File #1082: "CAP Historical Monograph Number 7.pdf"

CAP Historical Monograph Number 7.pdf

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H i s t o r y
o f
C O A S TA L

PAT R O L

BASE

Air

Patrol

Civil
World

War

NO,

6

II

St. Simons Island, Georgia

by

Colonel

John

H.

Batten,

C A P,

62149

C A P N AT I O N A L H I S T O R I C A L C O M M I T T E E M O N O G R A P H S E R I E S
NUMBER SEVEN
1 9 8 8

FOREWORD

As a combat veteran of two wars I have been in the unique
position of observing the actions of men who have chosen to rise
u p i n d e f e n s e o f t h e i r C o u n t r y. I h a v e a d m i r e d t h e m a l l . H i g h

on my admiration list are those, who due to physical infirmity
and/or age, were not in a position to serve their Country in the

regular military establishment. At the absolute pinnacle of this
admiration

list

are

the

members

of

the

Civil

Air

Patrol*s

Coastal

Patrol Operation during the period of 28 February 1942 and 31
August 1943.
It was during this period that a group of civilian pilots
who had banded together as the Civil Air Patrol petitioned the
government to help stem the tide of the German submarine havoc
being unleashed on our Country's wartime shipping.
They came from all over these United States and from all
walks of life to the 21 locations established along the Atlantic
and Gulf of Mexico Sea Coast. Here they flew outmoded civilian
aircraft which were hastily armed in a "jury rigged" manner as a
means of performing their service. It takes real courage to

continue to fly as far as 40 miles from land in a single engine
aircraft of doubtful condition. The need for this courage was
made even more pressing in the light of the 90 aircraft and 26
lives which were lost on this and other equally hazardous war-r
time

Civil

Air

Patrol

Mission.

What is presented herein is the story of one of those
21

locations

and

of

the

men

and

i

women

who

served

there.

Their

story is the typical one of overcoming many obstacles in order
to

have

the

right

to

defend

their

c o u n t r y. .



The story is told by one of their number, Colonel John H.

Batten, CAP who, at the age of 30 during the period, could have
very well stayed at home and supported the war effort in a less
h a z a r d o u s m a n n e r . To h i s c r e d i t , h e c h o s e n o t t o d o s o . I t h a s
been my pleasure to know and admire both John and his wartime
Commanding Officer, Thomas H. Daniel. Both of these quiet heroes
are also very fine gentlemen in every sense of the word.

While reading, it would be well for the reader to sit back and
reflect, not only on the deeds presented, but the conditions
which prevailed as they were accomplished.

Lester E. Hopper
COL

CAP

National Historian

i

i

PREFACE

Most of the contents of this report came from the pen of Major
Thomas

H.

Daniel,

Jr.,

who

served

as

Base

Commander

at

St.

Simons

Island from the formal commissioning of Base 6, 12 May 1942, until
its decommissioning 29 February 1944. Due to an unfortunate illness

he was unable to complete this report himself but generously turned
over

to

the

writer

the

materials

he

had

accumulated

when

the

under

s i g n e d w a s r e q u e s t e d b y C o l . L e s t e r E . H o p p e r, C A P N a t i o n a l H i s t o r i a n
Civil

Air
A

Patrol,

further

to

bring

contribution

this

report

came

from

together.
the

recollections

and

scrap-

W book of Capt. Francis A. (Sam) Baker, Base Operations Officer. Both
men have reviewed and approved this draft.
Comments attributed directly to the writer reflect his own
personal experiences while assigned to CAP Coastal Patrol Base 6

during the late winter and spring of 1942.

John

H.

Batten

C o l . C A P, 6 2 1 4 9
Racine, Wisconsin
June 31, 1988

W

i i i

W
INDEX

I t e m
To m

Page

Daniel

1

Winship Nunnally
Establishment

1

of

St.

Simons

Island

2

Operational Procedures

2

M i s s i o n s

2

First

Base

Staff

Administrative

3
Personnel

4

Flight Personnel

4

Support Personnel

5

Living Arrangements

6

Social

6

Life

Early Operations

7

Aircraft Types

8

Submarine Spottings

8

Later Operations of Base 6 Personnel

1 1

Visit by M/G Eric Fisher Wood

1 1

"Suicide and Sandwich Squadron"

1 2

Base

1 3

Close

Construction
of

Base

1 5

Early Released Personnel

Appendix 1

Final

Appendix 2

Air

Base
Medal

Personnel
Winners

Appendix 3

W

The Base Opens May 22, 1942
From conception to decommissioning CAP Coastal Patrol
Base 6 reflected the inspired leadership and good management
o f M a j o r T h o m a s H . D a n i e l , C A P. T h e h i s t o r y o f t h i s b a s e i s
b a s i c a l l y t h e s t o r y o f To m D a n i e l ' s a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s u n d e r t h e
difficult

conditions

of

war

time.

It

is

particularly

disappointing

that his health did not allow him personally to complete the story
of

St.

