122 of the
numerous tents and field gear.
Virginia Wing. With the exeepHeadquarters Company, 50th Supply and Service Battalion. Florida
tion of the 5th and 6th grades, all
Army National Guard provided a tactical vehicle to transport the
students are members of the
cadets to the school and provide support while they were training in
Civil Air Patrol and wear CAP
the field.
uniforms every day throughout
Their training included map reading, day and night navigation, field
the school year.
sanitation, first aid and survival.
The school is located 15 miles
Those units participating were the West Miami Cadet, University
west of Charlottesville, just off
Cadet. Miami Aerospace Academy, North DadeCadet, Ft. Lauderdale
1-64. It offers 1700 acres of camCadet and the Port Charlotte Composite Squadrons.
pus which features rolling hills,
CAP Maj. Fred Graham is commander of the Glades Survival
woodland, and a t2-acre lake for
School and Cadet Col. Randy Cason is the cadet commander.

Unit Hosts Survival School

ALL ABOUT CAP--Cadet TSgt. James Olschlager explains
some of CAP's programs to a prospective member during
the recent American-Canadian Sportsmen Show held in the
Cleveland Auditorium at Cleveland, Ohio. During the 10-day
show, members from the Ohio Wing manned the display
booth and briefed many of the 150,000 attendees on CAP activities. Ten new senior and 25 new cadet members will be
gained from the efforts of those CAP members participating. (Photo by Bruce Beam)

188 Cadets Will Participate In 1975 1ACE
MAXWELL AFB, Ala. -One-hundred eighty-eight
cadets from 46 Civil Air
Patrol wings have been named to participate in the 28th
annual International Air
Cadet Exchange program. In
addition, 31 cadets have been
selected as alternates in the
event a primary selectee is
unable to meet the schedule.
The cadets will visit 22
foreign countries, including
such widely separated ones
as Israel and Japan, Germany and New Zealand during the exchange, sponsored
by CAP and the United States
Air Force.
A like number of
youngsters and their escorts
will visit the United States as
guests of CAP, during the
same time frame.
Nations in the Far East,
Europe and the Middle East
plus Canada will send
delegations to the United
States in this annual exchange which began in 1948.
This will be the eighth year
in which female cadets have
participated in the IACE.
American girls will visit
Austria, Belgium, France,
Great Britain, Israel,
Netherlands, Hang Kong and
the Philippines this year.
Following is a breakdown
by Region and unit charter
number of those ~adets
selected to participate in the

exchange between July 15
and August 6.
PRIMARY CADETS
NORTHEAST REGION
A m y T. D a n a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .06015
.
Anthony P. Gutowski ....................
06041
Paul J. Gurecki ......................... 0~054
Michael W. Rogers ......................06059
N i c k T. C o l a s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19012
John J. Carroll ......................... 19012
R o b i n R . M i l e s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19043
.
28035
Sheila J. Parkhurst ......................
Michael M. Kaznkiewiez ................. 28037
Sandra D. Sullivan ..................... 29067
29~J2
Adrianne K. Glappa .....................
William J. Harlieka ..................... 29092
Dana W. Moss .......................... 31039
Richard D. Murray ......................31079
Raymond J. Castognaro ................. 31131
David J. Difelice ........................ 31173
Douglas G. Hancher .....................
31173
Robert G. Hahin ........................ 31187
Charles V. Hayes ....................... 31189
Robert Sabhatino ...................... 31227
James M. Bonielln ..................... 31228
37025
Robert P. Pellegrini .....................
Robert P. Niess ......................... 37025
Gary P. Stondorf ....................... 37026
Lee P. Ryglinski ........................ 37046
Konrad J. Trantmaa .....................37060
37133
Kenneth G. Worhatch ....................
Dennis C+ Tobias ........................37191
Larry W. Jones ......................... 37193
Victor E. Crnker ........................ 37240
Roland W. Spencer ..................... 37246
Walter R. Jones ........................ 38023
William A. Saeeo ...................... 44099

MIDDLE EAST REGION
G . A . Va n d e r l e k . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
07013
Kenneth W. Bosley ......................
18013
Howard F. Eisinger .....................18071
M a r k P. H e t t e r l y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18071
.
Michael S. Cowan .......................18075
V e r n o n L . B r o w n . . . . . . . . . . 18075
William H. Trail ........................ 18055
D a n i e l H o e fl y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25033
.
Charles W. Dixon ni ...................
Randall J. Williams .....................32081
Stephen L. McFinney ....................
Denese Shipman ........................ 45002
Kevin P. Logan ....................... ~ .45025
Julia D. Bohake ......................... 45064
David O. Fitts .......................... 45059
Jan K. Bateman ................... - ..... 45995
Christopher Wist ........................45117
S i l a s C . F o r e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47913
..
Michael E. Segle ........................ 47913
Jonathan R. Bonds .....................
ATO~0
Joseph D. Lnngdon ......................
47966

GREAT LAKES REGION
Michael R. Schmitz .................... 11011
Karl M. Hemmer ....................... 11020
John A. McGrann
...11074
Vanne M. Phillips ....................... 11~,
Diana T. Cangelosi ......................
11099
Barbara A. Campbell ....................
11166
Donald A. Cantrell ...................... 11172
Robert H. Castle ........................ 11189
Paul Signorelli ......................... 11189
William E. Powers ...................... 11189
Mary F. Hindrichs ...................... 11205
J o h n R . H o j e k . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11220
..
Daniel R. Hurley ....................... 11230
Scott A. Eiebelkraot .....................
11263
Rickie L. Sexton ........................ 12012
J i m S h e p a r d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12975
.
Charles M. Kidd ........................ 12979
Kenneth W. Adams ...................... 2172
1
Ann J. Thielking ........................ 12175
Donald E. Parman ...................... 20981
Joseph E. Baka ......................... 20096
Lionel D. Jenkins .......................~145
William F. Hagen ....................... 29164
Rodncy L. Telford .......................29235
William J. Corliss .......................29'237
Michael A. Gerznnics ....................
20238
Claude H. Fore III ...................... 34937
Doug A. Daley .......................... 34038
Ronald J. Gizzi ......................... 34951
J i m M . M a r r y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34070
David A. Hennig ........................ 34131
Robert W. Braun ........................ 34131
Cheryl J. Harman ....................... 34167
Edward C. Lewis ....................... 34167
Joseph G. Orlowski ......................
48064
Kenneth Berggreu ...- ...................
48124
Edward A. Romanski ....................
48126

SOUTHEAST REGION
Michael R. Meyers ...................... 01924
Paul S. Davison ......................... 01024
Jerri J. Coursey ....................... 01034
Kathryn L. Howar ...................... 01034
Sberrie L. Soustek ...... . . : . . . . . . . . . . . . .01041
Martin J. Tays .......................... 01041
Eric G. Haertel ......................
Jose R. Carrizales ......................0 ~
Robert A. Hinton ........................ 06103
M a r k J . C a m e r i n o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9~104
.
98143
Richard A. Brinkmnn ....................
98159
John P. Frootera. Jr .....................
Harry L. Grcenwuy, Jr ................... 08159
Karce L. Bndzinski ...................... 08160
David A. Pattillo ........................ 0~227
Rhaett K. Atbertnn ...................... 06432
Mitchell Krell ..........................
22044
Lelaod W. Maxey ....................... 2~9~7
41054
Kenneth E. Strohm ......................
F o r r e s t C . Wa r d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41054
.
Tommy E. Trippe ....................... 41994
Jay W. Cook ................... . ......... 419#4
~ck'y A. Nohna .........................
Radames Mereado .....................
F e M . O r t i z . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52917

Oladys M Rosario ....................... 53017
Luis A. Torres .......................... 55017
E d e l G a r c i a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52045
Edaardn Dominguez .....................
520~9
Carlos L. Torrens ....................... 52059
Joseph Alverio ......................... 52062
Richard Correa ......................... 52062
Gerardo Torres ......................... 52066
Roberto Marqnez ....................... 52066
G e r a r d o L u g o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52556
..
Ilda Gonzalez ........................... 52097
Jose E. Gareia ......................... 52097

NORTH CENTRAL REGION
Kevin A. Long .......................... 13002
Ronald A. Weg~er .......................13902
J a n e t K . M o l l . . . . . . . . . . . . .14929
Douglas D. Freeseman .................14056
21016
Michael W. Otterbtad ....................
Beth A. Nelson ......................... 21030
John R. Quilling ........................ 21030
Curtis G. Brimacnmb ...................
21034
William F. Pagel ....................... 21044
Raymond B. Phillips ............ . . . . . . . . 21048
Kevin E. Swanson ................... :...21048
23004
Gregory L. Hamtton .....................
Roy J. Sanderson .......................23fle8
Russ E. Knight ......................... 23057
Charles R. Sayder .......................

SOUTHWEST REGION
John A. Mayer .......................... 02036
Mark R. Weaver
. .~936
Todd D. Clifton
. .05045
Keith D. Brocksmith .................... 2045
0
Lorry M. Fenner ........................ 02071
Robert D. McCord n ....................0~0~6
Kenneth C. Ramage .....................
William R. James. Jr ....................
03040
Stanley A. Myers ....................... 03083
Terry L. Logan ......................... 10007
Willie M. Guillot ........................ 16014
Mary S. Sbepard ........................ 3N~0
John W. Boyd ........................... 35008
Scott A. Miller .......................... 35015
Jeffrey W. Lemay ....................... 42910
Robert W. Edwards .....................420'2.6
Arthur C. Hardin....~ ....................
42076
Christina B. Collins .....................
42508
Nathan C. Harnagel ..................... 2154
4
Melody A. Hayes.. : .....................42313

ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION
Joseph W. Pitt .......................... 0f~0~$
M i k e L . S h a f t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0f~.6
.
N e ff K . H a r l n n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
05061
Celeste M. Condit ....................... I00~7
Mark A. Brunton ........................ 24003
24008
Annette Chlapowski .....................
William G. Bowdea .....................241031
~00z
Michael W. Street ..
Scott A. Haydeu ........................ 4~00~

PA C I F I C R E G I O N
David S. Kaswan ........................ 04051
Gordon W. Odeil, Jr .....................04056
Mark F. Williams ....................... 04184
E d w a r d F. L e e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4230
0
Karl A. Hattendnrf ...................... 04289
Paul G. Mayer .......................... 27031
Kenneth E. Magelssen ................... 27031
Mike F. Mashaly ........................ 27040
Kevin D. Kertz ......................... 3~945
Eric D. Didomenieo .....................
Susan M. Fletcher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... f~O.~
Eli H. Waiters .......................... 51014
Mike D. Bnaehard ....................... 51028
Leslie K. Yamashita ....................51045
Keith D. Taguma ....................... 51056
Clifton M. Taketo ....................... 51056