Simons

Island.

Born January 27, 1909 in Atlanta, Georgia, educated in the
l o c a l s c h o o l s y s t e m , t h e C u l v e r M i l i t a r y A c a d e m y, O g l e t h o r p e
U n i v e r s i t y, a n d w i t h p o s t g r a d u a t e c o u r s e s a t N e w Yo r k U n i v e r s i t y
in

business

and

insurance,

To m

Daniel

became

a

member

of

the

Georgia State Guard (Aviation Division) before the war broke out.
W h i l e t h e r e h i s c o m m a n d i n g o f fi c e r w a s L t . C o l . W i n s h i p N u n n a l l y.
After orgjanization of the Civil Air Patrol in early December 1941,
Nunnally was appointed CAP Wing Commander for Georgia. Unofficial
coastal patrol flying was commenced out of the Army base at Ft.
Screvans, Savannah, Georgia in January 1942. Daniel was given the

responsibility of investigating the facilities of Malcolm McKinnon Airport
on St. Simons Island for use as a base for coastal patrol should

the Civil Air Patrol formally be commissioned as an auxiliary
s

e

r

v

i

c

e

.

German submarines were already active off the Georgia coast.
A large ship had been torpedoed twenty miles east of Brunswick,
Georgia. Coincidentally this was the last ship sunk in what became

the area of cognizance of Coastal Patrol Base 6 during World War II.

1

Daniel moved to St. Simons Island early April 1942 in

preparation for the opening of this base which was formally
commissioned 12 May 1942. Initially Base Headquarters were
established in offices attached to what had been the civilian

hangar on McKinhon Airport and consisted of an operations ready
room, radio room, plotting board room, the base commander's office,
the personnel department offices, a locker room, and a store room.
The Base Headquarters was equipped with a large map of the

a d j a c e n t c o a s t a l w a t e r s l a i d o u t o n a n e x t e n d e d t a b l e . To y a i r
planes carrying individual identification numbers were used to
record the last estimated position of each aircraft on an assigned

flight, reporting every twenty minutes by what was called a "terre
roger" radio position, given in terms of latitude and longitude
and accompanied by aircraft heading and estimated ground speed.
A large blackboard in the operations room contained a
schedule

of

all

flights

to

be

flown

that

d a y.

R o u t i n e l y,

such

flights covered the following missions.
1. Escort of coastal convoys southbound from Savannah or
northbound from "Jacksonville. Such flights were normally

implemented by flying a search path parallel to and around
t h e c o n v o y, l o o k i n g f o r s u b m a r i n e s . T h e c o n v o y s n o r m a l l y
sailed

out

of

port

at

first

daylight.

Accordingly

these

CAP anti-submarine patrol flights routinely departed
McKinnon Airport at daylight. Such flights were made by

t w o a i r c r a f t , e a c h c a r r y i n g a p i l o t a n d a n o b s e r v e r.
Flights were normally terminated at St. Simons Island on the
arrival

at

sea

of

a

pair

of

replacement

aircraft.

^

2.

Weather
In

flights.

case

of

considerable

weather

at

to

a

single

aircraft

was

W

dispatched

daylight

approximate

the

weather

conditions

over the field before more scientific weather reporting was
placed in effect. Otherwise weather reports were received
at

the

Base

Operations

Office

from

the

Weather

Bureau

at

Jacksonville. Such reports were coded in a previously agreed
manner so as to protect against eavesdropping on what was
,

considered

security

information.

3. During the first week or two searches were routinely under
taken by a single aircraft dispatched to pursue a creepingline-ahead search pattern of designated ocean areas. There
after all such searches were made by flights of two aircraft.

4. In the instance of reported distress special flights were
dispatched to help recover the crews of planes which had
had to ditch or to make an emergency landing off the
base,.

Initial

Base

staff

Commander:

Operations

Coastal

Major

Officer:

Personnel

of

Officer:

Thomas

Capt.
)

Patrol

^

6

was

as

H.

Daniel,

Jr.

A.

("Sam")

Baker

Francis

t

Base

t

m

ot

a.

Asst. Operations Officer:) * * Clayton
Intelligence

Officer:

Lt.

L.

Lex

Benton

A s s i s t a n t

Intelligence

Officer:

Administrative
Administrative
Head:
M.

W

Radio

Operator:

Plotting

Operator:

Lt.

Officer:
Section
C.

A.

S.

H.
Lt.

McKee
T.

Nunnally

B.

Sutton

Patterson

Baumann,'H.

M.

Mitchell

Board

E.

S.

Clayton,

J.
3

M.

Louis

follows:

^

Engineering

Officer;

Capt.

Officer:

C.

J.

M.

Cloud,

Jr.

A s s i s t a n t

Engineering

Initial

N.
and

J.

office

Collier,

A.

M.

B.

help

Guest,

Jr.