ALTERNATES
NORTHEAST REGION
Blaise T. Zyrnkowski ....................
Marcia E. Porter ....................... 17935
Edward M. Green .......................19043
J o h n T. B a r r y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9044
1
Timothy J. Cleary ...................... 31039

MIDDLE EAST REGION
Patrice M. Grimmnitz ...................
18011
Jeffrey B. Fetoer ....................... 35061

GREAT LAKES REGION
Robert W. Henson ....................... 1065
1
C h a r l o t t e H . F a j a r d o . . . . 12~4
Valerie C. Hager ........................ 2ff/.51
John G. Sladen ..........................34~M~
W. T. Stephens Jr ........................48055
James W. Silko ......................... 48122

SOUTHEAST REGION
Gretchen M. Hotmana ................... 01034
Cheryl A. Homzak ......................
G a r y J . B a i r d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ~170
..
James M. Mims ........................ 08227
Emily J. Dedsoo ........................ 41054
Montero V. Sierra .......................52~0
A n a M . S a h a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52077
.
~?gT7
Edward Aeosta .. ~ ......................
Juan V. Rodriguea ...................... 20@4
5
H i r a m M o a t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 520@4
.
Maria B. Eserlhana ..................... 20~
5

NORTH CENTRAL REGION
P a t r i c k S . D u f f . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14056
.

SOUTHWEST REGION
Danny O. West .......................... 35001
Linda D. Kristof ........................ 35015
Pamela L Kantor ....................... ~I10

ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGION
Mary A. Trude~au ....................... 05135
Chery L. MeNeill ....................... 43047

PACIFIC REGION
Dobornk S. AIg ......................... 04007

M AY, 1 9 7 5

AV I AT I O N M I N D E D - Cadet Bonnie Willhite of
Alaska Wing's Elmendorf
Cadet Squadron gets a
briefing about the radio
panel of a C-I18 aircraft
from Air Force Maj. Phil
Jeffreys, a 118 pilot. The
briefing was given when
members of the Elmendorf Cadet Squadron recently toured Elmendorf
AFB.

PAGIE

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

Radio Airs
Road Alerts

LEESBURG, Va. -- If-you
drive through Loudoun County,
Vi r g i n i a d u r i n g ' a w e a t h e r
e m e r g e n c y, y o u m a y h e a r
WAGE radio broadcast the
following announcement:
"The commander of Godfrey
Squadron, Civil Air Patrol. urges
all citizens band radio operators
to monitor emergency channel 9.
All Civil Air Patrol stations in
Loudoun County will be monitoring channel 9. CB radio-equipped
motorists are requested to broadcast road conditions in rural
areas for relay to WAGE radio."
CAP. Tom McGonegal, CAP,
squadron commander and Bill
Spencer, manager of WAGE
devised this plan to assist
motorists who may need help,
and acquire and give out road
conditions.

Wing locates
Downed Craft
M A N K ATA . M i n n . - - A
Minnesota Wing crew spotted.
the wreckage of a Clinton, Iowa
aircraft on Beaver Island in
the Mississippi River near
Clinton recently.
The deceased pilot of the PA28 aircraft had been missing for
a couple of days. He was Alfred
Froning, a Clinton grain exporting firm owner.
Minnesota was called in on the
search to assist the Iowa Wing
when it was learned that Mr.
Froning had a construction project in Winona, Minn., and it was
thought he might have been
planning to fly there.
Lt. Ed Fox, observer in the
Mankata Composite Squadron
aircraft spotted the aircraft. The
plane was piloted by Lt. Brian
Duehring while Lt. George
LaFavor was a second observer.

70 Receive Ride
In Giant Aircraft
TOWSON, Md. -- The U.S. Air
ForCe recently invited more
than 70 CAP members of the
Towson Composite Squadron
(Maryland Wing) for an orientation flight in their giant C-5A
aircraft.
The Air Force was conducting
the flight from Dover AFB as a
navigational training exercise
for crew members.
During the'six hour flight on
a course out over the Atlantic
Ocean, CAP members were
allowed to go to the flight deck
section where the operation of
the aircraft and various instruments were explained to
them by the crew.. - . . .
.
,.

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PAGE EIGHT

C I V I L A I R PAT R O L N E W S

M AY, 1 9 7 5

New Orleans Congress Is Huge Success
MAXWELL AFB, Ala. -- The eighth annual National Congress on
Aerospace Education, co-sponsored by Civil Air Patrol, was conducted at the Fontainebleau Hotel in New Orleans on Apr. 3-5. The
"biggest and best ever," this meeting drew more than 400 aerospace
educators from throughout the nation.
Among the highlights of the congress were the presentations by two
aerospace pioneers -- Grover Loening and Fred W. Haise Jr. Mr.
Loening is the first aeronautical engineer ever graduated in the U.S.,
was an aeronautical engineer for the Wright Brothers in 1913, and was
the first aeronautical engineer ever employed by the U.S. Army. In addition, he founded the Loening Aeronautical Engineering Company
which manufactured several types of amphibian aircraft.
Fred W: Haise Jr., although of a much later vintage, is every bit as
much a pioneer. He is a NASA astronaut and was the Lunar Module
Pilot on the ill-fated Apollo 13 flight. Mr. Baise talked of his own expriences and presented an overview of the Skylab and Space Shuttle
Programs.
The congress participants also heard general assembly addresses by
B. J. Long of Rockwell International, Jerry Boyer of GAMA, and Miss
Carol Rosin of Fairchild Industries.
Many seminar sessions, aimed at providing the teachers with
resources they could take back to their schools, were also conducted.
These seminars were chaired by teachers who themselves are experts
in the aerospace education field.
The congress was co-hosted by the State of Louisiana and Louis
Michot, Louisiana State Superintendent of Education. In addition to
seeing what is happening in Louisiana in aerospace education, the participants were treated to a Cajun dinner and a moonlight cruise on a
Mississippi River sternwheeler.
As in the past, this year's congress was planned by General
Westberg's aerospace education staff at National Headquarters; and
plans are already underway for the 1976 National Congress which will
be held in Las Vegas.
P R E S E N TAT I O N - - G r o v e r L o e n i n g p r e s e n t s a p o r t r a i t t o G e n e r a l a n d M r s . W e s t b e r g i n
appreciation of their support of Aerospace Education.

LEADS SEMINAR -- Mrs.
Pauline Maupin leads the
Elementary Education
Seminar during the
National Congress.

Photos by MSgt.
Russ Brown
K E Y P E O P L E - - C o l . W i l l i a m H . C a h i l l , C A P, L o u i s i a n a
Wing commander (left), Mrs. Mary Berkowitz, wing
secretary and Air Force Maj. James L. Solum, wing liaison
o f fi c e r, w e r e i n s t r u m e n t a l i n t h e s u c c e s s o f t h e N a t i o n a l
Congress.

iiii!:ili~!ii:i::!

C H AT- - A s t r o n a u t F r e d W. H a i s e J r. , ( l e f t ) , c h a t s w i t h B r i g . G e n . L e s l i e J . W e s t b e r g , U S A F,
national commander and Grover Loening about the future of aerospace.

SKIT--Third and fourth grade students from Louisiana present an original skit as part of the National Congress in New
Orleans.

PAGE NINE

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

MAY, 1975

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PAGE TEN

M AY, 1 9 7 5

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

Colo. Aids In Search
For Missing Aircraft
DENVER, Colo.--The Colorado wing recently participated in a two-day search
for a missing aircraft which
disappeared on a flight from
Wray to Boulder, Colo.
The aircraft was equipped
with an ELT, but it didn't activate. CAP search activities
were set up at Longmont with
Capt. I~enry Elgin acting as
mission coordinator. Snow
continued to fall the first day
of the search making it impossible for an air search.
Ground teams were utilized
and within two hours after
arriving in the search area, a
CAP ground team located the
wreckage of an aircraft. The
wreckage was that of an aircraft which had crashed
earlier and, according to the
Federal Aviation Administration, was never
reported.
Bad weather continued in
the search area the second
day and CAP ,aircraft
remained grounded.
However, three civilian aircraft based in the prime
search area were able to fly

~IONORED--CAP Maj. Lawrence W. Markham, (left), commander of the Merced County
Composite Squadron 147, receives the Gill Robb Wilson Award from CAP Col. Warren Barry,
California wing commander. The presentation was made recently during ceremonies held at
a CAP open house at Castle AFB, Calif. (USAF Photo by Sgt. Nick Barbaro)

BI-DEA Exchange
i|

Bicentennial Film Available
The Bicentennial: Beyond the
Birthday is a recently produced
40-minute color film presentation which seeks to encourage
the public to initiate and get involved in meaningful Bicentennial programs and projects.
The film, introduced by President Gerald R. Ford, is based on
a Bicentennial Declaration signed by 40 prominent Americans.
A spectrum of Bicentennial projects, initiated by communities
and private citizens, are shown
from all over the country with
comments from those who are
heading these efforts.
The film was produced by the
National Committee for the
Bicentennial Era, a non-profit
organization whose primary purpose is to encourage a Bicentennial observation of lasting
achievement and benefit for our
nation. It was originally
presented as a closed circuit
broadcas[ to community leaders
across the country by the affiliated stations of the NBC, ABC
and CBS television networks.

Colo. Members
See Space Center
DENVER, Colo., -- More than
40 CAP members of the Colorado
Wing recently traveled to
Houston, Tex., and toured the
Manned-Spacecraft Center
located near there.
A highlight of the tour was a
briefing on the center and the
duties of those working there.
Airlift for the visit was
provided by tbe314th Tactical
Airlift Squaron, McClellan AFB,
Calif., using one of their C-130
transport aircraft.

ITOUCHDOWN // ~
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Groups interested in viewing
Beyond the Birthday may do so
by writing on organization
letterhead to: Films, the

beneath the thousand foot
ceiling. One of these pilots
spotted the wreckage that
afternoon. The body of Dr.
Richard Halverson of
B o u l d e r, w a s f o u n d i n t h e
cockpit.