The Misses H. S. Blanton,

included:

S . G a d s d e n , M . B . iS o l o m o n , W e e d i e T i f t ,

Wynne.
Pilots

on

the

roster in May 1942 included the following

o f fi c e r s :



CAP

Name

S.N.

Duty

Assignment

B a k e r , F. A .

4 - 2 - 6 0 5

Operations

Batten, John H.

6 - 2 - 1 4 9

P i l o t

Baumann, A• S•

4 - 2 - 2 3 4

P i l o t

B r o m l e y, R . N .

3 - 1 - 3 2 8

P i l o t

Daniel,

4 - 2 - 3 6

Base Commander-Pilot

Dickson, G. E.

3 - 1 - 1 8 1 6

P i l o t

Egbert,

4 - 2 - 8 8 5

P i l o t

F.

3 - 1 - 1 4 9

P i l o t

Helms, E. G.

3 - 1 - 2 0 0

P i l o t

King, James B.

6 - 2 -

P i l o t

Flint,

T.

E.

W.

H.

H.

K n o t t , J a m e s P.

0
0

P i l o t

4 - 2 - 7 0

P i l o t

Mangum, J.O.

4 - 2 - 1 8 5

P i l o t

S o m m e r s , F. F.

6 - 2 -

P i l o t

Williams,

4 - 2 - 8 8 5

P i l o t

Larsen,

Pilot

Fuller,

R.

1

L.

J.

T.

observers

A.

1

then

included




6 - 2 -

H.

Guilbert, Gordon

to

Officer-Pilot

M.

P i l o t - O b s e r v e r

6-2-

P i l o t - O b s e r v e r

4

Marshall, M.

5 - 1 7 - 4 2

P i l o t - O b s e r v e r

Rowland, John A.

6 - 2 -

P i l o t - O b s e r v e r

Non-rated

observers

then

included:

Bosarge, E. H.

4 - 2 - 1 0 6

Non-rated

observer

Gaston,

4 - 2 - 8 1 8

Non-rated

observer

King, Rufus

4 - 2 - 4 1 8

Non-rated

Shivers, G. E.

4 - 2 - 6 0 4

Non-rated

observer

Zimmerman, C. B.

4 - 2 - 4 4

Non-rated

observer

M.E.

Others who joined during 1942

observer

i n c l u d e d :

4 - 2 - 8 2 9

P i l o t

Cochran, A. 0.

4 - 2 - 6 4 1

P i l o t

Davidson, N.A.

4 - 2 - 5 4 0

P i l o t

Nicolai, W. H.

3 - 1 - 2 6 0

P i l o t

S h e p h e r d , F. N .

5 - 1 - 1 5 2 4

P i l o t

Smith, H.

4 - 2 - 1 0 8 0

P i l o t

Bieder, A.A.

5 - 1 - 2 6 4

P i l o t - O b s e r v e r

B i e g u n , P. D .

4 - 2 - 3 9 7

P i l o t - O b s e r v e r

Mills,

4 - 2 - 9 3 2

P i l o t - O b s e r v e r

Smallwood, M. M.

4 - 2 - 1 5 1

P i l o t - O b s e r v e r

S o l o m o n , A . P.

4 - 2 - 11 5

P i l o t - O b s e r v e r

Weakland, J. R.

2 - 1 - 1 7 0 1

P i l o t - O b s e r v e r

Alger, R. A.

4 - 2 - 1 0 6 0

Non-rated

Observer

Harris,

4 - 2 - 5 5 1

Non-rated

Observer

4 - 2 - 8 7 2

Non-rated

Observer

Burckhalter,

L.

B.

A.

H.

R.

J o y,

Willard

In
to

M

addition

the

mission

of

to

the

the base

functions
were

noted above but all important

the mechanics,

aircraft

and

radio

w

service

record

personnel

lists

the

and guards,

of which the earliest remaining

following:
5

• S . E . Av e r y, J . M . H e c k l i n g , H . J . H a r t l e y, J r. ,

J . A . L a n g f o r d , M . M . L e v y, J r. , H . W. M a r t i n , H . H . M a r t i n ,
T. C . M c G a h e e , J . H . S c o t t , E . E . W a c h t e r , C . H . W h i t e h e a d ,
J.

M.

Woods.

C . M . B i s h o p , W . T. B r o w n i n j g , R . R . C a m p b e l l ,
R . C . C a r t e r , D . F. C h a s t a i n , 0 . J . C l a r k , H . H . D e a n ,
C . N . D o w d l e , E . E . G r i f fi n , J . E . H a m b y, W. M . H a r r e l l ,

F . A . J a r r e t t , A . N . M i t c h e l l , Y. M . M i t c h e l l , J . E . M o r r i s o n ,
A.

E.

Smith.

When Coastal Patrol Base 6 opened there were no quarters

provided of any sort for personnel. It was the individual's respon
sibility to find a place to live and to pay for his quarters
and upkeep with the per diem allowance of $8 made to commissioned W
personnel assigned the base. Except when assigned additional
duties, pilots were commissioned as 1st Lt. and co-pilotobservers

as

2nd

Lt.