Homer Designs
Radio Antenna
I-IERNDON. Va. -- Civil Air
Patrol 1st Lt. Bruce Homer of
the Herndon Composite
Squadron recently used his
creative talents to design a unique 4585 Khn radio antenna.
It was constructed from two
Slinkys and installed in a fellow
CAP member's attic in Reston,
Va., where outdoor antennas are
severely restricted.
The Slinkys were three inches
in diameter and fed with RG:~
58/u co-ax cable and hung from
the attic rafters.
According to Homer the
Slinkys can also be constructed
into very compact field antennas. Anyone desiring additional
information on this invention
should contact Lieutenant
Homer at 13129 Greg Roy Lane,
Herndon, Va., 22070.

National Committee for the
Bicentennial Era, 110 East 59th
St., New York, NY 10022. Please
include the name and title of the
person requesting the program,
organization, mailing address
and three alternate showing
dates. Also indicate whether
film or cassette is desired.

Lt. Gary Wortz Saves Aircraft
TULSA, Okla.--CAP Lt. Gary Wortz, a member of Oklahoma's
Northeast Tulsa Composite Squadron was credited recently with saving several aircraft from fire damage and possible total destruction.
The lieutenant discovered the fire just after midnight in the offices
and hangar of a Tulsa aviation firm at Tulsa's Riverside Airport. He
was working the night shift as a dispatcher for Great Western Airlines
when he discovered the fire.
His fast action in reporting the fire and organizing fire fighting efforts saved many aircraft parked near the flaming hangar. His decision not to open the doors of the flaming hangar was Credited by the
Tulsa Fire Department as the factor which prevented the heated fuel
in the hangared aircraft from exploding and spreading.

~ter

Busy Day For Squadron

TO P C A D E T AWA R D - - C a d e t C o l . R e i n a l d o H e r n a n d e z
(right), receives his recently earned Gen. Carl A. Spaatz
award from Congressman Lester L. Wolff, (Dem. N.Y.).
Hernandez is a member of the New York Wing's Long Island
Group. Congressman Wolff is the commander of CAP's
Congressional Squadron.

NORTH ANDOVER, Mass. -- This past Easter turned out to be a
busy day for members of the Hanscom Field and the Merrimack
Valley Composite Squadrons.
Code named "Operation Egghunt" the units were called out early in
the morning to participate in a search and rescue exercise.
Three aircratt were launched to search for the target which was
located in the area between Hanscom Field and Lawrence Municipal
Airport.
In less than three hours, the target was located by the aircraft and
retrieved by ground teams.

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PAGE ELEVEN

C I V I L A I R PAT R O L N E W S . . . . .

M AY, 1 9 7 5

alendar of
May 17
May 17
Jun. 7
Jun. 14-16

GLR Conference
.Armed Forces Day
NEC Meeting
Air Cadet League of
Canada Meeting
Jim 21-Jul I Cadet Officers School
Jul. 3-9
CAP National Staff
College
Jul. 11-12
SER Conference
Jul. 19
IACE Military Ball
Jul. 26
RMR Conference
Ju127-Aug I National SAR School
Aug. 2
NEC Meeting
Aug. 4
IACE Military Ball
Aug. 16
PACR Conference
Sep. 22-29 IACE Pla~ Conference
Oct. 2-5
National Board Meeting
(~'t. 18
NER Conference"
Dec. 13
NEC Meeting

Milwaukee. ~6isc.
Nationwide
Maxwell AFB. Ala.
Nova Scotia, Canada
Maxwell AFB, Ala.
Maxwell AFB, Ala.
Orlando, Fla.
New York, N.Y.
Jackson Hole, Wyo.
Governor's Island, N.Y.
Maxwell AFB, Ala.
Washington, D.C.
Honolulu, Hawaii
Brussels, Belgium
St. Louis, Mo.
Kiamesha Lake, N.Y.
Maxwell AFB, Ala.

Storm Puts Colo. In Action

HELPING HAND--Frank Cavender (left), commander of the American LegiOn Post 267 of
Jefferson Parrish, La., presents a check for $150 to members of the East Bank Cadet
Squadron (Louisiana Wing) to help promote the CAP cadet program in the local area. Receiving the check are Lt. George Anderso~ (right), squadron commander and Cadet Maj. Byron
Rambo, cadet commander.

NASA Visits Paine Squadron

30 Cadets Have Opportunity
To Join In EAA Convention
MAXWELL AFB, Ala.
Cadet activities involving
operations,
piloting,
maintenance, aircraft ground
handling and communications
have always been rated as
preferred interest areas.
Now the summer of 1975
brings all these" opportunities
into reality as Paul Poberezny,
president of EAA, has offered to
"= assist the Civil Air Patrol by
opening up the EAA Convention
at Oshkosh, Wise.. to 30 cadets.
The convention runs from July
29, 1975 to Aug. 4, 1975,"
therefore, cadet participation
(July 26 Aug. 5) will amount to
ten days because of pre and post
convention activities and
briefings.
Cadet assignments will allow
each cadet to be of service to the
public approximately, one-half
the time while the other half will
involve educational activities

t

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m m

m m m

m

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such as woodworking, visiting
the metal and paint shops,
watching air shows, and participating in "hangar flying"
with visiting pilots and
mechanics of EAA..

limited to the NCR and GLR.
Consequently, the proportionate
allocations will be 10 for NCR
and 20 for GLR.

Primary involvement areas .include: control center, general inf o r m a t i o n , s a f e t y, a i r c r a f t
parking, antique and rotary wing
aircraft operations, communications, general forums,
EAA workshop and education.
general awards and other areas
as determined by the project offleer. Additionally, a CAP information booth has been
authorized. James Pope,
Chairman of FAA/CAP Coordination Committee. has
volunteered his services as the
project officer.
Because of transportation uncertainties, the 30 cadet participants this year will be

m m m

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Interested cadets should inform their squadron commanders who, in turn, can notify
higher headquarters. Selection
processes will be as prescribed
by the respective regions.
Selected cadets will be housed in
University of Wisconsin,
Oshkosh, dormitories at no cost
to the cadet, however the cadet
should plan on approximately six
dollars per day for meals.
This planned expansion into
general aviation services will
prove extremely worthwhile.
The future of this program and
similar interesting activities depend on everyone's continued interest and positive attempts to
fill the quotas for this exciting
event.

m m u

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raThe Bookstore, National Headquarters, Civil Air Patrol, Maxwell AFB, Alabama 36112m
m
m
m
II Please send
copies of Hero Next Door to:
I
I
I
I
RANK

m NAME

m

m STREET AND NUMBER

m

m

m

m CITY

S TAT E

,
m

m

ZIP

m
m

@ $6.95 per copy is enclosed,

m My check/money order for $

MAGNOLIA, Ark. -- Shortly after a tornado had hit the
southeastern town of Warren, Ark., killing seven and injuring 54
others, the Magnolia Composite Squadron went into action collecting
clothing and foodstuffs.
CAP Lt. Elmer Brown, commander of the Magnolia unit, loaned the
use of his service station as a collection point for the relief supplies.
while the squadron broadcast their plea for assistance over local radio
and television stations.
The day following the tornado the squadron made their first delivery
of supplies which was estimated at near $450 in foodstuffs, clothing
and blankets.

CAP Maj. Attends Symposium
BEDFORD, Ind. Dr. John
Greeman, a major in Civil Air
Patrol's Bedford Flight
Squadron. recently attended a
one-week symposium for flight
surgeons conducted by the
Federal Aviation Administration
at its training center in
Oklahoma City.
Major Greeman is a flight surgeon for the Air National
Guard's 181st Tactical Fighter
Squadron at Terre Haute. Ind.,
and a Bedford pediatrician. He
is licensed by the FAA as an
aviation medical examiner.
The course, designed as a
review of private aircraft ac-

cidents, covered causes of pilot
incapacitation in flight, includingvertigo, illness, disorientation and hypoxia.

m
CAPSN
m

mm RANK
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Unit Responds After Tornado

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EVERETT, Wash. -- The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) space mobile recently paid a visit to the Paine
Field Composite Squadron.
- The space mobile featured detailed models of various spacecraft,
moon rock, samples, space photos and exhibits.
Gary Moen, a NASA representative gave the CAP members a
presentation on the United States past and future efforts in the space
program. A presentation was also given on the communications of
space missions explaining how information is received and what it
means.
The visit concluded with a film which showed Astronauts performing in a weightless condition while visiting the moon. A question and
answer period followed the film.

m

m
m SIGNATURE
m -

DENVER, Colo. The Colorado Wing was recently alerted to fly
surveillance missions over northeastern Colorado when a late winter
storm hit that area. The record breaking storm sent the temperatures
into sub-zero range with winds in excess of 60 knots in five Colorado
counties.
During the two-day mission CAP aircraft located hundreds of stranded cattle, and directed ground crews to abandoned ~¢ehicles and
to snow removal equipment Which had become bogged down in deep
drifts.
CAP also dispatched .two four-wheel drive vehicles to the area to
provide communications and assist local sheriff departments and civil
defense directors.
The wing assisted 25 persons during their 184 manday effort.

i m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m

m - - m

/,~76_191E)

Major Greeman

PAGE TWELVE "

M AY, 1 9 7 5

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

People In The News
Cadet 1st Lt. Keith Reneau, cadet commander of their first aid training to practical use at the scene
the Medford Composite Squadron (Oregon Wing) of an automobile accident. The pair rendered first
recentlysuccessfully passed his private pilot aid to the injured and called authorities for
check, ride on his 17th birthday...Cadet Sgt. Mike assistance...Cadet MSgr. David Horn of the
Highlanders Composite Squadron (New
Henderson of the Moisant Cadet Squadron
(Louisiana Wing) recently received a nomination Hampshire Wing) along with Cadets 2d Lt. Ray
to both the U.S. Air Force and Naval Academies. Haines, Sgt. Timothy Day and Amn. Nathan Day of
Henderson has been an active member of CAP for the Dover Composite Squadron recently manned
more than two years...
recruiting booths at a shopping mall in NewThe Outstanding Senior Member of the Year ington, N.H ....
Award for the Pikes Peak Emergency Services
More than 20 cadets and senior members from
Squadron (Colorado Wing) was recently presented the Oklahoma Wing recently paid a two day visit to
the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs,
to 1st Lt. Duane W. Brayton. He earned the award
Colo. The purpose of the visit was to tour the
for his outstanding contributions and dedication to
his unit and CAP...Two CAP members of Group 11 academy and its allied facilities ... Members of the
(California Wing) were recently luncheon guests Indiana Wing recently presented the CAP Seal to
Larry Ball and Vern Wright of the Indiana
of the Exchange Club of Santa Maria, Calif.
Attending the luncheon were CAP Lt. Col. L. H. Beechcraft Company. The presentation was made
in appreciation for their support of CAP...
Powell and Cadet Lt. Col. Theresa Ashcraft...
Cadet~ 2d Lt. Wanda Pendergraft and Capt.
A CAP recruiting booth was recently manned by
Larry Dingmore of the Raleigh Composite members of the Homewood-Flossmore Composite
Squadron recently earned their solo wings. The pair Squadron (Illinois Wing) at the Washington Park
havebeen active in CAP's flying program for one camper show in Glen Wood, Ill...Raleigh Comyear...During a recent awards dinner held by the posite Squadron's Cadet Commander Lt. Col. RayMuskogee Composite Squadron (Oklahoma Wing) mond Craig has exchanged his CAP uniform for
that of the U.S. Air Force. Craig has been active in
Cadet Gary Cassie was presented the Most Outs t a n d i n g F i r s t Ye a r C a d e t Aw a r d f o r t h e CAP for more than four years and attended Cadet
wing... CAP Capt. Franklin H. Spitzer, comman- Officers School, was a member of the Cadet Adder of the Colorado Springs Cadet Squadron visory Council and his squadron's drill team. In the
(Colorado Wing) recently arranged and conducted Air Force he will train to be a security policea tour of the U.S. Air Force Academy for 20 of his m a n . . .
CAP 1st Lt. George Anderson, squadron comsquadron members...
Seven senior members of the Tennessee Wing mander, was recently presented the official
charter for the East Bank Cadet Squadron
were recently named to receive the Wing's
(Louisiana Wing). The presentation was made by
1974 Senior Member of the Year Award. The CAP Col. William Cahill, wing commander...Cadet
seven who have dedicated 33 years of service
each to CAP were Lt. Col. Landon L, Covington, Amn. Kim Osantowske was recently named Cadet
of the Quarter for the Van Dyke Cadet Squadron
Lt.Col. Vernon L. Littig, Maj. William T. Beekler,
Maj. Gordon O. Durham, Maj. C. W. Garritson, 3-7 (Michigan Wing.) Kim is the first female cadet
Maj. Harold B. Johnson and Capt. Jerry Cam- in her unit to be awarded this honor...Two CAP
pilots of the Raleigh Composite Squadron (North
pora...Two cadets from the Winston-Salem ComCarolina Wing) recently earned their pilots
posite Squadron (N.C. Wing) Debbie Neal and
Brian Peters recently traveled from Dover AFB, licenses. Receiving their certification was Lt. Col.
John Allers and Capt. Glen Peting...
Del., to Bermuda and return via the Air Force's
The Eagle Cadet Squadron (N.Y. Wing) was
giant C-5A Galaxy aircraft...
n a m e d a s S q u a d r o n o f t h e Ye a r i n C A P ' s
A ground search team from the Tuscaloosa Comthe
posite Squadron (Alabama Wing) lead by WO Brad Jamestown Group atAlsogroup annual awards banquet held recently.
receiving awards at the
Lynn recently assisted Civil Defense personnel in
banquet were 2rid Lt. Dorothy MaeDougall who
the search for a man who had wondered away from
was named Senior Member of/the Year and Cadet
a local hospital ... Cadet Captains David Fitts and Lt. Col. Steven Gullherg was named Cadet of the
Rudolph vant'Riet were recently nominated for in- Year. Both are members of the Eagle Cadet
clusion in the Eighth Annual Edition of Who's Who
Squadron... Two members of the Colorado Springs
Among American High School Students. They are
members of Virginia Wing's West Richmond Cadet Cadet Squadron (Colorado Wing) recently received
nominations to attend U.S. Military Academies.
Squadron...
The Cutler Cadet Squadron (Florida Wing) First Lt. Anthony E: Cimino was nominated to the
recently recruited two new members into their Naval Academy and 1st Lt. Douglas S. Kiltey to
the Merchant Marine Academy.. :
unit who had served as cadets in CAP more than
nine years ago: The new senior members are Jay
The Skokie Valley Compdsite Squadron (Illinois
Greenberg and Martin Bishop.,. A 19 year veteran Wing) recently acquired a first when cadet MSgt.
Robert Plichta became a Radiological Monitor. He
of CAP Maj. Rebecca J. Lane has been named to
command California Wing's newly formed Yuba- is the first cadet in the unit to complete this
Sutter Squadron 19. Major Lane served on the staff training.. Solo pilots wings were recently donned by
of the Pennsylvania Wing Ranger program for 10 Cadet Capt. Mark Brunton of the Helena Cadet
Squadron (Montana Wing)... CAP Maj, William
years. She holds a 101 card in several staff
positions, a CAP radio operators card and holds Hartr, Group.I commander (Ohio Wing) recently
met with Gen. Raymond Wilson of the Salvation
a First Aid Inst_r~ctors card...
Sixteen-year-old Paul Warns, a member of the Army in an effort to bring the national agreement
between the two organizations down to a more
Paine Field Composite Squadron (Washington
Wing) recently soloed in a Cessna 150 after 10 solid basis on the local level...
hours of instruction. He is currently working
Eighteen cadets and one senior member of the
toward his private pilots license with the goal of Raleigh Composite Squadron (North Carolina
becoming a flight instructor...Two members of the
Wing) recently attended a communications course
Carroll Cadet Squadron (Maryland Wing)WO Jay in order to acquire their CAP radio operators
C. Voight and Amn. Steven J. Voight recently put cards.

Females Form

Drill Team

S T E R L I N G Mich. E
H
meeting was
recently held when female
cadets from Michigan's Wing
gathered in Sterling Heights for
the purpose of forming a female
drill team.
The meeting was hosted by
South Macomb Cadet Squadron
3-2 with girls attending from
Self ridge Cadet Squadron 3-5 and
the Van Dyke Cadet Squadron 37
E:zhteen cadets were present
~:r ,..~ meeting and made plans
:,. ,:r-¢~.e as a group drill team
:~- ~ -,:r:~- -~'~ce-sentmg their
- ,~ : '~,::o~al Drill
-- An all ladies

_ . , , . , , , . . . JULY 2,--AUG. 30
....

F,ELOTR, TO--.xx flaW'""~ ) ,
I rlll

WA S H I N G TO N A N D ~ ~ , ~ l p p
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OPEN TO BOYS
MONTREAL
&GIRLS 16TO 18
ALLMODERN ~ '~ K ~ 'i ~ l ' = . , ' ~ , N . ~ . 0 3 A _ ~ ~ ~ r ~
MINIMUM OF
~
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u l HOURS
CAMPUS
#N./%.v - p,r,
I FACILITIEST qlh. "~TM ~.**"
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ORGANFZED ~ ¢.k,~
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ACTIVITIES: ~.._~ ~
i.~.,., , t V ~ CREDITS
EIGHT
MOVIES ~
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CONCERTsROCK ~ ,
-~6:. "~I~'~
140's

TRAINING--Cadet Debbie Mesenbrink of Maryland Wing's
Glen Burnie Composite Squadron administers first aid to
simulated victim during a recent four-day exercise.

Units Hold Bivouac
GLEN BURNIE, Md. -Maryland Wing's Glen Burnie,
Apollo I and Peninsula COmposite
Squadrons recently gathei'ed at
Gun Power State Park and held
a four day bivouac.
The CAP members rose !at the
crack of dawn to begin their
training with calisthenics followed by a hardy breakfast.
Classes on search and rescue
techniques and navigation were
conducted by Cadet Lt. Col, John
Russo from the Glen Burnie
Squadron. He was assisted by Lt.
Wade Whitlock, senior advisor
from the Apollo I Squadron
Cadet Capt. Vernon Brown of
the Peninsula Squadron taught a
first aid class which covered
seizures, shock and artificial
resuscitation.
i

1

"

I

III " III il '

Other classes during the
bivouac included communications and ground signals
under the direction of Cadet Lt.
Col. William Trail from Apollo I.
A compass course was set up by
Cadet Lt. Col. Michael Smith
also from the Apollo I Squadron.
During their search and rescue
missions, radio communications
were constantly maintained by
mdmbers of Apollo I with the
Search teams. Simulated victims
were located, treated and
removed by the teams.
According to squadron officials the bivouac was a complete success. It proved that
CAP members from different
units can work together as a
team and do a good job.
*
" i i

|

~ "-

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1 Unit 2 Units 3 Units 4 Units 5 Units
Accidental Death $5,000 $10,000 $15,000 $20,000 $25,000
Dismemberment 5,000
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Medical Expense
500.
1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500
Annual Cost
Non-Pilot
Pilot

$10.00 $20.00 $30.00 $40.00 $50.00
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I I'~reby Make Application For Civil Air Patrol Senior Member
Accident Insurance Under Hartford Accident & Indemnity Co.
Master Policy On File At National Headquarters Civil Air
Patrol.
Name

Date of Birth ......................

Address ..,., .................................................................................
CAP Set. No.

Pilot ............. Non-Pilot ................

Beneficiary ............................ , ................. Relation
No. Units Applied For ...........................Premium $ ...................
I Certify I Am A Member Of The ............................ Wing, CAP
Signed ............................................................ Date ...................
Make Check Payable To Turner-Weaver-Wilson
P.O. Box 6010, Nashville, Tennessee 37212

PROGRAM
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C I V I L

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~e4~ ~mmrlmm

Checl Pilot Responds To _ -ticle
(Editor's Note: The following was received
f r o m C A P C a p t . G e o r g e R . ( B o b ) Wa l k e r J r. .
Chief Check Pilot. State of Virginia, in response
to an article which appeared in the November

1974 Civil Air Patrol NEWS title "How To Tame
The Cessna 305A.")

Dear Editor
I enjoyed the recent article by Maj.
Edward Fowler in the November
issue of Civil Air Patrol NEWS on
"How To Tame The Cessna 305A". It
was an admirable and definitely
needed article for those in the CAP
utilizing these aircraft. It did leave
me feeling a little like something
s h o u l d b e a d d e d h o w e v e r, a n d
prompted this response.
I have been in and around general
aviation since Dec. 6, 1946 and my
father since Sweeny Aviation School
at Kansas City, 1928. My wife is a student pilot and my three year old son
was in the rear seat of a CAP L-16
before he was four days old. This
should show some interest in and love
of flying.
The heritage however, is no claim
to fame or intelligence and my
tickets are only witness that I wish to
learn more. A beginning and not an
end as I see it.
During this often painfully slow and
I might add costly educational
process there have been some inevitable Truths gathered that may be
of some value to the reader.