The

residents

of

St.

Simons

Island

gener

ously opened their homes for this purpose and warm friendships were
formed which lasted for years. Later in the program better quarters
b e c a m e a v a i l a b l e w i t h t h e s u p p o r t o f t h e A r m y.
Such

social

activities

for

which

there

was

any

time

at

all

frequently took place Saturday evening across the highway from
McKinnan

Field

at

an

establishment

known

as

the

Nineteenth

where a wonderful band played Dixieland jazz that single
night of the week.

6

Hole

Early

Operations

It took no longer than one week to develop a standard

operating procedure for the base's anti-submarine patrol flights.
Initial flights conducted by a single aircraft were quickly revised
to require two aircraft flying in a loose formation. The day's
normal duty comprised two flights each of 3-1/2 hours duration.

Certain personnel were also assigned additional ground duties.

In the writer's case these duties included making up and provision
ing the contents of our "crash bags" for short term sustenance
should we be forced down at sea in one of our "barracuda buckets".
Routinely flights were scheduled to depart St. Simons Island either

for Savannah or for Jacksonville to do convoy duty when shipping
w a s i n o u r w a t e r s . A l t e r n a t e l y, c r e e p i n g - l i n e - a h e a d s e a r c h e s w e r e
deployed. Return to base legs followed the beaches wherever

possible because the aircraft were by that time always low on fuel.
About the middle of May the Army Air Corps issued orders

to install simple bomb racks on all assigned aircraft. Depending
on the aircraft size and power one to two 100 pound bombs were

n o r m a l l y c a r r i e d ; a l t e r n a t i v e l y, o n l a r g e r a i r c r a f t a s i n g l e 2 2 5
pound depth charge.
A practice bombing range was set up south of Sapelo Island

where smoke bombs were launched at sand bars designated as the
target.

Routinely

bombs

were

on

or

off

loaded

without

fail

each

d a y. T h e a i r c r a f t w e r e n o t l e f t o v e r n i g h t w i t h b o m b s a t t a c h e d .
Also routinely aircraft were completely refueled at the end of
each flight to prevent running out of fuel through carelessness or
oversight.

Early

in

the

base's

career

several

aircraft

were

lost

in the ocean by engine failure. The first was in the vicinity of

7

Sapelo when a Bellanca monoplane had to ditch. 1st Lt. Feldher
Sommer of Racine, Wisconsin, executed two nighttime landings on a
small emergency strip on Sapelo to bring the crew back to base
after their radio distress signal was heard.
Aircraft assigned the base ranged from two-place Stinson
9

lOAs to Stinson gull wings but also included Bellancas, Cessnas,
Wacos, and Fairchilds. At Coastal Patrol Base 6 there were
normally 17 aircraft for a total of 15 crews, and the Stinson
lOA and the Fairchild 24 predominated.

A number of engine failures occurred with ocean ditchings

follosving during the service life of the base, including one well
out

at

sea

on

which

an

accurate

location

was

radioed

by

the

crew

of the second aircraft, and safe recovery was accomplished by the
Coast Guard. No personal injuries of consequence were encountered
e x c e p t f o r t h e a i i ^ j c i d e n t t o L t . E r n i e J e n k i n s o n a t a k e o ff e m e r gency which occurred on a pre-dawn patrol. The aircraft stalled
and spun in and Lt. Jenkins, seriously injured, spent many months
in

an

Atlanta

hospital.

Several unusual events did occur which are worth recording.

Capt. Sam Baker was flying off Cumberland Island the spring of 1942
when he saw a sail boat with nice rigging. After a few seconds
he noticed that the boat was sailing stral"ghit into the wind and the
s a i l s w e r e b e i n g b l o w n to th e s te r n r a th e r th a n fo r w a r d a s n o r m a l l y
would

be

the

case.

The code name for a submarine was "one zed unit". When Capt.

Baker approached the sail boat it suddenly submerged leaving all
of its sails awash on the surface. Baker then realized it was

"one zed Unit" and so notified the base. At that time bomb racks
had not yet been installed.
8

On another occasion a submarine was sigjited stuck in the mud off

Sapelo Island. Lt. Bosarge radioed headquarters that he had
spotted one zed unit submerging. As this occurred before bombs
were installed nothing could be done after radioing Savannah
for

military

assistance.