One of these Truths is that under
water and in the air the human
animal is trespassing. He is trespassing in realms, that are to say the least
alien and most often hostile to those
that forget their place. To survive in
these hostile realms we must utilize
every instinct, attribute, intelligence
and experience we can muster to
break even and even much more to
get ahead safely over a long period of
time.
At the same time we are
trespassing, we are also at the game
time our own worst enemy. Our own
self-image concept, mental and
physical being is constantly in a state
of flux. (Age taking its toll in the
process). Add to this -- fear~ and
hang-ups associated with the human
animal and you now have a rather
f o r m i d a b l e a d v e r s a r y. C o m p o u n d
this disastrous team with emotional
trauma increased by guilt, known incompetence, raw fear, bad weather,
CAP search efforts for fellow pilots,
hanger talk, (worse one I know) unfounded or otherwise, and it spells
ACCIDENT. This is true regardless
of the mode. Some mediums are
more forgiving than flying but
nevertheless, all may be ego
damaging.
The very fear and apprehension
generated by the attention to a particular aircraft and its

rememb~ the ~ of ~ at
Flying. 1 forgot or did sot trtdy
b e l i e v e i n t h e s e Tr u t h s a n d t h e
results will be totally mine and not
the aircraft's.

characteristics and not
characteristics of all aircraft is a
self-perpetuating disease. In the
event this particular aircraft is being
utilized, within rather restricted confines called the Civil Air Patrol, it is
even more alarming that this would
be a self-serving problem.
I believe that every pilot has, by his
evident desire to pursue flying, reconciled himself to the added risk and in
most cases avails himself of the competent training and educational services. Most pilots keep their expertise to a reasonable degree of
readiness by owning their own aircraft. Others do so by regular checks
and currency reviews. Others I'm
afraid by sheer luck and no reasoning
whatsoever.
Another Truth is that once a person
understands how and why aircraft fly
and truly believe this to be absolute
fact and not just as some criteria included in his or her ground school
course, this belief and understanding
will reduce the amount of fear present and consequently reduce the confrontations and reduce the accident
factors.

Unit Responds
To Blood Call
others. Not flying them the way they
were intended to be flown made the
d i ff e r e n c e s a n d n o t t h e p a r t i c u l a r
plane.

In the case of the 305A. pilots are
not keeping up With the aircraft. With
the 305A the failure to keep ahead is
focused more pointedly but it is the
man that is behind and not the aircraft that is racing ahead. An analogy
is that there are also fewer
Rembrandts around and therefore
fewer artists are familiar with them,
The same goes for the 305A, but it
a l s o a p p l i e s t o a l l " Ta i l d r a g g e r s " ,
right?
To m a l i g n a n a i r c r a f t t h a t i s
reacting to the laws of nature and
physics is tantamount to criminal. To
remove the airplanes from use or
make unreasonable demands is
similar to doing away with all
matches in order to eliminate fires.

A n o t h e r Tr u t h i s t h a t b a r r i n g
differences in equipment and design
variables, i.e., gear position, high
wing, low wing, etc., that if a pilot understands flight in ai~'craft that pilot
understands flight in all aircraft.
Th~reisno more involvement or inCarry this a bit further and the old ....
a d a g e a p p e a r s t o b e c o r r e c t a n d e r t i n t r i c a c y, u n i q u e a r t o r m a g i c t o
the flying of the 305A than there is to
reasonable, the one about ... "a pilot
any Brand X aircraft. There is the
that can fly one plane can fly them all
knowledge of your own confidence
and a pilot that can't fly one had
and competence by admitting that
better stay out of them all."
you are not comfortable or competent, that this is a normal and
Here is where Major Fowler and I
reasonable feeling - and one that is
disagree, or rather differ -- not in our
natural and part of the total learning
interest in upgrading safe CAP airprocess and not detrimental. Quite to
craft utilization -- but in the degree
the contrary a good pilot strives to be
each of us assigns as priority to the
better and readily admits that he or
achievement of this end.
she is not competent without loss of
or damaged ego in the stating.
Major Fowler uses statistics in his
article and they may be well founded
Conversely, the pilot that fails to adas they were relayed. They were of
mit this failing is a pilot getting ready
little interest to me in that I don't feel
to have an accident. More than likely,
"taildraggers" are the cause but
he is also the type pilot that will in the
more truly a symptom of the
end attempt to blame his shortp r o b l e m . S t a t i s t i c a l l y, i f t h e t r u t h
comings on the aircraft he or she was
were known, the percentages would
in at the time of the ac_cident.
be 99 and 44/100% pilot error and not
Aircraft error.

S A R A S O T A , F l a . - - " Yo u h a v e
devoted time, talent and "personal
resources to Civil Air Patrol. Now all
I want is your blood." With this
message, CAP Maj. John Marquiss,
deputy commander of Florida's
Group 14, convinced three groups in
east central Florida to join a special
CAP Blood Bank Account.
The purpose of this program is to
allow members of the three groups
and their subordinate units to contribute their blood to a local blood
bank. The members can then, in case
of an emergency, withdraw blood for
themselves from the account. The account is not only for those members
who donate to it, but also for those
who cannot donate for various
medical reasons. All that is required
is that a person be a member in good
standing in a participating unit.
The account is held by the
Southwest Florida-Blood Bank of
Ta m p a , F l a . A s p e c i a l c o m m i t t e e
composed of members from Groups
3, 14 and 17 has been appointed to administer the program in conjunction
with the blood bank. CAP Maj. Bud
Koehler, of Group 3, is chairman of
the six-man committee.
Major Marquiss was not only the
originator of this program, but he
also donated the first pint of blood.

z~2"6 _193'~
CAP Tiffany Style

BRASS PLATED BUCKLE

Major Ed has my whole hearted
support of the 305A as CAP's most
viable aircraft for its use and we are
in complete agreement on the need to
address efforts {o serving the pilots of
these aircraft by a new flight manual.
The effort should take into consideration the absence of formal training
prior to flight. In the CAP's use this
class environment is lacking and
could well be supplemented by a
civilian type aircraft manual.
There are many references both in
and out of print about this or that aircraft, Major Fowler uses "bug-aboo", others hanger-flying have made
a "beast" of an airplane doing exactly what design, physics, and the
forces of energy have provided that it
should. Examples are the Twin Commanche, Cessna 337, Republic Sea
Bee, Luscombe, etc., and many

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I may, as will others in the future,
wipe out an aircraft but you can bet
that when and if I do, it will more
than likely be due to my error and not
the aircraft's. It will happen because
I did not understand the problem at
hand, was not aware of what was
happening to the aircraft in its
response to my actions, did not

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CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

PAGE FOURTEEN

M AY, 1 9 7 5

Virginia Wing Conducts
1st Combined Seminar

DEMONSTRATION--CAP Capt. Mary King of Montana's Helena Cadet Squadron demonstrates a survival shovel to a group of Cub Scouts and Webelos during a talk presented by her
and three cadets from her unit. Also participating in the survival briefings were Cadets Capt.
Jeff Bloomstrom, Maj. Mark Brunton and SSgt: Tracy Billings.

Could This Happen In Your Uniu ?
MAXWELL AFB, Ala. -- The
following letter was received by
a wing commander from one of
his squadron commanders. It is
an example of concern for the
aircraft flown within CAP. The
main thing it points out is that
there are people who will fly aircraft in less than perfect conditions.

C305A ( ) was being delivered
from ( ) Field to ( ) in the afternoon and would we be sure and
have it tied down.

"Subject: Unsafe Flight
Procedure

1. A protusion on the tail wheel
resulting from broken cords in
the tire.
2. The auxiliary fuel pump was
inoperative due to the wires hav-

"This squadron was notified
by landline on Feb. 27 that the

"Lt. ( ) was contacted and
went to the airport to check on
the aircraft. In his check of the
aircraft, the following were
noted:

The Lively Commander

SPEAKING TO A LOCAL CIVIC GROUP?

ing been disconnected.
3. The flight log was not filled out
noting time flow or who was the
pilot.
4. No microphone or headset included with the radio installed.
"The first two items should
have been corrected before the
plane left ( ) Field, as you could
imagine what could have occurred had either the tail wheel
blew out or the main fuel pump
malfunctioned.
"Not knowing who flew the
Birddog to ( ), the flight
operations officer and myself
are wondering if the pilot was
current and qualified, as he apparently failed to pre-flight the
craft.

S A N D S T O N , Va . - - T h e
Virginia Wing held its first joint
emergency operations seminar
here recently with representatives of five Virginia agencies
and the Air Force Rescue Coordinating Center (RCC) in attendance.
Among those attending were
CAP Lt. Coll George Jones,
coordinator for the Office of
Emergency Services for the
State of Virginia; Maj. Steven
Weaver, Salvation Army disaster planning office; Ron
ttendricks, chief of the Federal
Aviation Administration
General Aviation District Office, Dick Rodriguec of the
National Transportation Safety
Board and Sgt. Joe Scott of the
Virginia State Police. Air Force
Col. Joe Henjum, represented
the RCC, which is located at
Scott AFB, Ill.
Colonel Jones pointed out that
each agency needs to plan ahead
and know each others capabilities
before a disaster occurs so efforts can be coordinated.
Members of the Virginia Wing,
Maryland Wing and Middle East
Region attended the seminar.
Lt. Col. Frances H. Toth, CAP,

N.Y. Group Visits
Hurricane Center
SYRACUSE, N.Y. -- A visit
was recently paid to Homestead
AFB and the National Hurricane
Center located near Miami, Fla.,
by CAP members of New York
Wing's Syracuse Group.
While on the Air Force installation the group visited the
guard dog facilities, crash
rescue area, helicopter pads and
got a close-up view of the Air
Force's F-4 Phantom jet aircraft.
They also toured the Air
Force's Water Survival Training
facilities at Biscayne Bay, Fla.
During their tour of the
National Hurricane Center at
the University of Miami, they
were given lectures on its operation and a tour of the facilities.

newly appointed wing chief of
staff acted as moderator for the
day-long seminar.

Unit's Chaplain
Truly Involved
LEWISBURG, Tenn. -- The
Marshall County Composite
Squadron's chaplain has truly
become involved in Civil Air
Patrol since joining the unit two
years ago.
When Lt. Clay Derryberryjoined he had never flown an
airplane or helicopter and had
little knowledge of aircraft
mechanics.
Since that time he has
purchased his own aircraft,
earned a private pilot license
and has logged more than 100
hours of flying time.
He has also achieved student
helicopter pilot status and is
working on an airframe and
powerplant (A&P) rating.
According to squadron officials, a unit meeting never
passes without Lieutenant
Derryberry's presenting the
members a few important
"thoughts to remember".
In addition his services as a
pilot, he has strengthened the
squadron's capacity in search
and rescue efforts.

Take A Bicentennial
Second .
"The basis of our government being the opinion of the
people, the very first object
should be to keep that right;
and were it left to me to
decide whether we should
have .a government without
newspapers, or newspapers
without a government, I
should not hesitate a moment
t o p r e f e r t h e l a t t e r. "
(Thomas Jefferson, Jan. 16,
1787).

" We a l s o n o t e d t h a t t h e
logbook nor the flight authorization form were filled out after its
arrival at ( ) Airport, and feel
that the time should have been
logged from( )to( )andthen
to().

TRYING TO RECRUIT NEW MEMBERS?

"We also believe that a

microphone should
NEED MORE PUBLIC EXPOSURE FORheadset and included with the
have been

YOUR UNIT?
Do you know that the "TLC" kit can assist you to do all
these things as well as provide you with examples of a
squadron commander expressing appreciation for community support, conducting a squadron meeting involvement with cadet activities, and much more.
"TLC" or The Lively Commander, is a new color slide
set, audio tape, and printed narrative developed to aid
commanders at all levels in accomplishing their responsibilities.
A complimentary copy of the "TLC" package has been
distributed to each wing and region. Wing commanders
are encouraged to "loan" the TLC kit to lower echelon
units for their own.
Units may purchase the entire TLC package from the
CAP Bookstore at $9.50 per set.

radio installation and are
wonder how the aircraft received clearance to leave ( ) without
same."
The point is well put in the
statement "...you could imagine
what could have occurred had
either the tail wheel blew out or
the main fuel pump malfunctioned." We would have added
another accident to the already
too high statistics of CAP.
COULD THIS HAPPEN IN
YOUR UNIT?

1

BEST CADET -- Cadet 2d
Lt. Carey Fleming (right),
I lie] :Ill d | 141 ~ [o],tl nl[o[o] ~ I'J q 1 d :U,l :lq :[q d [o] ~.
receives congratulations
lie] d[~=q dl b d :1 ~ !.!~211J~'9'_.1 dl d q [aq ~1 nllel I(o]l d -" I I ~ [, ......
from North Carolina Wing
commander Col. Ivey M.
S E N D F O R T H E L AT E S T F R E E C ATA L O G
Cook Jr., upon receiving
{
{ {
. . . . . . . .
the Winston-Salem Composite Squadron "Cadet of
I -.
t h e Ye a r A w a r d . "

CIVIL AIR PATROL NEWS

M AY, 1 9 7 5

EARHART AWARDS
March 1975
Mark D. Sockwell ........... 01041
Linwood L. Smith Jr ........ 040~5
Steven W. Paliughi ..........04032
Michael M. Mooney .........04381
Peggy E. Reed ............... 05099
James E. Palmer ........... 06058
Larry W. Anderson ......... 08104
Kenneth E. Gilpin Jr ....... 08104
Roger W. Selch .............. 08133
Carlos R. Valdes ............ 08286
Janet T. Palardy ............ 09002
Keith D: Anthony ............ 09(X~
Bernhard W. Jager .........
W. Geof.frey Thomas ......11254
Donald L. Wenger Jr .......12186
Paul D. Cook ................. 13~51
R. A. Naaktgeboren ........ 13051
David A. Smith .............. 14100
Dennis J. Ponsness .........14100
Mike D. Taylor ............... 15~7
Linda R. Domeier .......... 30102
Peter T. Quinlan ............. 2100~
Tamara S. Joseph .......... 2,~57
Donald Spies .................. 23057
Michael L. Frey .............
Kenneth J. Gilrain .........
James N. Patnaude .........
Paul W. Morich ............
Jeffrey S. Gary .............. 31173
Douglas J. Wright ........... M185
Deborah L. Kristol ......... 35015
Darryl L, Brawn ............. 3¢~07
Jerrold J. Warthman ....... 37009
Diane M. Trautman ........ 37080
Robert E. Cummins ........ 42010
Robert T. Permar ........... 42110
Michael C. Jordan ........... 42187
J. G. Marklc .................. 42195
Thomas A. Tbeado .........45002
Judith I Seckel ............... 46002
John A. McCoy ............... 47049
Harold W. Storm ............ 47049
Gary G. Fennig .............. 48018
Rodney Y. Y. Tom .......... 51030
Jerry M. Nishihira .......... 51056
MITCHELL AWARDS
March 1975
John M. Gupton .............. 01075
David P. Rumharger .......01090
01091
Thomas C. Watkins .........
Bradley G. Hobbs ........... 01091
Cranford O. Childers .......01091
Eric Post ...................... 2045
0
Kathleen A.Falinn .......... 02071

Garth B. Andersen ...... 93042 Theresa A. Wiiloughby.....34Gff/
04507 Brenda C. Bakallk .......... 34096
Robert B. Smith ...........
John M. Stroble ............ 04130 Thomas E Opfell .........MII7
GrtgJ Yanok ................34153
DOn J. Elazar ..............
L. W. Armstrong Jr ......
J a m e s L . l ' l a ~ . . . . . . .M,I~t
Steven C. Navratil ........~0m Cassandra V. Walker .......34213
Linda L. AchrAger ...... C51~5 J a m e s R ~ . . . . . . . . . ~r~081
Mike T. Samuels ...... 07907 Demel M Get*.~ f f ..........
Mitchell J Goldade .........
Mark W. Cecil
Susan J Wat.~m ............ 37049
Craig M. Frank
~ l
Ja.aet M Jones ............... 37193
Royrnond C Bacon
~ I
mm~l Vincent S. Rob~ ........ 37246
Peter J Cocx~ro
Robert G. Morris ........... 38016
Raymond E Anthony .
.. NI03 Benjamin W. Dubeis H .... 39019
Lorraine G Smith
3
Jmmly R D~
08194 Anti~y H. C]afft ............ 9027
D o n o v a n E ~ . + 0 8 1 3 3 Wane M Kusler ............. 40038
08/42 Todd T Wilkinson .......... 45030.
Bill R ~
C l a r k L M o r r ~ . . . . . . . 08143 Ann M. Huntimer ........... 40050
Donna M Bodr.mm~ ...... 08160 Richard D. Bassett ......... 421~
E d M P q u a n . . . . . . Q6204 Charles E. Foster Jr ........ 42279
Sammy M Maekey ......... (}~93 Scott M. Langston ........... 42279
Patn~ H Ohara III ........0~93 Keweun R. Brown Jr ....... 42310
JolmC Baranowski ........ 11011 Kasmir Zaratkiewicz ...... 46002
[.~x~rge M Dobroski ........11194 Matthew N. Bennett ........ 46068
Jack C. Sarteris ............. 11228 F. Donald Kulms ............ 46080
David M. Winters ........... 11254 Robert L. Lawson Jr .......
Andrew S. Grimshaw ...... 12002 Mike T. Sehilz ................ 48061
Russell A. Pitier ............. 12100 Leonard P. Kuhnley ........ 45084
Leslie L. McConnel] ........ 12168 Jeffrey D. Good .............. 45110
Jeffrey L. Bird ............... 13002 Walter M. R Rose .......... 45112
James R Francisco ........ 13041 Barry S. Roithlat ............ 45112
Dennis A. McKinnon ....... 17056 Daniel J. Coehran ........... 45121
Patrick F. Moehan .......... 18079 Caroline Olson ............... 48149
Richard J. Forsyth ......... 19012 Peter M. Esser .............. 45150
Frank L. Kierst .............. 30038 Darrell L. Ching ............. 51005
Kevin E. Veltman ........... 20038 Richard D. Adamson .......51009
Tim L. Vandermolen ....... 30030 Kenneth E. Mumford .......51028
Mark A. Rein ................. 20072 Louise-Ann P. Serra ........ 51030
Robert J.Edwards .......... 30104 Norman H. Eko .............. 51030
Luzetta K.Smith ...... : ......20130
20241 Ramon Salazar .............. 52012
Charles G. Boehmer ........
Camille B. Nelson .......... "~1030 Rafael Alvarez ............... 52012
Dale E. Shattles ............. 22044 Jose J. Clavell ............... 52012
Robert D. Mason ............ 22044 Iris M. Lahoz ................. 52012
Gary R. Langenbaeh .......24003 Edwin Serrano ............... 52012
Lee J. Moooey ............... 29016 Angel M. Santana ........... 53012
39016 Daniel Escobar .............. 52015
Joseph A. Steinman .........
Kurt A Green.. ............... 29035 Jose Blanco ................... 52015
David M. Charash ...........31011 Jose Rosario .................. 52015
James D. Dolph .............. 31020 Evelyn Ortiz .................. 52.015
William E. Goin ............. 31090 Jose Rosa ..................... 52015
Jose A. Velez ................. 31092 Ana M. Martinez ............ 52015
Denise B. Hart ............... 31131 Noel E. Cruz .................. 52015
Rolbert E. Bridgman ....... 31273 Gladys Feliciano ............ 52015
Richard C. Frost ............ 31273 Ana E. Rivera ................ 52015
52105
Ivan D. Klugman ............ 31288 Sisdier W. Gonzalez .......
Mark R. Meade .............. 32064 Victor A. Gallardo Jr ....... 52165

KICK-OFF--Members of
New York's Schenectady
Composite Squadron check
their "kick off" display for
the Muscular Dystrophy
drive. The squadron cadets
and seniors recently held a
contest to see who collects the most money for
Dystrophy. Inspecting the
sign are (left to right)i.
Cadet lit Lt. Joseph Skiff,
C a d e t L t . C o l . Te d
LaPlante and Cadet 2d Lt.
Richard Van Patten.

Units Train At Encampment
SUMMI~RVILLE, S.C. Thirty-five cadets from three South
Carolina units gathered atWalterboro, S. C., recently for a Type B encampment.
During the encampment the cadets, from Summerville Cadet
Squadron and Charleston and Walterboro Composite Squadrons, were
instructed in land navigation and ground search techniques. They were
'also given orientation flights which, for many of the cadets, were the
first time they had flown.
Because of the success of the encampment the units hope to have additional activities together in the future.