Shortly thereafter base headquarters received a phone call
from a man living on a small island north of Sapelo Island called
Horses Neck. This had an emergency field for airline usfe. The
The informant accused base headquarters for not having come out to
sink a submarine that was in his yard. This sighting, had not been

dbserved of course by one of the base's search planes. A flight
was dispatched at once. While the submarine had gone there was
evidence found that the crew of the U-boat had been ashore on
this small island but had departed very quickly when their susi

.

picions had been aroused.
On another instance the pilot informed the Base that

he had signed one zed unit, informing the Base of the latitude
and longitude of the sighting. Informational comment by Base

personnel suggests that an actual attack was made by aircraft
of Coastal Patrol Base 6 and that there was evidence of damage
t o t h e s u b m a r i n e . H o w e v e r, n o c o n fi r m a t i o n o f t h i s i n c i d e n t
has been found in the official records.
Before bombs were provided, James King of Racine spotted
a submarine in Ossabaw Sound and reported the same by way of CAA
I

communications to the Naval Air Station at Savannah, where this
report was disregarded as representing an overactive imagination.

9

The
its

sub
way

was
out

actually
to

sea

seen

once

to

turn

around

in

the

Sound

and

make

more.

On a dawn patrol flight in early June 1942 the writer spotted
a submerging submarine about forty milies east of St. Simons
Island, dropped a smoke light in the absence of bomb racks at that
time

and

called

for

military

assistance

via

Savannah

radio.

A

^Catalina arrived on the scene later while the Civil Air Patrol
plane orbited location. The oil sliqk was noted but of course
the sub was long gone. The writer also made one other interesting
sighting in May 1942. This was of a very large cylindrical tank
anchored at the edge of the Gulf stream twenty or thirty miles
east of Sapelo Island. The location was subsequently visited
by the Coast Guard, and it was understood that the tank had been

traced to a shore location inhabited by some people of doubtful
n a t i o n a l l o y a l t y. T h e s e fi n d i n g s w e r e n e v e r c o n fi r m e d , b u t t h e
tank
this

which

has

been

used

to

contain

location.

1 0

fuel

oil

was

removed

from

Later Operations at CAP Coastal Patrol Base 6

Major Daniel has described in these pages the changing con
ditions under which Coastal Patrol Base 6 continued to operate
0

as the year 1942 gave way to 1943, and after its closure in
February 1943 his transfer with staff to the Mexican Border

"At the beginning of our patrols (when the planes flew in
i

from all around the United States) all of the lights on St. Simons

Island, and the adjoining islands, had to be extinguished. This

included all the lights on the automobiles and houses that fronted
o n t h e o c e a n o r c o u l d b e s e e n f r o m i t . F o r a d d i t i o n a l s e c u r i t y,
the main hotels, namely; The King and Prince on St. Simons and
the old Arnold house (which was owned by my great-aunt) were closed,
as were all the restaurants, except during daylight hours. The
Red

Cross

served

us

sandwiches

out

of

tents

for

at

least

a

month.

By that time, I had contacted the owners of The Cloister Hotel,
where

we

could

obtain

dinner

at

a

real

discount.

The

owners

of

The King and Prince were also contacted and free rooms were given
e v e n t h o u g h t h e r e m a i n d e r o f t h e h o t e l , l o b b y, e t c . w a s c o v e r e d w i t h
sheets

and

the

hotel

was

closed.

"One day Maj. Gen. Eric Fisher Wood appeared at the base
)
notifying me he was based at Ft. McPherson in Atlanta and wanted
to see the operations of the base. The guards and all of the

personnel had the strictest instructions from National Headquarters
that no person be allowed on the base whether in uniform or not.
I went to the guard gate myself, and after talking to Maj. Gen. Wood

1 1

and seeing his credentials I informed him I would have to get
permission from National Headquarters before I could allow him

on the base. While we were waiting for approval, I took him to
lunch at The Cloister Hotel. The request for permission was granted
and after Maj. Gen. Wood saw the efficiency and necessity of our
operations, he learned to respect what the Civil Air Patrol's

\Coastal Patrol's units were doing for the safety of the American
shipping lanes. (With the approval from National Headquarters
he was authorized to review our top secret plotting board of the
convoys off the coast.) Maj. Gen. Wood (through his influence)
sent us three portable one-story buildings. One for personnel
and operations, one for engineering, and one for a mess hall. He

s e n t o n e s t a ff c a r a t fi r s t , a n d a n o t h e r o n e l a t e r, f o u r o r fi v e
jeeps, several two-ton, six-wheel trucks and a larger one to be
used in our ammunition dump (all four-wheel drive). He also nick

named the CP6 operation the 'suicide and sandwich squadron'.
"About the time we were getting our equipment together for
construction of the three buildings sent by Maj. Gen. Wood, as
well as the standard four-person Army tents, the Navy announced
that

they

were

taking

McKinnan

Field

from

us

with

the

result

that

we would have no place to take off and land. That made a few Army
m e n p r e t t y m a d . T h e n e x t t h i n g I k n e w, a f t e r p e r s o n a l l y c a l l i n g o n
C o m m a n d e r W i l l i a m D a n i e l T h o m a s , B a s e C o m m a n d e r f o r t h e N a v y, I
hndfound a new friend. He had no objection to our take-offs and

l a n d i n g s , a n d a u t h o r i z e d s u c h a s p r i o r i t y. A t fi r s t , t h e N a v y
pilots gave us some static. After we located a couple of their
downed pilots in the ocean, and had them rescued by our State Guard
Volunteer Navy boats — their attitude changed.