New Yorkers Get Orientation Flight
NORTH BELIMORE, N. Y. -- Several cadets and senior members
of Nassau Composite Squadron were recently given an orientation
flight on an American Azrlmes Boeing 727 jetliner by three Civil Air
Patrol - American Airlines pilots.
The pilots of the aircraft were CAPLt. Joe Santos, WO Ken Drusch
and Capt. Louis Mahoney.
The flight lasted 45-minutes and was served by three volunteer AA
stewardesses. The plane flew over Long Island, Queens and Manhattan.

F U T U R E C A P P I L O T- - C a d e t s g t . G l e n n P. K u e l m e r
(right), receives a $200 flying scholarship from Air National
Guard Maj. Gen. D. L. Corning, adjutant general of South
Dakota. The scholarship was awarded to Kuehner by his
CAP unit, the Ellsworth Composite Squadron. He was
selected for it because of his high scholastic achievements,
leadership abilities, his flying interest and his participation
in CAP activities. (Photo by CAP Capt. Tam Gatje)

PJb4M

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PAGE SIXTEEN

M AY, 1 9 7 5

C I V I L A I R PAT R O L N E W S

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~ You II Be In The Cente f~i
Of Things

iii

C I V I L A I R PAT R O L

lli

AT

NATIONAL BOARD MEETING
St. Louis, Mo.- Oct. 2-5
Attractions.
...... ~*-'- ~ . .: ~.,. ~,

Education
Stouffer's Riverfront Towers
" :

F r o m h e r e , y o u c a n s e e i t a l l . Yo u r f r o n t y a r d i s t h e
86-acre Jefferson National Park; you can walk its
p a t h w a y s o r s t r o l l t h e w a t e r f r o n t . Yo u c a n r i d e 6 3 0

BUSCH MEMORIAL
S TA D I U M

feet to the top of the Arch or cruise the Mississippi.
( S e e m a p b e l o w f o r l o c a t i o n o f R i v e r f r o n t To w e r s . )

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8Cn STREET |

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BRIDGE

S. S. ADMIRAL
~

REGISTRATION FEE: $19.00

Mail To:
LARGE PRINT PLEASE )

Signature
Street
City

State

Zip

.

/ I '" - l'l~l'u{'~ ~"~"I~ it

We will preregister you ,n o room at 2:00 P.M. on your arrival date.
Arrival Date:
Departure Date:
On arrival, you will only need to ask tar your room key. If you have a change in plans,
please notify us by 2:00 P.M. on your arrival date -- or you will be charged and billed
for that night.
I will share with

Address

C I V I L A I R PAT R O L N AT I O N A L B O A R D M E E T I N G

200 South Fourth Street
St. Louis, Missouri 63102
Phone: (314) 241-9500

Friday, Oct. 3 thru Saturday, Oct. 4, 1975
[] Single - $18.00 [] Double - $21.00
I -

t _

Reservation cards must be received by September 19, 1975

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

I

:ETY
lave been electrocuted during the last four months. Three of these were a result of antennas
: a g e l i n e s . To a v o i d s i m i l a r a c c i d e n t s f r o m o c c u r r i n g w i t h i n t h e C i v i l A i r P a t r o l , t h e f o l l o w -

i t i o n s o i t c a n b e a s s e m b l e d , c a r r i e d , a n d e r e c t e d s a f e l y.
:hat its "falling radius" will be clear of all electrical lines.
:hat windstorms cannot blow it into electric power lines or damage the property of others.
~recting or relocating your antenna and plan what you are going to do ahead of time.
:t your antenna, know and follow the FCC legal limits on antenna height.
; lines don't mix. Any time an antenna contacts a power line, it damages your equipment; can
and can cut electrical power to vital police, fire, and other community functions.
DOK

ITIES PLANNING
EFFECTIVE WRITING AND THE CAP MEMBER
"Why should I be concerned with writing in CAP? My job is as a SAR
M i s s i o n C o o r d i n a t o r. I ' m a d o e r, n o t a h i s t o r i a n ! " T h e a n s w e r, u n f o r t u n a t e l y, i s a s i m p l e o n e . N o m a t t e r w h a t y o u r f u n c t i o n a l r o l e w i t h i n C A P
may be, its effective accomplishment to a large degree depends upon your
skill in effectively communicating, both verbally and in writing. Writing
tasks occur in many forms, ranging from the informal scratch-pad note, a
briefing outline, completing an awards application, preparing a flight
p l a n , t o t h e f o r m a l m i l l t a r y - s t y l e l e t t e r o r s t a f f s t u d y. E f f e c t i v e
writing pays huge dividends to all concerned and, therefore, to the accomplishment of your unit's mission.

vance :
gion/wing/squadron

bility
~::::::::::
i

Any writing improvement program must begin with an honest selfappraisal. Once you have identified your deficiencies, the battle to
improve your writing is half won. Four important aspects of writing
s e r v e w e l l a s t h e b a s i s f o r s e l f - a n a l y s i s . T h e s e a r e c l a r i t y, a p p r o priateness, directness, and correctness. A checklist is offered below
to help you conduct a systematic self-analysis of your effectiveness as
a writer and, thus, serve as a starting point to improvement.
WRITING ANALYSIS CHECKLIST

mbers with operator

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and number of attendees

agenda

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e s e n t a t i o n s , i f a p p l i c a b l e :::::-:-:
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eas to the local situation i{iii{i!i
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CLARITY (Did you communicate clearly?)
Does your main message come throu{h easily?
Are your ideas logically organized?
Have you supported and developed your ideas?
Have you weeded out unnecessary details?
A P P R O P R I AT E N E S S ( D o e s t h e w r i t i n g fi t i t s e n v i r o n m e n t ? )
Does the general tone suit the subject matter?
Have you considered who your reader will be?
Have you considered his knowledge level?
Does your writing style seem to fit you?
DIRECTNESS (Do your ideas come into focus quickly?)
Have you avoided long, involved sentences?
Have you chosen simple words, rather than
flowery or unusual ones?
Will the reader understand all the technical terms?
Did you use active verbs whenever possible?
Did you use personal pronouns where appropriate
CORRECTNESS (Have you met the standards of accepted
usage?)
Are you sure about your spelling?
Do your subjects and verbs agree?
Have you punctuated correctly and where necessary?
Are your pronouns in the right case?
Have you capitalized correctly?

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PREPARING A SPEECH
Because many of us take the ability to speak for granted, detailed preparation for public speaking is too often considered unndecessary and not
done. A few basic rules which may prove helpful in preparing a speech
are set forth below:
RULE

Seven members of the Air
coming in contact with hi8
ing precautions should be

"'"
....

I. Choose your antenn

DISCUSSION

I. Analyze your audience
before you select your topic.

COMMUNICATIONS-- ANT EI~

Speaking success depends upon
whether the audience responds in
the way the speaker planned. The
subject or topic must be one the
audience understands if the speech
is to be effective.

2. Locate your antenn

3. "Locate your antenn
4. Have plenty of he1
5. Before you start t
Remember that antennas and
cause injury and possible

2. Determine and limit the
purpose of your speech.

Tr a d i t i o n a l l y, a l l s p e e c h e s a r e t o
inform, to persuade, or to entertain. Limitations on these purposes
consist of time, audience background
and experience, the speakerrs
a b i l i t y, t h e o c c a s i o n , e t c .

3. Research your subject,
i.e., gather subject material.

The three sources of material are
the speaker's knowledge and experience; the knowledge and experience of others; and research,
such as is done in a library or in
authority files.

4. Prepare a speech outline.

The outline provides the speaker
with a structure to follow and ....
serves as a check on his purposefulness, logic, and the completeness of his presentation.

5. Practice.

No matter how well planned a speech
may be the real test will come when
the speech is made to the audience.
Any person's speech delivery nor-

CHEC~IST FOR CAP
Publicize well in advance:
-Date
-Place
-Inclusive period
-Directions to site (ground;
-Activity schedule/agenda

....

Determine number of attendees
-Monitor new membership in t
-Input from subordinate unit

Arrange for facilities:
-Relate to number of attend~
-Coordinate AF facilities t)
-Classroom/audltorium
--Acoustics
--Seating wlth note-takin~
--Lighting
--Heating/ventilation
-Billeting: male, female, (
-Food
--Assure volume capabllit)
--Pre-arrange meal times
--Have coffee ready for b~
-Transportation
--Buses/cars"
---Billets to activity
---Meal breaks
--Ground transport from a~
-Audiovisual equipment
--35mm slide projector

,..

"""

mally can be improved through practice, including "dry runs."
The ultimate test of any speech is whether the speaker holds the attention
of his audience and, therefore, furthers his purpose in presenting the
speech in the first place. It is bad to waste your time as a speaker but
even worse to waste the time of others.
DOT

SUPERVISOR -- HOW DO YOU SPELL-IT?
S A F E LY O R N O T AT A L L
~SE IS OWNERSHIP
P R E PA R E I S T O P R E V E N T L O S S
EASIER WHEN DONE RIGHT
R I G H T W AYp o N LY W AY

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W I'l'H E'AIFe.~ y,
BUBBV~ ~V,V
DEAI~. .....

VICTIM - AS IN ACCIDENT
i N V O LV E M E N T
~UPPORT YOUR PEOPLE
::~:i:i:F: O P E R AT E A S P L A N N E D

i:-:-::::Ii:

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iiii iiiiiiil --Chalkboard i f
::::::::::::::::
--Audio system,
iiii!iii!iiiii - - P rrequiresc r e e n
:::::::::::::::::
oj ectlon s

size of

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--Spare projection bulbs
--Extension cords
--Movie projector

Act ivity procedures:
-Publish and distribute sche
-Adhere to schedule
-Publicity photo coverage/ne
-Use local experts for specJ
--Aerospace Education:
Re
--CadetProgram:
s~
--Emergency Services:
a~
,Displays of CAP mission act
and publicity (SAR, Commu~
Activities, Aerospace Educ

CIVIL AIR PATROL

BULLETIN

©

P U B L I S H E D B Y N AT I O N A L H E A D Q U A R T E R S

NUMBER 3

MAY 1975

6
7
8
The cost of the
cadet wishing tc
his order form.