1 2

" A f t e r w e g o t t h e b u i l d i n g s a n d m a t e r i a l s f r o m t h e A r m y,
^

there

was

no

place

to

put

them

and

still

operate.

I

went

to

^

Bill Jones (owner of The Cloister Hotel). He owned several acres

of land ajoining McKinnan Field. I asked for permission to clear
out the heavy undergrowth and trees for our buildings to be
assembled. He not only gave us permission, but additionally told
us there was an artesian well with a constant flow of approximately

3 0 0 g a l l o n s , o r b e t t e r, a m i n u t e o f w a t e r w i t h i n 1 0 0 f t . o f t h e
p a v e d r o a d t h a t s e p a r a t e d u s f r o m t h e a i r p o r t r u n w a y. T h e r e f o r e ,
we built a village of our own, and with permission from Headquarters,
I was given authorization to make limitied photographs by the Army
u n i t b a s e d i n B r u n s w i c k , G e o r g i a ( w h o s e B a s e C o m m a n d e r, C a p t . S t e v e n s ,
was also a friend of mine.) CP6 men and women built the base by

tleneelves, and during the short construction period not a single
patrol was altered.
"When operations were going at full force, and with greatly

improved efficiency in all departments, we were notified by
National Headquarters that we had been selected as the only base
of all the 21 to be photographed for a movie (in color, which was
new in the early 1940's). They would soon be sending equipment from
one of the big studios to shoot so there would be a permanent
record

of

the

type

of

activities

that

took

place

at

all

coastal

patrol bases. Preliminary arrangements began when we were very
abruptly informed that we had just pushed the submarines out to
sea beyond our fuel supply (with bomb loads) and that blimps were
going to take over our duties. We were going to be transferred to

1 3

the Caribbean for patrol, and also that the movie company had
cancelled

out

all

their

operations

to

make

the

movie.

" To w a r d t h e e n d o f C P 6 I h a d a c a l l f r o m C o l . E a r l e J o h n s o n

(National Commander) who asked me to come to Headquarters for an
interview. I had no idea what the interview was about when we

sat down for our talk. He asked me several questions about equip
ment, and how we had obtained more than any base (of the 21). I

gave him my answers on how we had made contact with these prominent
p e o p l e ( n o t o n l y i n o u r l o c a l v i c i n i t y, b u t i n m a n y d i f f e r e n t p a r t s
of the Eastern Frontier). Then he popped me the question, "How
would I like to be transferred to command the Mexican Border Patrol"?

I knew that the great Commander, Major Jack Moore, (an experienced
man with military personnel) had this command just prior to my
being asked. Moore was a friend of mine when he commanded Coastal
Patrol Base 8 on James Island, near Charleston, South Carolina, but
he

had

been

transferred

to

the

El

Paso

Liaison

Patrol

Base

from

which he was retiring. Since we knew each other very well, I knew

t h a t m y r e p l a c i n g h i m w o u l d b e a h e l p t o m e , b u t , f r a n k l y, t h e b o y s
on

Liaison

Patrol

wanted

to

know

how

a

Coastal

Patrol

Commander

could help them. They wanted somebody who knew the ropes out there,
and not a promotion from their local Border Patrol personnel. This
made

me

hesitate.

"I told Col. Johnson (after much discussion pro and con) that
I would do anything he ordered me to do, but I hoped he would permit
me to take some of my CP6 staff with me as they knew me intimately
from my previous operations and could work as assistants with the
existing

liaison

staff.

1 4

"When the base was finally closed and I had my orders to
report to El Paso, we were allowed a short period of time to

r e t u r n a l l v e h i c l e s t o C o l . C a r t e r, t h e A i r C o r p s B a s e C o m m a n d e r,
at

Chatham

Field

in

Savannah.

Most

of

the

women

who

worked

in

t h e o f fi c e , a s w e l l a s C o l . N u n n a l l y ' s C PA w e r e r e t a i n e d a t
St. Simons Island, and shipped all details of activities as well

a s fi n a n c i a l m a t t e r s . O n t h e o f fi c e c r e w ' s fi n a l w o r k d a y, I w a s
in

El

Paso."

W

w

1 5

APPENDIX

1

Personnel based at CAP CP^6 who were released prior to January
1943

were

as

follows;

Batten, John H. 6-2-149
B a i l e y, J . W.
Bland, George A.
Brandon, Inman
Browning, Walter G.
Bryant, Samuel L.
Burckhalter, Billy M.
Campbell, Rufus R.
Carnegie, Thomas M., Jr.
C h a s t a i n , D a v i d F.
Culbertson, Stuart A.
Dresher, Jesse
Edwards, Albriston
F a u l k , H o r a c e P.
Fuller, A. H.
Fussell, Joseph C.
G e n t r y, R o b e r t R .
Gibbes, John H.
Gowen, Clarence B.
G u e s t , K e n n e t h F.
Guilbert, Gordon M.
Humphries, James
J o y, W i l l i a r d B .
King, James B.
K n o t t , J a m e s P.
Lewis, Richard
Lisk, Harry E.
M a n g u m , J o a b 0 , , J r.
Marshall, MacLean
Mills, Lewis A., Jr.
M o o r e , D r. J o h n R o y a l d
Morrison, J. E.
Moses, Arthur J., Jr.
McCain, Laura Jean
McCaskill, Malcolm
;Parham, J. H.
Reed, Marion D. Jr.,
Rowland, John A.
Scott, Julian H.
Shackelford, H. C. Jr.
Smith, Alvin E.
S o m m e r s , F. F.
Sweitzer, John 0.
Tift,
Lutrelle
Winover, Orville, J.
Wood, William D.
Wynne, Anne N.

3030 Michigan Blvd., Racine, WI
73 Elm St., Experiment, GA

820 Rhodes-Haverty Bldg., Atlanta, GA
3200 Arden Road, Atlanta, GA
Glenwood, GA
230 Barker St., Athens, GA

1918 Richland Ave., Aiken, SC
Not

known

Kingsland, GA

60-llth St., NE, Atlanta, GA
3 4 0 C e n t e r S t . , M e a d v i l l e , PA
R e a d i n j g , PA
Not
Not

known
known.

Route 1, Sturtevant, WI
1 4 4 8 C h e r o k e e Av e . , C o l u m b u s , FA
425 Meigs St., Athens, GA
P. O . B o x 7 4 , H i n i e s v i l l e , G A

1302 Dartmouth St., Brunswick, GA ^
445 N. Pope St., Athens, GA

Racine,

WI

3 5 0 D e l a w a r e A v e . , P a l m e r t o n , PA
2648 Forest Ave., Columbus, GA

2163 South 82nd St., Milwaukee, WI
1415 Boulder
202 Sycamore
506 5th Ave.,
942 Highland

Crest Dr., SE, Atlanta, GA
S t . , D e c a t u r, G A
S.W., Independence, lA
View, Atlanta, GA

Edgehill Farm, RFD 5, Rome, GA

829 East 34th street. Savannah, GA

3 7 0 1 N . B r o a d S t . , P h i l a d e l p h i a , PA
Glenwood, GA
Uvalda, GA
689 Dill Ave., S.W., Atlanta, Gea.
St. Simons Island, GA
Parham Motor Co., Columbus, GA
F t . Va l l e y, G A
1641 WisoDnsin Ave., Racine, WI
230 Milledge Circle, Athens, GA
1 7 1 4 M a p l e w o o d D r. , C o l u m b i a , S C
M t . Ve r n o n , G A
Chicago Rubber Clothing Co., Racine, WI
2 9 3 1 K u t z t o w n R o a d , R e a d i n g , PA
St. Simons Island, GA

9 1 5 We s t P o p l a r S t . , G r i f fi n , G A ^
Not

known

W y n n e G a b l e s , S t . S i m o n s I s l a n d , FA

A l - 1

APPENDIX

Award

of

the

3

Air

Medal

By direction of the President, under the provisions of Executive
O r d e r 9 1 5 8 , 11 M a y 1 9 4 2 ( s e c . I l l , B U L - 2 5 , T V D 1 9 4 2 ) a n d N a t i o n a l
Security Act of 1947, an Air Medal for meritorious achievement
while participatinjg in aerial flight during the period indicated

is awarded to the following-named U.S. civilians, members of the
Civil Air Patrol, Coastal Unit No. 6, serving with the Army Air
F o r c e s :

Flight Officer John M. Woods, CAP Serial No. 4-2-655
6 February 1943 to 19.June 1943
Second Lieutenant Clifford B. Zimmerman, CAP Serial No. 4-2-44
17 May 1942 to 31 August 1943
F i r s t L i e u t e n a n t J a m e s T. W i l l i a i n s , C A P S e r i a l N o . 4 - 2 - 6 1
12 May 1942 to 31 August 1943
Second Lieutenant J. Roy Weakland, CAP Serial No. 2-1-1701
24 May 1942 to 31 August 1943
F i r s t L i e u t e n a n t A l e x a n d e r P. S o l o m o n , I I I , C A P S e r i a l N o . 4 - 2 - 1 1 5
16 October 1942 to 31 August 1943
First Lieutenant Joseph M. Smallwood, CAP Serial No. 4-2-15
18 June 1942 to 31 August 1943
Second Lieutenant George E. Shivers, CAP Serial No. 4-2-604
17 May 1942 to 31 August 1943
First Lieutenant Floyd M. Shepherd, CAP Serial No. 5-1-1524
19 July 1942 to 31 August 1943
F i r s t L i e u t e n a n t Wa l t e r H . S a l t e r, C A P S e r i a l N o . 4 - 2 - 111 7
8 April 1943 to 31 August 1943
First Lieutenant Ernest J. Jenkins, CAP Serial No. 4-2-613
17