PERSONNEL
I. SENIOR MEMBER OF THE YEAR. Since the 1975National Board Meetlng is scheduled in early
O c t o b e r t h i s y e a r, t h e t i m e s c h e d u l e o u t l i n e d i n C A P R 3 9 - 3 f o r s u b m i s s i o n o f r e c o ~ e n d a t l o n s
f o r S e n i o r M e m b e r o f t h e Ye a r i s m o d i fi e d a s f o l l o w s :
( I ) B y 1 5 J u l y. U n i t c o m m a n d e r s w i l l s u b m i t n o m i n a t i o n s t o t h e w i n g c o m m a n d e r f o r c o n sideration.
(2) By 15 August. Wing commanders will screen nominations from umlt commanders within his
wing and forward the best nominee to the region commander for consideration.
( 3 ) B y 1 S e p t e m b e r. R e g i o n c o m m a n d e r s w i l l s e l e c t t h e b e s t o f t h e w i n g n o m i n e e s a n d f o r -

ADMINISTRATION
9. NEW AND REVI
a. CAPR 552 November 1972.

wa~d one nomination to National Headquarters for consideration.. ........
( 4 ) B y 1 5 S e p t e m b e r. N a t i o n a l H e a d q u a r t e r s w i l l s c r e e n n o m ~ n a t l o n s s u b m l t ~ e a o y o n e
r e g i o n c o m m a n d e r s a n d m a k e r e c o ~ n d a t l o n s t o t h e N a t i o n a l C o m m a n d e r. F i n a l s e l e c t i o n w i l ~ b e
m a d e b y t h e N a t i o n a l C o m m a n d e r.
2 . U N I F O R M T I P. S h a d e 1 0 8 4 u n i f o r m . T h e w e a r o u t p e r i o d f o r m e n ' s a l l w o o l I 0 1 / 2 o z . t r o p i c a l
shade 1084 uniform has been extended from 1 March 1975 to 30 June 1976.

1

::i::i::i::i::iiiiiiii!iiii!i!iii

MAXWELL AIR FORCE BASE, ALABAMA

b. CAPP 150
CAPP 150-2, July
FOR THE NATIONAL

:::::::::::::::::::::::

....

DPY

OPERATIONS
4 . C A P N AT I O N A L S A R S C H O O L . T h e a n n u a l N a t i o n a l S e a r c h a n d R e s c u e S c h o o l f o r C A P w i l l b e c o n d u c t e d a t G o v e r n o r s I s l a n d , N e w Yo r k , f r o m 2 7 J u l y t h r o u g h 1 A u g u s t 1 9 7 5 . T w e n t y - t w o s p a c e s
are available for CAP members. Quarters will be furnished at no cost to the attendee. Classes
will be conducted from 1300, 27 July until 1700, I August. In contrast to the two-week course
previously taught, almost all maritime SAR subjects have been eliminated and a course of one
w e e k d u r a t i o n e s t a b l i s h e d s t r i c t l y f o r C A P. T h e c o u r s e c o n t e n t n o w c o n s i s t s o f p r i m a r i l y i n l a n d
SAR subjects and is specifically designed as further training for qualified SAR mission coordinators or for those experienced SAR pilots or observers aspiring to be SARmisslon coordinators. After graduation, CAP members will be urged to conduct SAR mission coordinator
training within their units. Previous advertising to the field established a deadline for
a p p l i c a t i o n s t o t h i s s c h o o l t o a r r i v e a t N a t i o n a l H e a d q u a r t e r s C A P / D O S b y 2 8 A p r i l 1 9 7 5 . To
date (IAApril) only ten applications have been received. The deadline has been extended to
15 May and those CAP members interested are urged to submit their applications as soon as
possible in accordance with CAP Regulation 50-9, using CAP Form 17 dated Jan 74. Applications
m u s t b e p r o c e s s e d t h r o u g h t h e a p p l i c a n t ' s w i n g a n d r e g i o n c o m m a n d e r s f o r a p p r o v a l a n d i n d DOSe ors
ment.
LOGISTICS
5. ATTENTION ALL CAP WING COMMANDERS AND TRANSPORTATION OFFICERS. A new CAP Form 75, "CAP
M o t o r Ve h i c l e O p e r a t o r I d e n t i fi c a t i o n C a r d , " i s a v a i l a b l e f o r d i ~ t r l b u t i o n . P l e a s e s e n d y o u r
requisitions to National Headquarters/DApED and limit initial order to 20 copies. This new
form will insure compliance with the provisions of CAP Regulation 77-1.
LG
INFORMATION
6 . AT T E N T I O N C A D E T U N I T I N F O R M AT I O N O F F I C E R S . I f y o u r u n i t i s a c t i v e l y s p o n s o r e d b y a n o r g a n i z a t i o n o r g r o u p ( i . e . , c i v i c , b u s i n e s s , c h u r c h , m i l i t a r y, e t c . ) , s t o r y p h o t o g r a p h s a n d
background information including details on sponsoring organization, type support provided,
n a m e s o f u n i t c o m m m n d e r a n d s p o n s o r i n g o r g a n i z a t i o n l e a d e r s , e t c . , a r e n e e d e d f o r c o v e r a gOl
e
in CAP National phblications.

Director of Admi

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:::::::::::::::::::::
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JOIN. THE

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MEET THE R[

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John Max 0
Director o
USAF-CAP-R
Lowry AFB,

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7 . AT T E N T I O N A L L C A P U N I T C O M M A N D E R S A N D l O s . W e r e p e a t a n a n n o u n c e m e n t m a d e i n t h e B u l l e t i n
Board section of the March issue of the CAP NEWS. All CAP unit commanders and/or lOs send the
call letters of your local radio and TV stations to National Headquarters CAP/OIR, Maxwell AFB
A L 3 6 11 2 , s o y o u c a n r e c e i v e t h e n e w C A P r a d i o a n d T V s p o t s a n d h a n d - c a r r y t h e m t o y o u r l o c a l
s t a t i o n s . T h e s u p p l y o f r a d i o a n d T V fi l m s p o t s w i l l b e l i m i t e d t h i s y e a r. T h e y w i l l b e
distributed on a first come, firstserved basis. Send in the call letters of your local stat i o n s N O W . T h e s p o t s w i l l v a r y i n l e n g t h - - 1 0 , 2 0 , a n d 3 0 s e c o n d s . T h e y a r e e x p e c t e d t o b e Ol
ready about the end of June.

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...-.
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Wyoming fr
duty with

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CADET PROGRAM
8 . C A D E T A C H I E V E M E N T PA C K E T C O S T S . R e c e n t c h a n g e s i n t h e c a d e t p r o g r a m h a v e c a u s e d e x t e n s i v e
confusion about the prices of cadet achievement packets. Most of the transition problems have
been solved; therefore, the cost of cadet achievement packets can now be simplified. A sixmonth test procedure eliminating the additional postage for all cadet packets will be initiated
o n I J u l y 1 9 7 5 . P a c k e t s w i l l b e s h i p p e d t h e m o s t f e a s i b l e w a y, t h e r e b y e l i m i n a t i n g t h e c o n fusing extra mailing charges. The basic prices of all achievement packets follow:

Mr. Ogle w
and second
Greeley Hi
an AB degr
institutio
study at P
Univ er s it y

of Counsel
New Hexico
cational c
Air Force
USAF as Di
In lgSS, h
Air Patrol

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The Civil Air Patrol BULLETIN is published bimonthly (Jan., Mar., May, July, Sep., and Nov.). It contains
official announcements, interim changes to CAP publications, and other items of interest for oil CAP members.
............. ..-.-.....~. .... ~.~v~v==================================================================================

. . . . . . . . .

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. . . . . . . . .

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. . . . . . . . . . . . .

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.....................

iiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiii The six most important words:
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:::::::::::::::::::::

Cost

Achievement

Catalog No.

Cost

$2.50
2.50

9
I 0

049

$2. O0

050

1.00
i. O0

I I
12

051
052

2. O0
2.00

1.00

1 3

053

2. O0
2.00

I, O0
1.00

14
15

054
055

2. O0
2. O0

i

"I admit I made a mistake"

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iiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiil The five most important words:
" Yo u d i d a g o o d j o b "
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i!!iiiiii!iii~i!iiiiii The four most important words:
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"What is your opinion?"
........e.-......°...
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-v.:.:-:-:.'.:.:.:.:

The three most important words:
"If you please"

2.00
- o s p a e e e d u c a t i o n t e x t ( Yo u r A e r o s p a c e W o r l d ) t o c a d e t s i s $ 1 . 5 0 . A n y
Lse this text must order Catalog No. 037 and should include the cost on
EDA

The

two

most

"Thank

important

words:

you"

' P U B L I C AT I O N S :
The

vii Air Patrol Emergency Services," 8 May 1975, supersedes CAPR 55-10,

;. AIR FORCE -- THE AEROSPACE TEAM

space Education
ocky Mountain Region, CAP
0230

word:

.......
1:.-.:::::
:'::.::;::

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.:.:.:.:.:

Here's a protection-packed
pair of night driving habits-reduce speed and increase

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..

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J

THE OVERDOERS

iiiii

'n at Hamlet, Indiana. He attended elementary
h o o l s i n G r e e l e y, C o l o r a d o , a n d w a s g r a d u a t e d f r o m
Lool in 1924. Colorado State College awarded him
1928 and he was awarded the AM degree by the same
9 3 4 . M r. O g l e h a s c o m p l e t e d a d d i t i o n a l g r a d u a t e
C o l l e g e , Te x a s Te c h n o l o g i c a l C o l l e g e , a n d t h e
mth Carolina.
:eacher and high school principal in Colorado and
!8 to 1942. From 1942 - 1946, he was on active
n n y A i r F o r c e . A f t e r t h e w a r, h e b e c a m e D i r e c t o r
i d G u i d a n c e a t H i g h l a n d s U n i v e r s i t y, L a s Ve g a s ,
: ........
) m 1 9 5 0 t o 1 9 5 4 , M r. O g l e w a s e m p l o y e d a s a n e d u :ant to the Flying Training Air Force at Reese
Te x a s . H e w a s fi r s t e m p l o y e d b y C i v i l A i r P a t r o l .....
" of Aviation Education in the Middle East Region.
" .......
t r a n s f e r r e d t o t h e R o c k y M o u n t a i n R e g i o n o f C i v i l . . . . !:i ......
.

important

,li,,

DAP

ion

most

The least important word:

:nior Member CAP Orientation - Level I Study Guide," May 1975, supersedes

i, USAF

one
"We"

i

Trying to cram too much fun into a
day on the water is a common mist a k e . Ti r e d b o d i e s c a n g e t i n t o t r o u ble more easily than rested ones.
Reduce your chances of accident by:
'

1. Remembering that tomorrow's another
day.
2. Knowing waterway rules of the road.
3. Knowing the capabilities of your boat.

.