May

1942

to

15

October

1942

First Lieutenant Wilford A. Rose, CAP Serial No. 3-1-619
28

June

1942

to

25

October

1942

First Lieutenant Ernest G. Helms, CAP Serial No. 3-1-200
27 May 1942 to 31 August 1943
Second Lieutenant John N. Reid, CAP Serial No. 4-2-492
21 April 1943 to 31 August 1943
Flight Officer Harold R. Harris, CAP Serial No. 4-2-551
29 August 1942 to 31 August 1943
First Lieutenant W. H. Nicolai, CAP Serial No. 3-1-2602
7 June 1942 to 31 August 1943
Flight Officer Claude B. Guest, Jr., CAP Serial No. 4-2-926
8 April 1943 to 31 August 1943

A 3 - 1

APPENDIX

2

Personnel who served through the end of January 1944 (the base
was decommissioned in February) were as follows:
D a t e

Name

Reported.

Rank

4 - 2 - 3 6

5 - 1 2 - 4 2

Major

C . O .

4 - 2 - 6 0 5

5 - 1 3 - 4 2

Capt.

0 . 0 .

8 - 1 - 1 8 4

8 - 1 6 - 4 3

1st

Larson, R.L.

4 - 2 - 7 0

5 - 1 7 - 4 2

Capt.

S u t t o n , T. B .

4 - 2 - 8 3

5 - 1 7 - 4 2

Bieder, A.A.
Bosarge, G..H.
B r o m l e y, R . N .
Clayton, J.W.
Duckworth, J.D.
Helms, E. G.
Nicolai, W.H.
S h e p h e r d , F. M .
Weakland, J.R.,Jr.

5 - 1 - 2 6 4

9 - 1 2 - 4 2
5 - 1 7 - 4 2

Ser.

Daniel,

T. H . ,

Baker,
Earl,

F.

Jr.

A.

A.L.

Williams,

J . T.

4
3
4
4
3
3
5
2
4

No.

- 2 - 1 0 8
- 1 - 3 2 8
- 2 - 6 8
- 2 - 6 1 6
- 1 - 2 0 0
- 1 - 2 6 0
- 1 - 1 5 2
- 1 - 1 7 0
- 2 - 6 1

5 - 2 5 - 4 2

0
2
4
1

5
3
5
6
7
3
5

-

1
1
2
7
1
3
1

2 7 7 - 4
9 - 4
2 -

4
4
4
2
4
3
4

2
3
2
2
2

Lt.

E . O .

1st

Lt.

Adrm.

1st
1st
1st

Lt.
Lt.
Lt.

P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P

Capt.
1st

Lt.

Capt.
1st
1st
1st
1st

Lt.
Lt.
Lt.
Lt.

i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i

l
l
l
l
l
l
l
l

o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o

0.
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t

P i l o t
P i l o t

L e v y, M . M . J r.

4 - 2 - 8 3 6

5-16=-42

Sergeant

M e c .

Av e r y,
S.E.
Martin,
H.H.
Martin,
H.W..
Va n A r s d a l e , B . E .

4 - 2 - 8 5 0

Sergeant

M e c .

Sergeant
T/Sgt.
M/Sgt.

M e c .

8 - 2 - 2 11 9

5
1
7
8

Franklin,

4 - 2 - 8 5 4

5 - 2 2 - 4 2

M/Sgt.

R a d . Te c h .

4 - 2 - 1 0 1 2

Henderson, M.A.

11 - 1 2 - 4 3
1 2 - 3 - 4 2
1 - 2 4 - 4 4

S/Sgt.

4 - 2 - 9 6 5
4 - 2 - 1 2 7 6

C l k . Te c h .
C l k . Te c h .
C l k . Te c h

Harrell,

4 - 2 - 4 3 9

7 - 11 - 4 3

Corporal

4 - 2 - 1 3 5 7

8 - 11 - 4 3 4

P r i v a t e

F. W .

Gadsden, M.S.
Solomon, M.B.
C.W.

King, H.C.

4 - 2 - 1 0 5 5
4 - 2 - 7 7 9

A 2 - 1

- 1
0 - 1
- 3

6
9
2
0

-

4
4
4
4

2
2
2
3

Sergeant

Corporal

M e c .
M e c .

Award

of

the

Air

Medal

Continued;

Flight Officer William K. King, CAP Serial No. 4-2-474
2 March 1943 to 31 August 1943

S e c o n d L i e u te n a n t R u fu s D e W. K i n g , J r., C A P S e r i a l N o . 4 - 2 - 4 1 8
12 May 1942 to 31 August 1943
Second Lieutenant Russell A. Alger, CAP Serial No. 4-2-1062
13 Novmeber 1942 to 31 August 1943

A 3 - 3